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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  July 25, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at 9 with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines. borisjohnson begins his first full day in ofice — full day in office — taking charge of cabinet, and then addressing the house of commons. it was an early start for newly—appointed ministers as the new prime minister holds his first cabinet meeting — they're inside downing street right now. it follows one of the most radical reshuffles of all time — with brexiteers appointed to the biggest offices of state — and many big name departures. supporters hail the do or die cabinet with every minister committed to quitting the eu by october 31st. but is there trouble ahead on but is there trouble ahead on the tory backbenches? forecasters predict today will be
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the uk's hottest day on record — with temperatures potentially hitting 39 degress. iamjusta i am just a stone's throw away from heathrow airport, where later today we could see the highest temperature ever recorded in the uk. nissan cuts its workforce by 12,500 worldwide after reporting a 98% drop in profits. and in sport — england face an uphill struggle of they're to avoid defeat against ireland at lord's — the irish are playing only their third ever test match. and what goes up, must come down. a french inventor fails in his attempt to become the first man to cross the english channel on a jet—powered flyboard. good morning — and welcome to the bbc news at 9.
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after one of the most radical reshuffles in decades, borisjohnson will chair his first cabinet meeting this morning. the new prime minister moved quickly to install brexiteers in key posts to help carry out his pledge to take the uk out of the eu by the end of october, with or without a deal. let's take a look at where we are. today marks borisjohnson‘s first full day in office as the new prime minister. last night mrjohnson finalised his cabinet, appointing brexiteerjacob—rees mogg as leader of the commons. mrjohnson‘s new cabinet saw 17 of mrs may's former senior ministers being sacked or stepping down. with no time to waste, this morning the pm is chairing his first cabinet meeting at number ten. following that meeting, mrjohnson will head to the house of commons to address mps for the first time as prime minister. our political correspondent, jessica parker, reports on a day of resignations, sackings and promotions.
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a civilised start, meeting with the queen. then to downing street, taking his place in thejob he has wanted for so long. i have just been to see her majesty the queen, who has invited me to form a government, and i have accepted. but to boos outside, borisjohnson was about to get ruthless. some were sacked and some quit, but more than half of the old cabinet gone, including his leadership rival, jeremy hunt, who will now have to sweat it out from the backbenches. promoted: this is the uk's new chancellor. brought in: a new home secretary, leader of the house of commons, and foreign secretary. the most important thing is to get out of the eu by the end of october, preferably with a deal. surveying the scene, he hasn't rearranged the cabinet, he has overhauled it, trying to forge a team dedicated to that brexit deadline.
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i think it is really important that people who are appointed have signed up to leaving the eu by the 31st of october. we have already had too much limbo. she was blamed for that limbo, although there was applause for the outgoing pm, and as he takes residence in number ten, applause for him too, but there is no shaking off the huge challenge ahead. jessica parker, bbc news. our assistant political editor, norman smith is at downing street for us now, where that cabinet meeting is taking place. good morning norman. first of all, why has there been this huge reshuffle 7 why has there been this huge reshuffle? because boris johnson wa nts to reshuffle? because boris johnson wants to launch a three month campaign to get us out of the eu by october 31st. and so he has created in effect, a do or die cabinet, where every single member is
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publicly committed and signed up to the policy of quitting, no ifs, no buts, come what may by october 31st. notjust hard line brexiteer, former remainers like amber rudd, they are sign odd up to the policy. central to that campaign has been mr johnson's decision basically to reassembly the old vote leave campaign, the stalwarts of the brexit referendum. the war house horses have been brought back in the back room jobs if you look at the press tea m, back room jobs if you look at the press team, some of the policy team, it's the old vote leave campaign being brought back together, because i think being brought back together, because ithink mr being brought back together, because i think mrjohnson knows he has to deliver by october 31st, and if he doesn't, it may well be goodbye, farewell, to his premiership. let us ta ke farewell, to his premiership. let us take you through some the big name appointments. sajid javid. former home secretary, moved across to the treasury, to take over as chancellor. he will be the man
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responsible for coming up with the sort of economic measures to help the economy, tick over in the event of no—deal. priti patel is brought back from the political wilderness after she was sacked by theresa may, for the key post of home secretary. now that suggests there will be a much tougher line on law and order because priti patel has always been at the hawkish end of crime and punishment. elsewhere, we see dominic raab being brought in to the foreign office, former brexit secretary, the foreign office has a lwa ys secretary, the foreign office has always been regard as a redoubt of remain, now they have an out—and—out brexiteer at the top. michael gove, given the key post of in effect minister for given the key post of in effect ministerfor no—deal. his given the key post of in effect minister for no—deal. his task will be to make sure we are ready to quit, come what may by october 31st.
