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tv   The Papers  BBC News  July 28, 2019 9:30am-10:00am BST

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through this weekend and it will remain wet through today. it is this where the front that will continue to generate rain through northern ireland, west wales, down into the south—east. standing water and localised flooding. for scotland, sunny spells, lovely conditions. very warm across the northern isles. the best will be across south west england. this where the front moves north word, murky conditions, some showery bursts of rain. still quite humid here. a clear night further south. a guy just humid here. a clear night further south. a guyjust out through southern areas south. a guyjust out through southern areas on south. a guyjust out through southern areas on monday. in much better day throughout the board. a dry story here. some spells across scotland. 2a to 26 celsius. low pressure moving into the south—west. windier conditions here. that sets the scene for the rest of the week.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. no—deal brexit planning is now the government's number one priority according to michael gove, the minister responsible for preparations to leave the eu. fresh protests in hong kong as the territory continues to be engulfed by huge anti—government demonstrations. a last—ditch effort to save the nuclear deal with iran, senior international diplomats will hold an emergency meeting today. democrats in the united states have renewed accusations of racism against president trump after he criticised an african—american congressman. 15—year—old jaden ashman from essex has won nearly a million pounds after placing second in the world cup finals of the online game fortnite alongside his dutch team mate. before the papers, sport and for a full round up,
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let's go to the bbc sport centre. good morning. it's a big day for egan bernal, the 22—year—old is set to become the youngest winner of the tour de france in 110 years, and the first columbian. he's got the leader's yellow jersey going into today's final stage in paris, which is mainly processional so he won't get challenged. patrick gearey reports. on top of a mountain and on top of the world. egan bernal, the 22—year—old colombian, will almost certainly become the third youngest winner in the history of the tour de france. born in the andes, and crowned in the alps, bernal was followed all the way to the top by his countrymen who had never seen a colombian win this race. bernal‘s job was to stay in yellow and maintain his lead over the shortened 37 mile course. last year's winner, britain's geraint thomas, and the rest of team ineos, playing wingmen, protecting him from threats. like the man in blue behind him, frenchman julian alaphilippe was the chaser but that
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takes its toll on these punishing slopes. this is the moment france's bid for a first tour winner in sa years ran out of puff. thomas was now second but launched no challenge, effectively handing over the title to his team—mate. so what was his message to his successor? ijust said to him, just enjoy it, soak it all up and don't worry about crying because all real men cry. it's amazing to be part of it, he's a phenomenal athlete, 22, he's got an amazing year ahead of him and it'sjust an honour to have been a part of this. the two will ride together again in paris later. all bernal must do is stay on his bike. he has climbed his mountain already. patrick geary, bbc news. lewis hamilton will start today's german grand prix from pole, but he's not been well. the world champion says he felt so ill, that at one point, he thought he might have to drop out of the race weekend altogether. so to then come back, and take pole position at hockenheim is no mean feat. he was given a helping hand though,
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after both ferrari's failed to make it through qualifying. i don't know really how we did it today. i'm not quite sure what happened to the ferraris. but it's such an important race for us, it's the second round grand prix so for mercedes, 125th, 125 years, it'sjust incredible to celebrate in this way. warrington will play st helens in the final of rugby league's challenge cup. warrington were made to work for their victory by a well drilled hull fc side but eventually won by 22 points to 14. joe philbin going over the line late on, to send warrington through to the final for a third time in four years. the other semi—final always looked to be a mis—match on paper, but part—timers halifax put in a really resiliant performance to frustrate st helen's early on. but saints proved too strong in the end, running in four tries to win 26 points to 2, qualifying for their first final in 11 years. really proud of them. talking about effort all week,
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and we certainly didn't get beat on effort which is really pleasing. i think it might even have been a little bit tighter, if we had handled the ball a bit better. but saints definitely know they had a game anyway and that's a big thing for us. and leeds rhinos won the women's challenge cup for a second year in a row. they beat the same team, castleford, in the process. it was pretty close for a while, io—all before courtney hill went over for the rhino's with 20 minutes to go, 16—10 the final score at the university of bolton stadium. rory mcilroy looks like he's returned to form after missing the cut at the open championship last weekend. he leads the wgc invitational in memphis, after shooting an eight under par 62 in his third round. he birdied nine holes including four of the last five to leave him 12 under par overall, one shot ahead of us pga winner brooks koepka. the five—time open champion tom watson will retire from competitive golf after today's final round of the senior open at royal lytham & st annes. the american turns 70 in five weeks time, and says hejust doesn't "have enough tools in the toolbox
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to compete successfully." when it comes to swimming, there's always someone who absolutely dominates at the olympics. think michael phelps, ian thorpe, and going a bit further back mark spitz. well, for tokyo next year, remember the name caeleb dressel. he's been in scintillating form at the world aquatics championships in south korea. the 22 year old had already broken one of michael phelps' world records, and yesterday he won three goals in one session in the 50 metres freestyle, 100 metres butterfly and the mixed 4 by 100 freestyle relay. he leaves the championships with six gold medals in total. that's all the sport for now. now on bbc news, here's the papers. hello and welcome to our sunday morning paper review.
