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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  July 29, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's 11 and these are the main stories this morning: the prime minister heads to scotland, vowing to ‘promote and strengthen‘ the union — as the cabinet ramps up preparations for a no—deal brexit. part of that will be to make sure we've got the committee structures of cabinet in place so we can respond as effectively as possible in real time to all the issues, challenges, that will face. it comes as britain's biggest business group warns that neither the uk, nor the eu, is ready for a no—deal brexit at the end of october. a gunman opens fire on festival—goers at an event in california, killing three people and wounding 15
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a semiautomatic going off really close too, you know, people screaming and hiding and ducking. and coming up — the bbc follows police in one of the world's most dangerous cities — cape town — where on average eight people are murdered a day. and the duchess of sussex guest edits british vogue's september issue, focusing on women who "break barriers". good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. borisjohnson has called for a renewal of "the ties that bind our united kingdom" as he makes his first visit to scotland as prime minister. mrjohnson is announcing 300 million pounds of funding for scotland, wales and northern ireland.
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yesterday the scottish tory leader ruth davidson said she would not back his plans for a no—deal brexit. mrjohnson‘s visit comes as more details emerge of the government's brexit strategy. three new committees have been formed to ensure the uk leaves the eu by the october deadline. today the business organisation, the cbi, warned the government that neither the uk nor the eu is ready for a no—deal brexit on october 31st. here's our political correspondent jonathan blake. days into thejob borisjohnson is on the road again, after visiting manchester and birmingham last week, the prime minister is going to scotland where he will announce £300 million worth of funding for local communities and argue for a renewal of ties that bind the united kingdom as it prepares for a future outside the eu.
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yesterday michael gove, the minister in charge of preparing for a no—deal brexit, said that was now the government's number one priority. the prime minister will chair a new twice—weekly meeting of senior government figures to oversee the uk's exit. it is part of a new approach the government hopes will send a clear message about its promise to deliver brexit by the end of october, with or without a deal. it comes as the business group, the cbi, issues a new warning, that neither the uk or the eu is ready for a no—deal brexit. the uk government is saying it is going to put a lot of time and energy and effort into preparing for no deal, that is the right thing to do. we want to see businesses doing that as well and the eu responding in kind but ultimately, we can avoid all of this. the leader of the scottish conservatives, ruth davidson, will make clear to borisjohnson when she meets him today that she cannot support leaving the eu without an agreement in place. the prime minister is also expected to meet the scottish first minister nicola sturgeon who says leaving without a deal would be catastrophic.
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jonathan blake, bbc news. in a moment we'll speak to our assistant political editor norman smith in westminster but first to glasgow and our political correspondent nick eardley. borisjohnson is boris johnson is making borisjohnson is making these funding pledges and he has various meetings with political leaders in scotland. what kind of reception do you anticipate him getting from them? i think there could be quite a few heated discussions for the new prime minister today. the first one that will be difficult is with scotla nd that will be difficult is with scotland to's first minister, nicola sturgeon. not a surprise she does not deal with —— agree with boris johnson when it comes to brexit. she thinks the no deal would be catastrophic for the economy and she has promised to do whatever she can
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to avoid it, potentially putting independence back on the agenda. you would normally expect a new tory leader to have a better reception in the scottish party up here but the relationship between the scottish and uk tories is probably at its worst point since the conservatives won power back in 2010. ruth davidson was absolutely furious at the scottish secretary david mundell being sacked in the cabinet cull that boris johnson being sacked in the cabinet cull that borisjohnson initiated last week. more importantly she is going to make it clear at that meeting with mrjohnson today that under no circumstances will she backed a no—deal brexit. boris johnson circumstances will she backed a no—deal brexit. borisjohnson saying that has to be an option and the government in london saying it is 110w government in london saying it is now the presumption. ruth davidson saying clearly, whatever happens i am not getting on board with that. she is going to be part of that awkward squad of senior tories saying to mrjohnson, if you go for
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it no deal i am not on board. boris johnson's argument is that we need to renew the bonds of the union between the various countries of the uk, pledging extra cash for scotland, wales and northern ireland, £300 million in all for various city growth deals. it is easier to make the argument for strengthening union but actually doing it, is a lot easier said than done. thank you very much. let's talk to our assistant political editor norman smith. we are hearing that the government is terrible charging preparations for a no deal. what is that going to involve 7 for a no deal. what is that going to involve? it involves an overhaul of the machinery of government which has ended up rather dilapidated under mrs may when it came to no
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deal planning. there was the idea there was a lack of drive and cash. tea m there was a lack of drive and cash. teamjohnson there was a lack of drive and cash. team johnson has decided to strip everything back to just two committees, one committee which meets every day under michael gove which will be the nuts and bolts, the no deal planning committee which will meet in the same offices as the emergency committee. to convey the idea of a national priority. there will be a second committee which will be a second committee which will be a second committee which will be chaired by the prime minister and that will meet twice a week which will consist of the key players in cabinet and they will make the key brexit decisions. the idea is to give some real impetus and drive to the whole brexit‘s process , and drive to the whole brexit‘s process, not just to and drive to the whole brexit‘s process, notjust to make sure the plans are better but to convince the eu that we are absolutely serious about the possibility of leaving without an agreement and that was the message from michael gove as he left for the meeting. we are going to do everything we can to make sure we can
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leave the european union on october the 315t. there will not be any delays, we are determined to ensure we leave on october the 315t and it is myjob to make sure the country is ready. the difficulty is all these no deal preparations could hit the buffer if those mps at westminster opposed to no deal, get their act together and find a way of getting some sort of legislation which could block boris johnson from taking us out without an agreement. one of those leading the charge is oliver letwin and this was his view on the prospect of no deal. the whole of this sorry saga, from beginning to end, is about judgments and risks, and not about certainties. nobody knows whether a no—deal exit will be ok, not ok, very far from ok or very bad indeed. that's the risk that some of us don't want to take. it might go ok, but obviously in the same way, nobody can tell whether we will be able to get a majority in parliament for some
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way of doing something other than having a no—deal exit at the last moment if it turns out this government hasn't got a deal. is no deal now definitely on the cards? thejury is no deal now definitely on the cards? the jury is out on that, in pa rt cards? the jury is out on that, in part because mrjohnson himself seems to be coming under pressure from two camps, one side in the cabinet thinks an agreement is still obtainable and if they can get the eu to budge a bit then they could sell that package at westminster because they calculate a number of labour mps because they calculate a number of labourmps and because they calculate a number of labour mps and the supporting brexit constituencies would back a deal if it was put back to the commons for a fourth time. there is another group of ministers around mrjohnson who think there simply isn't the parliamentary time to get legislation through to put in place any sort of deal, even supposing the eu was prepared to come forward with
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some sort of compromise. their view is cut to beaches, plan for it no deal, leave on what they are calling a managed no deal basis. what we don't really know is where does borisjohnson fit don't really know is where does boris johnson fit into don't really know is where does borisjohnson fit into this? is he leaning more towards trying to get that agreement or does he think the game is basically up and he will have to go down the no deal route? we simply do not know at the moment. thank you for that. britain's biggest business group, the confederation of british industry, is warning that neither the uk nor the rest of the european union is ready for a no—deal brexit on the 31st october. the cbi had previously said leaving the eu with a deal was essential to protect the economy and jobs. it has now published practical steps for the uk, the eu and business owners to help accelerate no—deal preparations. our business correspondent, dominic o'connell, told us more.
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this is a cbi assessment from the businesses point of view, the business world's point of view, of what needs to be done. it is a very detailed list, 200 points referring to both the eu and the uk preparation, from fairly trivial things like the dates not having been changed and some of the technical guidance from april to the new leaving date of october the 31st, if it is a leaving date, to some quite serious things like all the sector groups that were meeting with government before april, right up to our leaving date, the end of april then, haven't met since which is quite a worrying disclosure from the cbi. and everything in between, all sorts of things about tariffs, border arrangements, all that kind of stuff. but there is a bigger thing going on here, as you hinted at, a change in tone from the cbi which first campaigned for remain then it threw its weight behind theresa may's deal and now, this is the first time the cbi is actually engaged with the nuts and bolts of a no deal and talking about preparing for a no deal so it is a sign really that the cbi is thinking it is much more likely we will get a no—deal brexit which is certainly in line
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with the borisjohnson government. the french parent company of the car—maker vauxhall says it could move all production from its factory at ellesmere port in cheshire if brexit makes it unprofitable. more than a thousand workers are employed at the plant. well our consumer affairs correspondent, colletta smith, is there for us. this is not the first time that the french parent company has talked about the impact of brexit on vauxhall will stop how seriously should we take this latest threat? what we are hearing is really more meat on the bones of what the company issued in a statement about four weeks ago, i was standing just here on the spot talking about the implications of what could have been and potentially is still a good announcement for workers here. the
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1000 workers here at this plant. that is the parent company said they wa nted that is the parent company said they wanted to build the new model of the astra here in the uk at ellesmere port rather than at any of their other sites, particularly a plant in germany. yet even at that stage four weeks ago they put an overarching concern over it saying it depends on what day of the uk government reaches when it comes to brexit. now the boss of psa has told the financial times that the car—maker has alternatives, that if there is any possibility that the overall company could be damaged financially because of a bad brexit deal or a no dealfor the uk because of a bad brexit deal or a no deal for the uk than the company would simply withdraw. that has big implications here at ellesmere port, they are a huge employer and in employer of high—end jobs right
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across the north west. there is a supply chain factor two, lots of companies supply into this plant. at the moment the plant is on summer shutdown for a couple of weeks so we no workers here but lots of people will be very concerned as they start their summer holidays at this extra level of worry for the company and the future of the jobs. thanks for that. now, a new report by the think tank — the institute for government — warns that there is ‘no such thing as a managed no—deal brexit‘ and that the hope for a ‘clean break‘ from the eu will not materialise. we can get more on that from one of the report‘s authors, joe owen is from the institute for government. he works on their brexit programme, leading the research into whitehall‘s preparation for exiting the european union. thanks so much for being with us, tell us a little bit more about what your main concerns are.|j tell us a little bit more about what your main concerns are. i think one
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of the things we wanted to draw out with this report is the idea that the 31st of october is the finish line after which the government can start focusing on things like housing and schools and broadband, which is the message you would be forgiven for forgetting if you are watching the recent leadership contest. that is probablyjust the start line. it is not settled, still u nsettled start line. it is not settled, still unsettled is what our trading relationship with europe, what our security relationship with europe would be, all of the domestic adjustments, both for government and business, here and on the continent, which all still need to happen. there would be a huge amount of work, more legislation required. it really is the end of the beginning rather than the finish line as some have presented it. are you saying a clea n b rea k have presented it. are you saying a clean break is impossible and effectively we could be in this no deal scenario for years to come?
