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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 4, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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i mean, northern ireland is a fascinating country. lots of history. but i think if not for game of thrones are probably would not have come all this way. so really are you like a big fan? on a scale of one to ten, like an 11. i'm 2a, travelling alone, my father grew up during the troubles so he thought it was absolutely insane. but he has seen all my photos and it has been a great trip. for three decades, up until 1998, northern ireland endured a violent and deadly conflict known as the troubles. since then, a kind of dark tourism exploring the locations and rules ——murals of the conflict has been popular here. but for some local people there is now a more positive story to tell about what their country has to offer. so here we have summer, which is bran stark‘s direwolf. now, you're going to go meet him later on.
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this is obviously — he's not a puppy any more. but he's stilljust as cute, trust me. ah, the runt of the litter. that one's yours, snow. the big draw behind my coach tour were local celebrities. william played a white walker in the programme, but it is his two dogs that people come from around the world to meet. who do we have here? this is odin and is thor. summer, bran stark‘s direwolf, and grey wind, rob stark‘s direwolf. aren't you beautiful. he's so fluffy! yeah. shall we take them for a walk? yeah. do you want to take this one? sure. it has changed from being only a couple of dogs to suddenly you've got a tourism operation now. well, you know, people started wanting to meet them. they contacted us through social media and so we decided that instead of them coming to our house we had to make it more official. so my brothers and i started up our own tour company. so tell us a little bit about the impact game of thrones has had on your community. county down, i think, was one of the least visited tourist—wise counties in ireland.
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now i think it is one of the highest because of game of thrones. you look like a game of thrones extra. do you buy into it? are you a game of thrones junkie? i was actually contracted to keep this while filming. my whole family have long hair and beards, but anyway... yeah, i am a massive game of thrones fan. good morning, welcome to breakfast with christian fraser and nina warhurst. our headlines today twenty people are killed and two dozen injured in a mass shooting at a shopping mall in the us city of el paso. on a day that would have been a normal day for someone to leisurely go shopping, turned into one of the most deadly days in the history of texas.
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more homes are evacuated near a dam that's in danger of collapsing as forecasters warn there's heavy rain to come. talks to avert a strike at heathrow are to resume today but nearly two hundred flights have already been cancelled. up, up and away — franky zapata succeeds in crossing the channel on his jet—powered hoverboa rd. england's ashes plan this morning... try and get steve smith out. australia lead by 3a after three days of the first test and the batsman could prove to be the difference at edgbaston good morning. after a quieter day yesterday, the showers look like they will be back out in force across the uk today. more details on the areas likely to be affected coming up. it's sunday the 4th of august. our top story. at least 20 people have been killed
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in the latest mass shooting in the united states. the massacre happened in a mall in the city of el paso, where many families were out shopping. a 21—year—old white man has been arrested and police are looking into whether he deliberately targeted the hispanic community. our north america correspondent chris buckler reports. oh, my god. families were out shopping on a saturday morning when they were advised to run. run, run, run. inside the mall in el paso, officers moved in, responding to another report of an active shooter in america. the gunman walked into the packed walmart supermarket, firing indiscriminately. 20 people were killed and more than two dozen were injured. the shoppers of the walmart were between one and 3000, with employees present, it is back to school and walmart was at capacity when the shootings occurred. el paso sits at america's
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border with mexico. it has a large hispanic population, and many people cross over into the us to visit friends and go shopping. police say the suspect taken into custody is white, he has been identified by local media as 21—year—old patrick crusius. at a news conference the authorities said that it was a murder investigation, that officers were examining the possibility that the attack was a hate crime, and looking at possible links with a white nationalist manifesto that claimed the attack was targeted at the hispanic community. it was published anonymously online. disgusting, intolerable, not texan. and we are going to aggressively prosecute it both as capital murder and as a hate crime, which is exactly what it appears to be, without having seen all the evidence yet. just days ago, two members of staff were killed in a separate shooting at a walmart store in mississippi. and days before that,
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people were shot dead at a food festival in northern california. now it is the turn of another state to mourn. reporter: how do you get our city ready for 20 funerals? i don't know, we have never done this before. i would hope and pray we never have to do it again, but we will do it. we're going to survive, because that's who we are. in a post on twitter, president trump described the shootings as "terrible", and pledged the support of his government. but some americans will be left wondering about the more regular rhetoric used by politicians, and asking if some of this country's deaths could be avoided if there were tighter restrictions on guns. so the debate begins again. what do we know about the gunman and his motives? earlier, we spoke to our correspondent
