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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 2, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's ham, and these are the main stories this morning: the liberal democrats win the brecon and radnorshire by—election — leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. i will fight to keep our country in the european union. and we now have in parliament one more mp who will fight to make that happen. the raf are dropping hundreds of tonnes of sand and gravel onto the damaged reservoir dam in whaley bridge. there's still a real risk that could collapse? yes, the structural engineer on site is very concerned about that. basically, the information we have had is that we have to do something here, because it's not going to go away on its own.
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two holiday firms, with bookings from more than 50,000 people, have ceased trading. last month was probably the warmestjuly on record — according to new research. and, england bowlerjames anderson awaits the results of a calf scan — and could be out for the rest of the first ashes test at edgbaston. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. the liberal democrats have won the brecon and radnorshire by—election — taking the seat from the conservatives, and leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. here is the result — the liberal democrat candidate jane dodds overturned the conservatives majority of over 8,000 to beat the incumbent mp chris
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davies byjust over 1,400 votes. the brexit party pushed labour into fourth place. and here is the share of the vote which saw a 12% swing from the conservatives to the liberal democrats, and the labour vote collapsed. 0ther pro—remain parties had stood aside to allow the lib dems a better chance to reclaim the seat they lost in the 2015 general election. 0ur political correspondent, jonathan blake, spent the night at the count and sent this report. the votes had been cast and the counting could begin. conservatives fighting to hold on, liberal democrats sensing a chance. both sides knew it would be close. i do hereby declare thatjane dodds is duly elected member of parliament for the said constituency. a win for the party that campaigned
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against brexit, and a message to the new prime minister from parliament's newest member. my very first act as your mp when i arrive in westminster will be to find mr borisjohnson, wherever he's hiding, and tell him loud and clear — stop playing with the future of our communities and rule out a no—deal brexit now. liberal democrats threw everything at this by—election, although they held back from their staunch "stop brexit" message, knowing it might cost them votes in a constituency finely balanced between leave and remain. in the end, it was a narrow victory, but one the lib dems will say shows that they are a party on the up. the liberal democrats were helped here by other anti—brexit parties standing aside.
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it was a terrible result for labour, who finished a distant fourth. the brexit party managed third, maybe costing the conservatives a win. for him and for his party — defeat will be deeply felt. let's talk to tomos morgan, who's in brecon. neil lib dem is always a campaign very ha rd neil lib dem is always a campaign very hard on the ground but what you think it was that clinched it for them? i think the first factor is them? i think the first factor is the reason why this by—election was called in at the first place, it was called in at the first place, it was called because back in march, chris davies, the incumbent tory mp, was found guilty of submitting false expenses. recall was started at over
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10% of the constituency signed it meaning a by—election was called. so 20% of the localjudiciary did sign out so there was a feeling for a by—election, and a need for one. but also, it was also overwhelmingly brexit. when you speak to people here, it is a hugely divisive topic, as it is across the whole of the uk. this was a brexit voting area, this constituency, where the brexit party came out top in the eu's parliamentary elections. as we know, a relying party came out on top overnight. —— may remain party. jane dodds clearly setting out what she was going to do as soon as she steps into west minister, calling out the new prime minister. 34 years ago, last month,
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richard livsey stood here, celebrating a by—election victory just like this one. a by—election victory that would restore the liberal values that we have all fought so hard for to this country. and here we stand, bursting boris johnson's bubble in the first week of his premiership. that seats has been one that has been to and through between the liberal democrats and the conservatives over the last 50—40 yea rs, conservatives over the last 50—40 years, no doubt this will be a huge victory for their new leader, jo swinson, who celebrated his victory just over an hour ago in brecon. she could get a party renaissance across wales out of the country. liberal democrats have a vision for a cleaner, safer, richer country — in the european union. as leader of the liberal democrats, i will fight to keep our country
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in the european union. we now have in parliament one more mp who will fight to make that happen. jane dodds will be a first class representative for brecon and radnorshire, and potentially, a key vote in cutting boris johnson's majority to just one. applied to new greens did not stand in this election, the reasoning being that they were pushing their support to the liberal democrats, the main party here. two results was at the brexit party doing so well, it not unexpected considering that they came out top in the eu parliamentary elections back in may. 0ut parliamentary elections back in may. out of the labour party floundering, following down to fourth, onlyjust getting on their deposit back here. that will be a big concern to them, a reflection of how welsh labour is
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doing in wales or the party as a whole, potential about the leadership of the labour party? no doubt the overwhelming talking point of this by—election is that this now means that borisjohnson's majority in westminster has fallen to just one at a time when he needs as much support as he can get. peter is at westminster for us. we heard jane dodds talking about bursting borisjohnson's bubble. this is quite a set back so soon after he was elected as prime minister. as we head down, critical and terms of the parliamentary arithmetic. on the behind, certainly, the parliamentary arithmetic. the lib dems may feel they did better than expected in brecon and radnor shed. they were
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favourites to win this by—election, the dead have a history of support in that area, and quite a well—organised ground operation. there has been a little bit of talk ofa there has been a little bit of talk of a boris bounce, shall we call it? this is an upsurge in support for the conservatives sent borisjohnson came to power, that is a little bit of evidence that in the by—election, but it wasn't massive. not enough for him to see off the brexit party and to hold onto that seat. in order to do that, i suppose, he would need a jointing to do that, i suppose, he would need ajointingjump to do that, i suppose, he would need a jointing jump rather than a boris balance. 0n the parliamentary arithmetic, significant. we talked about a working majority of one, meaning it will take one conservative mp to vote against the government in orderfor conservative mp to vote against the government in order for the government in order for the government to suffer a defeat. in practice, it will be a little bit more complicated than that. there
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are, for example, charlie elphick, the mp facing allegations. you will be able to continue voting on the brexit. there are also somewhat laid—back and independent mps that will continue to vote with the government. nevertheless, it highlights the skill of the challenge that the new prime minster will face when mps return from their summer break in september. this was a pointer to the conservative party chairman, james cleverly, earlier on. the simple truth is, as we have seen over the last 6—12 months, that whether it's a majority of one or two or three is really largely irrelevant. how is it irrelevant if anyone decides to leave? i was about to explain. go on, then. because, actually, the house has comprehensively rejected the withdrawal agreement, specifically because of the backstop. if that backstop can be removed, then democracy can win out and we can leave with a deal.
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but that isn't really dependent on the numbers — whether it be one, two or three. james cleverly effectively saying they are that the government does not intend to bring back theresa may's brexit deal, that much maligned but all a dream and that was rejected time and time again by the house of commons. they want to go back to brussels to reopen negotiations, to remove the controversial backstop from the withdrawal agreement. time will tell if they get anywhere with that. the eu says it will not reopen negotiations. this is not the only thing that potentially at this new government will be trying to get through the house of commons. it could face a vote of no confidence if labour decides to bring one in the very first week of september, it will be very interesting to see how that one pans out. not to say nothing of the various bits of legislation that needs to get through the house of commons as
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well. if there is nothing in terms ofa well. if there is nothing in terms of a change to the withdrawal agreement out of brussels, boris johnson is still very clear that he wa nts to ta ke johnson is still very clear that he wants to take us out, do or die, on the 31st of october, even if that means a no—deal brexit. we know there are a significant number of mps opposed to that scenario, they will do their utmost to block it, they may well include in their number some former members of the cabinet who have been sacked as borisjohnson has cabinet who have been sacked as boris johnson has taken cabinet who have been sacked as borisjohnson has taken power. they may well prove to be a thorn in his side. the emergency services have been working through the night to try and divert water away from a reservoir dam in derbyshire, which is in danger of bursting after being damaged in recent flooding. the raf is dropping hundreds of tonnes of sand and gravel onto the dam. yesterday, hundreds of residents were told to leave their homes and they gathered at a local school. simonjones has this report. a race against time.
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at first light, an raf helicopterjoins the battle to stop the dam collapsing. it will drop hundreds of tons of aggregate to try to prevent more water entering the reservoir, described by police as an unprecedented, fast—moving emergency situation, as intense rain took its toll. access to nearby whaley bridge remained blocked overnight, and a large part of the town evacuated. you can't risk it, can you? if something happens to the dam, i think we're getting wet. i think people are horrified about what is happening. it is a shock, because this is people's lives. it's where they live. a torrent of water flowing over the dam damaged its concrete panel. sandbags have been put along the top of the reservoir. pumps are being used to reduce the water to a safe level. the warning is the future of the dam wall remains in the balance. there's about 1.2 million tonnes of water in that reservoir.
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so the environment agency has issued a severe flood warning, because we don't know the state of the dam, and if there was a catastrophic failure, that volume of water at whaley bridge would have a devastating impact. the clean—up is continuing in other parts of northern england hit by flooding. the national trust's lyme park in cheshire suffered major damage. but near whaley bridge, residents have been told it could be days before they are allowed back home. they are just hoping they have homes to go back to. 0ur news correspondent, laura foster, is at whaley bridge. laura, ican laura, i can see plenty of activity going on behind you, just bring us up—to—date with how this operation is going. it's a little bit, than it was last night, that doesn't mean the has stopped. you can see how the engineers are working to clear this area of farmland in order to put more water pumps again, all there to
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there to try to reduce the pressure on the dam by removing water from the reservoir. up ahead here, you can see where the spillway is and where the raf have been flying in ballast and aggregate in order to try and support the dam. earlier, the chief fire officer had this to say. it's a national response, this is a really big incident for us. we've got 150 firefighters on scene in derbyshire, 50% of those from derbyshire fire and rescue service, the rest are made up of fire and rescue services from around the country. we have brought in ten high—volume pumping appliances to get the water down in the dam, along with a number of specialist officers who operate those appliances. and tactical advisers who help us with flood response of this nature. so the plan, really, for the fire service is very simply to stop water coming into the reservoir using the chinook and the raf coordinated to damp up those inlets. and the raf coordinated to dam up those inlets.
