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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  July 20, 2019 7:00am-8:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the government warns ships to stay away from the persian gulf after iran seizes a british oil tanker. the foreign secretary sends a stern warning to tehran. we are absolutely clear that if this situation is not resolved quickly, there will be serious consequences. tranquility base here. the eagle has landed.
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events will take place around the world today to mark the 50th anniversary of when man first set foot on the moon. the mayor of new york declares a local emergency as two thirds of the united states prepares for a dangerous heatwave. good morning. our weather is set to get hotter next week — in fact, very hot for some of us. but we're not there yet. still a bit of rain to come this weekend. i've got yourfull forecast coming up. heartbreak for rory mcilroy as he misses the cut by one shot at his home open championship at royal portrush in northern ireland. it's saturday the 20th ofjuly. our top story: uk ships have been warned by the government to stay away from the coast of iran, after the country's armed forces seized a british tanker yesterday. late last night, the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, said there'll be serious consequences if the vessel and its 23 crew aren't quickly released, but added that military
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options are not being considered. it comes after weeks of escalating tensions in the region as simon jones reports. seized in a major escalation of tensions. the stena impero, a british—flagged tanker and its 23 crewmembers from india, russia, latvia and the philippines, now in the hands of iran after it was surrounded by four boats and a helicopter. this is completely unacceptable. freedom of navigation must be maintained. we will respond in a way that is considered but robust. and we are absolutely clear that if this situation is not resolved quickly, there will be serious consequences. the tanker was tracked leaving the united arab emirates heading north, staying well inside waters of the gulf. but just after 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon, the 30,000—tonne vessel makes an abrupt change of course, its last known movement
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inside iranian waters. an announcement on iranian tv claimed the tanker had failed to respect international maritime rules. its british operator says that's not true. london is now urging uk ships to stay out of the area for the time being. there is no alternative route in and out of the gulf so if this is to endure, then clearly it is going to impact on trade routes, trade patterns and ultimately, the price of those goods. the us president is rallying to britain's support. we have a lot of ships there that are warships and we'll talk to the uk and we have no written agreement but we have an agreement — they've been a very great ally of ours. a second british—owned tanker, the mesdar, was boarded by armed guards, but now has been allowed to continue on its journey. iran's actions are believed to be in response to this — the royal marines helping to seize an iranian supertanker off the coast of gibraltar earlier this month.
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britain believed it was smuggling oil to syria, in violation of eu sanctions. tehran accused london of piracy. a meeting of the government's emergency committee cobra went on late into the night. the big question now — who will make the next move? simon jones, bbc news. simonjones is outside the foreign office in central london for us this morning. simon, this certainly has escalated, hasn't it? yes, and we had a statement in the early hours of this morning from the foreign office, describing what has happened as com pletely u na cce pta ble describing what has happened as completely unacceptable and calling foran completely unacceptable and calling for an immediate resolution to this. interestingly, written is now telling its vessels they should not sail in the area for the time being. as we heard, it could cause a real headache for oil because there is no alternative route. britain is also saying there will be severe
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consequences if the situation does not change quickly. what we have not heard is what exactly the foreign office means by this but the foreign secretary was keen to point out he is not looking at any sort of military intervention. he wants this solved via diplomacy. to that end, he has spoken to his us counterpart and tried to speak to the foreign minister ina and tried to speak to the foreign minister in a run yesterday but he was unavailable, on a flight —— tehran. romy hunt is hoping to have some sort of dialogue with him today and we are told they will be further emergency meetings through the course of the weekend. we have heard one alternative version of events from iran, saying the tanker was involved in an accident within rainy and fishing vessel and failed to stop and that is why it was impounded. —— with a fishing vessel from iran. the cost of the new £56 billion high speed rail project hs2 could increase by another £30 billion. the financial times says that allan cook, —— the financial times says that allan cook, who took over as chair of the high—speed railway last
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december, has warned that the scheme can't be delivered within budget. the phrase "poor doors" is used to describe separate entrances for social housing tenants used to divide them from private residents living in new build housing developments. the communities secretary, james brokenshire, said he was appalled by some examples of segregation he has seen. ministers have promised to put an end to the practice in england by introducing new planning guidance to create more inclusive housing. authorities in new york city are urging people to stay cool and safe as record—breaking temperatures grip the area. temperatures are set to hit 100 degrees fahrenheit — that's 38 celsius — over the weekend. the heatwave could affect about 200 million people in major cities like new york and washington. ramzan karmali reports. the race to stay cool in new york city. extreme hot weather is already starting to be felt here. and though it may look like fun at the pool, the city's mayor declared
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a local emergency. the message i want to keep getting across to all new yorkers is take this weather seriously. we have not seen temperatures like this in at least seven years. we haven't seen this many concentrated hot days in a long, long time. take this very seriously. people are being advised to stay indoors as much as possible over the weekend, and avoid exposure to the heat. new york's triathlon was due to take place on sunday but was cancelled due to the extreme weather conditions athletes would have likely faced. but the heat is on not just in the big apple. we are going to see dew points — which is a way to measure the amount of moisture in the air — well into the 70s. the highest it has ever been in boston is a 78—degree dew point. and we're going to approach that here over the next couple of days, so you combine that with a temperature between 95 and 100 degrees, it will feel between 102 and 110 degrees. it is notjust the us where the heat will be felt. in montreal, the humidity could make
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it feel like 45 degrees. the world experienced its hottest june on record last month and we've experienced more frequent heatwaves. this, experts say, it's down to climate change. this latest heatwave is likely to last the whole weekend, but there will be some quick relief as temperatures are set to fall rapidly early next week. ramzan karmali, bbc news. local authority services such as bin collections would be brought back under the control of councils, as part of new plans being announced by labour this morning. the party says it wants councils in england to stop the practice of outsourcing services to private firms within five years, if it wins the next election. here's our political correspondent ross hawkins. who is best to run council services like swimming pools and bin collection? the councils themselves or private firms? labour has long been against companies doing the
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work privately on their behalf, saying that businesses often do a poorjob for a high price. so today john mcdonnell explains how he wants to change the law, in effect oblige councils to bring some outsourcing toa councils to bring some outsourcing to a halt. when existing contracts expire. that is the ambition and i think that is what people want, they wa nt think that is what people want, they want the local council to deliver the service, they want to have a say over those services, they want to know who to go to complain. councils would be expected to comply with the plan and less there were significant barriers to them doing the work. with billions of pounds worth of services in private hands, that could mean a big change, a government spokesman says it should be for councils to decide which services to let private companies run, notjohn mcdonnell. ross hawkins, bbc news. visitors to chester zoo got an extra special surprise when a critically endangered chimpanzee was born right in front of them. it must‘ve been a remarkable moment!