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elsewhere matt hancock, a supporter of borisjohnson after he quit the race, he stays at health and social care, he will be responsible for deliver tong changes which mr johnson say he wans to see to end the social care crisis. —— driving on the. gavin williamson delivered from disgrace after he was booted out after leaking from the national security council. she back in cabinet at education, finally, jacob rees—mogg, the brexiteer‘s brexiteer is made leader of the house. he will be the man who will have to manage a hostile house of commons and quite possibly go toe to toe with speaker be co—. this morning one of those bercow. the attorney general geoffrey cox was asked as he left for this morn‘s meeting was that no—deal cabinet? for this morn‘s meeting was that no-deal cabinet? yes. we'll leave on sist october. no-deal cabinet? yes. we'll leave on 31st october. what is top of the
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agenda sir? i think we will be revealing the situation generally and the issue of brexit, but make no mistake, this government is committed to leaving the european union. now one of the names we haven't mentioned is that of dominic cummings. he is not a politician, he is not in the cabinet but he is as important as anyone sitting round that cabinet table. he is the mastermind, the brains for boris johnson's three month campaign to quit the eu, as he was during the vote leave campaign. he was the person who pulled together the whole campaign, and gave it its impetus and drive and strategy. a maverick, someone and drive and strategy. a maverick, someone who doesn't mind putting noses out ofjoint. what it tells us, i think, noses out ofjoint. what it tells us, ithink, is noses out ofjoint. what it tells us, i think, is that mrjohnson is prepared to shake things up in his campaign to get us out of the eu. joining me now from
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westminster is the former conservative party leader and dung dung —— dung. is this pick up on what norman was saying is that no—deal cabinet do you any?” on what norman was saying is that no-deal cabinet do you any? i think it is best described as a leave by the 31st october cabinet, of which the 31st october cabinet, of which the stream of work that needs to ta ke the stream of work that needs to take place, preparing for departure without a deal is a critical component, but obviously, they would like to reach some arrangement with the eu, not the withdrawal agreement as it stands, that is dead, boris has had that clearly, but there are other arrangements that can be made, to, so both eu and the uk depart in a managed way, and don't end up with ta riffs a managed way, and don't end up with tariffs and rows going on after. that is feasible. you don't get one without the other and the other is you have to prepare for no—deal brexit, you have to prepare to leave. there are lots of mini deal, the no—deal is a terrible phrase. lots of mini deals in existence to
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get various things done, there are i7 already, things liked me sins and landing rights, those deals are already pretty much agreed and need to be ratified and there are more to be done. it is not no—deal in the sense you walk away and never speak teach other again, it is managing that process which is critical. but as potentially no—deal as compared toa as potentially no—deal as compared to a much closer relationship, isn't it. well, it depends what you mean. withdrawal agreement was a bad deal, because it would have locked us into the eu as a rule take for a considerable amount of time, with no real absolute assurance that we would have ever have left that authority. now that was not what the british people voted for when they said leave. what they meant is you are not under the european court of justice take back control, all of that meant that that died after the third time of being voted down. that is still the only deal in town really as far as the eu is concerned, isn't it. we haven't
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really heard any serious suggestions from the eu that the there could be a significant renegotiation of the deal that theresa may was trying to get through. and i don't think a significant renegotiation of the deal by the way is going to happen. by deal by the way is going to happen. by no means do i think that to be the case, i think that the eu has decided that by and large this deal is what they themselves like, so they probably won't want to deeply renegotiate this, which is why i don't think it is worth wasting time, why don't we have a big renegotiation, the key thing is what they should be talking to them about is ok, you accept now you should accept that we are leaving, by the sist accept that we are leaving, by the 31st october. so what we want to know from you, the eu, and you should know from us, is what does that look like as we go out, and how do we then minimise any of the impacts to businesses on both sides of the channel, and to individuals too? that means that reaching agreement as we head towards free trade, which is the objective of the
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borisjohnson government, trade, which is the objective of the boris johnson government, but trade, which is the objective of the borisjohnson government, but the in between bit about stabilisation, stand stills on things like tariffs etc, which are feasible, these things need to be thrashed out with the eu so there is an arrangement. when borisjohnson spoke after winning the leadership contest, he talked a lot about unity, didn't he. do you think that the make up of the cabinet, heavily weighted as it is to brexiteers is the sort of cabinet thatis to brexiteers is the sort of cabinet that is going to deliver the unity he talked about? well, i think the cabinet will be united. no question. of course, nobody is glossing over the fact that there are people in the fact that there are people in the conservative party, there are in all parties, everyone is divided over these issues, there are people in the conservative party who don't believe that we should leave without a deal, and are deeply conearn sender about it. i don't have any problem with that. —— concerned about it. the key question is the
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default mechanism for the uk right now it is law, it is already law, passed into law that we leave as adjusted now for 31st october. but you say if i may interrupt mr iain duncan smith, there will be unity, you believe in the cabinet, but is there going to be o unity in the conservative party or will members of the conservative party seek to thwart the cabinet if it tries to push through a no—deal brexit? i mean that is a distinct possibility isn't it? i was trying to explain that, before you interjected. it is law that we leave by the 31st octoberfull law that we leave by the 31st october full stop. law that we leave by the 31st octoberfull stop. the law that we leave by the 31st october full stop. the article 50 comes to an end on 31st october. we are out. that is european union law by the way and we have embodied and enshrined that date in uk law. u nless enshrined that date in uk law. unless that lay, that date is changed, —— that law, it would have to be changed by legislation no matter what happens, we are leaving. so that is the key question, so now,
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the only thing that would create a problem, i say the only thing, there are problem, i say the only thing, there a re lots of problem, i say the only thing, there are lots of things, the biggest thing is if there was a vote of confidence. it is up to my collea g u es confidence. it is up to my colleagues in parliament whether or not they support their government, it is almost unheard of to vote against your government, in a vote of confidence, because the subsequent election therefore means that you run a risk at this stage of putting the other side in, in this case jeremy corbyn putting the other side in, in this casejeremy corbyn and his marxists so casejeremy corbyn and his marxists so the idea is they face big pressure, all i can say is right now, the law is that we leave by sist now, the law is that we leave by 31st october, and we would like to getan 31st october, and we would like to get an arrangement, but if we don't thatis get an arrangement, but if we don't that is the law. as you say we are in in extraordinary political time, briefly, finally, having run boris johnson's leadership campaign what is next for you? well, i was asked by boris to come in and get the second phase running, which we did, brought some people in, and i think the result speak for itself, two