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at the same time, get as much water out of the reservoir as we can to take pressure of the dam wall. because there's still a real risk that could collapse? yes, the structural engineer on site is very concerned about that. basically, the information we have had is that we have to do something here, because it's not going to go away on its own. joining us as gary lane, wing commanderfrom joining us as gary lane, wing commander from the ref. joining us as gary lane, wing commanderfrom the ref. gary, can you tell is a little bit about what the raf is doing? i came in at last night of what could do to assist our civil agency partners. we are here to help with shoring up the the dam area. earlier, a chinook picked up some local aggregate, it's been dropped in six tonne packages onto the area damaged by the water. but will then mean that later on today,
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hopefully, the engineers will have a firm base that they can pour a solidifying product into which will make the dam good hopefully. that helicopter has been touring and throwing for every ten minutes or so senseless morning. how much are you bringing in? we have a body depicting about 150 tonnes, we have more to go in there. each bag has about a tonne of aggregate. it is about a tonne of aggregate. it is about a tonne of aggregate. it is about a ten minute circle to get that through and then drop it. it is a precision task. we are being asked to get it almost into a centimetre square to get it in there. it's important to say that all this aggregate is coming from local quarries, they are donating it? yes, i turned up last night and there will order the trucks of aggregate ready to go. it shows some of the planning in place. it is all really vital. lots of people have been
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evacuated from their homes, sitting at their television is worried about what will happen here. how has the mood changed amongst the emergency workers from last night compared to now? we have been lucky lightly the rain has been off throughout the day making it easier to work. the idea to get the pumps to extract water from the reservoir is a little bit easier. our feelings from the reservoir is a little bit easier. 0urfeelings are from the reservoir is a little bit easier. our feelings are out for the people taken away from their homes for a considerable period of time, we are doing everything we can to get them back into their homes to make it a safe environment for them. what would you city people watching the television worried about their home towns? i sure that worry for them, we are doing everything we can to make sure they can get home as soon as they can do. the prime minister, borisjohnson, soon as they can do. the prime minister, boris johnson, has soon as they can do. the prime minister, borisjohnson, has called an emergency cobra meeting about the situation here at whaley bridge. meanwhile, emergency services will all be working together to try and make sure that the stamps stay safe
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and everybody‘s home is protected. the headlines on bbc news: the liberal democrats win the brecon and radnorshire by—election — leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. the raf are dropping hundreds of tonnes of sand and gravel onto the damaged reservoir dam in whaley bridge. two holiday firms, with bookings from more than 50,000 people, have ceased trading. england are now 22 without loss and are awaiting scan results from james anderson's calf injury, which shipped from four overs yesterday. judge a whole it is one of the lead and golfs british open. fellow brit,
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charley hull, is a shot behind. wills are into the third qualifying round of the europa league. looking to seal a six — one aggregate win against katmai crusaders. aberdeen, rangersjoin them. let's cross to know to brussels where nato's secretary generaljens stoltenberg is holding a press conference. he's speaking as the united states will formally withdraw today from a 30—year—old treaty banning intermediate range nuclear missiles, prompting fears of a new arms race. the us has accused russia of breaching the terms of the so—called inf treaty by developing a new short range missile, something moscow denies.
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we have no in four years that russia has developed this missile according to us documentation for. without even the public pressure of the inf, what's to stop russia from being more aggressive with its capabilities? and the pentagon has announced it will test a non—nuclear missile within the next few weeks. are you concerned about russia being able to say this as a provocation, and has the us has been consulting its nato allies about these tests? the us has been consulting very closely with all nato allies with all issues related to the inf treaty, i welcome that. that's one of the reasons why we have been able to maintain such strong unity. we all agreed today, again, that we are
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going to stay coordinated in the way that we are responding to the russian violation of the inf treaty. again, iam russian violation of the inf treaty. again, i am confident that we will continue to consult and continue to respond in a measured and coordinated way. i'm absolutely certain that in the long run, russia will realise that they will benefit from effective arms control. they realise that during the cold war, they realise that also after they started to deploy new intermediate range missiles in europe in the 70s. finally, they agreed to the inf treaty in 1987 which banned these things. it is serious that we see the demise of the inf treaty today but i still believe that it is
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possible to reach agreements with russia on arms control. because, in the long run, it will benefit them and us all to avoid a new arms race. it's dangerous, extremely costly. we have proven before that we are able to make agreements —— reach agreement on limiting the number of nuclear weapons. that was nato secretary general speaking live in brussels. 0ur diplomatic correspondent james landale is here. we heard him saying that that it was very serious, the demise of this treaty. what do you think the significance is? he is right, it is significant. this is one of the most extraordinary treaties made towards the end of the cold war, the only duty i took out an entire class of nuclear weapons, medium to short
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range, 300 miles range —— 3000 400 miles range. the reason these were so difficult and dangerous because of weren't very difficult to detect, they were mobile. and if you fired them, the defensive side only had a few minutes to respond. added to the danger of an already dangerous situation, and the removal of them, genuinely me to get up safer. so the removal of this treaty and the increase of these missiles clearly reduces safety in europe. clearly, there will be a race, but an arms race in the old term, but one where countries are more willing to develop these kind of massage. the americans want to compete with the chinese and in south china sea. the one saving grace, if you talk to officials, is that they say that not many countries have the money to buy these kind of miss out at the moment
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so that might act as some kind of restraint in the months ahead. thank you forjoining us. let's go back to whaley bridge, we are getting some new light pictures from the scene where you can see that chinook they are dropping bags and bags of sand and gravel, which is intended to try and strengthen that dam as the efforts continue to try to lower the level of the water above it. you can see there, fairly clearly, the scale of the damage that has already been caused. that chinook they are, we were hearing details of it from our correspondent adds one of the senior military commanders on the ground. they are
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dropping the sand and gravel into the damaged section of the dam, in order to try and shore it up, at least temporarily. i think everyone involved is well aware of the dangers here, because that dam is preventing those unusually high waters flooding the village below. we see the ballast being dropped down into the damage section. we know that around 1500 residents have had to leave their homes. we see the last of that load had been dropped onto the damage section there. you can see that this is an operation,
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clearly, they are working as hard and fast as they can, but it is an operation that could take some time. 0ne operation that could take some time. one of the councillors on the scene was suggesting it could take some time, clearly a matter of concern for those 1500 residents or so residents who had to leave their homes. even when the dam has been shot up, engineers will need to go in on the ground in order to try and check that the dam is safe before anyone is allowed back into those homes which lie immediately below it. -- homes which lie immediately below it. —— even when the dam has been shot up. we will be keeping a close eye on in the operation up there at whaley bridge, where at least it has stopped raining, thus allowing the operation to continue at a pace. we will keep you up—to—date with all the latest developments on that.
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more now on the brecon and radnorshire by—election where the liberal democrats won the seat from the conservatives. the brexit party came third ahead of labour. let's speak to the brexit party mep, claire fox. she joins us from westminster. you must be pretty disappointed? not at all. it would be silly to say that it was a great result, but of course you have to bear in mind that borisjohnson course you have to bear in mind that boris johnson wouldn't course you have to bear in mind that borisjohnson wouldn't be head of the tory party if it wasn't for the brexit party. the only bug that has collapsed, the brexit party has picked up a lot of labour votes. meps like me are desperate for boris to do thejob meps like me are desperate for boris to do the job and get us out. this isa to do the job and get us out. this is a warning to him that his balance
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isn't bouncing that hearty, he needs to ta ke isn't bouncing that hearty, he needs to take into consideration that the voters wa nt to take into consideration that the voters want to leave and we don't quite trust him yet. none of us are particularly tories, we just want to leave the eu. if boris can do that, he will get the support of all of us. in the meantime, why should we entirely trust him? the lib dem vote wasn't great for the remaining coalition to scrape through, which was effectively what happened. this was effectively what happened. this was an area which voted to leave, your candidate got 3300 votes. doesn't it show that the party gaining from this brexit uncertainty at the moment appears to be the lib dems, who are openly fighting to remain, rather than your party? that makes no sense at all. the tory
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party was nothing on the heels of the lib dems, the brexit party came third. those two parties represent a clea n b rea k third. those two parties represent a clean break brexit for, we have to get out by october 31. they're both combined to beat the lib dems. these days, everybody adds everything up, don't they? if you think the vote was broadly divided by 52% of leavers and 48% remain there is overall in the way they voted, i think itjust shows that nothing has changed. the brexit party was set up to ensure that brexit happens and it had a revolutionary impact on even the conservative party. if it hadn't existed and made people like me and mep, we don't even want to be an anti—democratic european parliament, then, actually, to his name will still be heading the conservative
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party and the tories would still be selling out the photos. we now have a completely fluid state in british politics. the most important issue is that we leave the eu, as the voters have commanded that the politicians do. the brexit party will not rest until that happens. 0n a brother point, party politics as we known it and pass has been thrown up we known it and pass has been thrown up in the air. the brexit party has just announced 50 prospective candidates and a general election, one of them was constituency chairmen in sevenoaks for the conservative party. then there was head of the council in rotherham for the labour party. things have changed, up in the air. we are snapping at heels. thank you for joining us.