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the baby primate was born to mother alice, a west african chimpanzee, as zoo guests watched. bosses say the newborn, which is yet to be named, is in good health and she's spending time bonding with the rest of the chimps. it was a little girl. when new housing estates are built, there's often a requirement that a number of properties must be affordable for people on low incomes. but there's concern that these homes are being separated from their more wealthy neighbours. ministers now say they want developers in england to stop building separate entrances to social houses' so—called "poor doors" let's talk to the communities secretary, james brokenshire. hejoins us from he joins us from bexley. good morning and thank you for your time. good morning, charlie. can we first establish the problem you are facing because people will be familiar with the idea of mixed housing developments, where there is private and social housing. take us through
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what has happened in terms of the relation to the entrances and how they are separated. i'm concerned that there have been a number of cases, one in particular which has been highlighted in recent months, of, in essence, a separate access point, a separate arrangement for people living in social housing rather than normal private, different types of housing. so when you have these mixed tenure, as it is known, type of estates, i think it is wrong there should be segregation. effectively this issue, whereby someone, because of the nature of the home they live in, they have a different access door, a different entrance point, or indeed whether some facilities and we have a case of a playground, effectively not being available at all. i think it is wrong, unacceptable, i think it is wrong, unacceptable, i think it embeds this issue of stigma attached to social housing, and therefore we're going to be new
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guidance and a new manual on design to see that councils have to really ta ke to see that councils have to really take this into account when considering applications of this kind coming forward and actually saying no, this is not acceptable, we need to ensure there is an even access regardless of the type of home you live in. you say examples have been brought to your attention, is it as stark as a block of flats where there is a door where one group of people can come in and another for others? yes. it is, precisely charlie. there may be a different door because of the type of accommodation that someone lives in on how they access a building. or, indeed, access some other communal space. therefore, this sense of separation, this sense of segregation, but for me is com pletely u na cce pta ble segregation, but for me is completely unacceptable and i think it is right that we take action to ensure it cannot continue, it cannot
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happen, and therefore everyone has the same form of access, regardless of the type of home they live in. other housing communities and local government secretary so i believe that when these developments were built, i mean, this must have been somewhere in some plans that somebody somewhere must have seen. how has it ever been allowed to happen? yeah. obviously is for local council and planning authorities to make individual decisions, we have already in our planning framework, what is effectively the rulebook for planning decisions, set out clear requirements in respect of issues of separation and integration. but i think what has become clear is it needs to be toughened up, which is why i am introducing this new guidance, this new manual on how to look at design buildings to ensure that cannot happen because i think it is these examples that have come to the fore. of course we have highlighted this induction has been taken but i think it needs to be
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done with a much more systemic approach where we are giving councils very, very unequivocal guidance that this is a next ball and when they consider buildings, consider these plans, not happen. the reality is of course these spaces already exist so is it a cce pta ble spaces already exist so is it acceptable in any shape or form that those spaces that already have this system in place, where people are segregated on that basis, is it a cce pta ble segregated on that basis, is it acceptable that that should continue? i don't think it is a cce pta ble continue? i don't think it is acceptable but it will be for different building owners, those responsible for those buildings, to establish what changes can be made. obviously, we didn't make a point very clear on development that was under way to underline that access toa under way to underline that access to a shared space and playground that was effectively being blocked off for those living in social housing was not acceptable. the developer and the housing provider involved responded positively to that and i am glad they did but i
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think we need to look carefully as to where these practices may well be embedded and actually underline how we can change how we can influence how we can pressure to see that that is no longer maintained because some sense of segregation, some sense that because of the type of housing but you live in, if you live in social housing but somehow it is right or proper, perversely, to do this, i think that is wrong and i think that is why we need to make the changes to the regulations looking forward and equally, work with those responsible for existing buildings to establish what is in place and how we can bring about further change. my my impression is that you, like a lot of people, have been on a steep learning curve as to what has been going on. some developers use this ina going on. some developers use this in a selling point in as much as you may be sharing this piece you are in with someone in social housing, but the good news is you won't have to see them. because of the nature of
