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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  July 23, 2019 5:00pm-6:00pm BST

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today at five — boris johnson is elected as the new conservative leader and will become the next uk prime minister. he beatjeremy hunt in a poll of tory members — winning 2 thirds of the vote. jeremy hunt, 16,656. borisjohnson, 92,153 and therefore, i give notice that borisjohnson is elected as the leader of the conservative and unionist party. deliver brexit, unite the country and defeat jeremy corbyn, and that is what we are going to do. mrjohnson met activists at conservative party
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hq this afternoon — before going on to address influential backbenchers, promising to deliver brexit by october 31st. the president of the eu commission and the eu's chief negotiator both say they look forward to working with him. and president trump has congratulated mrjohnson — saying, "he will be great". one other news story — a heatwave is spreading across the uk, with temperatures expected to climb to well over 30 degrees celsius this week. it's five o'clock — our top story: borisjohnson has promised to energise the country, after winning victory in the tory leadership contest.
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he secured two—thirds of members‘ votes, comfortably defeating the foreign secretaryjeremy hunt. mrjohnson will officially become prime minister tomorrow after a meeting with the queen at buckingham palace. in his victory speech, mrjohnson promised to unite the country — and deliver brexit by the deadline of 31st october. but he's already seen some ministerial resignations — and there could be more — as several cabinet members have already said they can't support his "do or die" pledge to leave the eu. iain watson has our first report. he walked in first but finished second, jeremy hunt was decisively defeated by borisjohnson. for many, the former foreign secretary was the face of brexit, the mop—topped figurehead of vote leave and that probably appealed to the two thirds of conservative members who gave him their support. he said he'd take britain out of the eu by the end of october and his acceptance speech was a cocktail of optimism
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and humour with the slightest dash of detail. we know the mantra of the campaign that has just gone by — in case you've forgotten — you maybe have. it is deliver brexit. unite the country and defeatjeremy corbyn. and that is what we are going to do! and i know someone has already pointed out, deliver, unite and defeat was not the perfect acronym for an election campaign since it spells dud but they forgot the final e my friends, for energise. he seems to have already united his family though some have very different views on brexit but he romped through some of its other policy ambitions as well. we are once again going to believe in ourselves and what we can achieve.
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like some slumbering giant we will arise and ping off the guy ropes of negativity with better infrastructure, more police and fantastic full fibre broadband sprouting in every household. theresa may promised to support him from the backbenches but not everyone is going to be so generous. the announcement of the new conservative leader was made here but the real challenges begin tomorrow when he moves just around the corner into downing street. borisjohnson has said he will take us off the hamster wheel of doom, as he calls it, and get britain out of the european union by the end of october. if he doesn't do that his time in downing street may be limited, if he does but without a deal he will be facing notjust the opposition but the unofficial opposition, senior members of theresa may's government who are prepared to rebel against him. another former foreign secretary believes borisjohnson may face some serious hurdles in parliament. there are at least 50 tory mps who will not support no deal. as long as he seems to be talking
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with that sort of language he will lose every vote in the house of commons. this is one minister who will not serve under boris johnson. david gauke‘s colleagues who oppose no deal have been dubbed the gaukeward squad. there is a clear majority in the house of commons that doesn't want to leave the eu without a deal. that will become very clear in the autumn. there may well be ways in which parliament finds an ability to make it clear that that is binding upon the new prime minister. the education minister resigned today. she was concerned britain could leave the eu with no deal. i wish the new prime minister well in his negotiations with the eu but i have always had grave concerns about leaving the eu without a deal in place. one prominent boris johnson supporter is looking down on those who choose to criticise him. there is no scope for
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self—indulgence and individual mps expressing their views. for the conservative party to deliver for our country we have tipped to unite, come together. borisjohnson‘s opponent admitted he was disappointed but called for unity, and this was his diagnosis for his failure to win. this was always going to be uphill for us because i was someone who voted remain. we have a prime minister who voted remain and a lot of conservative party members felt this was a moment when you had to have someone who voted for brexit in the referendum and that was, in retrospect, a hurdle we were never able to overcome. the future is uncertain for larry the downing street cat and for the country. the new prime minister has a wafer thin majority. even with the dup on site. borisjohnson moves in here tomorrow, but it is not clear how long his tenure will last.