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legally it would be a clean break and that of the agreements governing oui’ and that of the agreements governing our relationship with the eu would be guillotined over at night but that would lead to very messy consequences here in trying to adapt to the new world as it would be. yes, some areas will be working on this for years. you only have to look at things like universal credit, automatic pension enrolment, programmes that i think is fair to say are complicated but i know near the scale of a no—deal brexit. this kind of programmes have lasted for over a decade so there will be worked on new systems and what happens at the border, where in some cases the government only has temporary plans and we have not got any sense of what their medium to long—term plans are. this will carry on for months and months and possibly years areas. what you are saying is true, where does that
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leave boris johnson‘s saying is true, where does that leave borisjohnson‘s domestic agenda because he has been making ambitious promises in the last couple of days? it is likely brexit will crowd out the domestic agenda for any prime minister. remember theresa may when she stood on the steps of downing street after being elected, talking about the burning injustices she wanted to tackle and the rest of the conservative party ma nifesto, the rest of the conservative party manifesto, it is hard to point to anything significant we have done over the last couple of years because of the all—encompassing nature of brexit and that will be true any no deal circumstance. the prime minister has a limited amount of capacity and time, and a limited amount of political capital. it is very likely this prime minister in any future prime minister in a no—deal brexit would be spending all of theirs on dealing with brexit. from your research, do you think the uk is more prepared for leaving the eu without an agreement or deal on
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october the 31st than when we were supposed to leave in march? has there been six months of good preparations, so to speak? in some areas in government they have continued the work at pace, trying to build up readiness in key systems and processes but in other places, they stood down, all the big operational centres. thousands of civil servants who were moved to no deal were moved back and that will happen again fresh over the coming months. one thing to point to in the report is the concern that the uk could end up being less ready in october than it was march and a big reason for this is the business community and the concerns that actually they have been marched up the hill twice before with no deal and it did not happen. will they wa nt to and it did not happen. will they want to spend more money, more time orjust see this as part of a game of chicken with the eu that is
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ultimately aimed at getting a deal and therefore no deal will never happen. the other complication for october is we are in the run up for christmas. any storage space may be booked up for christmas and businesses will already be telling government that getting wearing house —— warehouse space in the run—up to october is proving difficult if not impossible. thank you. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister heads to scotland, vowing to ‘promote and strengthen‘ the union — as the cabinet ramps up preparations for a no—deal brexit. it comes as britain‘s biggest business group warns that neither the uk — nor the eu — is ready for a no—deal brexit at the end of october. a gunman opens fire at a food festival in california, killing three people and wounding fifteen.
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in sport, the first colombian to win the tour de france after safely riding into paris. last year‘s champion was second. jurgen klopp dismisses talk that sunday‘s clash with manchester was a curtain raiser. this time 83—0 defeat against napoli in edinburgh. —— a 3-0 against napoli in edinburgh. —— a 3—0 defeat. andy murray and jamie murray have been training this week. i will be back with more on those stories at 1130. three people have been killed by a gunman who opened fire at a food festival in california. video posted on social media showed crowds fleeing at the annual garlic festival in the small town of gilroy, which is around 80 miles
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south of san francisco. at least 15 people have been injured and the gunman was also killed. dave lee sent us this report from california. i can tell you that this is still what they call an active situation here in gilroy. there have been reports from some witnesses that may have been —— that there may have been an accomplice to this shooting. now, it is worth saying that this is quite typical and a mass shooting for witnesses to think there may be an extra shooter or an extra person involved. it is often not the case, overwhelmingly not the case, typically. but police here taking no chances so they are now into the early hours of the morning looking for anyone that may have been somehow involved. now, we are standing in the place where families were told to come and congregate if they wanted to find out more information
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about someone they couldn‘t get in touch with. it was also here that we had an update a couple of hours ago from the police chief scott smithee, here is what he had to say. there were reports of shooting on the north side of the garlic festival area. officers were in that area and engaged the suspect in less than a minute. the suspect was shot and killed. we have one suspect we know that is down, we have some witnesses reporting that there may have been a second suspect but we don‘t know that suspect was engaged in any shooting or whether they may have been in some sort of support role for the person that we have accounted for. we have at least 15 people injured, we have four fatalities that we know of, including the suspect. i don‘t have any information
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on the suspect yet and that will take a little bit of time, as with the victims as well, that will take some time before we identify them and make family notifications. so clearly a fluid situation here in terms of concrete information from the police. there have been multiple reports from local media that witnesses described seeing a man in his 30s, a white man in his 30s, and we expect to hear again from the police a few hours when they wake up again here on monday morning. speaking to witnesses they have been talking about scenes of panic and confusion. here is what they have described. there were so many shots. i saw people falling down, kids falling down. i had tojump over three of the kids. one bullet passed me very closely and it hit our friend‘s boot. so me and my friend, we were standing behind this truck and we heard what sounded
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like fireworks at the time and i saw like flashes of light and some bullets ricocheting off the ground and i thought to myself that they could just be like home fireworks. then he pointed out that there were three or four bullets that hit the truck, directly in front of us and that is when he turned to me and was like, "those aren't fireworks, there are gunshots, we have to run," and then we started just bolting for it. so i suspect in the morning we will be hearing some more about the victims of the shooting. there have been local reports tonight that a six—year—old boy may have been among them. that hasn‘t yet been confirmed but this seems to be yet another incidence in america in day—to—day life where what should have been a family friendly fun event has been turned upside down by gun violence. china‘s central government has made a rare statement to reiterate its support for hong kong leader carrie lam,
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as well as the city‘s police, and called on the people of hong kong to oppose violence. it comes after another weekend of clashes between protesters and police. hong kong has been rocked by protests over the past two months against a proposed bill that would allow people to be extradited from the city to stand trial in communist party—controlled courts in mainland china. a spokesman for the hong kong and macau affairs office made this statement. translation: direct adherence to law and strict handling of unlawful activities is the core meaning of rule of law and what the hong kong residents have taken with pride. any proposition, however lofty one may think it is, should not be expressed in unlawful ways, let alone resorting to violence. our correspondent in hong kong, stephen mcdonnell, sent this update this morning.
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there has already been a fair bit of response here in hong kong to this rare press conference in beijing which has reaffirmed the central government‘s support for carrie lam and her administration. the group which organised the largest protests here, the mass marches with hundreds of thousands of people, has come out and said it is greatly disappointed in these comments from beijing because they say that carrie lam is responsible for this crisis and that really is she should go so they do not support the chinese government in its backing for carrie lam. however, there has been a press conference here from the pro—beijing legislators. they are very happy, they say, with those comments from they say, with those comments from the chinese government, support carrie lam and the legislative
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process here. most importantly, the one country two systems model. both of them have something to take away from this anyway. when the chinese government says we are not going to intervene now, that is good news for both the probation and pro—democracy camp. it means the people‘s liberation army is not going to be turned out onto the street quickly to try and restore law and order. one government says it has faith in the hong kong government it means it means it might be, for the moment, involving itself very heavily in the crisis here and they are going to leave it up to hong kong authorities to sort it out. a couple are taking the church of england to court over christian school assemblies which they say are "indoctrinating" their children. lee and lizanne harris have been granted a judicial review in their challenge to
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the oxford diocesan schools trust, which they say should provide a ‘meaningful alternative‘ to christian lessons taught in assemblies. the trust says all publicly—funded schools in england and wales were required to hold daily religious worship and that the school has acted "entirely appropriately". joining me now is our religion editor martin bashir. let‘s pick up on that last point. remind us, what is the law as it stands? it dates back to 1944, the education act which says that every school, regardless of whether it is in the church of england, roman catholic system orjust in the church of england, roman catholic system or just the state system, every school should have a moment of dedicated worship, that it should be predominantly christian but also that parents can withdraw their children from those assemblies or collective acts of worship if they want. it was reiterated in the 1998 school standards and framework act. this statement that this
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collective act of worship should ta ke collective act of worship should take place a place right across the board. the problem is it is not very specific and to some extent, it is rather dependent on the senior management of the school. for example, in some schools you will go to this collective act of worship and it feels a little bit like custard in a school lunch time dinner, it is sweet, warm, a bit of love one another, be kind to each other, not a problem. love one another, be kind to each other, nota problem. in love one another, be kind to each other, not a problem. in other schools when some of the teaching staff might be quick committed christians, there will be more meat. they will talk about the authority of bible and history of christ and this has provoked this reaction from these parents because they have objected to the fact that when their children have been in attendance at these acts of worship the christian narrative has been taught as factual, as the truth. they also say that when they sought an alternative, the only alternative they were offered was to place their
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children in a classroom on their own with an ipad. it was not really educationally the equivalent. this isa educationally the equivalent. this is a test case and it will be judicially reviewed in november. what happens next? i appreciate crystal ball gazing on everything but what might be the outcome? crystal ball gazing on everything but what might be the outcome7m crystal ball gazing on everything but what might be the outcome? it is difficult to know which way this review might go. they could repeal and replace the law so they could decide that schools no longer need to have this act of corporate worship every day. it is worth remembering that in 2014, the national governance association as with a slot to be dropped and felt it wasn‘t being enforced. in 2015 the former education secretary charles clarke also wrote a paper with an academic saying they should be abolished because it is never enforced and britain as a society is deemed to be less religious than it was so what could happen? the judicial review may well repeal and
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replace the act or they may issue specific guidelines to the content of the collective worship. i should say humanist uk want the requirement for collective worship to be com pletely for collective worship to be completely repealed and replaced for a requirement for inclusive assemblies which would not discriminate against anybody whether they have a faith or guilt. and humanist uk are involved in this? they are supporting the parents. thank you. the duchess of sussex has become the first person to guest edit the september edition of british vogue, the magazine‘s most important issue of the year. meghan has chosen to feature 15 so—called "change makers" on the cover. the duchess declined to appear on the cover herself, telling the editor she felt it would be "boastful". now it‘s time for a look at the weather with lucy martin.