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thirds of the party voted for him. i am happy with that, i stepped away towards the end of last week when it was clear the campaign was over. i am very happy to get on campaigning to ensure that we leave the european union, on that date, because if we don't i have said to my colleagues all this rowing just ceases to be of any importance at all. disappointed not to be in this cabinet? not in the slightest bit. i never asked to be in the cabinet. i have done six yea rs be in the cabinet. i have done six years in cabinet. i was leader of the conservative party, i head up an organisation called the centre for socialjustice was voted think than thank of the year by prospect magazine. i am thank of the year by prospect magazine. iam not thank of the year by prospect magazine. i am not in the slightest bit bothered about that, i never asked for it, but i know what i had hoped for was that borisjohnson would be focussed on leaving, because it is the indecision round this which is causing the problem, it is not leaving, it is business is not knowing whether we are leaving oi’ not knowing whether we are leaving or not which is causing the back of
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investment. money will come through once we leave, because they will know what they are investing in and why. that is the key element. iain duncan smith, thank you very much. pleasure. joining me now from westminster is alex dawson, a former downing street adviser during theresa may's time. thank you for speaking to us this morning. just picking up on that subject of the balance in cabinet, very heavily weighted towards brexiteers it seem, described as a vote leave cabinet. is that the sort of cabinet that you think can get thejob done that of cabinet that you think can get the job done that borisjohnson wa nts the job done that borisjohnson wants done or is that perhaps lack of balance, arguably going to make it harder? i think they would argue it harder? i think they would argue it would be a clean break cabinet for a clean break brexit. why it has the advantage of is it is a cabinet built round a specific interpretation. leave on 31st
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october, the problem is not necessarily going to be disloyalty in the cabinet and disloyalty to borisjohnson in the cabinet and disloyalty to boris johnson and leadership manoeuvring, the difficulty will be trying to leave it through, first negotiated of the european union. then getting it through parliament, where you have got individuals like philip hammond, david gauke, who are happy to work with the potentially labour opposition to frustrate that sist labour opposition to frustrate that 31st date if there is a no—deal. labour opposition to frustrate that 31st date if there is a no-deal. and alex, as we speak, i think we can show our viewers the first images from inside the cab neating, going on in downing street. there we go. boris johnson's first full day as testimony and his first cabinet meeting kicking off business first thing this morning. i think we have just this, this one image to show at the moment. i am sure more will emerge. looking again at this cabinet, alex, do you think this is
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also a cabinet that borisjohnson has put together, with an eye to a potential general election, and with an eye to winning back voters who have been persuaded to vote for example for the brexit party? yes, undoubtedly, if you look at his speech on the steps of downing street it was about brexit and exit by 31st october which is a clear pitch to voters who left the conservative party for the brexit party, but also, there is a strong dose of economic populism in there, in terms of extra spending, tax cuts and leaving aside a lot the arguments from austerity that we had over the last decade or so from the conservative party. they will look to figures like robertjenrick as individuals who will be able to sell a programme one nation and elementments of social justice, calibrated if not necessarily going to the country before brexit, but after brexit. there a deal of focus
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on the deadline but it will be very difficult to govern even after that, and the no—deal is notjust a kind ofa and the no—deal is notjust a kind of a date, it is a process. and i think this cabinet is aiming to focus on how you actually deliver brexit after the 31st october. do you think as iain duncan smith was saying it is going to be a united cabinet, because there are big personalities in there, outpoken peek? yes, i mean you are never as powerful as prime minister as on your first day in the job, and the loyalty that there is now will undoubtedly start to erode away as it always does, but the question is whether they can hold it together, and after that really it's the start ofa and after that really it's the start of a new era for borisjohnson, if we get to that stage and if we get to that exit date and we exit on sist to that exit date and we exit on 31st october. the moment they are all bound in to supporting him as
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prime minister and his main policy, what happens when that starts to change? ok. alex, good to get your thoughts this morning. britain is set for record—breaking heat today, as temperatures could reach up to 39 degrees celcius. but the met office is warning of thunderstorms later on, which could bring flash flooding, power cuts and travel delays, as leigh milner explains. no matter where you are in the uk, there is no escaping the blazing heat. for surfers in cornwall, that is ok. but for these workers in london, not so much. in leicester there has been fun in the fountains, and for these daredevils in birmingham, quite literally. even the tropical birds will find it hard to stay cool on what could be the hottest ever day in the uk. with temperatures expected to hit 39 degrees today, health experts say we need to keep cool and hydrated, which means
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carrying plenty of this with you, and plenty of sunscreen. and a top tip — if you stay inside, make sure you close the windows and keep the curtains drawn if you want to stay cool. but if you are heading out, bear in mind network rail is warning of speed restrictions to stop the tracks from buckling in the heat. and there are warnings for the water as well. yesterday, divers in the thames found the body of a swimmer only a day after another man was found dead in a lake in the cotswolds. as the country prepares to break a world record, you are reminded to stay safe but have fun. the met office has said there is a 70% chance of the current record of 38.5c from august 2003 being broken. bbc weather presenter matt taylor is in one of the spots where temperatures are expected to hit an unprecedented high. i'm just a stone's throw away from heathrow airport, where later today we could see
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the highest temperature ever recorded in the uk. it's turning into a remarkable summer across much of western europe. of course injune we saw temperature records broken across many countries. the heat has now built again, and during the last 2a hours belgium, luxembourg, netherlands and germany once again have seen their highest temperatures ever, which could again be surpassed today. here in the uk we are starting to bring a bit more of that heat to our shores, increased humidity with it as well. today, it's in the south—east corner, particularly around the london area we could hit 39 celsius — that is 102 fahrenheit, which would beat the previous record set in 2003 of 38.5 degrees. add on to that with the humid air in place, it's going to feel closer to around 43 celsius in afternoon in the capital. and the heat‘s notjust going to be felt across the south—east, quite widely across england, wales and eastern scotland we'll see temperatures into the ‘30s. much more comfortable conditions though across in parts of northern ireland, but that heat humidity does combine to produce some thunderstorms later and still a very humid night in store, and it's that combination of the hot days, the humid nights which are proving a big problem for health. the body doesn't get the chance to cool down in any way, shape or form. but what we will see over the next two days is gradually atlantic