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sophie long who is in el paso. the gunman has been identified. police are dry to identify if a white nationalist manifesto published online has anything to do with him. the governor of texas described the scenes unfolding in the walmart behind me as horrific, he said of the 26 injured many of them are fighting life—threatening injuries. sadly, it's possible the death toll could climb further. as you heard in the report, mass shootings are not uncommon here in the united states, only last weekend a six—year—old and a 13—year—old we re a six—year—old and a 13—year—old were among those killed when a gunman opened fire at a festival in northern california. another community today, there is shock i have to say that it happened here in el paso, it's considered to be one of the united states ‘s safest cities. another community in america coming to terms with the horror that unfolded here today, there are again calls for something to be done about
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it. a number of democratic presidential candidates gathered in las vegas earlier today, we heard from a number of them, bernie sanders and beto o'rourke who is from el paso, he blamed the shooting and rising levels of hatred and racism here in the united states and he put at least some of the blame for that at the door of president trump. we have heard from the president via twitter who condemned the shootings and he and the first lady sent their prayers by twitter to the people here who will come to terms with what unfolded here earlier today. in the last few moments, breaking reports coming in ofa moments, breaking reports coming in of a second mass shooting in the united states, this one is in dayton in ohio. local media saying police responding to a shooting situation in the city centre, a report that hasn't yet been verified by the bbc. coming in from some of the american newspapers coating police as saying up newspapers coating police as saying up to seven people may have been
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killed and the gunman could still be at large. emergency services in attendance, the second mass shooting in 2a hours. goodness me. of course, we are gearing up for the presidential debates in the united states, you look at the opinion polling, gun legislation is quite high up in the pulling but it's not top and earlier we spoke to somebody from el paso and it was quite interesting, incredible really, when you think of what has happened, first response is if there's been a mass shooting we need to get a gun so we can mass shooting we need to get a gun so we can protect ourselves rather than talking about tighter restrictions. it's so deeply ingrained culturally and that's why it often comes up around election times, reports in the last few moments of a second shooting in the united states, in dayton ohio but we will bring you more on that as it develops. let's turn to events closer to home. another 55 homes have been evacuated near a dam in derbyshire which is in danger
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of collapsing.police say it's because more heavy rain is forecast. lets talk to our reporter luxmy gopal, who's in whaley bridge — luxmy, there's big concerns about this bad weather that's forecast later? it looks stunningly beautiful behind you, belying the real danger. it's a beautiful and idyllic scene, that's why it's hard to imagine just how much devastation could potentially be caused and the potential risk to life here. over the past few days the key aims have been to reduce the water levels of the reservoir and shore up the damaged part of the dam and you've seen in the past few days, the picture of the raf chinook bringing in ballast to shore up the dam and high volume pumps have been brought in to try and reduce the level, you can see work going on behind me now, diggers and machinery continuing that work to try and reduce the water levels to a safe amount. emergency workers have been doing that throughout the night. our priority has always been to pump as
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much water out of the dam is possible because every bit of water we take out reduces the risk of the dam failing so we've taken around 35% of the contents of the dam out i'iow 35% of the contents of the dam out now and we are aiming to get down to around 25% where we think it's at a safe level. throughout the night, what we've done is concentrate efforts on making sure the pumps run to full capacity, that means the water level drops, the dam doesn't come down on straight sides, it comes on like this so we have to keep relocating the pumps further and further into make sure we get them working the most efficient way they can be. so, as you see, still a critical situation, 55 homes evacuated late last night, on top of the one and a half thousand people who had to leave their homes on thursday. the evacuation zone is down that way and some residents have come up here to take a look at the reservoir this morning and they said to us, they find it hard to square the fact they've been made to
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leave their homes for potentially the rest of the week when the weather is like this but of course, that's all about to change because we've got an imminent weather warning, predicting heavy storms and rain hitting this area from about 2pm this afternoon. so this is very much the calm before the storm. thank you for that. we will check in with the weather a little bit later. more talks are planned today to try and stop a strike at heathrow by engineers, firefighters and security staff. 177 flights have already been cancelled on monday and tuesday after a union vote rejected a pay offer. heathrow has not said which flights will be cancelled, and said passengers should check with their airlines to see if they are affected. borisjohnson has announced extra funding for nhs hospitals in england. the one off payment of £1.8 billion will go towards new equipment and upgrades to 20 hospitals. let's talk to our political correspondent, jessica parker.