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hello, some heavy, thundery downpours in the forecast over the next few days. also some gusty winds, something to bear in mind if you have plans for camping. we have seen you have plans for camping. we have seen wet weather in parts of northern ireland in northwest england, scotland, and it‘s gradually pushing north, becoming increasingly showery, the risk of thundery downpours for northwest scotla nd thundery downpours for northwest scotland had we got these heavy, thundery moving into the south and west. elsewhere, good spells of sunshine and highs of 26 celsius. through this evening and overnight that area of low pressure is pushing its way further east so there will be some gusty winds for parts of the southwest of england overnight but as we move into tomorrow, it will become more widespread so we are looking at a blustery day across the southern half of the uk, some widespread showers, the best chance of seeing any dry weather further east. the wind gusts up to 40 mph in some spots, on exposed coasts we could see 50 mph and temperatures at
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a maximum of 24 celsius. hello, this is bbc newsroom live with rebecca jones. the headlines: the prime minister heads to scotland, vowing to "promote and strengthen" the union as the cabinet ramps up preparations for a no—deal brexit. there won‘t be any delays, we are determined to make sure we leave in october 31 and it‘s myjob to make sure the country is ready. it comes as britain‘s biggest business group warns that neither the uk nor the eu is prepared for a no—deal brexit. a gunman has opened fire at a food festival in california, killing three people and wounding 15. in a rare intervention, china has condemned the recent anti—government protests in hong kong as "horrendous incidents".
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and coming up — a group of mps who‘ve been on a fact—finding trip to canada predict the uk will fully legalise cannabis use within five to ten years. sport now, and for a full round up from the bbc sport centre, here‘s will perry. egan bernal is celebrating becoming the youngest rider in more than a century to win the tour de france. with the race leader traditionally not challenged on the final stage, the 22—year—old was hand—in—hand with his team—mate and last year‘s winner geraint thomas, who finished second overall. the traditional sprint finish was won by australian caleb ewan. but it was the colombian‘s day and night on the champs—elysees. viva colombia! tour to france, what more could you want when you got a new champion, a new ambassador? what
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a brilliant ambassador. for now a needs to enjoy the moment, have a party, celebrate, and then try and realise what he has achieved. it‘s historic for colombia and i‘m very happy to have helped him achieve his goal. there were also some pretty impressive scenes in colombia. this was in zipaquira, hometown of bernal, now the first south american to win the world‘s most famous bike race. located on the outskirts of bogota, the streets packed with people dressed in yellow and waving colombian flags. jurgen klopp has dismissed talk that sunday‘s community shield clash with manchester city is a curtain raiser and has described it as a final. liverpool lost again in preseason yesterday — this time a 3—0 defeat against napoli in edinburgh. it follows defeats against borussia dortmund and seville in the united states. romelu lukaku has been left out of the manchester united squad that has travelled to norway this morning. the belgian striker has been heavily
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linked with a move to inter milan throughout the summer and posted a picture with his agent on social media yesterday with the message, "soon to be continued." united face kristiansund tomorrow night. kojin young won the evian championship — the fourth women‘s major of the year — by two shots in france. it was the south korean‘s fifth lpga tour championship win in less than two years, and her second major victory of the year after the ana inspiration in april. rory mcilroy could only finish fourth in the stjude classic despite holding the lead going into the final round. mcilroy was playing with brooks kopeka who was once again in imperious form finishing three shots clear of second to win. and staying with golf it was also a special day for tom watson who played his final competitive round yesterday at the senior open at royal lytham & st annes. watson won eight majors during a glittering career to put him sixth on the all—time list.
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the crowd are very warm and appreciative and the crowd that entered at the ninth hole which is the furthest point on the golf course, they went all the way out there to watch my final hole. that was very, very special. and andy and jamie murray have been training together ahead of their doubles partnership at the washington open this week. the brothers will face edouard roger—vasselin and nicolas mahut in their opening round match tomorrow. the pair played together to help great britain win the davis cup in 2015. the tournament will be andy murray‘s fourth since having hip resurfacing surgery injanuary and his first on a hard court. he won the queens doubles title with feliciano lopez injune. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour.
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the personal doctor of the jailed russian opposition leader, alexei navalny, says she believes he‘s been exposed to an unknown chemical, possibly administered by someone else. anastasia vasilyeva said his medical team had been given permission to see him. she added they now had tissue samples, including hair and a t—shirt, and would arrange for independent tests to establish what made mr navalny sick. mr navalny was jailed last week for calling for anti—government demonstrations. steve rosenberg has more. navalny was taken ill on sunday morning and taken to hospital under police guard. it was suggested he had suffered an allergic reaction but to what? one russian news agency
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said mr navalny was suffering... but his long—time doctor said she believed his symptoms were caused by unspecified chemical substances. last night outside hospital 64, police detain supporters of mr navalny and this russian journalist. mr navalny is russia‘s most prominent opposition activist, a vocal critic of vladimir putin. two yea rs vocal critic of vladimir putin. two years ago he suffered a chemical burnin years ago he suffered a chemical burn in his right eye, following an assault. someone threw green antiseptic at his face. he had been serving a 30 day sentence for calling for this street protest at the weekend. it ended with moscow police detaining more than 1000 people to come out to demand honest elections. the south african city of cape town,
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a well known tourist destination, is also one of the world‘s most divided and dangerous cities. it‘s averaged eight murders every day in the first six months of this year and earlier this month, 43 people were killed in one weekend. the bbc‘s voldi carolso and christian parkinson spent a weekend with the police and spoke with the families of those who were killed. first on the scene, the metropolitan police‘s law enforcement officers are out on patrol in a dangerous pa rt are out on patrol in a dangerous part of cape town. jerry grew up on these streets. it's the same story, you killed my dad, i will kill yours, you killed my brother, i will kill yours. it‘s a curse because eve ryo ne kill yours. it‘s a curse because everyone is willing to pick up a knife or gun to avenge someone
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else‘s death. knife or gun to avenge someone else's death. often the guns are turned against police. six members of the anti—gang unit were shot and injured last month. over the weekend we we re injured last month. over the weekend we were filming, three more were shot. one of them died. we got a glimpse of the danger they face every day. is that sort of weapon something you‘d normally find? is that sort of weapon something you'd normally find? no, we normally find handguns but that‘s a big weapon. this is my thinking, if i get one gun out of the streets, i'm saving hundreds of lives. one gone, that‘s how many murders.
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saving hundreds of lives. one gone, that's how many murders. but policing can‘t fix the social and economic inequality in these areas. this area is home to over 20,000 people, sprawling townships like these are a legacy of apartheid. a month ago, five men were shot, execution style, in this shack. 15—year—old mohammed was one of the victims. his little sister and brother watched as he died. the violence has gotten more and more daily now. the children are not safe in that place, truly, they are not even safe in the park and that supposed to be... if you‘re not even safe in your own house, how can you be safe outside? to make these streets a little safer, the army has been called in. the army is meant to
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reinforce the police who are thin on the ground. with more than 1000 soldiers on the ground and some of the trouble hotspots, theirs is a temporary deployment, i —— a stopgap measure to help. she hope she won‘t have to bury another son. they have left the area and are hoping for a fresh start. i know violence is everywhere but i already lost one son and! everywhere but i already lost one son and i don‘t want to lose another. a cross—party group of mps has predicted that cannabis will be legal in the uk within the next five to ten years. the mps have recently returned from a fact finding trip to canada, which legalised the drug last year. jim connolly followed the mps‘ visit. these buds will probably get about four times larger by the time
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this plant is ready to harvest. currently, canada is the only g7 country to allow recreational use of cannabis. i‘ve got no hair, do i still need this on my head? even a few years ago, this would have seemed unimaginable — three british mps from across the political spectrum, looking at how the legalisation process has been implemented. we‘re following the liberal democrat sir norman lamb, the conservativejonathan djanogly and labour‘s david lammy. you could go to prison for a very long time in britain if you had anything like this. the trip has been organised by a london—based campaign group, volteface. it wants the uk to legalise weed. it‘s sponsored by a big north american cannabis company called mpx international, which runs this facility. scott boyes is the boss, and i put it to him that he was trying to use his money to influence british politicians. we‘ve been happy to be a host to them, to give them some exposure to the business and give them an understanding of what‘s happening
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here in north america. if that helps make the right decisions in the united kingdom, it‘s money well spent for us. canada‘s prime ministerjustin trudeau came to power promising to legalise cannabis. it‘s been available here for medical use since 2001, but as of last october, recreational users could use it too without fear of breaking the law, meaning places like this have been springing up all over the country. investors know there could be billions to be made from the industry, but the uk mps admit there‘s a lot to get their heads around. have you ever seen this volume of cannabis yourself? i never saw any volume of cannabis! so this is your first experience of it? so two or three of those balls are worth $60. so that‘s quite a valuable amount. sir norman was central to the lib dems‘ policy of backing legalisation. which do you tend to use? i've done this one. he decides to buy some. thank you very much. he wants to know what it feels like, and takes some before bed. so now i‘m supposed to put it under my tongue. he claims it helped him sleep.