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well — one of mrjohnson‘s first stops this afternoon was the conservative campaign headquarters where he was greeted by party chairman brandon lewis. he gave a thumbs up to the waiting cameras before going inside to meet members of the conservative party team. the new leader was there for about an hour — before pressing on to the houses of parliament and the party's 1922 committee, where we're told he was greeted with sustained applause and desk thumping. our chief political correspondent vicki young is across the road in the houses of parliament. he got a pretty good reception at the 1922 committee? he did as you would expect but he is still a divisive figure. if you take two exa m ples of divisive figure. if you take two examples of people, once said it was classically boris, the circus has come to town. another said the cloud has been lifted. there is no doubt
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his style, exuberance and talked of optimism makes mps feel better after the last three years but that is in the last three years but that is in the short—term. in the longer term and not that long way, there will have to be some difficult decisions, especially about brexit and how borisjohnson especially about brexit and how boris johnson can unite especially about brexit and how borisjohnson can unite the country is going to be much harderfor him to deal with, especially when it comes to brexit. i spoke to one former minister who is not supporting boris johnson, former minister who is not supporting borisjohnson, does not agree with him on brexit but is willing to give him a chance as long as he tries to get a better deal but if he goes down the route of no deal thatis if he goes down the route of no deal that is when problems are going to start and senior figures like philip hammond and david gauke do not want a hammond and david gauke do not want 3110 hammond and david gauke do not want a no deal to happen and they are not convinced boris johnson a no deal to happen and they are not convinced borisjohnson has a plan when it comes to brexit. there are troubling times ahead for the new prime minister as he will be tomorrow, he will have difficult decisions to make and the
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arithmetic, the numbers here in the house of commons do not change. there is barely a majority. that will make things incredibly difficult. talk to us about the reaction from the other parties, from the labour leader atjeremy corbyn for example. he has got a new opponent across the dispatch box. yet another one forjeremy corbyn, his third opponent. he feels like he is seeing them off. to read a couple of tweets, jo swinson, the new leader of the liberal democrats has said borisjohnson leader of the liberal democrats has said boris johnson has leader of the liberal democrats has said borisjohnson has shown time and time again he is not fit to beat the prime minister of our country and britain deserves better. the green party says around hundred thousand tory party members have inflicted on us a prime minister with a history of bigotry, lying and incompetence. this is not democracy. he got a winning mandate from the
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conservative party grassroots but for the country, it is still to be tested but tory mps are convinced he isa tested but tory mps are convinced he is a winner who could take onjeremy corbyn. this is the response from jeremy corbyn at the news. he's been elected by less than 100,000 people and he's been elected on a programme which appears to be tax write—offs for the very richest and a no—deal exit from the european union. i think he needs to think a bit more carefully about where we're going. are you worried about facing him in a general election? not in the slightest, i'm ready for a general election at any time. the issues have to be, what direction is this country going to go in? is it going to be more austerity, which he's supported? is it more inequality, which he's supported? or is it going to be the labour proposals of investment in the future and giving our young people some security and some hope? soa so a busy couple of days ahead for borisjohnson, he will formally
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become prime minister tomorrow afternoon after visiting buckingham palace and seen the queen. we expect jeremy corbyn to have a chance to ta ke jeremy corbyn to have a chance to take on his new opponent probably on thursday morning here in the house of commons. thank you. the conservative mp james cleverlyjoins me now. you are in the 1922 committee meeting with borisjohnson, what was the atmosphere? it was great, really warm welcome, a very warm room, warm welcome, a very warm room, quite hot. there was a real positivity. boris is very good at enthusing people, he is a natural communicator, one of the reasons he was successful in this campaign and that came across in the room. he set out his commitment to leave on the sist out his commitment to leave on the 31st of october but also made the point that enables us to speak with authority on things like education and policing and transport infrastructure. it is notjust about brexit as important as it is, it is about delivering for the country as
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about delivering for the country as a whole. what sort of cabinet you wa nt to a whole. what sort of cabinet you want to see him pick, one levers and remainers? or brexiteers only?” think it is a reasonable request of a prime minister that everyone in the government speaks with one voice and adheres to government policy but it doesn't matter how people voted, it doesn't matter how people voted, it matters that we built a government that delivers. from my time working with boris at city hall he is really good at building, leading and directing a team. i think he will do that at a cabinet level. do you think people will have to sign up to the possibility of a no—deal brexit if they want to join his government? we discussed this as if this is something new and unusual but collective responsibility, that means all members of government at every level abiding and communicating government policies, is nothing new. that is how governments are meant to work. i think it is legitimate to say
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members of government need to abide by government position. that didn't happen under theresa may, did it? what we should do now is speak with one voice our desire to deliver brexit as was promised to voters in the referendum but to deliver on other things, policing, the referendum but to deliver on otherthings, policing, education, transport, rod band because that is what people want us to focus on understandably. you voted for it theresa may's deal. do you think borisjohnson theresa may's deal. do you think boris johnson can get theresa may's deal. do you think borisjohnson can get a better deal? do you seriously think that? we have seen messages coming out of the eu, they want to do a deal. they have got to recognise the deal as was structured was defeated by the house three times so something has got to change. if there can be meaningful change. if there can be meaningful change in that agreement we have an opportunity to get it through the house which i think is what most
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people really want but if not, it has to be the case that we are going to leave on the 31st of october. so you are prepared for a no—deal brexit? you have said in the past it is not your preferred outcome.” brexit? you have said in the past it is not your preferred outcome. i do not want to leave without an agreement but myjob in government is making sure we are ready to leave with or without an agreement on the sist with or without an agreement on the 31st of october. we have to do that. but the point i have always said is if you are not prepared to vote for an agreement, you cannot criticise others for preparing to leave in the event of a no deal and this is my criticism of labour mps who say they wa nt to criticism of labour mps who say they want to honour the referendum result but say they do not want to leave without a deal but keep voting against one. parliament will not allow a no—deal brexit? against one. parliament will not allow a no-deal brexit? we do not know that is the case. it is not just in the hands of parliament. member states in you have a veto. if