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air push its way in. that will start to break down the heat a little bit more, and by the weekend, all of us will see temperatures closer to where we should be for the time of year. but the heat like this is starting to become more and more of a common feature, and the met office say that hot conditions like this and that we saw back in 2018 are now 30 times more likely due to climate change. matt mentioned those increasing temperatures in europe. gavin lee is in brussels where temperatures are also soaring. the temperatures think perhaps reaching record levels there as well. how are you all coping? well, the headlines in a lot the french and belgian press in the last
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48—hours has been the heatwave. it reached 36 degrees in brussels but you add to it what they call the factor of discomfort which is a humidity level in the city, when you have the beautiful vista behind me, concrete build, the asphalt surfaces where it retains the heat and it feels higher than it is. the record for the whole of belgium which was 38.8 degrees was broken yesterday, 39.9 degrees reached by the dutch border in the northeast, a tiny village there. today, it is expected to be even higher. here in brussels, but as well in hasselt, northeast, reaching over a0 degrees for the first time, so this really, this region brussels, further north, the border with germany, holland and netherlands is the epicentre of the red purple patch of the heat. owned
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hoven seeing the highest recorded temperatures, beating a record 70 yea rs temperatures, beating a record 70 years and and germany a0.5 yesterday recorded on the border with the netherlands as well. and expected again today. to live through it, i have been in brussels for five years andi have been in brussels for five years and i haven't been through a period where i have had to sleep with three fa ns where i have had to sleep with three fans whirring like a boeing 7a7 jet. it is really quite inseparable the heat. round us at the moment, where it is nice to see a view not the european commission, they turn this place into deckchair, in an hour's time, they call it brussels on sea, people drinking hopefully water and using shaded areas as well, but the ones they i am surprised to see, if you see the european commission there are senior commissioners walking with shirt, ties and you will see one official yesterday, with a waistcoat on, so wow, how do they do it without sweating. with a waistcoat on, so wow, how do they do it without sweatingm with a waistcoat on, so wow, how do they do it without sweating. it is interesting you mention that because i was going to say to you in a place
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we associate with big institutions and the power suit almost, what sort of the does it have tot get to before everyone starts wearing shorts in the team in the gallery are going on about belgian wear and waffles, so how are people staying cool? -- beer. the problem with that, because obviously hot days, especially in belgium, the capital of drinking good quality beer many would say is we, for the first time a code red alert, in belgium, like we heard before you have to live like a value pyre, inside, closing the curtain, drinking plenty of water, so belgian beer, the message from the government is a that is lethal. if you look elsewhere in the last day or so the french government are saying that potentially five deaths attributable to the heath wave, they are worried what happened in 2003 when 15,000 deaths were atribltable from discomfort facts of the the heat wave. we are seeing fires in portugal. they have been raging forfive day,
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fires in portugal. they have been raging for five day, this freak pattern returning, which if you to look at the scientists across europe, they are looking at the factor, the increased flood, the wild fires and saying there is a pattern with climate change, emissions coming off, and it looks great, wow it is uncomfortable here, even now but it will get worse, about 3.00 we think it will peak. we better let you get back in side. thank you. try to stay cool. gavin lee in brussels. north korea has fired two short—range missiles into the sea, according to officals in south korea. there's been no official comment from the united states, which has agreed to resume talks with the north on plans for the demilitarisation of the korean peninsular. pyongyang has recently suggested that military exercises between washington and seoul could jeopardise those negotiations. ge with going to have a quick look
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back at downing street where the cabinet meeting is breaking up. let us see cabinet meeting is breaking up. let us see who is coming out. not a member of cabinet but perhaps someone member of cabinet but perhaps someone to talk to the media gathered just opposite that famous door, this of course the first cabinet meeting with borisjohnson as prime minister in his first full day in office, this was a still shot that was released a little earlier. borisjohnson that was released a little earlier. boris johnson and his that was released a little earlier. borisjohnson and his team. we will keep an eye on all the developments throughout the day. another big day at westminster. another big day at westminster. a number of us media outlets are reporting thatjeffrey epstein, the billionaire financier facing sex trafficking charges, has been taken to hospital after being found semi—conscious in a prison cell in new york. the reports say guards found him sprawled on the floor with marks on his neck. it isn't clear how he sustained the injuries. mr epstein — who once counted bill clinton and donald trump among his friends — denies charges of trafficking dozens of underage girls.
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there is esther mcvey leaving. that meeting breaking up after an hour or so. as we have been reporting and as we saw the picture emerging last night. a massive reshuffle of this cabinet. 17 people who were in theresa may's cabinet gone by one means or another. resigned, sacked. one or two surviving from that cabinet. amber rudd one of them there in the floral dress you see alongside esther mcvey. but very much dominated by brexiteers, this cabinet, with gavin williamson of course, who is now the education secretary. he is back in. it does illustrate the reversals of
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fortu nes it does illustrate the reversals of fortunes in these higher levels of politics. norman smith is there for us. politics. norman smith is there for us. the wheel turns, some people who we re us. the wheel turns, some people who were out of favour find themselves backin were out of favour find themselves back in favour. we saw jacob back in favour. we sanacob rees—mogg coming out of course, a sort of leader of the erg rebels who made life a misery for theresa may. coming out, actually breaking convention, talking to some of my colleagues, spending time being interviewed by them. all change here, you would never have imagined ita change here, you would never have imagined it a few weeks ago, the man who sort of triggered the no confidence vote in theresa may, remember he came out the commons and great fa nfa re remember he came out the commons and great fanfare announced he was submitting a letter demanding a vote of confidence. now he is in the bosom of government. he is heading off to the commons because he will be in the chamber shortly for his first business statement, setting out the business for the government over the next week or so.