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i remember the promise on the side ofa i remember the promise on the side of a bus, is this the prime minister standing up to the promise he made? i think there is very much that going on, it's worth remembering theresa may when she was in charge pledged quite a lot of money for the nhs before boris johnson, pledged quite a lot of money for the nhs before borisjohnson, perhaps this has some particular significance because as you say, he was a leading like in the vote leave campaign. and adorned on the bus was £350 million a week pledge for the nhs, this is a one—off payment and a numberof nhs think nhs, this is a one—off payment and a number of nhs think tanks as well as the labour party say the money is welcome but it's not enough, it's a drop in the ocean but more broadly, maybe, what's going on, you seen borisjohnson taking maybe, what's going on, you seen boris johnson taking a harder line oi'i boris johnson taking a harder line on brexit, trying to take the fight to the brexit party, is he trying to ta ke to the brexit party, is he trying to take the fight to the labour party and public spending and that is added to the speculation, you will read it in the papers this morning, there could be a general election around the corner. downing street have pushed back on that but worth noting, this government under boris johnson, yes, it's very new but they
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are making a lot of big, bold pledges, not really the behaviour of a steady as she goes mid—term government. wright, jessica, thank you. sixty firearms have been found hidden in a car arriving in doverfrom calais. it's believed to be the largest seizure of lethal weapons at a uk port. a 37 year old man from dublin is due to appear in court on monday. we've been covering this this morning! a french inventor has succeeded in crossing the english channel on a jet—powered hoverboard. it was franky zapata's second attempt to cross the 22—mile stretch of water. he tried it last month but fell into the sea when he failed to land on a refuelling platform. he took off from france just after 7am this morning, and landed in st. margaret's bay in dover
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in the last 30 minutes. could you imagine if you were a ship in the channel this morning and saw that? you would think you were under invasion. but success and congratulations to him. it is like a segway, leaning back, sticks on the brakes. it's especially exciting, he tried a couple of months ago but he missed the spot where he had to refuel and he didn't succeed, if at first you don't succeed, try again. and landing in margate. there you go. we'll return to one of the main stories. a further 55 homes have been evacuated in whaley bridge, amid fears bad weather could hamper efforts to fix a damaged dam that's at risk of bursting. fifteen hundred residents have already left their homes, and emergency services are working round the clock to try and save the 180—year—old structure. we can speak now to fatherjamie mcleod, who was the first to notice the damage and raised the alarm. hejoins us from his home in whaley bridge.