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the difference between what he‘s taken and the cannabis oils you can buy in the uk is that this contains thc, the compound that can get you stoned, and at high strengths is linked to psychosis. this mental health link is rarely mentioned here in canada, and nor is the suggestion that the drug could be a gateway to harder substances, something i put to the man who led canada‘s legalisation process. now, because it‘s a regulated substance, we‘re having far more nuanced and robust conversations with our kids. and i think as a result, there will be lower risk decisions and healthier choices. back at westminster, one of the uk mps has had a significant change of view. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs, young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated. but i actually want to see the strength of the stuff reduced, labelled and properly organised in our country. the home office says there will be no change
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to the law on illicit drugs, pointing to harms and misery they can cause in families and society. on this day 70 years ago, the bbc revived the tv weather report, something it had originally introduced at the start of the second world war. the way we get the latest predictions has changed dramatically over the years, as our presenter matt taylor has been finding out. it‘s going to be a dull and wet start to the day... the way we consume the weather forecast has changed immensely. from simple hand drawn charts and magnetic symbols... there‘s some... oh, dear! let‘s do it again. there's the heavy and persistent rain... ..to 3d graphics and sophisticated mobile phone apps. we now have more weather information at our fingertips than ever before, but how exactly does that information get there? it all begins at a weather station like this. the radcliffe observatory has been recording data for over two centuries, making it one of the oldest and longest running in the world.
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we‘ve been taking temperature observations here on a daily basis since 1814, and then we‘ve got daily rainfall observations as well from the 1820s. so, everything that‘s used here to measure the temperature and the rainfall has been issued by the met office, so it‘s all standard kit. and so what‘s measured here will be measured likewise in other parts, notjust in the uk but right around the world ? absolutely. but with the atmosphere stretching kilometres above us, we also need weather balloons, radar and satellite data. and all that information gets fed into weather organisations such as the european centre for medium—range weather forecasting here in reading. where supercomputers like these ones, doing trillions of calculations every single second, churn all that weather observational data and create the forecast. this is planning for food, for transport, for health, for energy, for anything that's part of society, that's making society. agriculture needs to know when to borrow, buy, rent equipment.
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they need to know what crops to use when. that up—to—date, personalised information is crucialfor all of us. since the bbc weather app launched in 2013, it‘s been downloaded 15 times a minute, with up to eight million people using it every single week, and it continues to innovate and evolve. well, the technology and the amount of information available may have changed greatly in the last 70 years, but for me personally, you can‘t beat getting in front of the camera and communicating the forecast and its uncertainties verbally. now, if you don‘t mind, i have a job to do! see you soon! in a moment we‘ll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: the prime minister heads to scotland, vowing to "promote and strengthen" the union as the cabinet ramps up preparations for a no—deal brexit. it comes as britain‘s biggest business group warns that neither the uk — nor the eu — is ready for a no—deal
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brexit at the end of october. a gunman opens fire at a food festival in california, killing three people and wounding 15. normally at this point our business presenterjamie robertson would be here with me in the studio, but this morning he‘s in plymouth, where one of the regional hubs planned by maritime uk is being set up to help boost the uk‘s maritime economy and prepare it for the challenges of the future. over to you, jamie. good overto you, jamie. good morning. thank you, rebecca. i‘m on the river plym itself. these idea of coastal
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powerhouses such as the northern powerhouse, these are coastal powerhouses. it‘s a way of concentrating investment, expertise, academics, industry all into areas where they can benefit coastal ecosystems, let‘s call them that. i‘m joined by three people whose lives and businesses, whose councils are going to be affected one way or another by these powerhouses. they are going to be around the country and one of them will be here in plymouth, but overriding it is the umbrella group maritime you t. ben murray is the director of maritime uk. maritime uk is the umbrella body set across the component injuries and —— industries and ourjob is to provide equipment. can plymouth
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drive growth on its own? it‘s got amazing assets, it‘s got the water, it‘s got dockyards in the university, can‘t it do it itself? we are trying to bring those fantastic assets together, identify what plymouth and the south west usp is around marine engineering and do that across the uk. we are going into a potentially post—brexit world and next month there is international shipping week. we want to show the strength of what the uk has to offer and by doing that you can enhance that complete package. you say next week will be people from the shipping industry coming to london. what will you be telling them about plymouth? the global maritime sector will come to london in september and we will be saying it‘s not just plymouth, in september and we will be saying it‘s notjust plymouth, it‘s the whole breadth of the coastline.
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we‘ve been a strong maritime nation in the past but they don‘t know that todayit in the past but they don‘t know that today it is about showing a cutting edge maritime powerhouse. plymouth in particular has a fantastic new development to base business at and we‘re going to say it‘s one of the most cutting edge maritime technology developments happening here in plymouth and other places which are doing fantastic things. your leader of the local council, what has plymouth got that really should be attracting the kind of businesses that maritime uk wants to attract? we are already doing our bit, we want to do more for uk plc. 20% of the whole country's maritime engineering is based in plymouth. 40% of the fishing industry is here. we've got a university which is driving marine science and technology, we've got plymouth
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marine laboratory which has got the oldest continuous sampling record of the world. we are doing our bit. the council is supporting it through investing in things like oceans gate, a marine technology business centre, and we are really doing our bit in terms of driving this growth in this sector. you've sold me the city. now what is it that maritime uk are adding? i think it's helping to market it. we already working as a south coast cluster from penzance to portsmouth. the cluster works on the basis of all the specialisms that are on that cluster marketed abroad. it's much better if you've got a big gang with a wide variety of specialisms so we are doing that but also it is underpinned by real investment in future skills so the
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council has been working very hard on the stem agenda, we recently had a stem conference, the university of plymouth is helping us to drive that, so we are investing in the future and trying to future proof what we are doing and we can do much more for the country. lets about skills and talent because i got antony sheriff who is the chairman of the chief executive of princess yachts. we got one of your latest one is behind us. brand-new, first time it has ever been shown on the bbc. available in september. this one sells forjust under £2 million. talking about your business, what is it you talent and expertise that you are lacking at the moment. we need
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everything they have talked about, we employ 3200 people right here in plymouth. we have five sites, everything we produce insulin plymouth. we fired 1200 fired 1200 people in the last three years —— everything we produce is here in plymouth. the desire to enter the boat—building business is very important ina boat—building business is very important in a relatively small city, we are not in london, we employ a significant portion of the working force in plymouth. do you think this kind of system can provide that expertise? absolutely, we are trying to support businesses like princess by rebalancing the economy to identify what they need over what period of time and working together with the and council local economic partnerships and universities to plug that gap in a strategic and planned way. thank you all very much indeed. that‘s all from plymouth. talking about the coastal powerhouse, we‘ll be talking
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about it all afternoon and looking at other industries which are excited about this down here in the south west. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with lucy martin. thanks rebecca. wind is picking up over the next few days. we‘ve got sunshine around, this photo sent in by the weather watcher in cambridgeshire. but this one was sentin cambridgeshire. but this one was sent in from cumbria, fairly grey. we‘ve got outbreaks of rain through the beginning of the morning, we‘ve seen the beginning of the morning, we‘ve seen rain for northern scotland and this band of rain pushing out of northern england into central southern scotland and out of northern ireland as well, writing up —— brightening up behind that but we have the showery outbreaks of rain pushing in initially to the scilly
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isles, southwest england and southern wales. it could be thundery, temperatures in the north and the high teens, low 20s, a maximum of 26 celsius in the south. tonight, the low pressure starts to work its way in. it will turn quite windy and blustery for a time with gusts of 50 mph for the isles of scilly and more like 44 southwest coasts. through tomorrow‘s showers continue to push north, some thunderstorms in there as well, the best chance of seeing sunny spells, gusts of 40 to 50 miles an hour and the temperatures down on what we will see today, a maximum of around 24 celsius in the sunshine. into wednesday, we still have that area of low pressure, very slowly working its way eastwards so there will be further showers in the forecast as
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we move into wednesday but the focus of those showers starts to push its way further north and east, something drierfor way further north and east, something drier for northern way further north and east, something drierfor northern ireland and parts of wales and southern and south—western england, some sunny spells as well but those showers quite heavy, possibly thundery and slow—moving at times, temperatures on wednesday reaching a maximum of around 22 celsius and then as we move to thursday, we see the showers edging further towards the east and there will be some good spells of sunshine, the temperatures at a maximum of 23, 20 four celsius, the wind is easing towards the end of the week. a fresh feel to this week, certainly more than what we saw last week. a mixture of sunny spells and showers, the showers will be heavy and slow moving and there is some blustery winds to come as well.