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fewer showers in the forecast today, good news for the rescue effort we have just seen in good news for the rescue effort we havejust seen in derbyshire good news for the rescue effort we have just seen in derbyshire where the environment agency and still has that severe flood warning in force for the river goyt. through the day to day, one or two showers are dotted here and there, but they should not be as torrential. a bit of cloud down south, scotland and north—east england, which may linger for much of the day. here, a few showers through the morning, through the afternoon, could be further showers for the pennines, the peak district, south wales and perhaps into south—west england as well. but elsewhere, decent sunny spells, light winds, feeling pleasant. heading into the other night, most showers will fade away, but this weather front will begin to show its hand heading through saturday. any early morning mist down the east coast will start to dissipate gradually. sunny spells, sunshine turning his heir across northern ireland. here, outbreaks of rain before the end of play. the chance
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to be sure elsewhere, feeling warm, maximum 25 celsius. hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines — the liberal democrats win the brecon and radnorshire by—election — leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. i will i will fight i will fight to keep our country and the european union, and we now have in parliament one more mp who will fight to make that happen. the raf are dropping hundreds of tons of sand and gravel onto the damaged reservoir dam in whaley bridge there is still a real risk it could collapse. the structural engineer on the site is very concerned about that, and basically, the information we have had as we have to do something here, because it is not going to go away on its own.
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two holiday firms with bookings from more than 50,000 people have ceased trading. last month was probably the warmestjuly on record — according to new research. sport now — time for a full round up from the bbc sport centre. day two of the first test in the ashes has begun. england are now 22-1 ashes has begun. england are now 22—1 as they look to chase down the visitors' first—innings advantage of 284 runs. adam is there. australia with an early wicket there. indeed, and steve smith with the catch, you just cannot keep them out of the action, the australia batsmen who did such wonderful things yesterday with the innings of 144 that really
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saved australia on the opening day. —— batsman. it was his catch that has dismissed jason roy this morning. very disappointing for england, they were looking for a long day with the bat today. rory byrne is still with them though. in good nick, a couple of very nice boundaries. joe root, huge amount of pressure on him to get this innings studied. lots of talk about james anderson this morning, the england bowler. managed four overs yesterday, had to leave edgbaston at lunch to have a scan on the tight calf. arrived a couple of hours before the start of play this morning arriving with stuart broad, showing no real effect from the injury. he has been out doing some fitness work in the field, doing
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some running and monitoring. the word is that he might not necessarily be out for the rest of this test match. there were fears that he might miss the rest of the series. stuart broad said there is a chance he may well still be involved here at edgbaston. how much of that as mind games, we are yet to see. but england are really going to need him. they will need a long day with the bat today, michael vaughan, former england captain, saying on test match special, you think that england will have to bat out the day here, just to give those bowlers a rest. a long day in the field yesterday, they looked out on their feet at the end of the opening day. england in the middle, 24—1 so far. just the loss of one wicket, jason roy. french referee stephanie frappart will lead a team of mainly female officials who will take charge of the super cup clash between liverpool and chelsea later this month.
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frappart took charge of the women's world cup final between the united states and netherlands last month. this will be the first time that a female official has taken charge of a major uefa men's competition event. the assistant referees will be manuela nicolosi of france and michelle 0'neal from the republic of ireland. the domestic football season in england and scotland gets under way this evening. dundee take on dunfermline in the scottish championship, while in the efl, we'll get a first look at jonathan woodgate's middlesbrough. the former england and real madrid defender has taken over from tony pulis at his boyhood club. it's woodgate's first job in management. his side take on newly—promoted luton town tonight. really excited. we have prepared properly. we have worked as hard as we could over the pre—season. my staff and i have been really organised. when i was a young kid, i dream about playing for middlesbrough, but since i was about 30, miles wanted to manage a football club. so i am privileged to manage this fantastic football club.
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defending champion georgia hall is one shot off the lead on six under on the second day of golf‘s british open. fellow brit charley hull is a shot behind her compatriot on —5, and tees off at her home course of woburn at 12.15 that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. global temperatures forjuly could be the hottest on record. that's the initial assessment of the eu's climate change service. their figures show that this month will be 1.2 degrees above pre—industrial levels. 0ur science correspondent pallab ghosh explains. it is not water they are walking through, but a heat haze on the streets injapan. and it has been the same story across many parts of the world. record temperatures in finland, and a three—week heatwave in china too. and now, it's official — july is one of the hottest, if not the hottest, on record. and july isn't alone.
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2019 has been very warm globally. each month so far is among the four warmest for the month in question, and june has been the highest ever. this particular month has been very warm. but to me, this is really not the main point. the main point is that not only this month has been very warm, but last month was very warm. all months during 2019 were very warm, in terms of comparing with other years. the results are based on billions of measurements from satellites, ships, aircraft and weather stations all across the world. these latest figures are part of a long—term trend in rising global temperatures. and computer models of the impact of climate change predict that more summer temperature records are likely to be broken, all across the world, more often. individual heatwaves can't be pinned to human—created global warming, but the increase in extremes of weather we are beginning to see is in line with the predictions made
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by climate change experts, and they say that they are likely to get worse and more frequent. pallab ghosh, bbc news. well, bob ward, who you heard from there a few moments ago, isjoining me now in the studio. thanks very much for coming in. we all know how hot it was injuly, not just here but across europe, but this was just one month. how much can be read into this? this is the global average, so it includes the winter temperatures in the southern hemisphere as well, so the whole planet was warmer than it has been any other time on record. the previous record was set injuly 2016, so we are seeing this consistent pattern of breaking the temperature record around the world, not just four months, temperature record around the world, notjust four months, but temperature record around the world, not just four months, but years, every few years or so, part of the warming trend. and are you clear that this is caused by man—made
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industrial output and so on, the damage that we've been doing? there is no other explanation for this. scientists have been looking at all the other potential explanations, and it is very clear that it is a build—up of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere thatis greenhouse gases in the atmosphere that is driving this warmer trend. we do have new goals for tackling climate change here in the uk, across europe, we know that the americans of course pulled out of the keep paris accord, but are they going to be able to turn around this trend? well, globalwarming will not stop until every country in the world gets to zero emissions of greenhouse gases. and at the moment, that temperature this month has been 1.2 degrees above its preindustrial level. the international commitment is to keep that rise to well below two. so we need countries currently revising their pledges for
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emissions, all of them to come next year when they are due to submit it, and put on the table commitments to reach zero emissions, like the uk did last month, to commit to zero emissions by 2050. yeah, but as you say, those goals are decades away in the meantime. —— in the meantime, are we going to be seeing hotter and hotter summers? there is a lag in how the climate response to the greenhouse gas concentration. so for the next few decades, climate change will get worse no matter how well we cut emissions, and we are going to have to adapt to these impacts. things like the heat wave that we saw last month, but also more intense rainfall, which again, we have seen in recent days in the northern england. these things are going to get worse, there would have to adapt, we have to cut our emissions down to zero, otherwise it will get to catastrophic levels later in the century. we are talking here about climate change, which means not just the here about climate change, which means notjust the hotter temperatures, but yes, those sorts
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of really severe storms which have caused so much damage in the north of england in the last few days. earlier this week, the met office has pointed out the uk had had its ten warmest years since 2002, but also six of its seven wettest years. so britain is becoming warmer and wetter, and it is basic physics. if you warm the atmosphere, it can hold more water, so when it rains, it rains more heavily, and you get the greater risk of flooding. bob ward, thank you very much indeed for joining us. so how much warmer is your city? to find out how where you live might be affected by climate change and what can be done about it, go to bbc.co.uk/news. more now on our main story, and the liberal democrat have won the brecon and radnorshire by—election from the conservatives, cutting boris johnson's parliamentary majority to just one. the liberal democrat candidate, jane dodds, overturned a conservative majority of over
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8,000 to win the seat. i've been discussing the impact of the by—election result with sirjohn curtice, professor of politics at strathclyde university. three things that we suspected were true from the recent opinion polls are largely affirmed by this by—election result. the first is that the conservatives are indeed enjoying something of a bounce under borisjohnson, but it's a very specific kind of bounce. it's a squeeze on the brexit party votes. certainly the brexit party performance far less good, for example, than the 30% it got in the constituency back in may, or indeed what the brexit party managed to achieve in the peterborough by—election where they only narrowly lost out and defeated the conservatives quite substantially. here, the conservatives clearly emerged well ahead of the brexit party, albeit not well enough to be able to win
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the seat, and that brexit party vote certainly needs squeezing further by the conservatives. the second thing that we have had confirmed, with the labour party recording its worst ever performance in this constituency, just saving its deposit, is that the labour party is in deep electoral trouble. though doubtless in brecon, many a labour voter were switching to the liberal democrats in order to help defeat the conservatives. but the third thing we've learned is that the liberal democrat revival in westminster voting intentions, which so far has only been really confirmed by the polls, now very clearly evidenced in this by—election result. this is not a by—election we were expecting the liberal democrats to win as much as a couple of months ago. but here in a place where they previously had local strength, they still hold the assembly seat, have always held the assembly seat, and have held the constituency for much of the time between 1985 and 2015. here they've demonstrated that in those circumstances, they can do well enough to be able to defeat the conservatives, and this is a warning sign to the conservatives, who are, i think, at risk of getting
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rather overexcited by noticeable but not very large leads over labour in many of the opinion polls. actually, one thing they have to worry about in any general election is losing seats to liberal democrats, and on this kind of performance, 40, 50, liberal democrat mps is not inconceivable in an early general election, and that could make the difference between boris johnson having a majority and not having a majority. yes, it was interesting, we heard jo swinson there saying it shows that the liberal democrats are winning again, that they could provide a real alternative to what was on offer, not just from boris johnson, but also from jeremy corbyn. clearly they were helped here by the fact that other parties on the remain side of the argument decided not to put up candidates, but it does look as though they could be picking up, as we saw in the european elections, votes from the conservatives, as you've mentioned, but perhaps also votes from labour supporters too.