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you do not vote for an agreement and you do not vote for an agreement and you say you will not allow a no—deal brexit to happen, you have to confront the reality that the only option left is to not leave at all. the challenge i put two people saying they cannot countenance a no—deal brexit is are the willing to look the british voters in the eye and say they are willing to revoke article 50? i do not think they will. thank you for your time. borisjohnson has received messages of congratulations both here and abroad. despite all the robust words uttered during the leadership campaign, the eu's chief brexit negotiator michel barnier has tweeted saying... meanwhile, the european commission's recently elected president ursula von der leyen offered her congratulations to borisjohnson. first, congratulations to borisjohnson to be
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nominated as prime minister. i am looking forward to have a good working relation with him. there are many different and difficult issues to tackle together. we have challenging times ahead of us. it is very important to build up a strong and good working relation because we have the duty to deliver something which is good for people in europe and the united kingdom, so i am looking forward to working with him. let's get further reaction from our europe correspondent, damian grammaticas. some are reasonably warm words from eu leaders to borisjohnson's election as party leader. that is right, we have been through this already with one british prime minister, theresa may since the referendum. she was greeted warmly by the eu and the greeting boris
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johnson warmly now from leaders all around the eu, tweeting there congratulations. ursula von der leyen was in paris so we sell close coordination are likely to be happening between paris and berlin. she does not take up her post until the beginning of november so jean—claude juncker who is still the beginning of november so jean—claudejuncker who is still in post gives his warmest congratulations. but what can we read between the lines? look at the michel barnier to eat, we saw a clear message. boris johnson michel barnier to eat, we saw a clear message. borisjohnson says they want to be out by the end of october but that cannot be the irish backstop. michel barnier‘s tweet tells you know, that withdrawal agreement, he said, needs to be ratified. that is the current agreement as it stands and the eu is
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clearly sticking to its position that it has held throughout. there can only be minor changes to that. room for discussion is about the nature of the future relationship the uk wants so that is a clear cold shower over some of what boris johnson has been saying in the campaign to get to this point but here they wait to see the negotiating team he gets around them, his first speech and priority for brexit and what he says when he comes here. that is when i think they will properly react to what he says. thank you. let's see what president trump has my endorsement was a little earlier. we have a really good man is going to be the prime minister of the uk now, borisjohnson. applause. good man. he's tough and smart. they say britain trump,
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they call him britain trump. that's a good thing, they like me over there. that's what they wanted. that's what they need. applause. that's what they need. he'll get it done. boris is good, he's going to do a good job. lets have a quick look ahead now at what the next couple of days holds here in westminster now that we have a new leader of the conservative party. tomorrow, theresa may will take part in herfinal prime minister's questions in the commons. shortly after that, mrs may will head to buckingham palace to offer her resignation to the queen. she'll then be swiftly followed by her successor, boris johnson, who will ask her majesty for permission to form a government. after that, mrjohnson will deliver his first speech as prime minister outside number 10, before announcing who will make up his new government. then on thursday, parliament breaks up for its summer recess. it will resume on september the third.
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to discuss the challenges facing boris johnson when he formally takes over as prime minister, i'm joined by catherine haddon, senior fellow at the institute for government. talk to us about the logistics of this changeover in downing street. is it likely to be smooth as it is in the united states? yes, the officials in buckingham palace are used to doing the formalities of that change over, the trip to the palace, the discussion with the queen and then coming back to number ten. after that it is in the hands of borisjohnson ten. after that it is in the hands of boris johnson and ten. after that it is in the hands of borisjohnson and what preparation he has been doing during this campaign. unlike a us president he has not had months, you could say he has not had months, you could say he has not had months, you could say he has because he has been looking for this role for a while but in terms of doing detailed preparation, it is whether he has thought that through and what kind of team he has around him to do that preparation to
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be ready forforming around him to do that preparation to be ready for forming this government. everyone will be looking closely at what kind of cabinet he selects and whether there will be any non—brexiteers or remainers in there. is this good for party unity? when theresa may formed her first government it was a strong signal she wanted people from both sides of the brexit divide. we have been hearing borisjohnson the brexit divide. we have been hearing boris johnson is the brexit divide. we have been hearing borisjohnson is looking for a collective cabinet responsibility on exiting the eu on the 31st of october but there are still questions about whether he tries to send signals out about keeping in more moderate voices. he has a lot of people around him who believe they know what he should do and perhaps have been advising him behind the scenes. there is probably a lot of people looking for a job in the newjohnson administration. a lot of people looking for a job in the newjohnson administrationm depends who you listen to in the terms of the advice he is getting. we have heard from donald trump and
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various other leaders. will he be calling them or will they be calling him? but they decide who to visit first? they will be calling from the minute he works in the door. we have heard lots of congratulations. you would expect when those phone calls happen tomorrow world leaders were not just be looking happen tomorrow world leaders were notjust be looking for warm words and small talk but hearing about what he is going to do. we have barely got three months until that ha rd barely got three months until that hard deadline and there is a lot of other people, certainly in the eu but in the devolved nations who will be needing to ring ministers and find out what he's going to do next and over the summer. thank you very much indeed. one destination high up on mrjohnson's list will be scotland — he's promised to visit within days of becoming pm to reinforce his support for the union. however, scotland's first minister has expressed "profound concerns" over a possible no—deal.