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drier further south and west. that is all from me. goodbye. out the business for the government over the next week or so. are a fascinating and away because he will now have to be confronting rebellious remain backbenchers. they will be looking to trip them up and make life difficult for government and fascinating to see the dynamic betweenjohn and fascinating to see the dynamic between john bercow and and fascinating to see the dynamic betweenjohn bercow and rees—mogg, becausejohn betweenjohn bercow and rees—mogg, because john bercow betweenjohn bercow and rees—mogg, becausejohn bercow has been adamant he will ensure parliament has its day and backbenchers have their say, often to the huge discomfort of government as i know we have jacob rees—mogg and john bercow likely to be squaring up to each other, a fascinating clash. norman, thank you for that. we will be back there before too long. the japanese car maker, nissan, has announced it will cut 12,500 jobs worldwide in an attempt to shore up its finances after recent troubles. the company says its quarterly net profit has fallen nearly 95% . and it will reduce its global production capacity by 10% by the end of 2022. what does this mean
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for us here in the uk? our business correspondent theo leggettjoins me now. first of all, that backdrop, that huge fall in profits, is that a record for a company, the wrong sort of record? it has been an awful year for nissan. the last few months have been particularly bad, falling sales on the one hand, rising costs on the other and it has to invest in rising technologies like electric cars and all of this is coming together to wipe out its profits. at the same time, all sorts of corporate infighting and last november, carlos ghosn, the man who orchestrated nissan and its alliance with renault and mitsubishi, he was arrested on charges of financial misconduct that resulted from investigations within the company, a lot of corporate infighting so at the moment, this is a company in a very difficult situation. the management have to turnit situation. the management have to turn it around and what they will be doing is trying to cut costs by cutting capacity and jobs, 12,500
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around the world. we don't know whether cuts are going to fall at the moment. there are 1a plans potentially in line for cuts either to production lines or factory shutting down but we don't know where they are. looking at the uk, the big plant is obviously sunderland. it is a relatively efficient plant, and it makes the nissan leaf as well as the cash guy, so nissan leaf as well as the cash guy, so it looks like it is in a strong position, so we don't know whether there will be any cuts in the uk —— kashqai. when will we know? the chief executive said today he couldn't give any details because some of them are still being worked out. we are expecting another statement from nissan in europe later today but whether it will give us later today but whether it will give us the detail we are looking for, it is hard to say. thank you very much. time never look at the weather forecast and simon king has the details. that's right i know. today is the day we could well reach the highest recorded temperature in the uk. the
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magic number as it stands is 38.5 celsius, that was recorded in august 2003. today, we are expecting temperatures to reach 39 degrees in the south—east of england. a very warm start, a little bit of clive for northern ireland into the north and west of scotland, one or two showers popping up later in the afternoon in north wales but it is all about the temperatures, high 20s for scotland. for england and way is, temperatures into the 30s for many, 39 celsius as i mentioned in london, just to the west, northolt and heathrow, that sort of area. through tonight, storms quite widely across england and way is pushing their way into scotland and we will see some lightning without, torrential rain, but much fresher for friday, temperatures in the low to 20s. goodbye for now. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... borisjohnson's new cabinet have
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been meeting for the first time, before the new prime minister addresses the house of commons. it follows one of the most radical reshuffles of all time — with brexiteers appointed to the biggest offices of state and many big—name departures. the uk is expecting its hottest day on record, with temperatures of up to 39 degress forecast in southern and eastern england. nissan cuts its workforce. the japanese car giant nissan has announced 12,500 worldwide after reporting a 98% drop in profits. and a french inventor has failed in his attempt to become the first man to cross the english channel on a jet—powered flyboard. will have more on that later. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing.
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it is heavily dominated by politics today. the dup‘s deputy leader, nigel dodds, says their mps will be talking to the new prime minister to ensure their priorities are addressed — including keeping no—deal on the table during brexit negotiations. the democratic unionist party, the secret is in the name, we are a unionist party, like the conservative and unionist party, so we believe having a conservative government in the current circumstances is much more prefera ble circumstances is much more preferable to a corbyn led government, so we have a five year deal with the conservative party, signed between the chief whips, not between theresa may and our leader, so between theresa may and our leader, so it is a five year deal but subject to a review after every parliamentary session. we have a longer session going on in history but that will come to an end shortly and at that point, we will refresh and at that point, we will refresh and renew but overall, the principle of one being to ensure stability and ensures that conservatives are able to continue to government as opposed to continue to government as opposed tojeremy to continue to government as opposed to jeremy corgan and to continue to government as opposed tojeremy corgan and that is what we still subscribe to. refresh and
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renew, does that mean renegotiate?” think we have renewed the substance of confidence and supply but we need to refresh because a new prime minister, new cabinet ministers, as we have been hearing, effectively a new government so a lot of the things agreed two years ago have run their course so we want to see what their course so we want to see what the plans are going forward but let me give you the priorities. strengthen the union, get brexit delivered and get revolution restored in northern ireland —— my devolution. those are the priorities. and the numbers in parliament mean that you have boris johnson over a barrel. if anything, he need you even more than theresa may did. look, the arithmetic is what it is. yes, clearly, we wouldn't regard it as having him over a barrel or anything like that. i think the arrangement we had with theresa may worked extremely well. of course we had our differences over brexit, that is what caused her problems and led to her downfall but
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she had much greater problems within her own party. i think as we get towards the deadline and we realise that for the conservative party, this is really something that has got to be delivered, i think we can get that over the line and we can move forward on a more stable basis. specific to the backstop, we have yet to hear clearly from boris johnson, it is only day one, but what do you see as the potential breakthrough areas? he seems to think things can be recreated in a way that will work? well, look, i think that people need to realise the european commission has been comforted previously under the theresa may regime by the view that the government will never do or no deal. we don't want an ideal outcome, our view is a deal is much more preferable but if you don't keep that on the table, then the absolute de laet other side have no motivation to offer you a half decent deal. i am very hopeful...