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the planning system, it is very firmly devolved, it is for individual councils to look at individual councils to look at individual planning applications. it is hard to get that nationwide you in relation to all of this. but we have been picking up these cases that i think have been brought to the floor over recent months, on the issue of separation and segregation of so—called poor doors. indeed, where some have said, yes, there has been an argument that things have been an argument that things have been marketed on the basis of things being separated. that is just com pletely being separated. that is just completely wrong. and i think it has been that we have been presented with a number of different the picture has become clear and is why it is right to take action in the way we have destro. james brokenshire, thank you for your time this morning. here's nick with a look at this morning's weather. the skies opened yesterday. they literally threw everything they
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could at us here in manchester. how was it elsewhere? even reports of a tornado in the manchester area as well. some gusty winds. it was a very tabular day of weather and there were further heavy showers around the time today. —— there are. some sunshine in between. turning quieter across western parts. there isa quieter across western parts. there is a low pressure. you know there are going to be showers or spells of rain. it is all moving further east today, allowing western parts to see an improvement as the day goes on. rainfall radar picture for the past few hours, parts of the east and south—east of england that overnight saw the heaviest and most thundery rain. that has pushed away. there are plenty of showers out there, particularly across scotland a northern england. these will move east as we go through the day. northern ireland, the last of any showers moving away from eastern parts, western scotland improving, wales and western parts of england, showers glaring as we go through the afternoon. eastern scholar, north—east england, into parts of
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midlands and east anglia, abia thundery showers around. southernmost parts mainly dry. it is still quite breezy out there. for day three of the open golf at royal portrush. broken cloud and sunshine on the way. tomorrow a different story. it should make things very interesting, the weather in play as rain moves tomorrow. we will see that later. this is this evening, showers billowing from eastern parts. the bulk of the night will be dry, clear, the winds easing, co mforta ble dry, clear, the winds easing, comfortable temperatures around 10— 14 comfortable temperatures around 10— 1a degrees. cooler than it was last night. into tomorrow we will start with a lot of sunshine out there. some cloud will build. you come see next weather system turning things weather in northern ireland, into the afternoon. that room progressing to scotland as the day goes on into north—west england and north wales late in the day. south and east of all of that it will stay mainly dry,
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at least during daylight hours. some cloud and sunshine and some warmth, as you can see. many places where you stay dry into the 20s. the rain and wind start to freshen as well. looks very wet sunday night into monday in parts of northern england, western scotland, maybe rainy integers and western scotland. there could be even 100 millimetres of rain in the wet spots. elsewhere on monday, drier, sunnier, and temperatures heading up. near 30 anyone parts of eastern and south—eastern england. it is a side of things to come next week, tapping into building here. another heatwave through iberia and france next week. temperatures 30 or above any hotspots of england and wales. mid-205 hotspots of england and wales. mid—20s in scotland and northern ireland. all will be dry and sunny for a few days before it turns on settle late in the week stop again, with heat like this you can expect high humidity and some pretty uncomfortable nights for sleeping. some are bites back next week stop next, thank you very much —— summer.
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really hot next week. it is 19 minutes past seven. the lights are dimmed. the mesmerising coverage of the apollo 11 moon landing brought previously unthinkable images into homes across the world. you have got to remember that moment, seeing it. bearing in mind how sophisticated we are now and what we know about the world, it is ha rd to what we know about the world, it is hard to grasp the extraordinary nature of... being here on earth and eve ryo ne nature of... being here on earth and everyone looking up and thinking one of us is on that, the moon. it is an extraordinary thing. it remains so. 22 million people tuned in to watch the bbc‘s first all night broadcast — and it was all unplanned. james burke was the man who talked the nation through all the events as david sillito reports. good evening! james burke, 50 years
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ago he was the bbc‘s moon man. good evening! james burke, 50 years ago he was the bbc's moon man. at this moment, apollo 11 is nearly 35,000 miles out from earth and heading for the moon at 7000 mph. over the week of the lunar mission he was on f around 27 hours. in almost all of it has been lost. but, thankfully, we still have mrjames burke. 50 years on, welcome to what isa burke. 50 years on, welcome to what is a virtual reconstruction of that bbc studio from the night. and joining me, well, the very real james burke. it is only a virtual reconstruction, but does this all ta ke reconstruction, but does this all take you back? yes, it does. there is armstrong. the atmosphere was quite tense. it was something you had one go about. if you got it wrong you got it completely wrong. just our mission control asked them why the long period of radio silence and they answered "that wasn't radio
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silence, that was a sandwich in my mouth". what was the most terrifying moment in the studio? then he is putting his foot out. the worst thing you can do on those missions talk when astronaut is talking. and i had horror dreams the night before that he would be walking down the steps and he would open his mouth to say something anai was a on top of it. that's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind. we are used to live broadcasts of major world unusual, though, wasn't it? the first all night broadcast. it was the first all night broadcast, which meant no sleep all night. and it wasn't planned. one of the final landing computer programmes. altitude 9200 feet. looking great.