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let's get more from our correspondent lorna gordon in glasgow. small but noisy and passionate protest here in glasgow against the prospect of borisjohnson's premiership. those involved says they believe this is the first protest against boris johnson becoming prime minister. they are pro—independence supporters and that points to one of the great dilemmas he is going to face when he steps up to become prime minister tomorrow. the challenge of keeping the united kingdom together in the event of a no—deal brexit. nicola sturgeon has been speaking today. she says she has profound concerns about the prospect of his premiership and borisjohnson should be in no doubt about the strength in which she and others will pose the threat of a
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no—deal brexit. remember, the majority of people here in scotland voted in favour of remaining as part of the eu and there is some polling to suggest that if the uk left the eu without a deal, 68% of people would vote in favour of independence here. borisjohnson seems alert to these concerns. he has talked about adding the ministerfor these concerns. he has talked about adding the minister for the these concerns. he has talked about adding the ministerfor the union these concerns. he has talked about adding the minister for the union to his title of prime minister. he said he will keep the barnett formula in and establish a union unit to stress test every policy through the prism of devolved nations. he has also —— is also expected to be up in scotla nd is also expected to be up in scotland very soon to give a speech injudgment on scotland very soon to give a speech in judgment on the union but for now this protest is in the centre of glasgow. thank you very much indeed. so in mrjohnson's in—box, brexit is absolutely his priority. chris morris, from
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reality check, is here. we heard so much fiery rhetoric from him during the campaign. a lot of people said they do not really know who the real borisjohnson is, what he stands for and what he will really do once he is in number ten. one of the most striking things he said during the leadership campaign, a phrase we heard a lot, is the idea the uk will move on october the 31st do ordie, the uk will move on october the 31st do or die, deal or no deal. the words, albeit put it into his mouth bya words, albeit put it into his mouth by a journalist, suggest what are the consequences? one of the consequences is you need to prepare straightaway, both within government but persuade businesses who have already done it once back in march, or perhaps not, a lot of smaller businesses were not ready. that has got to be done. mrjohnson said living with no deal would be in his
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words, vanishingly inexpensive but thatis words, vanishingly inexpensive but that is not what a lot of people think. many members of the outgoing cabinet and the independent office for budget responsibility are saying there will be a price to pay for this which is probably why he is still saying, however unlikely many people think it will be, that he can renegotiate a deal by the 31st of october. that means he wants to dump the irish backstop, not tweak it or add a new legal amendment but get rid of it all together, one thing the eu has said it is not prepared to do. he also says he wants to withhold payment of the divorce bill that theresa may's government agreed to pay over a number of years. he wa nts to to pay over a number of years. he wants to use that money as a bit of a bargaining chip for a future trade agreement. the eu has said it is simply not on the agenda from their perspective is in a short period of time, he is relying on the eu
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changing course quite dramatically in away it was not prepared to do for theresa may. we know is going to bring this burst of can do energy and renewed optimism but there are legitimate questions about whether thatis legitimate questions about whether that is going to be enough. thank you very much indeed. well, we are all sweating down here in westminster and we're not alone. the whole of the uk is basking in hot sunshine and forecasters expect temperatures to rise throughout the week, with a heatwave predicted to bring temperatures above 35 degrees celsius over the next few days. joining us from regents park in central london is caroline davies, caroline. it is certainly still pretty warm here in regents park and there is plenty of people out enjoying the remainder of the sunshine. it was so hot that public health england have put out a level three health heat alert which means you have to make
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sure you are alert which means you have to make sure you are hydrated and special warning for people who are elderly or have young babies. some people have still been out and able to enjoy the sunshine as duncan kennedy has found out. as schools break up, the fun breaks out. this is britain's oldest sea water pool, where you see water, you go for it. what sort of temperatures can you take? as hot as you like. she's hot stuff. it's factor 50 all the way with temperatures nudging the late 20s. is it hot enough for you? it is lovely, i mean, this is almost as nice as being in spain at the moment, isn't it? do you have to take care in this kind of weather? well, i do because i have a lot of freckles and i have fair skin, soi have to take care that i put on the factory 30 or something like that but otherwise i'm just happy to be here. so what is going on?