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good morning to you and thank you for joining good morning to you and thank you forjoining us. what was it, when you looked over the dam, that made you looked over the dam, that made you think, we could be in trouble here? good morning. firstly, we had beenin here? good morning. firstly, we had been in the situation where we've had a lot of water coming down the dam and everybody has been watching it for quite a while. and then suddenly, the following morning, i thought i'd go over and see how everything was going about 10am. and then whenl everything was going about 10am. and then when i was over there it started to crack. and the sluice keeper had arrived and i asked him what he was doing and why, basically fight this loose had only been opened at 10:32am. as it got worse, ithen went opened at 10:32am. as it got worse, i then went over to the council and raised the alarm and said, we need to evacuate the village. we then we nt to evacuate the village. we then went back to the reservoir and of course the police came and the procedure was then eventually put into place. but you could sorry,
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father, so you sort the crack unfold before your eyes but at that point i thought at that point the village was going to go. and how would you sum up the response from the emergency services? the emergency services have been absolutely fantastic. i would say everybody is emotional about it, in the sense that part of you want to cry with relief, part of you wants to cry with the sense of what is actually happening. and also, it's very emotional, so many people have come forward and said they want to come forward and said they want to come and help and things, people are managing to get over to the whole because we are stuck, but they're bringing food, we've had people coming in last night, 2am, we have
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done tea and coffee and food for the emergency services over at the dam. i left them at 4:30am this morning. and then i went back to them just after 7am this morning. 90 millimetres per minute is actually going out of the reservoir as we speak. so you know, that's great news but we are not out of the clear at the moment. we are seeing live pictures at the moment and it's really visible how much the water level has dropped and therefore, quite difficult to imagine, it must bea quite difficult to imagine, it must be a very tense time because we are waiting to see what the weather has in store this afternoon. yes. it is tense. we've got an emergency plan in place, if it goes, a klaxon will sound, secondly we will then receive messages here at the whole, the bell will ring here at the hall, the church, the belt will go nearby to announce, and secondly once we hope
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for good news that we are in the clear, it would be great if every church bell and cathedrals would ring out to announce we are in the clear because this is a national disaster in this country. we'd also like to give thanks for all the emergency services, their time and borisjohnson for his emergency services, their time and boris johnson for his help and support in coming the other day. fatherjamie mcleod, support in coming the other day. father jamie mcleod, many support in coming the other day. fatherjamie mcleod, many thanks, do ta ke fatherjamie mcleod, many thanks, do take care of yourself and keep looking after each other, it sounds as if that's happening. they've done an incrediblejob, as if that's happening. they've done an incredible job, those firefighters, you will see it sits ina firefighters, you will see it sits in a bowl firefighters, you will see it sits ina bowland firefighters, you will see it sits in a bowl and that we get all that rain, they might have blocked the ingress as but it's going to accumulate in the reservoir so let's talk to susan. let's find out what the weather has in store. there are yellow warnings in place, susan? christian, that's right, the warning stands today from 12 noon lunch lunchtime until 10pm and as you saw,
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the scenes from whaley bridge and from the north of england, it's a lovely start, sunshine, but we anticipate intense showers developing through this afternoon and into the evening. but it won't just be the rain today that will cause concern, this area of low pressure that is the driving force, swirling away with the centre to the west, is set to be with us throughout the week. almost day and date there will be a continued threat of heavy showers and the northern half of britain, looks to be in line for some of the worst. for this morning a lot of sunshine across northern and eastern regions of england, scotland already starting the day with more showers, more planning and for the afternoon but look at the difference across northern england once we've injected some energy into the atmosphere, courtesy of the sunshine, after 25 degrees in the that warmth will to dry the development of intense, thundery showers. isolated showers possible further south, here's the
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area covered by the met office warning stretching from the northern midlands through much of northern england and into central and southern scotland and it is for those locally intense, heavy, thundery downpours. you'll see gaps between the showers, not all areas will see them, the worst of the thundery rain through the evening, showers drifting offshore as we get later into the night, lingering across scotland but another band comes into play, moving across northern ireland through the small hours and that will pull into northern england and southern scotla nd northern england and southern scotland first thing on monday. not just the period covered by that warning. thicker cloud for the south—west of england and wales, some rain to get monday under way and here is the low pressure and i'm sure you will see this picture or one very sure you will see this picture or one very similar many times now in terms of the forecast in the coming week because the picture doesn't change very dramatically, this look continues to swirl dance of showers across parts of the uk. tomorrow, probably england and wales getting some of the heaviest, brighterfor
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the afternoon, more to come from scotla nd the afternoon, more to come from scotland and northern ireland through the second part of the day but with some sunny intervals in between, pressure tomorrow with a westerly breeze. here is tuesday, the same old, same old, the low pressure setting out to the west, further showers crowding in and a line here, you can see heavier rainfall totals and the outlook for the rest of the week? really is very mixed, yes, most of us will see the sunshine at some stage but most of us will get caught in some heavy downpours as well. fortunately, looking further ahead towards next weekend, there is the potentialfor very heavy rain for nearly all parts of the uk. it's worth keeping up—to—date with the forecast. susan, thank you. we will keep our fingers crossed especially for people in derbyshire. a reminder of your top story.