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indeed, they were supposed to be having a rest. and they sat between them all and they were doing things that clearly you are going to do when you are going to go out and not sleep. and so is that... and people said if we do that unstable note this could be very bad for your career if they don't get out —— stay up career if they don't get out —— stay up all night. what was the most nerve—racking moment for you then? well, landing. as they got down to under 30 seconds worth of fuel he was over a big boulderfield and a giant crater and it looks like a bit of flat landing on his side so he tried for that. and they landed after 240,000 miles with 19 seconds of your left. that is what you call nerves of steel. 50 years on, what is your overriding feeling than about all of this? it's history. in the sad thing is that for young people today it is just dead and
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gone. they take it for granted. they forget what an extraordinary event it was. james burke, a pleasure to meet you, a pleasure to talk to you. and a pleasure to talk to you in as near as we could get to the bbc studio. the bbc studio, yes. isn't it fascinating? we're joined now by dr chris copperwheat, an astrophysicist at liverpool john moores university. we were all watching that together. james burke's voice, number one, those of us who can remember, it immediately takes you back to a time and place. but apart from that, some of the statistics in that, 19 seconds of fuel left when they landed. yes, it's incredible. athelston footage this week about landing we saw that, superimposed on top of it was the monitoring of the telemetry of the astronauts' heart rate. and armstrong's lters going like the clappers. you hear his voice and he is so calm. he is talking about walking the dog or something like that. i suppose it shows you why these guys had the right stuff, why they were chosen.
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absolutely. they have spoken to tim peake absolutely. they have spoken to tim pea ke about the absolutely. they have spoken to tim peake about the international space station and he is the calmest person i have ever met. not quite robotic but you do wonder... absolutely in control. what do you think it did in terms of engaging people in the whole space race and where we are now, which has been re—engaged with yellow think it was huge. that footage we have seen there, we have seen footage we have seen there, we have seen it so many times. we can place in our heads the number of times we have seen it. there are generations of children who have seen it over and overagain, of children who have seen it over and over again, inspired to study science in general, notjust space and astronomy. it was an epochal moment. it is funny because it all comes down from it all went away after another 15 years. the space race kind of went away for political reasons and now it is being reignited again. donald trump has said he wants to see the next
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progression, moving to mars, obviously setting up base camp on the moon now. and it is private space travel that seems to be dominating. that is true. there a lwa ys dominating. that is true. there always was this political imperative, course. and virtually every president since then has talked about a return to the moon or a return to mars. what they have not talked about generally is the investment that goes with that. so the nasa budget in the 19605 was about four x 5% of us gdp now it is about four x 5% of us gdp now it is about 0.5%. they would need to increase the budget by 20 billion —— for .5%. there were two imperatives for .5%. there were two imperatives for the new space race. the first one is the commercial involvement. thi5 one is the commercial involvement. this is what often drive5 new endeavour. we think of human expre55ion endeavour. we think of human expression in the past, columbus, for example, he was looking for a route to the indies, he was not looking to explore, discover something. other state actors are
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the other thing. i'm thinking of the chinese, for example. they are very interested in putting forward their space programme. they have done incredible things recently to —— like landing a satellite on the far side of the moon which has not been done before. that was why they did it, not because they are interested scientifically on the far side of the moon but because it is a technological challenge. when you see that happen it is very likely that the next astronaut with the walk on them and will be a chinese arsenal. that potentially will drive the americans to reassert the position as the pre—eminent space power. we did quite a bit of coverage yesterday. one of the films we had was ordinary people talking about when the moonwalk happened. and some of the myths and misconceptions that people were thinking, will they sink into the moon, will the surface be hard or soft? will they survive? and we kind of forget now the level of, high—quality ignorance, but only because we hadn't been there before.
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people almost scared of what it might have been like. neil armstrong's mother told him when you are going down that ladder if it doesn't look safe to step off don't doesn't look safe to step off don't do it. so maybe there is a moment in that footage when he pauses and checks before he jumps that footage when he pauses and checks before hejumps down. that footage when he pauses and checks before he jumps down. there we re checks before he jumps down. there were elements that they genuinely didn't know. yes. it is the unknown. also about bringing softback. when the astronauts came back this spacecraft was scrubbed of moon dust and they were kept in quarantine for and they were kept in quarantine for a few things. we did not know if there were pathogens they might bring back with them. it was a com plete lea p bring back with them. it was a complete leap into the unknown. earlier we were looking at this pull—out in the times this morning. they have done this brilliant poster, the kind of thing you would put on your wall as a child. you we re put on your wall as a child. you were saying you were building one of these. the saturn v rocket. me and my son built one out of lego. used this phrase, the something gateway.
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the lunar gateway. for getting children into... sorry, it space is a kind of gateway into science in general. you can't not be interested. i am fortunate to go into primary schools and talk to children about my work and they also inspired by. they love it. they have so inspired by. they love it. they have so many questions, they won't let me go they have so many questions. not all of them will go on to be astronomers or space scientist, but hopefully the seed and they will go onto science, technology, engineering careers. so it is a kind of gateway drug stop it is definitely worth us marking this moment, 50 years on. certainly. it changed everything. it showed what humans can do when we work together and when we set ourselves lofty goals. this is the message i think for all of us that we should set ourselves testing goals in our personal lives, and are professionalised, and then we can go on and do great things dog bite on that rather philosophical note i think we will leave it. to see you this morning —— philosophical note.