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well, as the jet stream eases north of the united kingdom, european and african weather is surging in behind, creating these temperatures by thursday. we are going to tap into what has been happening across parts of western europe. high pressure has been in charge there, things are very dry, the ground is dry, sunshine overhead, that has been warming things up. then bringing in a little bit of african warmth too and that all starts to trundle our way from here on. in london, pavement thermals revealed the shimmering effects of the heat. it's fine for some who can cool off but for elderly people, this can be an oppressive time. age uk recommends that if you have an older family member or neighbour, that you check in with them during the hot weather to make sure they're keeping hydrated, that they are coping, wearing light clothing and keeping the blinds shut during the day to
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keep their home cool. in clacton on the east coast, the only wind was offshore. the heat here sapping people, pets and plants. well, this weather, we absolutely soak the ground about three times a week, two to three times, and if we didn't do that within a week in this weather, they would alljust die, and that would be the end of them. so you have got to keep on at them all the time. cross the country and you find cardiff baking, along with many others. a time for relaxation but also responsibility. public health england are warning about pollution levels, along with saharan dust that may bring some troublesome particles. after britain's last mini heatwave in may, this really is summer's second act. duncan kennedy, bbc news. no heatwaves can also be very dangerous. according to public health england, many people died during the heatwaves last year, a research group has suggested that perhaps the met office should start
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naming heatwaves in the same way it does winter storms to tell people just how dangerous and severe they are. this weather is expected to continue over the next few days, getting hotter by thursday. louise has the weather. you're right, it has been and hot day, in fact, we can confirm that jersey has seen highs of 35 degrees this afternoon. are not a cloud in the sky across great yarmouth, glorious. that heat has been extreme for some, and unfortunately, where we see the heat the south west, we can see some sundry downpours developing over the next few hours. some of the game was moved northwards overnight, some of them are quite significant. some sharp downpours are pushing their way up into scotland, where they'll longer until dawn, and on top that, temperatures not falling are very far. overnight lows, high teens and
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perhaps 21 degrees in london. we start warm tomorrow, showers lingering in scotland, but they ease away. the cloud will thicken and off for drizzle in the west, the highest values of temperatures tomorrow 32 degrees and the heat set to peak on thursday. much more on all the latest political developments coming up in the next few minutes, but at first a round—up of the sports news. good afternoon. there was a scare for geraint thomas
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on stage 16 of the tour de france. the defending champion crashed but recovered well on the 177km route, starting and ending in nimes. you can see the welshman coming off the bike here on a corner, but it didn't set him back too much. thomas quickly caught up with the peleton and finshed in the main group, which keeps him second overall, 1 minute 35 seconds behind the race leader, frenchman julian alliphillipe. australian caleb ewan took the stage in a sprint finish. the world aquatics championships in south korea continues today. great britain's adam peaty won the gold medal in the 100m breaststroke yesterday, after breaking his world record in the semifinal. today, he went in the semi of the 50m breastrstroke, winning it comfortably in 26.11 seconds, just shy of his own world record.
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tonight was about process and ijust didn't nail that process. it has been an emotional few days of racing. ijust been an emotional few days of racing. i just need been an emotional few days of racing. ijust need to go for it without thinking about it too much. i love racing, tomorrow is all about winning. ifi i love racing, tomorrow is all about winning. if i get a world record, that's a bonus. there's also been a bronze for britain's duncan scott in the 200m freestyle. he originally finished in joint—fourth place, but was upgraded after danas rapsys was disqualified. and there was controversy during the medal ceremony as scott refused to share a podium with chinese swimmmer sun yang, who was banned for doping 2014 — something that australian mack horton also did on sunday. what he did hit home, and everyone in swimming got behind him. hopefully this happens in more events. i'm team mack. if he can't
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respect our sports, why should i respect our sports, why should i respect him? england fast bowlerjames anderson has been ruled out of his side's ashes warm—up test against ireland at lord's, which starts tomorrow. anderson injured a calf playing for lancashire earlier this month. england's record test wicket—taker now faces a race to be fit for the opening ashes fixture at edgbaston a week on thursday. england captainjoe root says a convincing victory against the irish will put them in a good position for a busy summer. the message to the squad is to play with a huge amount of pride and passion and intensity. of the intensity this week will set the term for the rest of the summer. as long as we apply ourselves in the right manner, we go into this game exactly like that, we will give a good account of ourselves. the open championship winner shane lowry has been talking about his joy of becoming the first irishman to win the tournament on home soil. lowry finished six shots clear at royal portrush on sunday and says, despite his extra preparation for the open, his victory come as a shock.
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i woke iwoke up i woke up this morning and look over, and the claretjug are sitting by my locker, it's hard to believe. if you're lucky it's happened to me. a lot went into winning this, but i don't know if i was ever going to achieve anything like this, it's amazing. and the international olympic committee says tokyo is fully on track to deliver the 2020 olympics, as the city prepares to celebrate one year until the games. organisers are gearing up for a day of celebrations tomorrow as the countdown begins. budget figures released last year put the total cost atjust over £10 billion, well above their original estimate of 5.6 billion. just over three million tickets have already been bought in the first phase of sales. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website, that's bbc.co.uk/sport. we'll have more for you in
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sportsday at 6:30pm. boris johnson was favourite to win from the start, and now he's been voted in as the new conservative leader. he will officially take office as prime minister tomorrow after a meeting with the queen at buckingham palace. he has been speaking to reporters and said after meeting backbenchers he said they seem happy and the party seems in very good heart. said the last few hours have been busy and when he was asked how he failed achieving his long—held dream of being prime minister, replied, impatient. he did refuse to answer questions about issues like hs2 and who he's chosen as his new chancellor of the exchequer. earlier in his victory speech, mrjohnson promised to unite the country and deliver brexit by the 31st of october.