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with me are business commentator josie cox and john crowley from first draft news. let's take a look at the front pages. and yes, brexit and borisjohnson feature on most of them. the sunday telegraph leads with reports that the new chancellor sajid javid is planning a big spending blitz to prepare for brexit. it's a pensive looking prime minister on the front page of the sunday times, by framing him in front of the staircases it almost looks like he has a set of wings. the headline focuses on his determination to make a no deal brexit happen. the observer goes with talks between the former chancellor philip hammond and labour's brexit secretary keir starmar to try and block a no—deal brexit the mail on sunday the mail on sunday has a full page splash on ‘boris's bounce' reporting that a new poll suggests a 10% rise in support for the conservative party with mrjohnson as prime minister. but the scottish mail on sunday focuses on a showdown between scottish conservative leader ruth davidson and borisjohnson over a no—deal brexit. and the sunday express has a poll
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saying that the public wants mps to let the prime minister get on with brexit. i suppose that is where we inevitably have to start. there is one other story we will look at before the end of it. sunday times first, there he is with those winglike stares, a great picture. boris vows no—deal brexit by any means necessary, fighting talk. boris vows no—deal brexit by any means necessary, fighting talklj means necessary, fighting talk.|j didn't realise we were at war with anyone but apparently according to borisjohnson anyone but apparently according to boris johnson under his anyone but apparently according to borisjohnson under his new premiership, we are. he has set up a war cabinet involving six men which will be responsible for no deal preparations and making sure that we leave. as they say, hopefully it will be with a deal but i think they are preparing the ground for no deal and what is quite striking, michael
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gove, the mood music coming from the department of environment is that no deal is bad but he seems to have drunk the kool—aid and no deal juice, and he is in charge of the planning and making this happen. it all feels a little bitjingoistic to me. war gets mentioned a lot, we survived the war, we will be all right on our own. we have been very closely associated and entangled with the legislation that has come out of eu over the last 50 years in various forms. the issue as well is that theresa may was accused of being a poor negotiator, she showed her hand to readily and you wonder how much of this is positioning to say, like brinkmanship. exactly and i think boris is capitalising on that. doing what boris does best which is being a showman, being a statesman, a fantastic writer, good at rallying the masses —— afford —— fantastic orator. he is good at
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speeches. he is looking at this rhetoric, talking about the war cabinet, and he is taking a stance and that is clearly paying off because it looks like, we have several polls this morning showing he has managed to secure what people are calling the boris bounce. people are calling the boris bounce. people are swinging towards boris, it's clearly working. but whether it's actually going to come through and whether he's going to be able to deliver on all these grand promises, that's the billion dollar question. michel barnier said that he never felt theresa may was ever going to fall back on the no deal, he never thought it was serious. the mood music across the papers is, we are serious, even if we don't want it, we have to be prepared to go through with this and this is why there is this tough talk. but that has changed in the last two or three days, hasn't it? middle of the week, borisjohnson first days, hasn't it? middle of the week, boris johnson first became days, hasn't it? middle of the week, borisjohnson first became prime minister, there was still talk of
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engaging with the eu 27, trying to find a way through, even though for the last couple of years the eu has said, this is it, once you have your withdrawal agreement we are not going to revisit it. that feels like a significant change in tactic. going to revisit it. that feels like a significant change in tacticm feels like by saying that the backstop is completely out, that he wa nts to backstop is completely out, that he wants to actually pick a fight with the eu and dare i say it actually may be forced their hand and force them to call an election. he has claimed he doesn't want an election but if he can turn round and say, the eu refuses to talk to us, parliament is being obstructive and is trying to stop us, let's tell them again. the other story on the front page, conservative bounced a ten point lead over labour which you mentioned. that strengthens his hand if he does decide to call the general election. exactly and this is exactly it. boris whatever you think of him, he is a very