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coming up in the next half hour: it's been called "terrifying and insane" but will the new trailer for cats put viewers off or will their memories of the musical make it a box office hit? we will talk about it later in the programme. stay with us, headlines coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. uk ships have been warned by the government to stay away from the gulf after iran seized
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a british tanker yesterday. the foreign secretary, jeremy hunt, says there'll be serious consequences if the vessel and its 23 crew aren't quickly released, but added that military options aren't being considered. it comes after weeks of escalating tensions in the region. our middle east correspondent lina sinjab is in beirut for us this morning. this is a very delicate diplomatic situation now. the cobra meeting taking place last night here in the uk. bring us up to date with any developments. basically as we heard, the uk is very concerned about this incident and it has considered it as unacceptable but of course any development should be resolved diplomatically. us is supporting uk. donald trump came out to say they would work closely with their allies to solve this problem. but of course iran is also responding to what happened earlier with one of its
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ships that the uk seized over gibraltar. you know, it was suspected that it was taking oil to syria against un sanctions. iran is facing a terrible economic situation because of the sanctions imposed by the us so probably it would use this incident to negotiate some solutions but could release its economic pressure and so far they are saying the ship has violated the navigation rules and that it was involved in an accident with a fishing ship of its and it is coming out investigations. lina, thank you very much. the cost of the new £56 billion high speed rail project hs2 could increase by another £30 billion. the financial times says that allan cook, who took over as chair of the high—speed railway last december, has warned that the scheme can't be delivered within budget.
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council services would be outsourced —— local authority services such as bin collections would be brought back under the control of councils, as part of new plans being announced by labour this morning. the party says it wants councils in england to stop the practise of outsourcing services to private firms within five years, if it wins the next election. the phrase "poor doors" is used to describe different entrances for social housing tenants, with the intention of separating them from private residents who live in new—build housing developments. the communities secretary, james brokenshire, said he was "appalled" by some examples of segregation he has seen. ministers have promised to put an end to the practice in england, by introducing new planning measures to create more inclusive housing. sense of separation, this sense of segregation, but for me is com pletely u na cce pta ble segregation, but for me is completely unacceptable and why i think it is right that we take action to ensure that cannot
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continue, that i cannot happen and therefore everyone has the same form of access, regardless of the type of home that they live in. authorities in new york city are urging people to stay cool and safe as record—breaking temperatures grip the area. temperatures are set to hit 100 degrees fahrenheit — 38 celsius. the mayor of new york, bill de blasio, has declared a local emergency, due to the extreme heat in the city. desperate situations call for desperate times. take a look at these pictures. it shows the moment a man took drastic action to escape a fire in a high—rise building in philadelphia. he can be seen scaling down multiple storeys with a helicopter spotlight guiding his way. the unidentified man, who's been dubbed a real—life spider—man by local media, reached the ground safely. in all seriousness, he made it safely. all well and all safe, but is the main thing. —— that is. talking golf. good morning, gavin. such a dramatic day, so much disappointment but mostly for rory
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mcilroy himself. he grew up right near portrush, he held the course record when he was a wee bairn, so to speak. he showed what a champion he is by just to speak. he showed what a champion he is byjust storming it on the second day but... it wasn't enough. it isa second day but... it wasn't enough. it is a shame because like you said the second day was a box office performance and on the 18th hole, eve ryo ne performance and on the 18th hole, everyone was sort of willing him on to make the birdie, to make the cut, and it was a shame for the first day that it went so badly for him. people will not look at him and be disappointed because he showed how disappointed because he showed how disappointed he was in himself first of all and then he fought, really fought and said no—one cannot appreciate that. -- and sorrow. when rory mcilroy was involved in golf there will always be drama and it is so there will always be drama and it is so good to see because i'm a dramatic second day of the open championship, the terrible opening round from him, he had it all to play for in the second round in
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front of his home fans to have any chance of making it to the weekend but he came so agonisingly close. there is still plenty of home interest at the top of a crowded leaderboard, though, as adam wild reports. in picturesque portrush, golf as dramatic and spectacular as the surroundings, with all of the ups and downs, the open championship always delivers. for irishman shane lowry, this may well be an unforgettable weekend, joint leader at the halfway stage. but over his shoulder, the english pair of tommy fleetwood and lee westwood. could his wait for a major title be nearly over? well, as everyone at portrush will tell you, patience sometimes pays off. it's taken 68 years for this great championship to return to northern ireland, and whilst the focus now is on that race to the claretjug tomorrow afternoon, there remains lots of discussion around portrush about those star players who have not made it this far.