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i read in my financial times this morning that no incoming leader has ever faced such a daunting set of circumstances, it said. well, i look at you this morning and i ask myself, do you look daunted? do you feel daunted? i don't think you look remotely daunted to me. and i think that we know that we can do it and that the people of this country are trusting in us to do it, and we know that we will do it. and we know the mantra of the campaign that hasjust gone by. in case you've forgotten it — you probably have — it is deliver brexit, unite the country and defeat jeremy corbyn. and that is what we're going to do! applause. we're going to defeat jeremy corbyn. and i know some wag has already pointed out that deliver,
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unite and defeat was not the perfect acronym for an election campaign, since, unfortunately, it spells dud. but they forgot the final e, my friends, e for energise! and i say to to all the doubters, dude, we are going to energise the country, we're going to get brexit done on october the 315t, we're going to take advantage of all the opportunities that it will bring in a new spirit of can—do. and we are once again going to believe in ourselves and what we can achieve. and like some slumbering giant, we're going to rise and ping off the guy ropes of self doubt and negativity, with better education, better infrastructure, more police, fantastic, full—fibre broadband, sprouting in every household. we are going to unite this amazing country and we're going to take it forward. and i thank you all very much for the incredible honour that you've just done me. i will work flat out from now on with my team that i will build, i hope, in the next few days, to re pay your confidence. but in the meantime, the campaign is over
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and the work begins. thank you all very much. that was his victory speech, let's discuss what the premiership will look like. with me now is kulveer ranger, a former adviser to borisjohnson. you are with him when he was mayor of london. what was he like then? a lot of people are saying, whatever his rhetoric, he's actually not every good administrator. for example, when he was foreign secretary, he was a bit of a disaster, that is a commonly view? generally, the viewers he did a good job as mayor of london, however. he knew out of the points when there was uncertainty whether he could be mayor, there is always uncertainty when a new leader comes in, but boris is a unique politician. he
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generates sways or political capital, that's what his raison d'etre is. when he gets a really strong team around him, to deliver the promises he makes, the trust on the promises he makes, the trust on the promises he wants to build with a public, those who might not be fully convinced, he wants to deliver on promises and gets the best people possible to help him do that and then reinforces that bond with people. that's the kind of politician he is on the kind of prime minister we're going to see. but he doesn't have an eye for detail? he doesn't master his brief, not so important for a prime minister? it is important. it was also important when you're running what is the biggest, most complexities in the world. you had to be across waves of detail, policing, infrastructure, housing, transport, culture, the arts — things that matter to people's lives. this is a global city with a global audience. plus you have to
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deal with the government and the various ministers and secretaries of state, that's what i'm out of london has to do. you can't do that without being across the detail. he was across the detail. his unique style that people perhaps feel is more casual, but he does get it done. the other thing people say is, you can't really trust what he says, he's a political chameleon. he had two newspaper articles written about brexit, one supporting remain, one supporting leave, he couldn't quite make up its mind and then he went for leave because that would further his political career? people want to say this about boris, but this is about the country. everything he has been talking about is to get the country off this malaise of brexit and moving on. he is committed to that. he is also committed to reigniting a fractured conservative party and today we see the new dawn, under boris as later, that will
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unify the party. he can use that unification to do the third thing, defeatjeremy corbyn. he sees these three things as the palace of him being prime minister. unifying the party, does that mean he needs to bring everyone into the cabinet, remainers and levers?” bring everyone into the cabinet, remainers and levers? i think we are hearing about a mixed cabinet be informed. i'm sure that both leadership candidates were thinking about their prospective future cabinet. but he needs people committed to things here setting out, a getting britain out of the brexit malaise, to moving forwards, to deliver a bold agenda. he wants more police, to deliver housing, to enter the world of superfast broadband, a digital britain, the economy, jobs, empowering people, a smaller states, lower taxes, dare i say, conservative values that should empower the conservative party. good
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to talk to you, you were a former adviser to borisjohnson as mayor of london, thank you. let's get the view from other parts of the uk with our correspondents emma vardy in northern ireland and sian lloyd in wales. emma, the backstop has always been crucial to the brexit issue and will continue to be so, so what has been the reaction there where you are to the reaction there where you are to the news of borisjohnson? apprehension about which direction borisjohnson will now go in. there was that backstop that theresa may had negotiated, which people had agonised over here for months, but theresa may couldn't get that through parliament. opponents here say that it would keep northern ireland more tightly bound to eu rules and that's why she couldn't get a majority for it in parliament.
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borisjohnson get a majority for it in parliament. boris johnson wants to get a majority for it in parliament. borisjohnson wants to convince the eu to ditch the backstop and negotiate a free—trade agreement with the eu which he believes will solve the problem and avoid any need for checks on the irish border. there have been at reaction from both the two main parties here. the dup, theresa may's allies in government through that confidence and supply arrangement to give her the extra votes she needed, arlene foster has today is said that agreements will be reviewed and renegotiated in the coming weeks with borisjohnson. whether they dup decide to ask for a certain price to continue their alliance, we have to wait and see what those negotiations deliver. as for sinn fein, big opponents of brexit, they have said today that boris johnson is opponents of brexit, they have said today that borisjohnson is a volatile character. they believe if he moves towards a no—deal brexit that could be catastrophic for the
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islands of ireland is. that have been a lot of warnings here before today that the brexit trading relationship between so many businesses here north and south of the islands overnight could lead to thousands of job losses, the islands overnight could lead to thousands ofjob losses, some businesses becoming unviable, unable to trade overnight. those are the warnings. supporters of boris johnson say, actually, the irish border has been a too hyped up through this process, they believe it can be resolved through technology, through striking a free—trade agreement with the eu that avoids the need for checks. the bottom line is that the eu has repeatedly said that boris johnson's new approach is not possible. many people will be waiting to see a new approach. thank you. and in wales, there is a by—election coming up, sian lloyd has the latest for us.