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people are saying the heads of government are off on holidays, but they remain in place, angela merkel, emmanuel macron, the irish prime minister, these are the key people, not so much the commission, so work needs to begin immediately by boris johnson on trying to strike the deal. we will give him all the support we can and we believe it can be done with goodwill. that was nigel dodds of the dup. we can show you some pictures now from inside that first cabinet meeting this morning. just one has been released so far, as far as we are aware. and we can bring you a clip of what the new prime minister had to say to his team. good morning, everybody, it is wonderful to see this new team assembled here, respecting the depth and breadth of talent in our extraordinary party and, as you all know, we have a momentous task ahead
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of us. the pivotal moment in our country's history, we are now committed, all of us, to leaving the european union on october the 315t, or even earlier. no ifs, no buts, but we are not going to wait until october the 315t to get on with a fantastic new agenda for our country. let's take a look at how the papers have been reflecting on the papers have been reflecting on the prime minister and his cabinet appointments. the telegraph brings us appointments. the telegraph brings us to perspective from inside number ten and says the promotion of loyalist and brexiteers is aimed at helping mrjohnson deliver brexit on october the 31st. the daily mail says he began his leadership by stepping out with all guns blazing, calling the reshuffle "boris's bloodbath". and the guardian says the purgejob bloodbath". and the guardian says the purge job theresa bloodbath". and the guardian says the purgejob theresa may's bloodbath". and the guardian says the purge job theresa may's cabinet signalled his ruthlessness and says it has stoked speculation about an early election. taking a look at the
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times, it describes the reshuffle as an afternoon of cabinet carnage. and the sun is calling the change over the sun is calling the change over the night of the blonde knives, a reference to the major cabinet reshuffle under harold macmillan in 1962. that is priti patel, just a glimpse of the new home secretary leaving that cabinet meeting today. the new cabinet has been departing after a meeting lasting an hour or so after a meeting lasting an hour or so this morning. lots of comings and goings already in downing street this morning and, of course, boris johnson to speak in the house of commons later on as well. we will just have a very quick look at what you are reading and watching on the bbc news app. dominated really by politics. number one roast red is a new cabinet meeting for the first time. if we can show you? perhaps not, the image we havejust if we can show you? perhaps not, the image we have just shown you from inside the cabinet meeting. number
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three looks at prime minister boris johnson and who is in the cabinet. we are having some technical difficulties and can't show you the images. the most watched is jacob rees—mogg learning of his newjob from journalists and at number three is four challenges facing boris johnson. so very much dominated there by developments in westminster. plenty to digest already, then, although in reality things are only just getting started. to discuss what lies ahead, i'm joined from westminster by tom mctague, staff writer at the atlantic. tom, very good to have you with us on bbc news this morning. what do you make of the group of people that borisjohnson has put around him and how are they going to serve him, do you think, both in the short term i could delete short term and the long term? —— the short—term and long—term question market is a radical group of people he has brought in to power. some of these
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quys brought in to power. some of these guys were brought in to power. some of these guys were way too far out for theresa may's party, they were too far out for the conservative party mps in the leadership campaign, talking about dominic raab, who is effectively his deputy prime minister. priti patel, who has talked about support for hanging in the past, these are people who have supported boris and have been rewarded for doing so but i think you can pick out a few key messages from this. one is an absolute ferocious commitment to get out of the european union, deal or no deal, on october the 31st but you are also seeing boris close down weaknesses in the conservative party's ma nifesto in the conservative party's manifesto in 2017, so priti patel is a tough on crime conservative mp. that played badly at the last election, where jeremy that played badly at the last election, wherejeremy corbyn was able to make gains. so you are seeing something that could look towards a general election may be
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later this year or after brexit, sometime next year. in picking pretty much a really overtly pro—borisjohnson, pretty much a really overtly pro—boris johnson, pro brexit pretty much a really overtly pro—borisjohnson, pro brexit team, though, do you think that perhaps isn't going to serve him well not only within the conservative party and backbench mps and their views on this new cabinet, but more broadly in the house of commons and more broadly in the country, despite this message of unity that he talked about after his leadership campaign announcement? yes, well, i got a text m essa g e announcement? yes, well, i got a text message last night from senior conservative figure who was hailing this reshuffle and saying it reminds him of going back to the days of tony blair and him of going back to the days of tony blairandi him of going back to the days of tony blair and i reminded him of going back to the days of tony blairand i reminded him, you know, tony blair had a majority of almost 200. boris has a majority of one, or potentially three depending one, or potentially three depending on how you counted, so this is a gamble but it is consistent with his character. at heart, boris a