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home hero rory mcilroy came agonisingly close to an open comeback to rival that of portrush itself — just a shot off making the cut. it's been a somewhat emotional day, you know? i — you know, the support that i got from the crowds out there were absolutely phenomenal and, ah, you know, as much as i was trying to do it for me, i was trying to do it for them as well. fellow northern irishman darren clarke looked close to tears as he blew his chance at the 18th. still, someone at this open will get their fairytale finish — although it may not be the one anyone predicted. adam wild, bbc news, at royal portrush. what drama! england look to reach their first netball world cup final when they take on new zealand later today. the roses beat south africa on thursday to confirm new zealand as their last four opponents. the silver ferns have played in the last five finals but tracey neville's side, who won commonwealth gold last year, are unbeaten in the tournament.
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these players now are athletes, they're world—class, and do you know what? they‘ re an absolute pleasure to watch. and even the other countries, they're role models, ambassadors, and there's a legacy that's gonna be left from this world cup that hope will thrive and will make netballjust the biggest sport in the world. you can watch that match live on bbc two and the bbc iplayerfrom 2:30. eoin morgan says he's not sure if he'll remain england one—day cricket captain following last weekend's world cup win. he's been in the role since 2014. i don't think i'm in a good state to make a decision at the moment, just simply the fact i haven't had a chance to get away from the madness and the craze of winning the world cup. i've not been able to get into a logical mindset and actually ask myself a couple of questions about, you know, four years is a big commitment to commit to a 50—over world cup. the t20 world cup next year obviously is probably more realistic target. but even still then, i've battled my way through this year's world cup. it's taken a huge out of me, mentally and physically, so once everything calms down over
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the next couple of months, i'll then hopefully come to a decision that, you know, at the forefront will of it be my family and the team. england's women have it all do on day three of the only ashes test match after rain stopped play yesterday. australia only need to avoid defeat to retain their title and they're well on their way after some sloppy fielding by england contributed to ellyse perry reaching her century. that helped australia get to 5/341 before rain stopped play at taunton. england are 6—0 down in the series. the test is worth four. there are three t205 to come. britain's geraint thomas might be relishing the tour de france returning to the mountains today after yesterday's time trial in pau didn't go to plan. the defending champion excels at time trials and was expected to close the gap on the leader julian alaphilippe. but the frenchman put in a stunning ride, beating thomas by 14 seconds and extending his advantage
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over him to one minute 26. tom daley has the chance to defend his ten metre platform title today in south korea, through to the final along with noah williams at the world championships. it means they secured two spots in the event at the tokyo olympics next year. back to the netball, and as we've been saying, england play new zealand in their world cup semifinal later today, while south africa take on the defending world champions australia. the diamonds, as australia are known, have dominated for decades, winning the trophy 11 times. mike has been to train with them to see how they do it. for decades they have been terrifying all the came before them, making the sport their own, 11 world cups making the sport their own, 11 world cu ps to making the sport their own, 11 world cups to their name, and this weekend the australian diamonds will be even more determined to retain their crown because of what happened to them at home last year. commentator:
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to ta ke them at home last year. commentator: to take the title! when england dared to beat them to win commonwealth gold. they have broken history! every time we go out as a team it is to be our best and we wa nt team it is to be our best and we want not our best when we were on the gold coast for that game but probably the toughest it has ever been. i think a lot of the girls we re been. i think a lot of the girls were hurting and no—one really wants to feel like that again but i think it has been probably really good for the sport and especially over here in england, being the world cup here. the diamonds have tasted defeat to england twice more in the last nine months but in training, they seemed as sharp as ever and feared no—one, ready to lead a merry dance however they meet this weekend. it is like dancing, isn't it? quick feet are so important, this is about movement of the bowl and teamwork but do not think it is noncontact when playing at such speed. as long as two players are going for the ball, anything is
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allowed so i broke my arm injanuary playing. purely from going to catch a ball and playing. purely from going to catch a balland a playing. purely from going to catch a ball and a defender came through a little bit late and tempt my arm so there are things that go on of the ball these days. and despite all of the frenetic action and movement it is all about calm, composure when the chance comes. i actually have three seconds to compose myself before shooting. it does not make any difference though. it is obvious i needed coaches —— coaching from the sharpest tutor of all, six foot five caitlin bassett. number one is feet, a shoulderwidth position and number two are your feet, a shoulderwidth position and numbertwo are yourarms, feet, a shoulderwidth position and number two are your arms, have the ball is high above your head as possible because if we are vertically challenged like yourself we do not want the defender having the hand anywhere near the ball and lastly pending our knees, this is where the power from the shot comes from. good. good. good. good! ok, now, do exactly what you did every single time. oh! did you get that on camera? excellent. three, two, one, go! she is obviously also a coach in
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the making as a local school found out as they went through a series of nipple —based games. it is all about making friends. their accent festival and it is good to play with them. strong passes, definitely. very nice. it is obviously nice to see young kids loving netball and giving back to the sport, notjust in australia but over here in england. i know the england roses are on the rise. it is england versus australia and are we going to win? yeah! i think we have them outnumbered and we will break down the diamonds defence. on the semifinal weekend friends turned to rivals. oh! you have a chance. and the future will be strength in depth for england. mike bushell, bbc news. i'd tell you what. i think he gives ita i'd tell you what. i think he gives it a good go. all the time. even