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first electoral challenge for the new prime minister, with the brecon and radnorshire a by—election looming just next week. in terms of reaction here in wales to the announcement of boris johnson reaction here in wales to the announcement of borisjohnson as new conservative leader, the welsh secretary, alun cairns, a supporter of borisjohnson, secretary, alun cairns, a supporter of boris johnson, said secretary, alun cairns, a supporter of borisjohnson, said he believes he could be at the prime minister who can act as a bridge between our two great nations and get on and deliver brexit. the whole position of the welsh government towards this conservative leadership contest has really centred on brexit and what welsh ministers here in cardiff bay we re welsh ministers here in cardiff bay were saying is that, whoever got into number10, were saying is that, whoever got into number 10, they would have to rule out a no—deal brexit, because that would be catastrophic for the welsh economy in terms of exports and tariffs and potentially fewer it jobs here. we know borisjohnson hasn't ruled that out. today tweeting, the first minister, mark dra keford, tweeting, the first minister, mark drakeford, said he wished boris
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johnson at well and look forward to meeting him. if we don't know when that meeting will take place, but perhaps one of the first thing is the first minister would bring up is what boris johnson the first minister would bring up is what borisjohnson said at a hustings here in cardiff around the replacement cash replacing the eu finds that, here, because he said that assembly ministers should have a say in how that is spent. let's go to worcester now, which is a marginal seat. our correspondent phil mackie has been to the local conservative association there. what has the reaction been to the new prime minister? asi as i would expect in most parts of the country, they‘ re as i would expect in most parts of the country, they're probably not entirely focused on westminster, they have been trying to focus on they have been trying to focus on the weather today. it has been as much as 33 degrees today, most people looking for a cold drink and ice cream and to find shades. but when you talk to them about boris
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johnson, there are mixed views. this isa marginal johnson, there are mixed views. this is a marginal city, a labour target in the next general election, a seat they held between 1997—2010, but for they held between 1997—2010, but for the rest of the last 50 years, it has been a conservative seats, voting with the country and every referendum since 1975. it has been a bellwether constituency that voted to leave by 37%, not far off the national average and for the west midlands, quite low. the deadline of october the 31st is playing a lot of people's mines, i spoke to some party members this morning he said they were behind boris, even though some said they hadn't supported him at the beginning of the leadership campaign. one described as marmite, meaning some people would take him. he would have to win over the people who don't like at the moment if he is going to win a like this. you couldn't believe a word that
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comes out of that man's mouth. so i don't know why it should make any difference. no, i think he's going to be a disaster. i don't think he's going to do much good, to be fair. to be honest, no. are you or have you been a conservative voter? yes, i have over the years, but i don't think there's many people at the moment, with brexit the way it is, it's going to do anything. do you think he can deliver brexit? do you want him to? no. i want him to deliver brexit, i don't think he can. brilliant. you like him? best thing that could happen. i think so, yeah. the country needed sorting out and, hopefully, he'll be the person to do it. well, if he does what he says, maybe we'll be ok. but it depends whether he sticks to his word or not, with all the things he promised on the radio and on the news. we'll wait and see. he's a leaver, isn't he? he's a leaver for europe, out of brexit. you want brexit to be delivered by october the 31st, which is what he's promised? yes, that's what he's promised. that's what he's promised, i think he might struggle.
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you remember that tony blair said it was worcester women that him that election in 1997 and kept him in power for the next three general elections. if you had four of them there, two and further boris johnson, two against. all had voted conservative in the past. people are saying they want until the 31st of either brexit deadline, but what mr johnson and the conservatives now need to do is convince those other two former conservative voting when men, otherwise labour will be licking its lips and thinking it can win worcester back again. it's number 44 on its target list, around a number it needs to win to become the largest party in the next parliament. it may not get a majority, but will allow it to form the next government. thank you.