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we're getting unconfirmed reports of a second mass shooting in the united states, in the city of dayton, ohio. local media say police are responding to an active shooting situation near the city centre — with unconfirmed reports that up to seven people may have been killed, with one gunman still at large. there are reports that emergency services are now on the scene, again, we must stress that these reports are unconfirmed at this stage. some reports on social media which say it was in a bar, and it is a late night shooting, people might have been gathered. incredibly, look at the death statistics for people killed in mass shootings in america it's way more than people who die in iraq and afghanistan and yet this intransigence in the country to deal with it and try and get a handle on gun legislation, it's just astonishing i think two people in this country. we'll be talking about
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the american elections shortly. but a nyway the american elections shortly. but anyway let's take a look at some of today's front pages. the sunday telegraph says that mps have been told it is "too late" to stop a no—deal brexit. the paper says dominic cummings, the prime minister's aide, has briefed mps that the opposition has missed the chance to force an election before the deadline of october 31st. the mail on sunday says the uk is demanding that the eu reopen talks on the withdrawal deal, saying chief negotiator, michel barnier, has no mandate since a new european parliament was elected in may. its headline is "get new orders, monsieur barnier". the observer also has a brexit—related lead story but its main picture is a dramatic image of an raf chinook helicopter helping to shore up the dam at whaley bridge in derbyshire. and the sunday times reports that doctors have created a "revolutionary procedure" which can delay the menopause by up to 20 years. it's an ovarian transplant surgery which can take as little as 30 minutes.
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that would be revolutionary, wouldn't it? the writer and broadcaster robert meakin is here to tell us what's caught his eye. you did pick out a story about the upcoming american election. i always forget that to get to their candidate takes longer than us. it's such an incredibly complex background. at the moment, we are bracing ourselves for a british general election, times that by five orten, general election, times that by five or ten, tells you how nasty the election is going to be in america at next year, donald trump, the favourite, joe biden, although he has stuttered a bit recently, possibly coming up against him. you got the split in the democratic party, the centrist versus the progressive left and he of course is more to the centre but it's a reminder that not only, you know, if you are running for the white house, do you have to beat your opponent but you have to beat those on your own site, to win the nomination as well as win the white house. compare it with the conservative contest,
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people reasonably civil, i know all sorts of sneaky things going on behind the scenes but quite civil and public during the debates. compare that to watching the democrats knock chunks out of each other. he was target number one the other. he was target number one the other night. he really was, the marked man, they were trying to pull him down and if he gets through, you are going to have to 70 somethings battling for the presidency. over in the state of the baby boom generation still holding sway very much. it matters how you perform in the run—up to it because the public remember the caucus stage.|j remember the caucus stage.|j remember not long ago people laughing at donald trump standing for the republican candidacy, people said at each level he will get found out, but it seems ludicrous now. i've been asking this question in the mail on sunday, why oh why given the mail on sunday, why oh why given the politics in this country and spitting image disappeared and here is the suggestion it might be. it's got to be ripe for the taking. i rememberasa kid got to be ripe for the taking. i remember as a kid watching it, loving it at the time when they were
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satirising margaret thatcher and john major he was painted grey. the only difficulty with are coming back, one of them, how do you parody borisjohnson and back, one of them, how do you parody boris johnson and donald trump? are you joking? because they are living, breathing, satire themselves, donald trump 's twitter every day is satire, how can you beat that? i saw the guy in the brexit drama playing boris and i thought how can you be as maverick and ludicrous at times as maverick and ludicrous at times as he is? they have it in france, i remember when i lived in france they have spitting image, it's been ongoing, it reminded me how good it is. it's so good. it had a real effect on certain careers, david steel was very embittered, they had him asa steel was very embittered, they had him as a little glove puppet to david owen, he felt that had fixed are running a series of ronald reagan ‘s brain bouncing around the world. i rememberjohn major 's obsession with peas. and on to the