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though he is not as tall as some of the players... vertically challenged. i'm just using his phrase. he moves around a lot. that was just before the game. it is a big day. we will see you a bit later on. thank you. it is 60 minutes to eight. it was chucking down you "16. absolute deluges across some parts of the uk yesterday. further heavy showers on the way today. it was south—east england, thunder and lightning and heavy rain last night. she was possible just about anywhere today. the trend will be for western parts of the uk to turn drier. here is low pressure bringing the u nsettled is low pressure bringing the unsettled weather. it is moving eastwards. behind it settling a bit across the eastern side as we go through the day. they want to showers you the last few hours of the rainfall radar. these are the heavy doubles towards the south—east
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overnight. they may have disturbed a few people. that has cleared away. there are showers following behind, particularly at the moment scotland and parts of northern england. they will move further east during the day. northern ireland, much of the day. northern ireland, much of the day will be dry, broken cloud and so judge. drying up into western scotland, eventually in western parts of england and wales. this afternoon it is eastern scotland, north—east england, parts of the midlands was east anglia that run the risk of those heavy and thundery downpours. southernmost counties of england mainly dry. temperatures, none too special. 18—22 for most. 24 for anyone parts of the south—east. quite breezy up there. as it will be at royal portrush for the goal. there will be good sunny spells. more heavy rain a moving in the day goes on. this is how the evening a saving up. the heavy showers to the east. going to fade away. on the night is looking guy with clear
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spells and a pleasant overnight temperature. lower than recent notes, 10— 14 degrees as we start the day tomorrow with a lot of sunshine as thunder begins. some cloud is going to build. the next weather system. anything sweated through northern ireland, especially into the afternoon. the rain running into the afternoon. the rain running into western scotland, moving across scotla nd into western scotland, moving across scotland is a day goes on. putting into north—west england and north wales. elsewhere in england and wales. elsewhere in england and wales it will stay dry. that is during daylight hours. some cloud building out of the sunny start. low to mid 205. it will feel quite cool where you have the rain and a strengthening wind once again. looking very wet north—west england and offer scotland on through sunday night and into monday. parts of western scotland and the hills by tuesday could see 100 millimetres of rain. and during monday, notice the temperatures are heading up. near 30 in east anglia and south—east england. a heat wave again through
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iberia into france. we are tapping into some of that. it will turn drier is only for a few days. scotla nd drier is only for a few days. scotland and northern ireland, the mid—205 for a few days. england and wales 30 or above. it looks like the east and south—east of england will be approaching the mid— 305 for a time. but along with that there is humidity as well and some pretty warm nights on the way. so careful what you wish for. it is not my favourite type of weather. at least i have had rain on the garden for the past few days. like it or lump it things are hotting up. charlie and naga, back to you. at least the sunshine is coming. be careful what you wish for. many people say that is way too hot for them. thank you very much. it is $7 47. now on breakfast it's time for newswatch. -- 7:47. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. getting away from the westminster village. i'll be asking the bbc's new political correspondent based outside london about her role. and...
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it really is the end of an error... ..ofan era. thanks! it's farewell to this week with andrew neil, viewers vent their feelings about the axing of the late—night politics show. first, you may have noticed a different look to bbc news programmes this week, with new on—screen graphics rolled out on all programmes, including, as you can see, newswatch. the corporation—own typeface named reith, named after its first director general, has been used online for a couple of years and now appears on air too. the aim is to make the information on—screen clearer, easier to read and better suited to the digital age, with many more people consuming news on small, mobile and tablet screens. but not everyone thinks that is being achieved. some object to the prominence of the "breaking "news banner. others object to the new headline font.
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some viewers have been complaining that there's just too much text and the location, reporters name and title, bbc news branding, programme name, time and news updates on the white bar, all appearing on screen at once. valerie king wrote in about the news updates on the white banner at the bottom of the screen: chris haigh had this to say: from denise o'neill: brian green agreed:
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and john tait asked: now the bbc's political coverage has long had a reputation for being overly obsessed with westminster, not surprising when that is where the houses of parliament are. but that can lead to those outside london to feel their being ignored. that might well have been the thinking behind the recent appointment of alex forsyth to the new role of political correspondent based outside of london. for the past few weeks, she's spent much of her time going around the country, talking to members of the conservative party about who should be its next leader. here she is in a report shown last month. sandwiches anybody? meet some of the men and women who will pick the country's
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next prime minister. we have the chance to really change things and it's notjust the party that's going to change, it's going to be the whole country. they know that whoever wins this contest will have a lot on their plate. a viewer, jackie, was disappointed with how the conservative voters they were depicted: a couple of weeks later, another report found more conservative members going on a trip to a steam train that prompted a similar objection from chris: we put those points to bbc news and they told us:
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but what of the wider notion of reporting politics more outside of the capital? kate harper greeted alex forsyth‘s appointment enthusiastically: another viewer tweeted this response: and thomas smith requested: well, alex forsythjoins me in the westminster studio.
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thank you forjoining us. congratulations on your new role. you are covering the whole of the country. can you explain your new role? yes, the thinking behind this is that over the course of the last few years in particular, our political coverage has quite rightly been dominated by what happens here in westminster and that is of course been largely to do brexit, the fact that there's been a lot of parliamentary process, there's been some of the important decisions taken here in westminster and, of course, the mp5 from the various political parties have had a real influence on what's been happening more widely. but there was a sense and a feeling that it should not be all we do in terms of our politics. that, of course, the decisions made here in westminster affect people from around the country and sometimes what is happening out there in the uk can affect the way that the things play out here in westminster, so the idea was that we should try and represent that bit more fully. you're based in birmingham, how is it decided where you're going to go day to day? largely, it depends on the story. so, the jobs really got two parts to it.