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intelligent strategise. do you think he really is? do you think that that that you talked about his oratory, a lot of it for some people does not contain any actual substance, that it's all about, we just need a positive attitude and we will get through. i think actually this week what he has proved is that he is tapping into what the people want to hear. i think he's very aware of where he needs to gain support, which is beyond the metropolitan bubble which is london, he has spent a lot of time this week talking to this investment in local communities, he was up in manchester, we will probably talk about this later, he was speaking at the science museum in manchester, directly mirroring that northern powerhouse speech that george osborne made five years ago and failed to deliver on. and he's
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saying, this is something close to my heart as well, if you endorse me and led me to support now when i need it, iwill deliverthis and led me to support now when i need it, i will deliver this for you. i think he's fully aware of what he has to do to push his agenda through. it is love bombing the labour heartlands as well, all this money being thrown at the trans—pennine line, these neglected towns, and that was where the liberal establishment was, we missed that, we didn't realise the people in the great and washed outside london, we didn't realise that they didn't want to stay in the eu. i think he's being very smart. there is clearly a plan, and everything seems to be linking up. we will talk about sajid javid the new chancellor, priti patel is making noises, it's all about seeing off the brexit party. which has fallen, asjosie has said, rightfully, the
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tories are surging but who was paying the price, it's the brexit party. it really makes sense, they have to do this to see them off. it's an existential crisis for the conservatives may have to, if anyone was in doubt that they were not a leaf party, they have showed it today in the party of —— the leave party. the party. most today in the party of —— the leave party. most people think there will be an election today, —— this year, that would be extraordinary, working with very little time to get britain out of the eu and work on an election campaign. but on the back of these polls in the papers, an election would be the best thing for boris. in terms of fortifying that
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support, and being able... before or after the exit? he has been quite vocal about the fact that there will be no election before. as was theresa may. but who knows? and over the summer, as we get closer to the deadline and the refusal to, by many, to countenance the idea of a further extension because in their view, what with the point b, the complexion of things can change. —— what would the point b. he will say, the eu is refusing to talk to us, parliament is being obstructive, give mea parliament is being obstructive, give me a new parliament. look at everything i have said, iam promising all these goodies, spending like there is no tomorrow. i think to come out and call an election now is, it's not going to happen because parliament is in recess now , happen because parliament is in recess now, but if he feels there is nowhere else to turn, i think you
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can legitimately turn around to the people and say, look, help me out here, i'm trying to deliver it for you. let's look inside the sunday telegraph, page five here. i will deliver a london style bus network in the north, pm promises, buses are not normally thought of as a great modern policy although we are trying to get out of our cars more. this week with it being so hot, quite a few people have complained to me about how hot it is on board the so—called boris buses in london. about how hot it is on board the so—called boris buses in londonlj have just written a piece for the independent today saying that we should all have free public transport, like in luxembourg. have you come on now? how do we find that, have you costed it?|j you come on now? how do we find that, have you costed it? i think boris would take that on at the moment! exactly! it is topicalto talk about buses. we are using cause too much. that's one way in which we could start to tackle thing like global warming. boris has this weird
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obsession is with buses, he painted buses as well, he revealed during his election campaign. there was a lot of discussion about why, if you google that, you get i paint buses out of cardboard, to deflect attention... so cynical. no longer quite so often the £350 million on the side of the bus. there is a serious point, andy burnham, the mayor of manchester saying yesterday on the bbc that people in london pay £1 50 on the bbc that people in london pay £150 innerfair, in manchester, it's £4. clearly the money has a put in. and a country girl who grew up when we had a couple of buses a week, it was more expensive to get around. it was highlighted in a