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sunday express. a story aboutjohn cleese, stem cells keeping him young. he's on his fourth wife, considerably younger, he is he's keeping younger by stem cell therapy. i don't know the ins and outs of such a technique but he's adamant it's working, he looks younger than his years. he goes on regularly and has a dose of stem cells. that's what he's claiming. maybe you keep getting bits replaced until you are a full person? he is famous for his phoney war, the ministry of funny walks, the tall one in monty python, he's had to jack that in. the old hibs won't let him do that. it's very physical, the ministry of silly walks. i'm like eve ryo ne ministry of silly walks. i'm like everyone with a bad back, i'm praying they get this stem cell that you inject into your back. rooney, mr rooney. he went off to washington to play his football. but he wants
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to play his football. but he wants to come back? i think he's hinted at it before, he fancies going into management. we know how precarious it is, great footballers becoming managers, it's not a given, right back to the days of the great bobby charlton who did not cut it as a manager, in the premiership this season we will see two great x solves —— season we will see two great x solves — — footballers, season we will see two great x solves —— footballers, frank lampard one of them, and us fans i grew up loving bryan robson, i wanted one of them, and us fans i grew up loving bryan robson, iwanted him one of them, and us fans i grew up loving bryan robson, i wanted him to bea loving bryan robson, i wanted him to be a great manager but he didn't quite get the rub of the green, no guarantee that your good in the field, you will be a good manager and that it will translate. thank you so much, some great stories this morning, stay with us, you are watching abc breakfast. all the headlines coming up. see then. bbc brea kfast.
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hello, this is breakfast with christian fraser and nina warhurst. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. at least 20 people have been killed and another 26 injured in the latest mass shooting in the united states. the massacre happened in a mall in the city of el paso in texas, where many families were out shopping. a 21—year—old man has been arrested and police are looking into whether he deliberately targeted the hispanic community. people are just trying to get out of there, trying to go to the closest store and trying to push people at the way or trying to get them to go with them so they were not stuck behind. when we looked at the back, thatis behind. when we looked at the back, that is where they started to come down and reality set in and people we re down and reality set in and people were crying and calling their families and letting them know it was ok and calling a police.
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we're getting unconfirmed reports of a second mass shooting in the united states, in the city of dayton, ohio. local police say they are responding to an active shooting situation near the city centre — with unconfirmed reports that up to seven people may have been killed, with one gunman still at large. there are reports that emergency services are now on the scene, again, we must stress that these reports are unconfirmed at this stage. another 55 homes have been evacuated near a dam in derbyshire which is in danger of collapsing. police say it's because more heavy rain is forecast. 1500 residents have already left their homes and emergency services are working round the clock to shore up the structure, but the risk of collapse remains at a "critical level". our priority has always been to pump as much water out of the dam as possible because every bit of water we take out reduces the risk of the dam failing. we now know we have taken around 35% of the contents of the dam out now,
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we are aiming to get around 25%, where we think it's at a safe level. throughout the night, what we've done is concentrate efforts on making sure all the pumps run at full capacity. that means, as the water level drops, the dam doesn't come down on straight sides, it comes in like this, so we will have to keep relocating the pumps further into the dam, to make sure they are working at the most efficient they can be. more talks are planned today to try and stop a strike at heathrow by engineers, firefighters and security staff. 177 flights have already been cancelled on monday and tuesday after a union vote rejected a pay offer. heathrow has not said which flights will be cancelled, and said passengers should check with their airlines to see if they are affected. borisjohnson has announced extra funding for nhs hospitals in england. the one—off payment of £1.8 billion will go towards new equipment and upgrades to 20 hospitals. writing in the sunday times, mrjohnson said he was "determined to deliver" the promises
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of the brexit referendum campaign and increase nhs spending. 60 firearms have been found hidden in a car arriving in doverfrom calais. it's believed to be the largest seizure of lethal weapons at a uk port. a 37—year—old man from dublin is due to appear in court on monday. a french inventor has succeeded in crossing the english channel on a jet—powered hoverboard. it was franky zapata's second attempt to cross the 22—mile stretch of water. he tried it last month but fell into the sea when he failed to land on a refuelling platform. he took off from france just after 7am this morning, and landed in st margaret's bay in dover about an hour ago.