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more reaction from scotland, with ruth davidson saying there is scepticism about borisjohnson becoming the next prime minister, but saying that she willjudge him on his actions. at the conservative msp saint the incoming prime minister has to deliver and that he only has a very small window of time to finalise brexit. with me now is katy balls, deputy political editor at the spectator, and owen bennett, head of politics at city am. katy, the rhetoric during the campaign has been pretty fiery, do you think his actions once you're in number 10 you think his actions once you're in number10 are you think his actions once you're in number 10 are going to match the rhetoric? i don't think his supporters are particularly sure. i've been speaking to mps on both sides of the camp, those in the european research group and sceptic backbenchers, and there is uncertainty as to whether boris johnson is the man to take charge in number10. johnson is the man to take charge in
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number 10. but when it does come to the do ordie, number 10. but when it does come to the do or die, and he has made on brexit, that is difficult to row back from. so when it comes to leaving by the end of october, that is something he has to stick to. the question is which brexit strategy does he go for? because on the erg sides, they are pushing notjust for a small change to which all agreements, they want something major, perhaps something like the maltose compromise, if you remember that. so managed no deal. so if you think about other mps, they want just a change in the bank stop. out so which one he goes forward dictate how drastic and divisive his policy is going to be. when we see his cabinet choices, how important is that going to be? does he go for a brexiteer, ideological purity, but a broad, tory reunification, bring in some remainers? what do you think? he needs to make notes at the same
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mistakes as theresa may, she tried to please everyone all the time, ended up losing nobody. i think he needs to be prepared to disappoint some people. will he disappoint the heart erg line of no bank stop, but will he go a softer line? whatever he picks, he needs to make it very clear and go for it and say to his cabinet, this is what you're signing up cabinet, this is what you're signing up for. with the cabinet, if he's seen to reward people who battled for him from the beginning, like priti patel, there are egos to manage their as well. what about the possibility of an early election if he can't get a no—deal brexit through parliament? that we have an election in september or is this a man who's waited so long to be prime minister, he's not prepared to risk it? again, this is what happens with borisjohnson, he it? again, this is what happens with boris johnson, he has it? again, this is what happens with borisjohnson, he has so many functions around him, it is hard to get a straighter read. when it comes
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toa get a straighter read. when it comes to a general election, lots of his supporters think that's where we're heading. if you think in terms of timing, the question is, if it's going to be in the autumn or spring. with the brexit deadline, if he doesn't manage to renegotiate a deal in this time, and we don't even know how big an ask that is, then we start to go for no deal and what the commons allow that? then we may have to go to the polls to leave around that time. can borisjohnson stay having not left past the end of october? he could do, he may decide he really likes number 10. i think if he decides doing so could lead to the extension of the very party, i think it would be reluctant to do that. how hard is it going to push for a new deal? does not depend on the people who are various different factions offering him different advice, and as it depends who he's listening to? he is going to push ha rd listening to? he is going to push hard for no deal, he has made it clear he wants a deal so he will
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push the europeans to make changes to that. he has said he may reopen things like gibraltar, so where is he going to give to get what he wants on the backstop? i think is going to be pushing hard for a deal, because the only way the tory party come out of this and anywhere unified is leaving on october 31 but with a deal. that is the only way to get out of this on one piece. thank you both. that's it from me at westminster on a day when a boris johnson, as expected, to become the new leader of the conservative party, and tomorrow, he will become the new prime minister of the united kingdom. very hot day here, time for a look at the weather, here's louise lear. the kind of weather that brings out the kind of weather that brings out the marmite in people. your either love it or hate it. guess what this was earlier today, indicative of most of the coastal areas south and
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west, but this was actually cornwell. hardly a newbie in the sky, but the clouds are starting to gather as we speak, and that will bring a change. you can see how much sunshine we have had across the country, but draw your attention down to the south west, where we've seen 35 degrees in parts of the channel islands today, but these clouds are looming and could bring such thunderstorms through this evening and overnight. those thunderstorms will push from the south west. over the next few hours, some of them heavy. the motorway steadily north as well. the showers will be pretty hit and miss, not eve ryo ne will be pretty hit and miss, not everyone will see them, but a cluster forming by everyone will see them, but a clusterforming by donor everyone will see them, but a cluster forming by donor across the central area of scotland, and these could linger during the early morning rush hour. to add insult to injury, if the crashing doesn't keep us injury, if the crashing doesn't keep us awake, the feel of things well, because it will be pretty warm, lows
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of 21 in central london. we start warm, showers easing the steadily north. behind them, another dry, sunny day for many. those holidaying in the uk will not be disappointed, but for some, it's too hot. highs of 32, with the heat peaking on thursday as we drag up this dry, continental air from africa. we could see record—breaking warrants across parts of northern europe and perhaps into the south east. there is an exception, out to the west we could see a little more cloud and some showers being triggered through the irish sea through the day. just a little fresher here, perhaps more co mforta ble. a little fresher here, perhaps more comfortable. into the south east corner, highs of 37 celsius, just shy of 100 fahrenheit on thursday afternoon. if we get that, and it looks as though we could, we are
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going to break thejuly records that we re going to break thejuly records that were set back in 2015. if it's all too much, you hate this weather, something a little fresher arrives on friday and into the weekend, more rain in the forecast. details and all that with sue this evening. take care.
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today at six, we have a new prime minister in waiting. borisjohnson is elected leader of the conservative party. conservative party members gave him nearly twice as many votes as jeremy hunt. so what's his plan? deliver brexit, unite the country and defeat jeremy corbyn! and that is what we're gonna do. today it's the door to tory hq. tomorrow it will be downing street — and that's when the tough part starts. borisjohnson may have achieved his lifetime's dream but the tory party is still divided and brexit are still a dilemma. you could face a nightmare i

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