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stock—take of the northern powerhouse pledge, five year anniversary this year. one of the big think tanks did a big review and said that transport was one of the areas where we had the greatest inequality between the north and london and the north and the south. this is strategically a super smart move. he is also focusing on things like the police force, broadband, things that will appeal to the man on the street, people who aren't in this westminster bubble, the metropolitan bubble. where are all of these police officers going to work when they have closed the police stations? at the borders? you can put them on the road. you don't see any walking around. bobbies on the beat. let's look at the observer. x chancellor plotting with keir starmer, not so fast, prime minister. philip hammond made no secret that he was stepping down to
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fight no deal from the backbenches. a nice bit of colour in the other paper here, boris did not have a bed and the chancellor philip hammond graciously offered him the use of his bed which boris has declined. it's not a surprise which this is happening, there are cross—party talks but it all feels a little bit, the energy doesn't feel, with this group of people committed all fields, as you said, boris is making all of the announcements, hitting the ground as running. the hatched plans are amending legislation or the nuclear option, bringing down the nuclear option, bringing down the government but for a conservative mp to do that, that is obviously going to be a massive decision. oliver letwin, former tory ministers oliver letwin and dominic grieve are talking with brexit spokesman for labour keir starmer about this but of course labour had to sort out their own policy on
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brexit, which is, in my view, muddle to say the least. they are conflicted somewhat. but what it does show, this is always the case, people did not vote on party lines in the referendum which is the model. which is now not the pricing that we see cross—party talks about this. —— it's now not surprising we see cross—party talks. amid this wonderful rhetoric from boris and these grand promises, we have to rememberthere isa these grand promises, we have to rememberthere is a huge portion these grand promises, we have to remember there is a huge portion of the country and politicians who oppose brexit. and for whom no—deal brexit would be an absolute disaster. and i can see why. we have to remember that. but then again on the flip side, we have had years of trying to about and no—deal brexit and we have not managed to achieve it so far —— trying to avert it.|j have accidentally skipped over the
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sunday telegraph so we will go back, it is above, should you need to look down on it, if you can't go back to the graphics. sajid javid blitz for the graphics. sajid javid blitz for the no deal, tv adverts? it's like there is public information days. you don't see many of those anymore. you don't see many of those anymore. you don't. the feeling is that philip hammond, he wasjust you don't. the feeling is that philip hammond, he was just trying to thwart brexit at every move. sajid javid's sprays, the treasury will play a full role in delivering brexit, it's a very deliberate message to send out, david davis writing in the sunday telegraph, saying the brexit process was handicapped by people in the treasury. so, yeah, ithink sajid javid is backing his boss again and saying, we will be full square
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behind you in making sure this happens, through public information m essa g es happens, through public information messages and so forth. but it is as much for the public, it's going to have to be aimed at business, to help them in a relatively short period of time to prepare for no deal. it means that we don't have, for a while, thatjust—in—time capability to get manatees into —— commodities into the country, even things like chemicals to purify the water supply, business has to get their skates on. they are, as far as they can, i don't know what skates are available to them. this is not going to help them. a tv advert? it's not going to help them. we have had a very vocal warnings from places like the cbi had a very vocal warnings from places like the cb! and bcc and business groups, the federation of small businesses has been very vocal about this, it's not getting any better. we are heading towards a cliff edge. whatever sajid javid is
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permitting, i don't know how it will help. let's finish with something not to do with brexit. career focused students shun english a—levels. all three of us did english at a level or a level! how worried should we be about this? english at a level or a level! how worried should we be about this7m the first paragraph it says, students are favouring other subjects because they are considered more employable, they subjects, which i completely disagree with. i think english is one of those subjects, it teaches you so much about your approach to learning, about your approach to learning, about a holistic discipline in academia, it teaches you to read, it gives you that oversight. i'm not quite sure how one can describe it asa quite sure how one can describe it as a subject which would not make you employable. it goes on to say it remains one of the most popular a—level subjects but if maths and science are on the increase, something has to give because you don't take more a—levels. some subjects will become less popular.