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well, they are picking up some votes from the conservatives, about 9—10% of those people who said that they voted conservative 2017 are telling pollsters they would vote for the liberal democrats. the honest truth is at the end of the day, that's not the conservatives' principle problem. their principle problem has been the loss of votes to the brexit party, and certainly, the liberal democrats are gaining more from labour than they are from the conservatives, because at the end of the day, there are far more remain voters who previously voted labour, and it is to remainers that the liberal democrats are primarily appealing. that said, notice the use of the language byjane dodds, the new mp for brecon, of the idea of the liberal democrats being the rural voice. if they are going to turn about local strength in places that voted to leave in the european referendum, they are going to have to link the
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stop brexit adamant with the much more traditional appeal of being the party of the celtic fringe that defends your interest against london. and in this constituency at least, they at least managed to pull in some of the lever vote on the basis of that appeal. so they have got to be more than a one trick pony. got to be more than a one trick pony, the liberal democrats, if they are pony, the liberal democrats, if they a re really pony, the liberal democrats, if they are really going to recapture the losses they had in 2015, but certainly this gives them an idea of their ability to do so. in a moment, we'll have all the business news, but first, the headlines on bbc news. the liberal democrats win the brecon and radnorshire by—election, leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. the raf are dropping hundreds of tons of sand and gravel onto the damaged reservoir dam in whaley bridge. two holiday firms with bookings from more than 50,000 people have ceased trading.
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in the business news — some disappointing news from the construction sector. output declined for the third month running injuly, according to the ihs markit/cips pm just published. according to the report, this reflects lower volumes of work across the board. two package holiday firms have collapsed, affecting more than 50,000 travellers. malvern group, which incorporates manchester—based late rooms and york—based superbreak mini holidays, known as super break, has ceased trading. a no—deal brexit would result in an instant shock to the uk economy, the governor of the bank of england, mark carney, has warned. in an interview with the bbc, the governor said items such as petrol and food would become more expensive if the uk leaves the eu without an agreement.
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the plans of thousands of holidaymakers are under threat as two package holiday firms collapse. late rooms and super break, owned by malvern group, have both ceased trading. over 50,000 travellers who have booked through super break are at risk of losing their holiday. 400 people are currently abroad on a super break holiday. so what does this mean for all of these people? i'm joined by guy anker, managing editorfor money saving expert. before we talk about what it means for customers, talk me through what has happened to these companies. quite frankly, it seems as though they have run out of money. a few agents and tour operators recently, we saw an airline a couple of years ago ceased trading. a year before that, low cost holidays. over the
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last few years, hundreds of that of thousands of holiday—makers have had their plans disrupted. there is a difference between these two companies. late rooms does hotel rooms, second does package holidays. what happens to anyone who has booked a hotel through late rooms, what are your rights? it is early days, but we are being told that people who have booked hotels through late rooms should be ok, most of them. because what happened with them was when the boot, the money went straight to the hotelier. —— when they booked. it is early days, but if something does go wrong, the best port of call is your ca rd wrong, the best port of call is your card company. most most people these days tend to pay with a credit or debit card, so you do have protection if you do not get the service when booking a hotel room or flight service when booking a hotel room or flight are pretty much anything when you flight are pretty much anything when y°u pay flight are pretty much anything when you pay on plastic. thousands of people have booked holidays through super break. what about those people
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who have bookings, and what about the 400 super break customers on holiday in the uk or overseas? we understand the majority of these are package holidays. again, early days, but that is our initial understanding. and again, the news, while clearly worrisome in creating hassle, the user is ok in terms of refunds. because either the package holiday should go ahead as normal, because it is supported... any package holiday that involves a flight package holiday that involves a flight is supported by what is called atol protection, official protection from the regulator. if not, it should be protected under the trade body firm of the travel industry. so either it goes ahead or you get your money back, which applies also to people who are abroad. you should be able to continue with your holiday. you do occasionally hear horror stories, such as people abroad, even when holidays are cancelled, still being asked to fork out for the hotel againa asked to fork out for the hotel again a second time. i'm not saying that will happen this time, just
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preparing people for the worst case that does happen. if it does, keep receipts, and you should get the money back. so a lot of hassle, a lot of worry, but in most cases, not all, but in most cases, holidays should either go ahead or people should either go ahead or people should get their money back. so there is some consolation. and how to get their money back, through insurance? it would be through, when i talked about the atol protection, the holiday either goes ahead as normal, or you are entitled to a full refund. so if it is, you would claim via the civil aviation authority, the regulator. it if it isa authority, the regulator. it if it is a result of abta protection, you complain with abta. travel insurance in this scenario covers something else. if you had an excursion booked our car else. if you had an excursion booked ourcar hire, you else. if you had an excursion booked our car hire, you might be able to claim additional cost from your travel insurance, but the cheapest policies often do not cover you when a firm goes into administration or ceases trading. thank you very much.
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a look a some other businesss stories now. the owner of british airways and iberia — international airlines group — has reported a fall in profits for the first six months of the year. however, it did say ticket sales have been strong in the last three months — the beginning of the key summer holiday period. royal bank of scotland just announced a £1.7bn dividend after half—year—profits beat analyst forecasts. however, the bank is yet to replace outgoing chief executive ross mcewan, and has warned of a tough economic environment in coming months. it's another big weekend in the world of e—sports. this weekend's london's 02 arena hosts the fifa eworld cup grand final. up to 30 million people are expected to watch competitors play the football video game at some stage this weekend. mosaad aldossary from saudi arabia is the defending champion. the prize pool is worth $500,000. european stocks posted their biggest drop of 2019
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on friday and german bond yields hit record lows after us president donald trump fired his latest trade war salvo at china, jolting markets and sparking a frenzied bid for safe—haven assets. that's all the business news. it's reported the new northern ireland secretary, julian smith, has asked for portraits of the queen to be put back on display inside government buildings at stormont. the portraits had been taken down after a senior civil servant was paid £10,000 in compensation after saying it was unfair for him to walk past pictures of her majesty and the duke of edinburgh as he might feel offended. our correspondent keith doyle is outside stormont. keith, tell us a bit more about this intervention by the new northern ireland secretary. well, in northern ireland, symbols are hugely significant, be it flags, mules, or
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is this row illustrates, portraits. there are strict laws and specific laws in the northern ireland that cover these areas, and indeed employment and equality laws so that no workplace should be intimidating or hostile for any workers, no matter which side of the community that they come from. this whole row came to light when lord mcguinness, the ulster unionist party mp, told the ulster unionist party mp, told the house of lords that a senior civil servant here at the northern ireland office, which is on the ground here in stormont, received a £10,000 payment for distressed because he had to walk past a picture of the queen throughout his working day. indeed, nationalists may not see the queen as head of state here. needless to say, unionist mps have been outraged by this, have called for some clarification. the secretary of state did not give as much clarification, whether pictures have
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been removed, whether they've been put back, but the secretary of state julia smith did tweet a picture of the queen that he said was on his mantelpiece in his private office in belfast. quite a small photograph of the queen is there. ulster union is stem piece so that is not enough, they want more answers to the questions. they are asking where portraits have been taken and we wa nt portraits have been taken and we want them put back up. so really, thatis want them put back up. so really, that is where the row is at the moment. —— that they want them put back up. the secretary of state did not give much information on that, but he said in a statement the other night that the northern ireland office must be open and inclusive for people to be able to attract people from all parts of the community. so another row over symbols in northern ireland. as you say, symbols of huge significance given the very sensitive political situation there, but people will think back to the queen's very successful visit to ireland, and
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perhaps be surprised thatjust a picture of the queen could cause this sort of a row. well, what happens here in it northern ireland might bemuse people in england, scotland, wales and the republic of ireland, because things that would seem insignificant elsewhere are hugely significant here. you might remember back to the rows of flagpoles. when the british flag can be for nonofficial buildings. the lord mayor of belfast some time ago removed a picture of the queen and put a republican. up there. that also caused a row. —— put a republican poster up there. this is one of the complex things about life in northern ireland. thank you very much indeed. now let's get a look at the weather. fewer showers today, and they should not be as intense as the ones we have seen. good news for the rescue
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effort at whaley bridge where there is still a severe flood warning enforce. some lingering clouds down the north sea coasts, and a good deal of fine dry weather elsewhere. some sunshine peeking through the cloud, but also some sunshine for the pennines, derbyshire, and wheels. in the sunshine, with light winds, should feel pleasant, highs of 25 celsius. showers continuing for a while forfading of 25 celsius. showers continuing for a while for fading away, and then the weather front indicated by then the weather front indicated by the area of cloud will move in through saturday. fine start from most places, some lingering mist down the east coast once again, a good deal of sunshine, one or two showers, turning more and settled through northern ireland as the day goes on. feeling warm down towards the south—east.