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you‘re watching bbc newsroom live — it‘s midday and these are the main stories this afternoon: the prime minister heads to scotland where he faces opposition from both the snp, and his own party, over his brexit policy. it comes as the cabinet ramps up preparations for a no—deal departure. part of that will be to make sure we‘ve got the committee structures of cabinet in place so we can respond as effectively as possible in real time to all the issues, challenges, that will face. britain‘s biggest business group warns that neither the uk, nor the eu, is ready for a no—deal brexit at the end of october. a gunman opens fire on festival—goers at an event in california, killing three
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people and wounding 15. it was a semiautomatic going off really close too, you know, people screaming and hiding and ducking. coming up — the bbc follows police in one of the world‘s most dangerous cities — cape town — where on average eight people are murdered a day. and the duchess of sussex guest edits british vogue‘s september issue, focusing on women who "break barriers". good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i‘m rebecca jones. borisjohnson is making his first visit to scotland as prime minister, where he‘s facing strong opposition to his brexit policy from both the first minister, nicola sturgeon, and the scottish conservative leader, ruth davidson.
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the snp says mrjohnson‘s government is driving the country towards "disaster", while ms davidson says she won‘t support a no—deal brexit. the business organisation, the cbi, has also warned ministers that neither the uk nor the eu is ready to leave the bloc without an agreement at the end of october. it comes as new cabinet committees are formed to prepare for the uk‘s exit. in a moment we‘ll speak to our assistant political editor norman smith in westminster but first to glasgow and our political correspondent nick eardley. tell us a little bit more about the kind of reception that borisjohnson might get. i think it could be quite a tough reception and notjust for the normal reasons, the ones you would expect. he is meeting scotland‘s first minister this afternoon, probably at her official
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residence in edinburgh. we expect that to be a fairly tetchy meeting for the simple reason the scottish government is opposed to the uk‘s governments approach to brexit. she has always said she thinks living without a deal will be a complete disaster. he is also meeting the scottish tory leader at ruth davidson later and that meeting could be quite a tough one as well because relations between the scottish conservative party and the rest of the party across the uk are probably at the lowest for about a decade. the reason is simple. with the scent does not believe with boris johnson‘s approach to the scent does not believe with borisjohnson‘s approach to brexit and she will make it clear at the meeting this afternoon. we understand that under no circumstances will she bat him if he opts for a no—deal brexit. she may well bring up herfury at opts for a no—deal brexit. she may well bring up her fury at the cabinet: and the way it was conducted last week with the scottish secretary david mundell
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being unceremoniously booted out of his post against the urgings of the scottish party. borisjohnson is in scotla nd scottish party. borisjohnson is in scotland saying i care about the union, i have made myself minister for the union as well as prime minister, i am for the union as well as prime minister, iam pledging new cash for the union as well as prime minister, i am pledging new cash to go into infrastructure and local city deal projects. he will be saying we can city deal projects. he will be saying we can renew city deal projects. he will be saying we can renew the ties that bind the uk and i want to make them stronger after brexit but i have to say i think that is easier said than done. thank you for that in glasgow. let‘s talk to our assistant political editor norman smith. we are hearing the government is charging preparations for a new deal, what does that actually mean? it involves overhauling the machinery of government that deals with no deal planning because the view of team johnson is under mrs may it became a little bit sketchy and casual and there wasn‘t a real focus and momentum, a lack of cash
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and direction, so what mrjohnson has done is he has established two committees who are going to take charge and grip the process. one committee under michael gove which will handle the daily nitty—gritty of brexit planning and will meet in the cobra emergency room, a room set aside for dealing with national crises. the point being to symbolically underline that we are now engaged on a real national mission, as it were, to get ready and then another committee which will be chaired by the prime minister. this will meet twice a week and will consist of the big brexit beasts of the cabinet, and that will shape up key brexit decisions. the thinking they are billion it is easier to reach decisions in a small group than any big unwieldy cabinet format. it is an attempt to notjust prepare but also to convince the eu that we are
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serious about the possibility of leaving without an agreement and that certainly was the message from michael gove as he left for work this morning. we are going to do everything we can to make sure we can leave the european union on october the 315t. there will not be any delays, we are determined to ensure we leave on october the 315t and it is myjob to make sure the country is ready. whatever though the planning is put in place, mrjohnson mr to overcome huge opposition in parliament when mps return in september because it is clear there is a fairly solid block of mps, now may be a majority, who want to support no deal and they are trying to find some sort of legislative device which would enable them to ensure borisjohnson could not take us out of the eu without an agreement. one of the key players is the former cabinet minister, sir oliver letwin. the whole of this sorry saga, from beginning to end, is about judgments and risks, and not about certainties. nobody knows whether a no—deal
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exit will be ok, not ok, very far from ok or very bad indeed. that's the risk that some of us don't want to take. it might go ok, but obviously in the same way, nobody can tell whether we will be able to get a majority in parliament for some way of doing something other than having a no—deal exit at the last moment if it turns out this government hasn't got a deal. what to be really don‘t know is where borisjohnson what to be really don‘t know is where boris johnson fits what to be really don‘t know is where borisjohnson fits in this tussle between those arguing to keep pressing for a deal and those around him who think there is no time to push a deal through parliament even where the eu to agree to one and think mrjohnson opting out step up the planning for no deal. on the domestic front we have heard from the prime minister‘s spokesmen that
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carrie simmons, his is moving into number ten downing st and moved in today. they will be in downing street together, she will be the first lady if you like in fx. she was there when borisjohnson made his first speech on the steps of downing street, she was amongst the group of supporters looking on from the side but she is now officially moving into number ten today. thank you so much. britain‘s largest business group, the confederation of british industry, is warning that neither the uk nor the rest of the european union is ready for a no—deal brexit on the 31st october. the cbi had previously said leaving the eu with a deal was essential to protect the economy and jobs. it has now published practical steps for the uk, the eu and business owners to help accelerate no—deal preparations. our business correspondent, dominic o‘connell, told us more.
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this is a cb! assessment from the businesses point of view, the business world‘s point of view, of what needs to be done. it is a very detailed list, 200 points referring to both the eu and the uk preparation, from fairly trivial things like the dates not having been changed and some of the technical guidance from april to the new leaving date of october the 31st, if it is a leaving date, to some quite serious things like all the sector groups that were meeting with government before april, in the run up to our leaving date, the end of april then, haven‘t met since which is quite a worrying disclosure from the cbi. and everything in between, all sorts of things about tariffs, border arrangements, all that kind of stuff. but there is a bigger thing going on here, as you hinted at, a change in tone from the cbi which first campaigned for remain then it threw its weight behind theresa may‘s deal and now, this is the first time the cbi is actually engaged with the nuts and bolts of a no deal and talking about preparing for a no deal so it is a sign really that the cbi is thinking it is much more likely we will get a no—deal brexit which is certainly in line
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with the borisjohnson government. the french parent company of the car—maker vauxhall says it could move all production from its factory at ellesmere port in cheshire if brexit makes it unprofitable. more than a thousand workers are employed at the plant. our consumer affairs correspondent — colletta smith — sent this update from the site. what we are hearing is really more meat on the bones of what the company issued in a statement about four weeks ago, i was standing just here on this spot talking about the implications of what could have been and potentially is still a good announcement for workers here. the 1000 workers here at this plant. that is the parent company said they wanted to build the new model of the astra here in the uk at ellesmere port rather than at any
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of their other sites, particularly another plant in germany. yet even at that stage four weeks ago they put an overarching concern over it saying it depends on what deal the uk government reaches when it comes to brexit. now the boss of psa has told the financial times that the car—maker has alternatives, that if there is any possibility that the overall company could be damaged financially because of a bad brexit deal or a no deal for the uk then the company would simply withdraw. that has big implications here at ellesmere port, they are a huge employer and an employer of high—end jobs right across the north west. there is a supply chain factor too, lots of companies supply into this plant. at the moment the plant is on summer shutdown for a couple of weeks so we‘ve no workers here but lots of people will be very concerned as they start their summer
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holidays, at this extra level of worry for the company and the future of the jobs. the personal doctor of the jailed russian opposition leader, alexei navalny, says she believes he‘s been exposed to an unknown chemical — possibly administered by someone else. anastasia vasilyeva said his medical team had been given permission to see him. she added they now had tissue samples, including hair and a t—shirt — and would arrange for independent tests to establish what made mr navalny sick. mr navalny was jailed last week for calling for anti—government demonstrations. steve rosenberg has more. alexei navalny was taken ill on sunday morning and taken to hospital under police guard. inital reports suggested he had suffered an allergic reaction but to what? one russian news agency quoted the hospital as saying mr navalny was suffering from hives. but in a post on social media,
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his long—time doctor, who saw him briefly in hospital, said she believed his symptoms were caused by unspecified chemical substances. last night outside hospital 64, police detained supporters of mr navalny and this russian journalist. alexei navalny is russia‘s most prominent opposition activist, a vocal critic of vladimir putin. two years ago he suffered a chemical burn in his right eye, following an assault. someone threw green antiseptic at his face. he had been serving a 30 day sentence for calling for this street protest at the weekend. it ended with moscow police detaining more than 1000 people who‘d come out to demand honest elections. our senior world service correspondent olga ivshina is here,
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and we‘re just hearing from russian media that alexei navalny may be being taken back to prison now. do you know anything about those reports? yes, the events developed in the following fashion. his personal doctor managed to get into the hospital and she, surprisingly, found out the doctors of the hospital where he was kept said he is fine enough, he got basic medication and some of the symptoms deteriorated so now they want to send him back to the present where he was exposed to this unknown substance or whatever caused this severe allergic reaction. why does the doctor think all of this might be suspicious? his doctor, it was really ha rd be suspicious? his doctor, it was really hard for her to get in which is already suspicious. secondly the doctors of the hospital refused to
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show her any tests, any checks which we re show her any tests, any checks which were made. it seems those tests were not made in the first two hours after he was brought to the hospital which is a critical time to find out what has happened and the reason for it. he was given some medication but it. he was given some medication but it is really, really strong medication which helps to cut down the symptoms but does not explain what has happened and find the main reason. she also says she is highly nervous and she thinks that if he is brought back he can be exposed again to that agent and the second intoxication can be really harmful for his health and his eyes because two years ago he was splashed with antiseptics into his face and one of his eyes was really damaged, she has spent a lot of time and effort in order to save his eye. if something goes wrong this time he could lose
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sight in one of his eyes. he is a prominent opposition activist, tell us more prominent opposition activist, tell us more about him and why he might bea us more about him and why he might be a target in this way potentially. he is the most famous, the most charismatic and vocal critic of the current russian president vladimir putin. he never calls him by name on camera. he was famous for quite a while but recently he has become really, really famous and there are a lot of followers amongst russian youngsters. currently the russian economy is in crisis and more and more russians are struggling to survive, their life is becoming worse and worse and that is why some people in the administration can be worried that at such a critical time such a charismatic figure as alexei navalny can be dangerous in sparking the protest or calling people to do
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something that the kremlin does not wa nt to something that the kremlin does not want to do. it is hard to measure why the support of alexei navalny is. he does not have access to state tv which is the main source of information for many russians. there are no independent polls. it is hard. we know for sure it couple of yea rs hard. we know for sure it couple of years ago he ran for the post of moscow mayor and he managed to get 30% of the votes. moscow mayor and he managed to get 3096 of the votes. and the fact he is not well. good to talk to you, thanks so much. the headlines on bbc news... the prime minister heads to scotland where he faces opposition from both the snp, and his own party, over his brexit policy. it comes as the cabinet ramps up preparations for a no—deal departure. britain‘s biggest business group warns that neither the uk, nor the eu, is ready for a no—deal brexit at the end of october. a gunman opens fire at a food festival in california, killing three people and wounding 15.