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it has fallen by 8.4% which is the biggest full in 17 years. and doing stem subject is great, science, technology and maths, but english, it teaches you about the human condition, emotion, and also we have exported our english literature around the world. i was doing a story on people doing stem in universities and it's almost like they are so driven now when they go to university, it's like you are doing stem subject because that's going to be yourjob. when i was doing english, i had no idea what it was going to do. it's good to do something for thejoy of was going to do. it's good to do something for the joy of it. normally it's something for the joy of it. normally its foreign languages that are dipping, that is normally the front page rather than english. are dipping, that is normally the front page rather than englishlj hope they're not, i hope this means they are not. the other thing to
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consider is that the popularity of stem subject is particularly good for things like the gender pay gap, there is research that says the reason that women are not going into the same level paid jobs as men is because they have not taken as many stem subjects. we can't have it always, we can't just stem subjects. we can't have it always, we can'tjust keep studying law! that is it for now, the next edition is at 10:30pm. you can see all of the front pages on the bbc website to seven days a week. and you can watch it on the bbc i player. thank you for watching. in a moment, we'll have the weather. but first let's find out what coming up on sunday morning live.
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the recent heatwave has some people talking about climate change but our environmental protesters right to use disruptive tactics? and why some academics think we should be going to the pub more. and the priests trying to be stand—up comedians. join us at10am. ahead on the bbc news channel after 10am, we will be discussing this success of a teenager from essex who has won nearly £1 million by playing an online game. he is the weather. the recent heatwave seems like a distant memory for some of us, it has been a thoroughly wet weekend so far thanks to a pretty stationary wear “— far thanks to a pretty stationary wear —— weather front. but the south—west on the far north of the country has had some glorious sunshine. but the weather front will
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bring a wet day to northern ireland, south—west scotland, north wales, north—west england where we will see the heaviest of the rain and into east anglia. the north of it, good of sunshine, already 22 degrees in shetland, very warm here with humid air. afew shetland, very warm here with humid air. a few heavy showers, best of the sunshine across central and southern wales and south—west england. into the south—east as well through the afternoon. cool underneath rain band. the weather front will drift a little bit further northwards tonight and it should tend to fizzle out, turning a bit drierfor northern should tend to fizzle out, turning a bit drier for northern ireland should tend to fizzle out, turning a bit drierfor northern ireland but still quite damp across the north midlands into northern england, parts of scotland, a joyous story further south. —— a drier story. still quite humid across the north. this weather front moves north on monday bringing some showers, into the south—west there is a developing
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area of low pressure, which will bring unseasonable showery and windy weather. before that point, a much better day for many of us on monday, dry for northern ireland, northern england, into the north midlands. some good sunny spells around, and a warmer day. highs of 24 to 26 degrees. turning increasingly warmer and windy during monday night, pushing north and east through the country through tuesday, wednesday and thursday. it will bring some u nsettled and thursday. it will bring some unsettled weather, initially to parts of england and wales on tuesday. sunny spells around but also heavy and thundery downpours which could lead to localised flooding. strong winds on the south coast, 30 to 40 inland in exposure. warm when you have the sunshine. beyond tuesday, there will be low
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pressure bringing warm sunny spells and heavy and thundery showers continuing to cause issues with a bit of localised flooding in places. no heatwave just now.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 10am. no—deal brexit planning is now the government's number one priority — according to michael gove — the minister responsible for preparations to leave the eu. but labour are against the idea .. what we are saying is no deal we'd oppose and we think people should have a final choice on it. they could have a vote then between remain or whatever option borisjohnson decides to put to them at that time. these are the scenes in hong kong with protesters gathering — as the territory continues to be engulfed by huge anti—government demonstrations. a last—ditch effort to save the nuclear deal with iran — senior international diplomats will hold an emergency meeting today. democrats in the united states have renewed accusations of racism against president trump after he criticised

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