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snapping at heels. thank you for joining us. you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's midday and these are the main stories this morning: the liberal democrats win the brecon and radnorshire by—election — leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. i will fight to keep our country in the european union. and we now have in parliament one more mp who will fight to make that happen. the raf are dropping hundreds of tonnes of sand and gravel onto the damaged reservoir dam in whaley bridge. there's still a real risk that it could collapse? yes, the structural engineer on site is very concerned about that. basically, the information we have had is that we have to do something here, because it's not going to go away on its own. two holiday firms, with bookings from more than 50,000 people,
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have ceased trading. last month was probably the warmestjuly on record — according to new research. and, england's jason roy is out for 10, caught by steve smith at the first ashes test at edgbaston. good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm carole walker. the liberal democrats have won the brecon and radnorshire by—election — taking the seat from the conservatives, and leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. here is the result — the liberal democrat candidate jane dodds overturned the conservatives majority of over 8,000 to beat the incumbent mp chris davies byjust over
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1,000,400 votes. ——1,400 votes. the brexit party pushed labour into fourth place. and here is the share of the vote which saw a 12 percent swing from the conservatives to the liberal democrats — and the collapse of the labour vote. other pro—remain parties had stood aside to allow the lib dems a better chance to reclaim the seat they lost in the 2015 general election. our political correspondent, jonathan blake spent the night at the count and sent this report. the votes had been cast and the counting could begin. conservatives fighting to hold on, liberal democrats sensing a chance — both sides knew it would be close. i do hereby declare that jane dodds is duly elected member of parliament for the said constituency. cheering. a win for the party that campaigned against brexit, and a message to the new prime minister
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from parliament's newest member. my very first act as your mp when i arrive in westminster will be to find mr borisjohnson, wherever he's hiding, and tell him loud and clear — stop playing with the future of our communities and rule out a no—deal brexit now. liberal democrats threw everything at this by—election, although they held back from their staunch "stop brexit" message, knowing it might cost them votes in a constituency finely balanced between leave and remain. in the end, it was a narrow victory, but one the lib dems will say shows that they are a party on the up. the liberal democrats were helped here by other anti—brexit parties standing aside. it was a terrible result for labour, who finished a distant fourth. the brexit party managed third, maybe costing the conservatives a win.
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for him and for his party — defeat will be deeply felt. in a moment, we will talk to our political correspondent, peter saull, who is at westminster. but first to tomos morgan who is in brecon. the lib dems like to make a bit of a speciality about these campaigns, but tell us more about the fact that on ground which clench them for them? reporter: one of the important factors is how this by—election came about in the first place, originally backin about in the first place, originally back in march when the incumbent mp back in march when the incumbent mp back then, chris davies of the tory party, was found guilty of submitting a fake expenses claim.
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that conviction led to a recall petition being set up in the constituency, and with 20% of the constituents signing that petition, it led to the by—election. no doubt that was a contributing factor amongst many of the voters here, the satisfaction with what happened with chris davies and his submission of false expenses. no doubt brexit was also a huge issue. borisjohnson was here in wales on tuesday, visiting farmers in this rural country where agriculture is still a huge part of the economy. he was trying to waylay any the economy. he was trying to waylay a ny fears the economy. he was trying to waylay any fears they had with regards to a no—deal scenario, but clearly, that just wasn't enough in this constituency. the greens and clyde can root didn't stand together the lib dems more of a chance, all of them remain backing parties. for they new leader, it could be somewhat iffy list for their party.
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liberal democrats have a vision for a cleaner, safer, richer country — in the european union. as leader of the liberal democrats, i will fight to keep our country in the european union. we now have in parliament one more mp who will fight to make that happen. jane dodds will be a first class representative for brecon and radnorshire, and potentially, a key vote in cutting boris johnson's majority to just one. the other main talking point from this by—election was the huge fall of the labour of doubt, they came out fourth, narrowlyjust making sure they were able to reclaim their deposit. questions may now be asked of the leadership and of their sta nce of the leadership and of their stance on brexit, which has been labelled as confusing at times. and to the brexit party coming third, overtaking the labour party which may come as no real surprise. as we
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mentioned earlier, in the european parliament elections in may, they actually top the polls in this cou nty of actually top the polls in this county of which brecon and radnorshire as a constituency office. the main talking point is that this now narrows boris johnson's majority by that are just one, meaning any chance he has of getting a potential brexit do will teach pre—parliament even trickier. our political correspondent peter saull is in westminister. peter, this is one of the fastest by—election defeats any prime minister has everfaced, by—election defeats any prime minister has ever faced, and by—election defeats any prime minister has everfaced, and doesn't leave the parliamentary arithmetic looking even tougher for him. reporter: the conservatives are doing their very best to accentuate the positives this morning, they say borisjohnson is still determined to deliver brexit on time on october 31 and tell this result changes nothing. we have been looking through the archives, actually, and
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1908 was the last time a premise that lost a by—election so soon after getting into power. —— is a prime minister. thatjust shows how difficult this is for the new prime minister, not least because it cuts his working majority down to just one. we have seen how difficult it was for tourism need to get anything through parliament, it could be even harderfor boris through parliament, it could be even harder for borisjohnson. through parliament, it could be even harder for boris johnson. that through parliament, it could be even harder for borisjohnson. that was a point put to james cleverly, the conservative party chairman, earlier. the simple truth is, as we have seen over the last 6—12 months, that whether it's a majority of one or two or three is really largely irrelevant. how is it irrelevant if anyone decides to leave? i was about to explain. go on, then. because, actually, the house has comprehensively rejected the withdrawal agreement, specifically because of the backstop. if that backstop can be removed, then democracy can win out and we can leave with a deal. but that isn't really dependent on the numbers — whether it be one, two or three.
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the tories didn't perhaps lose as many of those sites had been expected to the brexit party in this election, there was a little bit of evidence of the boris balance shoring up a little bit more support for the conservatives. —— the boris balance. it highlights that if he we re balance. it highlights that if he were to go forward with a general election before brexit was delivered, that is a highly risky strategy, the parliamentary arithmetic is against him. an incredibly challenging few months ahead for boris johnson. let's just bring you an update, which is thankfully was, the veteran mp who quit the labour party last
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year, has announced he is going to stand at the next general election asa stand at the next general election as a birkenhead socialjustice candidate. he is chair of the work and pensions select committee, he has been sitting as an independent but has declared that he will continue to try to serve his constituents in birkenhead as a candidate for the birkenhead social justice party, of which i suspect he is probably the only well known member, clearly that will add to labour‘s difficulties. some breaking news now. a mother who murdered her two young daughters after they "got in the way" of her sex life has been jailed for life with a minimum term of 32 years. louise porton was found guilty yesterday of killing three—year—old lexi draper and 17—month—old scarlett vaughan, less than three weeks apart, last year. ajury at birmingham crown court convicted her of both murders following a five—week trial. jailing porton on friday,
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mrsjustice yip described her actions as "evil" and "calculated", and told her: "these were blameless young children who were plainly vulnerable and ought to have been able to rely on their mother to protect and nurture them. "instead you took their young lives away." an emergency operation to shore up a dam on the verge of collapse in derbyshire is at a critical stage. these pictures have come into us in the last hour of the raf dropping bags of sand and gravel around toddbrook reservoir. it's in danger of bursting, threatening hundreds of homes in the village of whaley bridge below it. the dam was damaged in recent flooding and parts of its wall collapsed yesterday afternoon. our correspondent, laura foster, is in whaley bridge and told us how the operation is going.