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sport now. good afternoon. jurgen klopp has dismissed talk that sunday‘s community shield clash with manchester city is a curtain raiser and has described it as a final. liverpool lost again in pre—season, this time a three — zero defeat. romelu lukaku has been left out of the manchester united squad that has travelled to norway this morning. the belgian striker has been linked toa the belgian striker has been linked to a move to inter milan throughout the summer. he posted a picture on social media with his agent alongside the message, seem to be continued. united play tomorrow night. egan bernal is celebrating becoming the youngest rider in more than a century to win the tour de france. the 22—year—old finished hand
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in hand with his team—mate nad last year‘s winner geraint thomas, who finished second overall. team ineos general manager sir dave brailsford was understandably pretty happy afterwards on the champs—elysees. the that colombia. toured to france, what more could you want? we have got a new champion, a new ambassador. i think you needs to enjoy the moment, have a party, celebrate then time to realise what he has achieved. i think it is something historic for colombia, very important, i think, and something historic for colombia, very important, ithink, and i something historic for colombia, very important, i think, and i am very important, i think, and i am very happy to help him achieve his goals. there were also some pretty impressive scenes in colombia. this was in zipaquira, hometown of bernal, now the first south american to win the world‘s most famous bike race. located on the outskirts of bogota, the streets packed with people dressed in yellow and waving columbian flags.
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andy and jamie murray have been training together ahead of their doubles partnership at the washington opened this week. they will have their opening round match tomorrow, the pair played together tomorrow, the pair played together to help when the british davis cup in 2014. it will be andy murray‘s fourth after his hip surgery. he won the queens title injune. we will have more in the next half an hour. three people have been killed by a gunman who opened fire at a food festival in california. video posted on social media showed crowds fleeing at the annual garlic festival in the small town of gilroy, which is around 80 miles south of san francisco. at least 15 people have been injured and the gunman was also killed. dave lee sent us this report from california. i can tell you that this is still what they call an active situation here in gilroy. there have been reports from some
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witnesses that there may have been an accomplice to this shooting. now, it is worth saying that this is quite typical in a mass shooting for witnesses to think there may be an extra shooter or an extra person involved. it is often not the case, overwhelmingly not the case, typically. but police here taking no chances so they are now into the early hours of the morning looking for anyone that may have been somehow involved. now, we are standing in the place where families were told to come and congregate if they wanted to find out more information about someone they couldn‘t get in touch with. it was also here that we had an update a couple of hours ago from the police chief scott smithee, here is what he had to say. there were reports of shooting on the north side of the garlic festival area. officers were in that area and engaged the suspect in less than a minute. the suspect was shot and killed.
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we have one suspect we know that is down, we have some witnesses reporting that there may have been a second suspect but we don‘t know if that suspect was engaged in any shooting or whether they may have been in some sort of support role for the person that we have accounted for. we have at least 15 people injured, we have four fatalities that we know of, including the suspect. i don‘t have any information on the suspect yet and that will take a little bit of time, as with the victims as well, that will take some time before we identify them and make family notifications. so clearly a fairly fluid situation here in terms of concrete
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information from the police. there have been multiple reports from local media that witnesses described seeing a man in his 30s, a white man in his 30s, and we expect to hear again from the police in a few hours when they wake up again here on monday morning. speaking to witnesses, they have been talking about scenes of panic and confusion. here is what they have described. there were so many shots. i saw people falling down, kids falling down. i had tojump over three of the kids. one bullet passed me very closely and it hit our friend‘s boot. so me and my friend, we were standing behind this truck and we heard what sounded like fireworks at the time and i saw like flashes of light and some bullets ricocheting off the ground and i thought to myself that they could just be like home fireworks. then he pointed out that there were three or four bullets that hit the truck, directly in front of us and that is when he turned to me and was like, "those aren't
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fireworks, there are gunshots, we have to run," and then we started just bolting for it. so i suspect in the morning we will be hearing some more about the victims of the shooting. there have been local reports tonight that a six—year—old boy may have been among them. that hasn‘t yet been confirmed but this seems to be yet another incidence in american day—to—day life where what should have been a family friendly fun event has been turned upside down by gun violence. china‘s central government has made a rare statement to reiterate its support for hong kong leader carrie lam, as well as the city‘s police, and called on the people of hong kong to oppose violence. it comes after another weekend of clashes between protesters and police. hong kong has been rocked by protests over the past two months against a proposed bill that would allow people to be extradited from the city to stand trial in communist party—controlled courts in mainland china.
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a spokesman for the hong ong and macau affairs office made this statement. translation: direct adherence to law and strict handling of unlawful activities is the core meaning of rule of law and what the hong kong residents have taken with pride. any proposition, however lofty one may think it is, should not be expressed in unlawful ways, let alone resorting to violence. our correspondent in hong kong, stephen mcdonnell, sent this update this morning. there has already been a fair bit of response here in hong kong to this rare press conference in beijing which has reaffirmed the central government‘s support for carrie lam and her administration. now the group which organised the largest protest here, the mass matches with hundreds of thousands of people, has come out
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and said it is disappointed, gravely disappointed in these comments from beijing because they say that carrie lam is responsible for this crisis, that really she should go so they don‘t support the chinese government and its backing for carrie lam. however there has also been a press comment here from the pro—beijing legislators. now they are very happy, they say, with those comments from the chinese government, the support for carrie lam and also the legislative process here, and more importantly, the one country two systems model. but both of them have something to take away from this in a way because when the chinese government says we are not going to intervene now, that‘s kind of good news for both the pro—beijing and the pro—democracy camp, it means the people‘s liberation army isn‘t going to be turned out onto the streets here quickly to try
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and restore law and order. when the central government says it has faith in the hong kong government it means it won‘t be, for the moment, it says involving itself very heavily in the crisis here, and they are going to leave it up to the hong kong authorities to sort out. now that means though of course, that these criticisms of the way that the riot police have handled this will continue and there has to be some way of addressing this. protesters say there should be an inquiry, especially into the slowness of the riot police to turn up when those triad gangs attacked activists. but at the press conference today from beijing we also heard that the chinese government is very mindful of the pressure on the police here, the pressure on their families, saying they have also been coming out day in, day out, many hours on end,
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fighting in the streets with protesters and that people should bear in mind a lot of the stress that officers are facing. the other thing is that beijing has been calling on everybody here to reject violence as an option, and that would cut across many different groups so even some in the pro—democracy camp, in fact many in the pro—democracy camp, are not prepared to engage in the most violent of protest here and yet we still have a core of thousands, times tens of thousands, of more hardline demonstrators who have been radicalised who are prepared to take it up to the authorities. they have been coming out now with their own gas masks, their own helmets, their own shields. they are prepared to throw projectiles at the police and the police, in turn, are more than happy to fire tear gas, rubber bullets at them and there are more protests planned for next weekend so i suppose we will probably see more street clashes.
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now it‘s time for a look at the weather with alina jenkins. hello there, for many it is a dry afternoon with some spells of sunshine but there is some rain and showers in the forecast across parts of south—west england, south—west and northern scotland. elsewhere some good spells of sunshine they put the finals of england and northern ireland, could get the odd spot of drizzle but in the sunshine could be the warmest day of the working week. showers make their way eastwards into wales, parts of the midlands and northern ireland, elsewhere save one or two showers across parts of scotland, mainly dry. quite a muggy night. through tomorrow we have an area of low pressure churning out showers, initially across england and wales are moving into parts of northern ireland and maybe southern scotland, some gusty winds associated with these and maybe some thunder and lightning. it could feeling day, we will see some showers on the coast.