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how long did it take him? about half an hour. at first i thought it was margate, then go there. at first we thought he went to calais. it changes every hour. the amazing thing is he made it in one piece. i like the idea he carried on going. he is still going to land somewhere north of edinburgh. ica clash ica clash with the afternoon cricket. i will have to record the football and, at the end of the day with the ashes, i will go to the football. it will be an afternoon of avoiding. that is really tricky. you will have to stay away from your phone. only about two or three
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hours. the important thing that will start first is the ashes. it'll be an intriguing morning session on day four of the first ashes test at edgbaston with australia leading by 3a runs with three second wickets down. what england would give for the fourth to be steve smith. our sports correspondent joe wilson has more. edgbaston, saturday. dress code optional. but try to be eccentric. some of them made you think "why?", and others, "how?" but even on fancy dress day, it is still about cricket. no ashes without fire and no england without burns. yes, he was back. stretch, refocus, and try to find inspiration again. it took a sharp catch from the australian wicket—keeper to finally get rid of rory burns, but his 133 was an immense personal contribution. who would add to it? batting suddenly seemed baffling. chris woakes attacked. in the context of the match, as england built a lead, this shot seemed almost
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worth more than six. nice try in the stands. crowd fully engaged, suggesting david warner, former ball—tamperer, had sandpaper with him. empty pockets, he showed them. the crowd was loud enough even for a passerby to hear, as england bowled, 90 runs ahead. david warner tried not to hit this one but on england's review, there was the evidence, it brushed the bat. he was out. farewell, old friend. england took two more wickets, moeen ali struck, then ben stokes got khawaja. the match was moving, like an inflatable president pursued by mexicans, very edgbaston. steve smith withstood everything. medical check ok. australia 3a ahead and ready for more. obviously, steve is a very good player, and we will try to get him out, but when you get a new batsmen
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at the crease you attack them as much as possible. that is when you are most vulnerable. we saw that in the first innings, built a pressure at the other end and put pressure on the other batters, and we will try to do that again. we will certainly be looking to get steve out if we can. if you like to follow the cricket, you can do. later in the afternoon, if you would like to listen to the cricket and watch the football, it is all possible. red bull's max verstappen will start a formula one race from pole for the first time at the hungarian grand prix later. despite seven race wins, it's taken the dutchman until his fifth season in the sport to start a race from the front. he broke the track record in hungary and will start ahead of the mercedes‘ pair of valteri bottas and championship leader lewis hamilton. england's bronte law and charley hull remain in contention going into the final day of the women's british open at woburn. but defending champion
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georgia hall's 7a leaves her 10 behind the lead. hull though recovered from dropping shots early with four birdies on her back 9 for a round of 70. while law is still to drop a shot at this year's event. both are tied for seventh place, on nine under, that's five shots behind the leader who is the 20 year—old hinako shibuno from japan, she's playing in herfirst major championship. rangers start their scottish premiership campaign later when they face kilmarnock. they're looking to stop celtic winning a ninth league title this season. and they've already got some catching up to do as far as goal difference is concerned. yesterday, neil lennon's side started their defence with a 7—0 win against stjohnstone. ryan christie hit a hat trick. elsewhere there were wins for hibernian and ross county. fulham say they will take the "strongest possible action" after their defender cyrus christie claimed his sister was hit and racially abused by fans during their defeat at barnsley. christie posted on social media after the game to condemn the fans‘ behaviour saying, "regardless how you felt about the result your
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actions are shameful." fulham have launched an investigation into what happened. that story emerged after fulham's 1—0 defeat to barnsley on the opening day of the english football league season. fulham of course were relgated from the premier league last year while barnsley were promoted from league one. just the only goal in it. luke thomas scored barnsley‘s winner. full details of yesterday's results are over on the bbc sport website. the curtain raiser for next week's premier league season is at wembley this afternoon when liverpool take on manchester city in the community shield. and pep guardiola has raised an eyebrow at the lack of city players on the shortlist for fifa's best player award, wondering if they need to get 250 points this season to improve their chances. their opponents today won one trophy and have three nominated, while the premier league champions won three major titles but don't have any.