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its a little bit calmer it was last night, but that doesn't mean new work has stopped. you can see how the engineers are working to clear this area of farmland in order to put more water pumps again, all there to there to try to reduce the pressure on the dam by removing water from the reservoir. up ahead here, you can see where the spillway is, and where the raf have been flying in ballast and aggregate in order to try and support the dam. earlier, the chief fire officer had this to say. it's a national response, this is a really big incident for us. we've got 150 firefighters on scene in derbyshire, 50% of those from derbyshire fire and rescue service, the rest are made up of fire and rescue services from around the country. we have brought in ten high—volume pumping appliances to get the water down in the dam, along with a number of specialist officers who operate those appliances. and tactical advisers who help us with flood
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response of this nature. so the plan, really, for the fire service is very simply to stop water coming into the reservoir using the chinook and the raf coordinated to dam up those inlets. at the same time, get as much water out of the reservoir as we can to take pressure of the dam wall. because there's still a real risk that could collapse? yes, the structural engineer on site is very concerned about that. basically, the information we have had is that we have to do something here, because it's not going to go away on its own. joining us is gary lane, wing commanderfrom the raf. gary, can you tell is a little bit about what the raf is doing? i came in last night to scope what could do to assist our civil agency partners. we are here to help with shoring up the dam area. earlier, a chinook picked up
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some local aggregate, it's been dropped in packages onto the area damaged by the water. that will then mean that later on today, hopefully, the engineers will have a firm base that they can pour a solidifying product into, which will make the dam good hopefully. that helicopter has been to—ing and fro—ing for every ten minutes or so since this morning. how much are you bringing in? we have dropped in about 150 tonnes, we have more to go in there. each bag has about a tonne of aggregate. it is about a ten minute circle to get that through and then drop it. it is a precision task. we are being asked to get it almost into a centimetre square to get it in there. it's important to say that all this aggregate is coming
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from local quarries, they are donating it? yes, i turned up last night and there will order the trucks yes, i turned up last night and there were already the truckloads of aggregate ready to go. it shows some of the planning in place. it is all really vital. lots of people have been evacuated from their homes, sitting at their television is worried about what will happen here. how has the mood changed amongst the emergency workers from last night compared to now? we have been lucky that the rain has been off throughout the day, making it easier to work. that means the idea to get the pumps to extract water from the reservoir is a little bit easier. our feelings are out for those people taken away from their homes for a considerable period of time, we are doing everything we can to get them back into their homes and make it a safe environment for them. what would you say to people watching the television worried about their home towns? i share that worry for them, we are doing everything we can
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to make sure they can get home as soon as they can do. the prime minister, borisjohnson, has called an emergency cobra meeting about the situation here at whaley bridge. meanwhile, emergency services will all be working together to try and make sure that the dam stays safe and everybody‘s home is protected. in the last few minutes, we have had a statement from on the environment secretary, theresa villiers, who says she is receiving regular updates about the situation on the ground and those efforts to try and shore up the dam. she says that she will be chairing a meeting of the government was not emergency cobra committee later today to make sure everything possible is being done to make sure that the coordination is there and to make sure that everything is being done to prevent further damage to the dam, and to protect homes and businesses. she
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goes on to thank all the emergency services. we can speak now to professor nigel wright from nottingham trent university who is a civil engineer and an expert in flood risk management — hejoins is from beijing. i don't know if you have been able to see the latest pictures that we have been showing of these sacks of sand and gravel being dropped onto the dam — what do you make of the operation which is under way to try to shore up this dam? it's being looked at a national level, it really is a national operation. they are doing a number of the things, they are bringing the aggregate to shore up the dam, they are to adjust the water level in the dam. there are also trying to stop the water getting into the reservoir and the first place. they have been helped a bit today, i have heard there has been no rainfall so far today, that is great news. i think it will still
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probably take a few days yet until the situation is resolved. you're talking about a few days, that is to simply ensure that the water is reduced to a acceptable level? yes. as mentioned before, you can't let the water out of the reservoir too quickly because that will cause flooding problems downstream. they are trying to get the water out of the reservoir as quickly as they can without causing further damage. in the meantime, shoring up the dam so it does not collapse. presumably, even when that has been done, you will then need to get engineers actual on—site, on the ground, on the dam to assess the scale of the damage? i think so. the dam to assess the scale of the damage? ithink so. it is the dam to assess the scale of the damage? i think so. it is now looking like it would be quite a big job. i would say is unlikely to be a dam that will be repaired. given what has happened, they may well need to remove it and replace it.“
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you're one of those 1500 residents also who have had to leave their homes in whaley bridge, this is something that could take quite a considerable amount of time, it may be quite some time before they can even consider that it's safe enough to go home? once the water level in the reservoir is down, it will be safe for them to go home. their work being done to rebuild the dam will not stop them from going home, it just means that the reservoir will not be envious until properly repaired. it is this face comic phase which is affecting local residents. once the reservoir is empty, they should be able to return. so they should be able to return. so they should be able to return to their homes while the long—term efforts will be under way to rebuild the dam itself? yes. what do you make of the operation but is under way? do you see it as simply
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emergency measures at this stage?” think it is, but i think it is a strong response. the raf are now involved. they are doing all they can, notjust involved. they are doing all they can, not just trying involved. they are doing all they can, notjust trying to shore up the dam but trying to get the water level down and getting the tributary is to stop feeding water into the reservoir. there are a whole number of people working on this, sometimes it's difficult to to courting all those people but in this case, it seems to be very well. the headlines on bbc news: the liberal democrats win the brecon and radnorshire by—election — leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. the raf are dropping hundreds of tons of sand and gravel onto the damaged reservoir dam in whaley bridge.
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two holiday firms, with bookings from more than 50,000 people, have ceased trading. sport now. lets get the very latest on the test match and everything else from holly. day two of the first ashes test has just got underway at edgbaston. angling that was jason roy for ten. i don't while it is there for us. an early wicket for a show you're qst smith causing problems for england once again? a tricky little period for this 14 when's batsmen, joe root and rory burns out there in the middle. a moment or two ago, rory burns was rapped on the pads by the australian spinner. really only a
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half—hearted appeal, he was given not out. replays showed that if he had appealed, he would probably have been given out so bad that lucky to survive that. he is going 0k been given out so bad that lucky to survive that. he is going ok on 27, joined byjoe root were, on seven. jason roy caught at second slip by steve smith, you just can't keep him out of the action after his extraordinary 144 yesterday that really saved australia, 284 was the target. that is what england are chasing. they will have to bat throughout the day, according to michael von, former england captain. one of the bowlers, james anderson, arriving here this morning. you left it at lunch yesterday having only bowled four overs above that tight ca lf bowled four overs above that tight calf muscle. he was doing some fitness work and at the outfield before the start of play. the
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suggestion is that if required, he will bat today. england will sincerely hope it does not come to that, they will want to bat out the rest of that day just to give those builders a rest, give james anderson extra time to recover, if indeed he can extra time to recover, if indeed he ca n recover extra time to recover, if indeed he can recover and play a part in the rest of this test match. going 0k can recover and play a part in the rest of this test match. going ok so far. this is a really tricky period for england, 49—1 in response to australia's 284. french referee stephanie frappart will lead a team of mainly female officials who will take charge of the super cup clash between liverpool and chelsea later this month. frappart took charge of the women's world cup final between the united states and netherlands last month. this will be the first time that a female official has taken charge of a major uefa men's competition event. the assistant referees will be manuela nicolosi of france and michelle o'neal from the republic of ireland.
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that has all your spot for now. you can find all the latest bbc dot co dot uk falstaff sport. more from me and at the next hour. the air accidents investigation branch has said it will not re—open the investigation into the shoreham airshow disaster that killed 11 people in 2015. there had been calls for a review after pilot andy hill was acquitted of manslaughter in march, claiming cognitive impairment — something not considered in the initial report. but today, the branch ruled out another investigation — saying its 2017 report was wide—ranging, and still stands. the bank of england governor mark carney says a no—deal brexit would be an instantaneous shock for the uk. speaking to the bbc — mr carney said items such as petrol and food would become more expensive if the uk leaves the eu without an agreement,
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and some businesses will feel the impact overnight. the big, big difference in the event of no—dealfrom a referendum is that with no—deal, the shock to the economy is instantaneous. and that, instantly, you have notjust supply disruptions... so i'm not talking about just the issues at the ports, which are real. but you actually have businesses that are no longer are economic. a holiday firm which had taken bookings from more than 50,000 people has ceased trading. super break — which specialised in organising city breaks, along with its sister company, the booking website laterooms.com — had around 250 employees, based in york and manchester. charlotte gallagher reports. the summer holidays have onlyjust begun, but it is bad news for thousands of people who have booked trips away. super break, which specialised in organising city breaks,
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along with its sister company, the booking website laterooms.com, have ceased trading. they were trying to drum up custom in the hours before going into administration. late rooms tweeted, "it's never too late for a cheeky weekend up in manchester," but it was too late to save the business. those who are yet to travel are likely to see their holidays cancelled, but should be able to obtain a refund if they had a package deal. in a statement, super break said hotel—only breaks had been cancelled, and customers could be asked to pay twice, while laterooms said it anticipated that reservations would be honoured. with this latest collapse, and british airways pilots set to strike, it could be a long, hot summer for holiday—makers.