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romantic who believes that he can bend people and institutions to his will, to his personality, that he can dominate and get things done where others have failed, because they are not powerful enough, they are not committed enough, so this goes to the heart of paris, he thinks he can control parliament, staring down and succeed where theresa may failed —— heart of boris. how do you see things playing out over the next few months, what are your predictions?” out over the next few months, what are your predictions? i think it is all going to hinge on two aspects. one is can boris succeed in getting anything from the european union where theresa may failed? almost eve ryo ne where theresa may failed? almost everyone you speak to says that is virtually impossible, although there are signs that the germans in particular are concerned and are trying to find a way not around the backstop, not to get rid of it, but to somehow make it irrelevant. can you come up with something else that means you don't need to use the
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backstop? .2 is if that is not possible, those conservative mps that were sacked yesterday or have been consistently against no deal and are prepared to vote against the government, when push comes to shove, are they prepared to vote down the government, costing them their own careers and potentially risking jeremy corbyn getting into number ten? are they prepared to do that? it only takes around five. so that? it only takes around five. so thatis that? it only takes around five. so that is the key moment in september that is the key moment in september that will make or break boris‘ premiership. tom, good to talk to you, thank you. that was the morning briefing. now it is time for sport, let's head to the bbc sports centre andjoin let's head to the bbc sports centre and join holly hamilton. i'm not sure what you have got on your agenda today but is anyone playing sport in all of this lead? would you believe? they are going to step out with the cricket ireland and england today and it is around
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38 degrees, in a0 minutes, when ireland was my cricketers will look to edge ever closer to what would be a shock victory in that case meeting at lord's. day one couldn't have gone any better for the irish actor they bowled england out forjust 85 and ended by taking a 12 run lead. jo wilson was watching. if it is your first test match at lord's, if it is your third test match ever, milk every moment, especially when everything was flowing ireland's way en on murtagh‘s magical morning. approaching his 30th birthday, tim murtagh has been doing this kind of thing on this ground for middlesex the years. for middlesex for years. keep in mind this is england's world cup winning squad being dismissed for nothing. they could do with a rest. they got murtagh. 85 all out? well, once more at this famous old ground, found oneself asking, did that reallyjust happen? ireland soon took the lead. andrew balburnie made 55. stuart broad is trying to remind as he is a fast bowler for the ashes, he took three wickets, but even murtagh came
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in for some late slogging fun. he'll soon be bowling again. just think, you could be that good when you are 37. britain's record—breaking swimmer adam peaty has told the bbc that he backs the actions of some of his fellow competitors who have protested on the podium against china's sun yang at the world championships this week. peaty‘s gb team—mate duncan scott refused to share the podium in protest at sun yang's doping history — as did australian mack horon. peaty said he would do the same if a similar situation arose. absolutely. absolutely. and i think being british, that is one of our best qualities. we will stand for what we think is right on the rest of the world is with us. you know, when matt horton protested and came back into the dining room, all the countries were clapping, and we know doping has no place in sport, it never has and never will but it is getting the message out and standing
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ourground, getting the message out and standing our ground, but massive applause to duncan. i have seen on twitter, eve ryo ne duncan. i have seen on twitter, everyone is behind him and that is exactly the way should be. i repeat ten times a day to the media, doping has no place in any sport and the people who will win, if you cheat and win, you know you haven't one, so and win, you know you haven't one, so that stays with them for the rest of their lives, but hopefully duncan next year will pick it up and smashing out the water. ! smash him. geraint thomas goes into today's 18th stage of the tour de france with 95 seconds to make up on race leaderjulian alaphillipe. stage 17 yesterday was won by italy's matteo trentin, who broke clear in pont du gard in the south of france, defending champion thomas finished in the peloton so still trails alaphilippe as the race heads into the alps for what could prove a pivotal day. celtic are on course for the third qualifying round of the champions league. they take a 5—0 lead to estonia for the second leg against nomme kalju. leigh griffths scored his first goal since november on an emotional night for the scotland international.
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he's made his return to football this month following a break for mental health reasons. european champions liverpool drew 2—2 against portuguese side's sporting lisbon in their latest pre—season friendly in the united states. the game though will probably be remembered most for a howler from liverpool goalkeeper simon mignolet who let that tame shot somehow squirm past him. liverpool's goals came from divock origi and this neat finish from georgino wijanaldum. just missed it! across merseyside, everton have announced that they have sold winger ademola lookman to bundesliga club rb leipzig for an undisclosed fee. the 21—year—old scored five goals in 11 appearances for leipzig during his loan stay there in 2018. let's have a look at some of this morning's back pages. it's the cricket that dominates.