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for the week ahead, a fresher feel, a mixture of sunshine and heavy thundery showers and also some gusty winds. goodbye. vogue hello, this is bbc newsroom live vogue with rebecca jones. the headlines: the prime minister heads to scotland where he faces opposition from both the snp —
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and his own party — over his brexit policy. it comes as the cabinet ramps up preparations for a no—deal departure. there won‘t be any delays. we are determined to make sure believe on october 31 and it‘s myjob to make sure the is ready. britain‘s biggest business group warns that neither the uk — nor the eu — is ready for a no—deal brexit at the end of october. a gunman has opened fire at a food festival in california, killing three people and wounding 15. in a rare intervention, china has condemned the recent anti—government protests in hong kong as "horrendous incidents". and coming up: a group of mps who‘ve been on a fact—finding trip to canada predict the uk will fully legalise cannabis use within five to ten years. the duchess of sussex, meghan markle, has been revealed as the first person to guest edit
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the september issue of british vogue. she‘s reportedly spent the last seven months working on the issue and has chosen to focus on empowerment and diversity. the edition, entitled forces for change, highlights what buckingham palace called "trailblazing change makers", including the teenage climate activist, greta thunberg, and the prime minister of new zealand, jacinda ardern. well, here to discuss this is the playwright and commentator bonnie greer. should a member of the royal family be editing a fashion magazine?” think in the 21st century, yes. fashion is notjust about clothes, it‘s also about a statement and social positioning. a lot of fashion magazines now have commentary. teen vogue is full of political thoughts. it's vogue is full of political thoughts. it‘s very much part of the time. you look at young people now and they
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are mixing fashion in politics and it‘s an easy blend for them so it‘s very, very good. she's put these 15 different women on the front cover. what do you make of them? first of all, it‘s one of those brilliant interventions because we are in a nativist moment in the country right now where foreigners, people of colour, women of colour are not exactly flavour of the month so british vogue actually makes an intervention to remind us that the world is multicultural, the world is female and that the world has changed. it‘s perfect timing. it‘s very funny because if we look at certain breakfast television shows and read the tabloids, we imagine the duchess of sussex was somehow lined up in her cottage worrying about her sister—in—law and she spent herfirst about her sister—in—law and she spent her first pregnancy, which about her sister—in—law and she spent herfirst pregnancy, which has got to be really, really difficult for any woman, editing a magazine. i
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think it‘s amazing, really. for any woman, editing a magazine. i think it's amazing, really. she's put these different women on the front. what do you make of her choices? they are obviously her personal choice. the editor would wa nt personal choice. the editor would want them to be her personal choices. if you look at her former life, you can see she is an activist, she is someone very much on trend in terms of what‘s happening with women now, the issues, so it all makes sense and it tells us that this duchess is going to be in the world. the only i wa nted to be in the world. the only i wanted to say is that looking at the list of women she has highlighted like jacinda ardern, the actress laverne cox, the transgender advocate jane fonda and salma hayek who raises awareness of violence
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against women, the nigerian award—winning novelist, i do read vogue... a lot of these women feature in the pages of vogue quite regularly. in some ways i would have liked to have been surprised by some com pletely liked to have been surprised by some completely new names and faces. first of all, the magazine is a business so you have to bring people like yourself to the magazine and thatis like yourself to the magazine and that is the editor‘s chief responsibility to make sure that we buy it so what i hope is happening is we get a new slant on all of these women. you always want to see new people but i think if the duchess has brought in something new about them, i think that‘s exciting, and more people will be buying this magazine than normally. i don‘t buy it regularly so i will be buying it andi it regularly so i will be buying it and i will be learning a lot about these particular people in the public eye. she says she wants to inspire readers. she comes in form quite a lot of criticism —— for
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quite a lot of criticism —— for quite a lot of criticism —— for quite a lot of criticism.” quite a lot of criticism —— for quite a lot of criticism. i think the reaction will be, there are meghan haters and she can‘t really do anything right, but everyone else, i think britain is a fair country and i think people who don‘t hate meghan will be really interested to see the quality of her mind, the quality of her choices. she‘s a 21st century women and she‘s not going to be somebody sitting knitting in frogmore cottage and that‘s what she is telling people. i'll that‘s what she is telling people. i‘ll be buying this addition or someone i‘ll be buying this addition or someone will give it to me, definitely. good to talk to you, thank you. now, a new report by the think tank the institute for government warns that there is "no such thing as a managed no—deal brexit" and that the hope for a "clean break" from the eu will not materialise.
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a little earlier, i spoke tojoe owen, who is one of the report‘s authors. he started by telling me what the ifg wanted to convey in their paper. i think one of the things we wanted to draw out with this report is the idea that the 31st of october is the finish line after which the government can start focusing on things like housing and schools and broadband, which is the message you would be forgiven for forgetting if you are watching the recent leadership contest, that is probably just the start line. it does not settle, still unsettled is what our trading relationship with europe, what our security relationship with europe would be, all of the domestic adjustments, both for government and business, here and on the continent, would all still need to happen. there would be a huge amount of work, there would be more legislation required. it really is the end of the beginning rather
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than the finish line, as some have presented it. are you saying a clean break is impossible and effectively we could be in this no—deal scenario for years to come? legally, it would be a clean break in that of the agreements governing our relationship with the eu would be kind of guillotined overnight, but that would lead to very messy consequences here in trying to adapt to the new world as it would be. yes, some areas will be working on this for years in whitehall. you only have to look at things like universal credit, automatic pension enrolment, programmes that i think it‘s fair to say are complicated but nowhere near the scale of a no—deal brexit. this kind of programmes have lasted for over a decade so there will be work on new systems and what happens at the border, where in some cases the government only has temporary plans and we have
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not got any sense of what their medium to long—term plans are. this will carry on for months and months and possibly years in areas. if what you are saying is true, where does that leave boris johnson‘s domestic agenda because he has been making ambitious promises in the last few days? it‘s very likely brexit will crowd out the domestic agenda for any prime minister. remember theresa may when she stood on the steps of downing street after being elected, talking about the burning injustices she wanted to tackle and the rest of the conservative party manifesto, it is hard to point to anything significant we have done over the last couple of years because of the all—encompassing nature of brexit and that will be true any no—deal circumstance. the prime minister has a limited amount of capacity and time, and a limited amount of political capital.
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it is very likely this prime minister and any future prime minister in a no—deal brexit would be spending all of theirs on dealing with brexit. from your research, do you think the uk is more prepared for leaving the eu without an agreement or a deal on october the 31st than when we were supposed to leave in march? has there been six months of good preparation, so to speak? in some areas in government, they have continued the work at pace, trying to build up readiness in key systems or processes. in other places, they stood down all of the big operational centres that were stood up for the end of march. thousands of civil servants who were moved to no deal were moved back and that will happen again fresh over the coming months. one thing to point to in the report is the concern that the uk could end up being less ready in october than it was march and a big reason for this is the business community
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and the concerns that actually they have been marched up the hill twice before with no deal and it did not happen. will they want to spend more money, more time orjust see this as part of a game of chicken with the eu that is ultimately aimed at getting a deal and therefore no deal will never happen? the other complication for october is we‘re in the run up for christmas. any spare warehousing space may be booked up for christmas and businesses will already be telling government that getting warehouse space in the run—up to october is proving difficult if not impossible. the south african city of cape town, a well known tourist destination, is also one of the world‘s most divided and dangerous cities. it‘s averaged eight murders every day in the first six months of this year and earlier this month, 43 people were killed in one weekend. the bbc‘s voldi carolso and christian parkinson spent a weekend with the police and spoke with the families of
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those who were killed. first on the scene, the metropolitan police‘s law enforcement officers are out on patrol in a dangerous part of cape town. jerry grew up on these streets. it‘s a neve—ending story — "you killed my dad, i will kill yours, you killed my brother, i will kill yours." i call it a curse because everyone is willing to pick up a knife or gun to avenge someone else‘s death. often the guns are turned against police. six members of the anti—gang unit were shot and injured last month. over the weekend we were filming, three more were shot. one of them died. we got a glimpse of the danger
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they face every day. is that sort of weapon something you‘d normally find? no, we normally find handguns but that‘s a big weapon. this is my thinking, if i get one gun off the streets, i‘m saving hundreds of lives. one gun, that‘s how many hijackings, how many murders? but policing can‘t fix the social and economic inequality in these areas. this area is home to over 20,000 people, sprawling townships like these are a legacy of apartheid. a month ago, five men were shot, execution style, in this shack.
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15—year—old mohammed peterson was one of the victims. his little sister and brother watched as he died. the violence has gotten more and more daily now. the children are not safe in that place, truly, they are not even safe in the park and that‘s supposed to be... if you‘re not even safe in your own house, how can you be safe outside? to make these streets a little safer, the army has been called in. the army is meant to reinforce the police who are thin on the ground. with more than 1,000 soldiers on the ground and some of the trouble hotspots, theirs is a temporary deployment, a stopgap measure to help halt the killings.
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mohammed‘s mother hopes she won‘t have to bury another son. they have left the area and are hoping for a fresh start. i know violence is everywhere, but i already lost one son and i don‘t want to lose another. a cross—party group of mps has predicted that cannabis will be legal in the uk within the next five to ten years. the mps have recently returned from a fact finding trip to canada, which legalised the drug last year. jim connolly followed the mps‘ visit. these buds will probably get about four times larger by the time this plant is ready to harvest. currently, canada is the only g7 country to allow recreational use of cannabis. even a few years ago, this would have seemed unimaginable — three british mps from across the political spectrum, looking at how the legalisation process has been implemented. we‘re following the liberal democrat sir norman lamb,
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the conservativejonathan djanogly and labour‘s david lammy. you could go to prison for a very long time in britain if you had anything like this. the trip has been organised by a london—based campaign group, volteface. it wants the uk to legalise weed. it‘s sponsored by a big north american cannabis company called mpx international, which runs this facility. scott boyes is the boss, and i put it to him that he was trying to use his money to influence british politicians. we‘ve been happy to be a host to them, to give them some exposure to the business and give them an understanding of what‘s happening here in north america. if that helps make the right decisions in the united kingdom, it‘s money well spent for us. canada‘s prime ministerjustin trudeau came to power promising to legalise cannabis. it‘s been available here for medical use since 2001, but as of last october, recreational users could use it too without fear of breaking the law, meaning places like this have been springing up all over the country.