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well let's speak to two people who have been affected — jeannine and colin roe. just tell us your experience. we booked towards the end ofjune, to iceland just for a four—day break. particular, we wanted to suit the moment lights, we had never been to iceland before so we were very excited about it. i did some research about the company and everything seemed to be well. until we had yesterday that they had gone into administration. so a bit disappointing. had you already pay for this holiday? we just paid a deposit. we did go onto the website today and downloaded all the small print and you claim from which we will shortly fill in to claim our deposit back. have you been told below you will be able to get your money back? what sort of sums are
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involved? fairly small for us, we only paid a £100 deposit. we are hopeful that we will get it back. we have yet to fill the form in. does this cause you concern? presumably, you will be looking to try to book another holiday, will you be looking at different arrangements when you come to try to read it? we would like to go to iceland, the big point of that holiday was that it was flying from norwich, our local airport. we live in norfolk, quite away airport. we live in norfolk, quite airport. we live in norfolk, quite away away from other airports. it was for us. colin, are you surprised that having booked with what you presumably thought was a stable and reputable company to find yourself landed in it like this? yes, it has come as a bit of a shock, really. as
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my wife said, we research the company thoroughly before we paid out the money and there was no hint, just a month ago, that there were any financial difficulties at all. presumably, if you want to see the love and light and so on, you do need a special company that will ta ke need a special company that will take you up there. there is not so easy to book a flight and hotel on the internet? a bit more research required now. next year. colin, you're still planning to go? yes, it's still on our list of things to do. we still want to see the northern lights, the volcanic scenery. and won the wales. are you sympathetic with other people who will have booked with this company, they might have lost more money and find themselves any more difficulties abroad? absolutely. our
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holiday in iceland was not until february. i imagine a lot of summer holidays will be disrupted through this fall. when you have done research about the company think it isa research about the company think it is a good solid company and then this happens, it's a bit worrying.” hope you have managed to rebook and have a good trip. thank you for talking with us. the situation at whaley bridge ongoing, severe flood warnings still in force. very little if any rain falling here today. over the past three hours, more cloud has come into south—east scotland, north—east england, with some showers. clouds bubbling up ahead of that in the midlands and home counties, catching a few showers, but later today. fewer showers, should be a drier day in the north—east of england and scotland. temperatures into the low to mid 20s. showers that do form
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will tend to fade away during this evening, dry overnight. a bit misty around some eastern areas, with some patches of low cloud. temperatures 12 to 14 celsius. this band of the cloud will produce a few bands of charlemagne. —— distended showery rain. one ortwo charlemagne. —— distended showery rain. one or two showers breaking out ahead of that, temperature is very similar to those today.
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hello, this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines — the liberal democrats win the brecon and radnorshire by—election, leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. i will i will fight i will fight to keep our country in the european union. and we now have in parliament one more mp who will
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fight to make that happen. the raf are dropping hundreds of tons of sand and gravel onto the damaged reservoir dam in whaley bridge. is there still a real risk that it could collapse? yes, the structural engineeron the could collapse? yes, the structural engineer on the site is very concerned about that. and basically, the information we have had us we have to do something here because it is not going to go away on its own. two holiday firms with bookings from more than 50,000 people have ceased trading. last month was probably the warmestjuly on record, according to new research. global temperatures forjuly could be the hottest on record. that's the initial assessment of the eu's climate change service. their figures show that this month will be 1.2 degrees above pre—industrial levels. our science correspondent pallab ghosh explains.
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it is not water they are walking through, but a heat haze on the streets injapan. and it's been the same story across many parts of the world. record temperatures in finland, and a three—week heatwave in china, too. and now, it's official — july is one of the hottest, if not the hottest, on record. and july isn't alone. 2019 has been very warm globally. each month so far is among the four warmest for the month in question, and june has been the highest ever. this particular month has been very warm. but to me, this is not really the main point. the main point is that not only this month has been very warm, but last month was very warm. all months during 2019 were very warm, in terms of comparing with other years. the results are based on billions of measurements from satellites, ships, aircraft and weather stations all across the world. these latest figures are part of a long—term trend in rising global temperatures.
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and computer models of the impact of climate change predict that more summer temperature records are likely to be broken, all across the world, more often. this record shows that the average temperature around the individual heatwaves can't be pinned to human—created global warming, but the increase in extremes of weather we are beginning to see is in line with the predictions made by climate change experts, and they say that they are likely to get worse and more frequent. pallab ghosh, bbc news. well, bob ward, who you heard from there a few moments ago, isjoining me now in the studio. the whole planet was warmer than it has been any other time on record. the previous record was set injuly 2016, so we are seeing this consistent pattern of breaking the temperature record around the world, notjust four months,
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but years, every few years or so, part of the warming trend. and are you clear that this is caused by man—made industrial output and so on, the damage that we've been doing? there is no other explanation for this. scientists have been looking at all the other potential explanations, and it is very clear that it is a build—up of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in the atmosphere that is driving this warmer trend. we do have new goals for tackling climate change here in the uk, across europe, we know that the americans of course pulled out of the key paris accord, but are they going to be able to turn around this trend? well, global warming will not stop until every country in the world gets to zero emissions of greenhouse gases. and at the moment, that temperature this month has been 1.2 degrees above its preindustrial level. the international commitment is to keep that rise to
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well below 2. so we need countries currently revising their pledges for emissions, all of them to come next year when they are due to submit it, and put on the table commitments to reach zero emissions, like the uk did last month, to commit to zero emissions by 2050. yeah, but as you say, those goals are decades away. in the meantime, are we going to be seeing hotter and hotter summers? there is a lag in how the climate responds to the rise in greenhouse gas concentration. so for the next few decades, climate change will get worse no matter how well we cut emissions, and we are going to have to adapt to these impacts. things like the heat wave that we saw last month, but also more intense rainfall, which again, we have seen in recent days in northern england. these things are going to get worse, and we will have to adapt, but we have to cut our emissions down to zero,
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otherwise it will get to catastrophic levels later in the century. we are talking here about climate change, which means notjust the hotter temperatures, but yes, those sorts of really severe storms which have caused so much damage in the north of england in the last few days. earlier this week, the met office pointed out the uk had had its ten warmest years since 2002, but also six of its seven wettest years. so britain is becoming warmer and wetter, and it is basic physics. if you warm the atmosphere, it can hold more water, so when it rains, it rains more heavily, and you get the greater risk of surface water flooding and river flooding. it's reported the new northern ireland secretary, julian smith, has asked for portraits of the queen to be put back on display inside government buildings at stormont. the portraits had been taken down after a senior civil servant was paid £10,000 in compensation after saying it was unfair for him
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to walk past pictures of her majesty and the duke of edinburgh as he might feel offended. i've been speaking to our correspondent keith doyle aboutjulian smith's intervention. well, in northern ireland, symbols are hugely significant, be it flags, mules, or as this row illustrates, portraits. there are strict laws and specific laws in northern ireland that cover these areas, andindeed employment and equality laws say that no workplace should be intimidating or hostile for any workers, no matter which side of the community that they come from. this whole row came to light when lord mcguinness, the ulster unionist mp, told the house of lords that a senior civil servant here at the northern ireland office, which is on the which is in the grounds here in stormont, received a £10,000 payment for distressed because he had to walk past a picture of the queen
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throughout his working day. indeed, nationalists may not see the queen as head of state here. needless to say, unionist mps have been outraged by this, and have called for some clarification. the secretary of state did not give much clarification on whether pictures have been removed, whether they've been put back, but the secretary of statejulian smith did tweet a picture of the queen that he said was on his mantelpiece in his private office in belfast. quite a small photograph of the queen there. ulster unionist mps say that is not enough, they want more answers to the questions. they are asking where portraits have been taken and they want them put back up. so really, that is where the row is at the moment. the secretary of state did not give much information on that, but he said in a statement the other night that the northern ireland office must be open
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and inclusive for work people to be able to attract people from all parts of the community. so another row over symbols in northern ireland. as you say, symbols do have a huge significance given the very sensitive political situation there, but people will think back to the queen's very successful visit to ireland, and perhaps be surprised thatjust a picture of the queen could cause this sort of a row. well, what happens here in northern ireland might bemuse people in england, scotland, wales and the republic of ireland, because things that would seem insignificant elsewhere are hugely significant here. you might remember back to the rows of flagpoles. when the british flag can be for nonofficial buildings. the lord mayor of belfast some time ago
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removed a picture of the queen and put a republican poster up there. that also caused a row. this is one of the complex things about life in northern ireland. a fourth person has tested positive for ebola in the city of goma in the east of the democratic republic of congo. the outbreak has become the second—worse on record, killing more than 1,800 people since it was declared one year ago. worsening violence in the region has added to the spread of the disease as thousands of people are living in makeshift camps. anne soy reports. thousands on the move in the drc‘s north eastern province of ituri, taking what they can as they flee. they've lost homes, food, and their loved ones. 49 bodies were recovered in this village alone when a rival ethnic community attacked in june. this was once a big village. and see what remains. these burnt—out huts. the people have all fled. they've been coming back during
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the day to harvest their crop. and they tell me that they're determined to return here even though there's every evidence of the massacre they went through, with a big graveyard just as you enter the village. this is where most end up, in camps that have sprung up across the province. they are farmers who were about to harvest their crops, but now, they are forced to rely on donations. translation: i lost my husband and two children. we ran and hid in the forest until soldiers came to rescue us. the un has its biggest peacekeeping force here trying to pacify a region that has no no peace for decades. the conflictjust got worse, with automatic weapons now replacing machetes. translation: we want security. the government should confiscate
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the guns the attackers have. those who want to join the army should do so. they should leave us to go back to our land to build our homes and farm. more than 300,000 people have been displaced. this grandmother shares this small tent with her ten orphaned grandchildren. translation: we sleep on the floor. we have nothing. the food isn't good. look at this skin disease i've contracted. and each day, there are more new arrivals. it's getting dangerously overcrowded. these people may be relatively safe for now from physical violence, but living right outside a big hospital, and next to a centre set aside for suspected cases of ebola, is nowhere near safe for them. the conditions here are just perfect for an explosion of disease. but they cannot return to their villages just yet.