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part of it is reactive. it may be that if something is happening, that they want some reaction from somewhere across the country. and it may be that it is more proactive. so i could suggest that we should be covering something or examining an issue, or going somewhere to tell a certain story. that may, of course, if it is a proactive thing be dictated by what the story is. for example, i recently did a story about council budget cuts and we ended up going to hampshire where there is a very active consultation and discussion about what's going on there. for the more reactive pieces, we try to get a good geographical spread so we are not too focused in one area. the spotlight on a particular area, completely see. but with the reacting somewhere in the nation, is there a risk that it could come across as tokenistic? i think what we are trying to achieve here is getting the voices we do not always hear on the main bbc outlets on as much as possible. and of course what we have to be careful to do is frame that and that it is going to be a snapshot. so we shouldn't at any po9int say that these these are representative of the whole country. we just have to be careful to label it as it is, which is about these are the people we are talking to, these are some of the views
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about the wider population, and over course of our coverage, the idea is that we try to get around to as many places as possible, so that it becomes a little bit more representative and diverse. the snapshot of views, is a real challenge, because a regular concern of news viewers is when people go out of london to take the political temperature, you get the vox pops which can be seen to reinforce sweeping stereotypes. how do you deal with that challenge in what, in the end, will be quite a short report? the point of this role in part was to be able to plan it a bit more carefully. take for example this conservative leadership contest. of course we've been focussed very much on the views of conservative members because they are making a decision that will affect the whole country — they're the ones that get a say in this process — but the idea is that, by having a few days where i have the time and the space to be able to contact them in advance, set them up, speak to them, arrange to meet them somewhere which they are happy with as well to make sure
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that we are representing them in their environment that they are happy with. it allows us then to get a broader range. it may be that someone could take the time off on their lunch break and come down. we're notjust going to go to any old street and get the views of people, which are very valid, but we are trying to do something a little bit more considered and a little bit more representative. it's interesting because, despite all those efforts, some viewers feel that in the end, they did feel conservative members might be stereotyped, and we have heard it in the past with other reports going to working men's clubs to represent a certain constituency. how would you deal with that concern? you try not to. you talk to the contributors who are involved. so in the case of both those reports in loughborough and in bracknell, we were in conversation with the conservative party members from those local associations for a few days ahead of those films so they knew exactly where were hoping to film and exactly how they would be represented. and in both cases, the party members were very happy with how they came across. part of it is about have a conversation and part of it is thinking it through to make sure that you aren't sort of leaping, that you're considering how it's going be perceived by the wider public. i think another big part of this role is notjust been
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about the coverage that appears on air, but it's about feeding into the wider political machine. i have attended several of the hustings events between boris johnson jeremy hunt that have taken place across the united kingdom and talking to people on the ground, not necessarily people that appear on the news bulletins, butjust talking to as many people as possible who are attending those events, i can feed back to colleagues in westminster who might not always get the chance to attend. just a sense of what people are thinking and feeling. something that is often been said is there can be a disconnect between what we know is the westminster bubble and the wider united kingdom. sometimes what can feel very important here westminster, might not seem so important when you go down the road. and vice versa. so it's about feeding into our wider coverage as well, to make sure we are in the right place with these really crucial stories. thank you so much. finally, this week saw the last this week, bbc one's weekly late night politics show, which has been presented by andrew neil for all of 16 years. it will be replaced from september by a television version of brexit cast, the hit podcast series. the final extended episode
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on thursday featured elements familiar to the programme's devoted fans, such as michael portillo a brightjacket, molly the dog and references to blue nun wine, as well as musical tributes, including a pastiche of the musical, grease. sing: # summer sun sounds like fun... ..but oh oh it'sjuts climate change...# a fitting end many thought to this week's quirky mix of political debate, passionate diatribes from its presenter and off—beat humour. leslie snell recorded her thoughts on the show‘s demise. i would like to say how devastated i am that this week is coming to an end. there is not enough blue nun in the world to drown my sorrows. at a time when the bbc is coming under increasing criticism for its bias and its interviewing style, this week stood out as a beacon of excellence, for andrew neil's interrogations, the discussions, the satire and the comedy — there's nothing to replace it. i would also like to ask the bbc
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programmers why was this programme consigned to the graveyard shift? why could not a more convenient time been found for it? this is the last programme of this series of newswatch, we'll be back on air at the end of august, when there will be a new prime minister. and brexit will no doubt still be dominating the news agenda. do please let us know your views about what you see on bbc tv news online or on bbc social media. you can e—mail newswatch or find us on twitter. you can call us and do have a look at our website. that's all from us. we'll be back in a few weeks with more of your thoughts about bbc news coverage. goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the government warns ships to stay away from the persian gulf after iran seizes a british oil tanker. the foreign secretary sends a stern warning to tehran. we are absolutely clear that if this situation is not resolved quickly, there will be serious consequences. tranquility base here. the eagle has landed. events will take place around the world today to mark

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