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investors know there could be billions to be made from the industry, but the uk mps admit there‘s a lot to get their heads around. have you ever seen this volume of cannabis yourself? i never saw any volume of cannabis! so this is your first experience of it? so two or three of those balls are worth $60. so that‘s quite a valuable amount. sir norman was central to the lib dems‘ policy of backing legalisation. which do you tend to use? i've done this one. he decides to buy some. thank you very much. he wants to know what it feels like, and takes some before bed. so now i‘m supposed to put it under my tongue. he claims it helped him sleep. the difference between what he‘s taken and the cannabis oils you can buy in the uk is that this contains thc, the compound that can get you stoned, and at high strengths is linked to psychosis. this mental health link is rarely mentioned here in canada, and nor is the suggestion that the drug could be a gateway to harder substances,
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something i put to the man who led canada‘s legalisation process. now, because it‘s a regulated substance, we‘re having far more nuanced and robust conversations with our kids. and i think as a result, there will be lower risk decisions and healthier choices. back at westminster, one of the uk mps has had a significant change of view. i want the market legalised and regulated, taken away from criminal gangs, young people not criminalised because of use, properly educated. but i actually want to see the strength of the stuff reduced, labelled and properly organised in our country. the home office says there will be no change to the law on illicit drugs, pointing to harms and misery they can cause in families and society. the headlines on bbc news: the prime minister heads to scotland where he faces opposition from both the snp — and his own party —
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over his brexit policy. it comes as the cabinet ramps up preparations for a no—deal departure. britain‘s biggest business group warns that neither the uk — nor the eu — is ready for a no—deal brexit at the end of october. a gunman opens fire at a food festival in california, killing three people and wounding 15. a man‘s been rescued after spending more than three hours trapped between rocks off a seaside promenade. it happened yesterday in norfolk, as will batchelor reports. for the emergency services, it was a race against time. a man trapped between rocks with the tide coming in fast. he entered the sea in sheringham, norfolk to save a toddler who had fallen in. having rescued the child, he got stuck. the coastguard, rnli, police and fire service worked to free him,
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some holding his head above the water and others cutting the rocks. itjust goes to show that all the emergency services, when required, can come together, act as a single team, put in a plan and save people‘s lives. all i would like to do is just ask people to be aware of their surroundings when they‘re on the beach and although this was probably purely an accident, we need to be able to get the emergency services there as quick as possible and therefore we can act sooner. the coastguard said it was a very frightening experience for the man but that he suffered only minor injuries. a couple are taking the church of england to court over christian school assemblies which they say are "indoctrinating" their children. lee and lizanne harris have been granted a judicial review in their challenge to the oxford diocesan schools trust, which they say should provide a "meaningful alternative" to christian lessons taught in assemblies.
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the trust says all publicly funded schools in england and wales are required to hold daily religious worship and that the school has acted "entirely appropriately". our religion editor martin basheer spoke to me earlier about the issue. the law dates back to 1944, the education act, which says that every school, regardless of whether it is in the church of england, roman catholic system or just the state system, every school should have a moment of dedicated worship, that it should be predominantly christian, but also that parents can withdraw their children from those assemblies or collective acts of worship if they want. it was reiterated in the 1998 school standards and framework act. so this statement that this collective act of worship
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take place applies right across the board. the problem is it is not very specific and to some extent, it is rather dependent on the senior management of the school. for example, in some schools you will go to this collective act of worship and it feels a little bit like custard in a school lunch time dinner — it‘s sweet, warm, a bit of kumbaya, love one another, be kind to each other, not a problem. in other schools when some of the teaching staff might be committed christians, there will be more meat. they will talk about the authority of bible and history of christ and this has provoked this reaction from these parents because they have objected to the fact that when their children have been in attendance at these acts of worship, the christian narrative has been taught as factual, as the truth. they also say that when they sought an alternative, the only alternative they were offered was to place their children in a classroom on their own with an ipad. it was not really educationally the equivalent. that‘s why this is a test case and it will be judicially
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reviewed in november. what happens next? i appreciate crystal ball gazing and everything, but what might be the outcome of thejudicial review? it is difficult to know which way this review might go. they could repeal and replace the law so they could decide that schools no longer need to have this act of corporate worship every day. it is worth remembering that in 2014, the national governors association, something like 300,000 members, asked for it to be dropped and felt it wasn‘t being enforced. in 2015 the former education secretary charles clarke also wrote a paper with an academic saying they should be abolished because it is never enforced and britain as a society is deemed to be less religious than it was so what could happen? the judicial review may well repeal and replace the act or they may issue specific guidelines
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to the content of the collective worship. i should say humanist uk want the requirement for collective worship to be completely repealed and replaced for a requirement for inclusive assemblies, which would not discriminate against anybody whether they have a faith or don‘t. on this day 70 years ago, the bbc revived the tv weather report, something it had originally introduced at the start of the second world war. the way we get the latest predictions has changed dramatically over the years, as our presenter matt taylor has been finding out. it‘s going to be a dull and wet start to the day... the way we consume the weather forecast has changed immensely. from simple hand drawn charts and magnetic symbols... there‘s some... oh, dear! let‘s do it again. there's the heavy and persistent rain... ..to 3d graphics and sophisticated mobile phone apps. we now have more weather information at our fingertips than ever before, but how exactly does that information get there? it all begins at a weather station like this.
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the radcliffe observatory has been recording data for over two centuries, making it one of the oldest and longest running in the world. we‘ve been taking temperature observations here on a daily basis since 1814, and then we‘ve got daily rainfall observations as well from the 1820s. so, everything that‘s used here to measure the temperature and the rainfall has been issued by the met office, so it‘s all standard kit. and so what‘s measured here will be measured likewise in other parts, notjust in the uk but right around the world ? absolutely. but with the atmosphere stretching kilometres above us, we also need weather balloons, radar and satellite data. and all that information gets fed into weather organisations such as the european centre for medium—range weather forecasting here in reading, where supercomputers like these ones, doing trillions of calculations every single second, churn all that weather observational data and create the forecast. this is planning for food, for transport, for health,
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for energy, for anything that's part of society, that's making society. agriculture needs to know when to borrow, buy, rent equipment. they need to know what crops to use when. that up—to—date, personalised information is crucialfor all of us. since the bbc weather app launched in 2013, it‘s been downloaded 15 times a minute, with up to eight million people using it every single week, and it continues to innovate and evolve. well, the technology and the amount of information available may have changed greatly in the last 70 years, but for me personally, you can‘t beat getting in front of the camera and communicating the forecast and its uncertainties verbally. now, if you don‘t mind, i have a job to do! see you soon! now it‘s time for a look at the weather with alena. the intense heat of last week gave
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way to heavy rain in places and so local flooding in england way to heavy rain in places and so localflooding in england but we start the working week with blue skies. not for all, we have showers developing across northwest england and longer spells of rain across scotland. there are three key areas, southwest england, rain continuing across southwest scotland and some showers for northern scotland. in between, we see a few spells of sunshine. cloudy in the afternoon across northern ireland, most places mainly dry but a good deal of sunshine across england and wales away from the far southwest and increasing amounts of sunshine across much of northern england. temperatures between 20 and 24 celsius, possibly 25 or 26 across southeast england. the showery band pushes its way north and eastwards into wales and the midlands, they could well see local thunderstorms with this area of showers and a muqqy with this area of showers and a muggy night, particularly across
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central and southern england, temperatures you‘re not much lower than 16 or 17 celsius to this area of low pressure is the driving force for our weather this week and it will continue to generate heavy and locally thundery showers as we go through tuesday. we have warnings in place for these thunderstorms from the met office and you can see how across parts of wales and central southern england, the showers move north and eastwards across the day, a fairly cloudy day, winds are strengthening as well in parts of southwest england could see those gusts reaching 40, may be locally 50 mph so some blustery showers and a much cooler feel tomorrow, save for some eastern counties where we have fewer showers in the best of the sunshine up to 24 celsius. quite slow moving pressure system into wednesday which has worked it‘s way further northwards so things looking drier with the wind is easing into parts of wales, southwest and southern england but some heavy and locally thundery showers across the midlands, northern england, into
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scotland, northern ireland probably staying mainly dry but with a lot of cloud and temperature is not much higher than 19 to 22 celsius. by the end of the week, still some heavy showers on thursday by looking drier through friday and saturday with the wind is slowly easing down.
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neither the uk nor the eu is ready for a no—deal brexit, warns the country‘s biggest business group, the cbi. one boss from the troubled car industry says it‘s ready to pull out of the uk if brexit hits its profits. the minister in charge of no—deal, michael gove, says britain will be prepared. there won‘t be any delays, we‘re determined to ensure that we leave on october the 31st, and it‘s my job to make sure the country is ready. we‘ll bring you all the latest with our correspondents at the vauxhall plant in ellesmere port and at westminster. also this lunchtime: borisjohnson is in scotland, calling for unity, but he faces opposition to a no—deal brexit from the first minister and the scottish tory leader.

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