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this has been described as a scorched earth attack, a message to the displaced that they are not welcome back, and those who attempted to rebuild were hit again. anne soy, bbc news, bunia. the headlines on bbc news — the liberal democrats win the brecon and radnorshire by—election — leaving borisjohnson's government with a working majority of one. the raf are dropping hundreds of tons of sand and gravel onto the damaged reservoir dam in whaley bridge. two holiday firms with bookings from more than 50,000 people have ceased trading. for the first time, women in saudi arabia will be allowed to travel abroad without getting permission from their male "guardian". the ultra—conservative kingdom
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is relaxing the guardianship laws, where women had to seek permission from their husband, father, or other male relative, which had faced criticism from international human rights' groups. last year, saudi women were officially allowed to drive. a bitter trade war between america's two allies in asia has escalated, after the japanese government removed south korea from a list of preferred export partners. those on the so—called "white list" of countries enjoy fewer trading restrictions. it's a move that's infuriated south koreans. here's our seoul correspondent laura bicker. this is the level of anger some in south korea feel towards japan. in disgust, this man is destroying his japanese—made car, an act of defiance just days after tokyo slapped trade restrictions on seoul. he's not alone in his fury. the trade spat has prompted thousands of south koreans to boycott japanese goods.
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hundreds of items have been taken off supermarket shelves. translation: japan took action, and as korean citizens, we should act fast as well, so we haven't been using any japanese products. translation: we often used to go on vacation to japan, but now we don't. we've even recently cancelled our trip to japan. this dispute comes after decades of mistrust. when japan occupied south korea from 1910 to 1945, prisons such as this one were used to silence and crush dissent. around 500 inmates were held here, including women and children. some of them were tortured. it is a time south koreans have never forgotten, and more importantly, have never forgiven. tens of thousands of koreans were forced to work injapanese mines and steel mills without pay during the second world war. they said we were treated as slaves.
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japan maintains these issues were resolved by a treaty signed in 1965. but a supreme court ruling in seoul decided last year that workers and their families were owed compensation. this 96—year—old man is one of the few survivors from that time. translation: they told us that we would study and learn technologies from japan, but when we went, there was no studying. just doing a lot of hard manual labour. i had to move heavy steel from one cargo to another. i sweated so much. the company told me to continue to stay in japan and work for them, but i couldn't stay. it was so hot, and hard work. seoul believes tokyo's trade restrictions on essential supplies for its biggest industries are a form of targeted retaliation for the court orders. japan says that's simply not true.
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but the pain will not just be felt here. it could ripple through global tech supply chains, which may force the us to step in to try to solve this feud before it escalates further. laura bicker, bbc news, seoul. it's been more than 30 years since the devastating nuclear disaster at chernobyl, but families in the region are still suffering the effects of the radiation. this week, a group of affected school children are coming to the derbyshire town of glossop for three weeks of health and wellness activies to help them enjoy the outdoors and learn new skills. fiona lamdin went to meet them. right, everyone! it's pizza snack time! everyone around the fire circle! wash your hands first! this is more thanjust an adventure in the woods. these children are here for a recuperative rest. all are in remission, recovering from cancer, likely to be as a result
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of chernobyl, the world's worst nuclear accident when, in 1986, a reactor at the nuclear power station in the ukraine exploded, sending a radioactive plume across europe. it happened 33 years ago but these children still live in radioactive environments in belarus. when there was the accident at chernobyl, the wind was blowing northwards so a lot of contamination fell onto belarus. although much of it blew across europe, but belarus was the country that got most of the radiation so there are areas of contamination still all over belarus so even though some of the children may live hundreds of miles from the actual chernobyl reactor, they're still breathing contaminated air and eating contaminated food every day. we're going to now demonstrate how to toast a marshmallow. and that's why, over the last two decades, a charity based in derbyshire has brought over 5,000 children to the uk to give them some respite.
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doctors believe that these children spending time here in the fresh air, eating fresh food without contamination, can boost their immune systems for up to two years. so what difference do you notice in the children after they've been to the uk? translation: after staying in the uk, our children have less colds and infections. kristina's 12, milana's 9. it's their first time here in the uk. do you both feel a lot better being here in england? kristina says that she is enjoying staying here in the uk because she feels more energy, she feels cheerful, more energetic, more healthy.
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at the end of the summer holiday, these children will have to go back home, but it's hoped that this clean—air holiday will give these damaged young bodies a boost. fiona lamdin, bbc news. first it was tennis, then football, but now it seems that even the medieval sport ofjousting needs modern day technology — a video referee. var may have proved controversial, but that hasn't stopped it being introduced in the premier league from next week. now cameras are being used to see when knights score a direct hit on their opponent. david sillito has been to see it in action. ominous music you can't breathe, you can't see, you can't hear, you can't talk to anyone, you can't feel the horse
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through your legs. it's an experience. sensory deprivation, i can see this much, i can see a person's head, i can see nothing else, i can feel nothing and hear nothing. jousting. a little bit of the middle ages that still survives in britain's castles, and it does have rules and a scoring system, but it's hard to follow. i asked a couple of young fans what they made of it all. people riding on horses and fighting each other with sticks. bashing swords. it's fight stuff. so a little bit of explanation. the pointscoring, three points if you get the shield, one point for the body and alarmingly, five points if you hit the head. here they come, here they come! however, the real question is,
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how could anyone be sure who's hit what, where? she took a nasty one there, didn't she? and so to solve the problem, hidden in a tent is markjenner — the joust video assistant referee. you might get a point with that. you wouldn't have got this without this? no, not a chance. these are blink—and—you—miss—it moments. take this contest between clive "lancelot" hart and lisa "wild woman" dixon. can you see me? i can see your glasses, just about. and the joust? any idea what happened there? thankfully, the action replay reveals all. he struck you in the head, didn't he? apparently. you can't feel it. if you have good armour
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you don't feel it. ladies and gentlemen, please give it up for rob the jester. and the point of this? jousting wants to be taken seriously. jousting is and was england's first national sport and, as such, it needs to be taken seriously. oh, this is a joke, though, isn't it? not at all, no. english heritage is even at the forefront of trying to get the international olympic committe to recognise this as a sport that should be competed at. we've even got olympic athletes... olympicjousting — you're kidding me. not at all. they are very serious. 30mph impacts in full plate armour. it's not quite as dangerous as it was in the middle ages but it's still spectacular, and they hope technology may just help give this bit of the past a new future. our new champion, the knight of the raven! david sillito, bbc news, bournemouth. the very latest pictures from whaley bridge, where an raf chinook is an
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action. there you can see it over the damaged dharma, bringing in bags of sand and gravel, which we understand have been donated locally. she damaged damp. the idea is to fill in and shore up the damaged section that damp. —— damp. there are also efforts under way to lower the level of the water in the reservoir above the dam and the operation continuing. in a moment, we'll say goodbye to viewers on bbc two, and ben brown will be here shortly with the bbc news at one, but first it's time for a look at the weather. the ongoing situation at whaley bridge with the severe flood warning. little or no rain falling
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today in this area, most places dry with some sunshine. but even in warwick, the cloud is increasing, and one or two showers possible. some cloud continuing to push into north—east england in south—east scotland, showers which will drift that down into the midlands, and perhaps all the way into the home counties. one or two showers further west, but few are in scotland and northern england than yesterday. many places dry, temperatures low to mid 20s. very pleasant in the sunshine if you have it, a bit of sunshine if you have it, a bit of sunshine at edgbaston for a day two of the ashes. looks like it should really be dry. if we catch a shower tomorrow, later on in the afternoon. any showers we have got late this afternoon into the evening will fade away, and we will have some breaks in the cloud. a little bit of low cloud, misty perhaps around eastern areas. temperatures down to about 12, 14 celsius. this band of cloud producing some showery rain, the
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showers brushing the south—west of england, headed towards wales come into northern ireland, may be picking up a few showers in the north west of england as well. heading further east, more chances of staying dry, with some sunshine, although turning a bit hazy. highs around 26 celsius in the south—east of england. second half of the weekend, more places seeing some rain, an area of low pressure slowly coming in from the atlantic, which will push ahead these weather fronts as well. and as the showery rain moves northwards into scotland, through the late afternoon and evening, it could turn heavy infantry. a few showers elsewhere across england and wales, maybe even lincolnshire will have a dry day. probably feeling quite muggy, temperatures towards the high 20s here. low pressure moving across the country for the beginning of next week, so although some places have had more than enough rain, it looks like there's more to come. quite
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pleasing on the cooler side, with some heavy showers. —— quite breezy.
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raf helicopter crews in a race against time to save a dam, before it bursts and floods the town of whaley bridge. the chinooks are dropping bags of sand, stone and gravel to shore up a gaping hole in the dam wall. more than a thousand residents have been moved out of the derbyshire town — experts say the situation is critical. there is still a real risk it could collapse. the structural engineer on site is very concerned. and basically, the information we have had is we have to do something here because it is not going to go away on its own. we'll have the latest from our correspondent at the scene, and analysing from our science editor. also this lunchtime: i do hereby declare thatjane dodds
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is duly elected member of parliament

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