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the mirror has gone with the headline champs to chumps — referring to england's fall from grace after their world cup triump 11 days ago to being beaten by ireland at the same venue. express — murtagh most foul — tim murtagh, the man who took five wickets yesteday pictured on the right. and in the sun — jonny bairstow being bowled out while they've got a bit of news from manchester united... after lukaku was ruled out of their clash with tottenham today over injiry — the sun says it's actually to avoid injury that might scupper his move to inter milan. that is all the sport for now, more from the bbc sports centre at 11:15am. the cricket providing some good material for the headline writers. thank you very much. temperatures could soar to an unprecedented high of 39 celsius this afternoon — on what's forecast to be the uk's hottest day on record. rail passengers in southern england have been advised to consider changing their travel plans, after network rail said it would implement speed restrictions
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to prevent tracks buckling in the heat. here's our transport correspondent, tom burridge. there will be plenty of that today. i've got a little hand fan and lots of water. it's when you get off the train on the platform, it's like going into a hothouse. and just as we passengers struggle in the heat, train tracks do as well. just as a coin left in the sun heats up, the track here does the same and as the steel gets hotter, it expands and can buckle when a train goes over. and this is what a buckled rail line looks like. so to reduce the risk of that happening, all trains travelling from midday until eight o'clock this evening in the southern half of england will be subject to speed restrictions. i've been working on the railway for ten years. i've never encountered temperatures like this or put in the level of blanket speeds that we are talking about so it's absolutely vitally important, we're not doing it easily, we are not making this decision
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easily but it's essential in terms of passenger safety. so only seven in ten services will be running and trains travelling between london and other parts of the country will also be affected. tom burridge, bbc news. the inventor of a jet—powered hoverboard has failed in his attempt to cross the channel from france to britain. franky zapata, a former jet—skiing champion, took off successfully from sangatte in northern france but then fell into the channel during a mid—sea refuelling stop. zapata had planned to land in britain around dover after a flight ofjust 20 minutes. our correspondent duncan kennedy is in dover where franky was expected to land. so, what exactly happened? well, it
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was all going so well, you are absolutely right, he was taking off from sangatte in this thing they call the flying board, this inventor, zapata, the take—off was absolutely perfect. he even got 18 kilometres, that is 12 miles, out across the channel where he was due to refuel and the original plan was he would refuel while floating on the flying board but there was a mix—up with the french authorities, they didn't want him to do that so plan b was him landing on a boat mid—channel and refuelling for 30 seconds and it was during that manoeuvre that it all went wrong. i have spoken to his team, it seems like there was some sort of disconnect between the wave and him landing, there was a bit of disjoint and he ended up in the channel with this thing on board. he was ok, they got him on board a boat and at that
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point, the machine, the flying board is so complicated and full of electronics, he couldn't carry on hisjourney, so electronics, he couldn't carry on his journey, so the team here and no doubt franky zapata himself, are absolutely crestfallen because they wa nted absolutely crestfallen because they wanted to achieve this today because it is the exact 110th anniversary of the first solo flight across the channel and they wanted to coincide their plight with that flight. sadly, it wasn't to be. —— their flight. sadly, it wasn't to be. —— their flight. it looks spectacular and he looks like kind of avengers superhero flying across the sea. will he try again? definitely. it won't be tomorrow, he has got to go back to his workshop in marseille and get all of the salt water out and get all of the salt water out and start again. he has only got one of this type of prototype. he has got others which are similar but only one of this and he is developing for the french military to see if there is some kind of military application for this device. he tested it over the champs
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elysees and the place de la concorde during bastille day a couple of weeks ago and it went really well. he also tested it on a boat in florida and he landed there well. it is just today, he florida and he landed there well. it isjust today, he mistimed it all florida and he landed there well. it is just today, he mistimed it all by a couple of metres or so and ended up a couple of metres or so and ended up in the drink. he is ok, the project is knocked off track a little bit but they say they will get going again, perhaps in the next few days or weeks. ok, duncan, thank you very much for that, in dover. the white cliffs looking rather splendid in the sunshine and a few early beach—goers behind duncan. on that note, let's take a look at the weather forecast with simon king. i think you have a few small details that tell us about today! yes, not much going on with the weather today! well, an historic day weather today! well, an historic day weather wise, temperature is already close to 30 celsius in the south—east of england, lots of sunshine across england and wales throughout this morning but we have more cloud in northern ireland, the north and the west of scotland, it will be a bit fresher here,
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certainly not seeing the extreme temperatures we are likely to see today in the south—east. that is the magic number, 38.5 celsius, the highest recorded temperature in the united kingdom, said back in 2003. will we be today? there is quite a good chance we could get to 39 to the west of london. elsewhere across greater london towards cambridgeshire, temperatures up to 38 celsius. we will keep some sunshine through into this afternoon, still some cloud in northern ireland and the north and west of scotland. it is later on this afternoon we will see some showers developing in north wales and the west of england. widely, temperatures in the high 20s to the mid 30s for england and wales. i mention fresher in northern ireland, 23 here but into the high 20s in the central belt of scotland but through the later stages of this afternoon into this evening, we are looking at some thunderstorms developing, so it could all go bang later on. initially showers across wales and northern england up into scotland and then thunderstorms developing
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across eastern areas of england, they will track their way northwards. we went to the frequent lightning we saw on tuesday night but certainly isolated downpours and a warm, sticking out, temperatures no lower than 17—20, that is in the very early part of friday morning. if you don't like the heat, friday will see something of a change. this cold front moving its way in from the west but the wind changes to a south—westerly so we cut off that heat that is coming in from the near continent, it comes in from the south—west, temperatures are going to drop, there will be clouds and showers across eastern areas of england during friday afternoon. sunny spells elsewhere but those temperatures down to 21 — 25, still the chance of getting up to 30 degrees on the far east of england but not those really high temperatures we are expecting today. on into the weekend, that is the weather system that will stick around, may be bringing rain toward scotland, northern and eastern areas of the uk for saturday, so for wales in the south—west, it should be
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largely dry and also northern ireland with some sunny spells. temperatures 19—23dc, back to where it should be for the time of year, really. sunday, some rain in the north and east but dry further south and west. bye—bye.
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hello it's thursday, it's ten o'clock, i'm chloe tilley. borisjohnson's new cabinet is already getting down to work. they met this morning at downing street. it comes after over half the old cabinet resigned or were sacked. a "political massacre", a "bloodbath", the "night of the blonde knives" — that's how some newspapers described it. it is wonderful to see this new team assembled here, representing, i think, the depth and breadth of talent in our extraordinary party, and, as you all know, we have a momentous task ahead of us. borisjohnson has brought committed brexiteers into his cabinet — have they been put on a general election footing? it has been dubbed the do or die
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cabinet, with every

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