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we won almost every trophy but, yeah, it is quite remarkable what we have done. not enough to have our players in the best players of europe but good. of course we know each other better than the first season. we start in the first season about what we are going to do. the players know it, so it's easier for ourjob. that is truly bonkers. they do not have one player. but lest was voted for by representatives of both football and the media, so have a word with both. the rugby football league and super league say they're appalled by clashes between catala ns dragons and warrington wolves fans towards the end of their match in france yesterday. tempers flared on the field and off it with around ten minutes of the game to go — two warrington players and one from catalans were sent off after a brawl. there were also disturbing scenes in the crowd as fans then clashed in the stands. both clubs have condemned the incident. the match itself saw catalans beat warrington by 30 points to 10,
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meaning st helens win the league leaders shield. so it seems riding a bicycle seems perilous enough but, on a motorbike, you don't even need anyone knocking you off. this is south african rider steven odendaal being thrown off his bike. that was during qualifying yesterday ata that was during qualifying yesterday at a moto event. he somehow managed to keep control, keeping it upright, and eventually bringing his bike to a standstill. ahead of the moto2 czech grand prix. all we can say is the time for that lap was not quite his best and he did not qualify my son rides his bike like that. he has not found the bra kes yet. bike like that. he has not found the brakes yet. if he had stabilisers, he might do a little bit better!
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thank you. the very mention of chemistry lessons conjures up memories of bunsen burners, experiments gone wrong, and of course — the periodic table. but new research shows there's been a sharp rise in the number of girls choosing the subject at a—level, because of a rising demand for knowledge about skincare products. ione wells has been to one school in wakefield where more and more pupils are taking up the lessons. hydrogen carbonate. if you add that... seems like this are becoming more common. teenagers chatting about the chemicals in skincare and make—up. about the chemicals in skincare and make-up. we all use make-up or skin ca re make-up. we all use make-up or skin care products. at the time you do not know what is going into it. other stuff you have, you know it is in what you are eating so it seems odd to do not know what you are using. this goal in wakefield has
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started to run special skincare chemistry classes and they have had queues out of the door. the younger generation is very engaged in social media, whether instagram or influences, there has been a rise in stu d e nts influences, there has been a rise in students taking an interest in making cosmetics or understanding what is in them. conversations about chemicals in beauty products are some of the most popular conversations in social media. the royal society of chemistry are pushing projects like this because the subject becomes more relatable. at the royal society of chemistry we have education coordinators working throughout england, wales, scotland and ireland. research has shown that stu d e nts and ireland. research has shown that students are subconsciously making decisions about whether science is for them or not earlier than we thought, as young as primary school age. myself and my friends understand it is notjust about the best products are what celebrities he is, it is about the ingredients
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and what is best for the skin. social media often gets blamed for distracting students when they should be working but the students in positive that skincare is helping them get into science. so important to make lessons relevant to people. you studied this at college. what attracted you to the course? you studied this at college. what attracted you to the course ?|j a lwa ys attracted you to the course ?|j always had a natural ability in science but was more interested in the trends of skincare and make—up. when i found this course at the london college of fashion married my passions and strengths. what puts girls of chemistry? only 9% of chemistry professors are female. what is a drop off all about? i think, from my experience at school, it was not seen as a particularly
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feminine subject and i think, when you are a teenager, you naturally wa nt to you are a teenager, you naturally want to fit into those sort of stereotypes, if you like many want to do more textiles and art and humanities and boys are encouraged to do more science subjects. from a very young age, it is influenced. but all the young women who are watching, he might be thinking of a course like this, how is it relevant to you today? i had spent a year in product development. i did the course and went straight into formulation chemistry for a big british skincare brand and moved into development. i have spent my whole career doing what i love from having a technical background. whole career doing what i love from having a technical backgroundlj guess having a technical background.” guess the problem for me certainly at school with physics and chemistry, i could not see orfeel anything tangible enough to make it releva nt. anything tangible enough to make it relevant. with something like this,
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it makes it more understandable, doesn't it? exactly. using real-life examples, ina doesn't it? exactly. using real-life examples, in a bathroom if you have moisturiser and shower gel and he read the ingredients and relate the surface chemistry and emotion chemistry to the products you are using, it makes it more digestible and helps you to learn it. you have your own company, you are an entrepreneur. hopefully that will appeal to more women to go down the chemistry route. absolutely. there are science roles in other areas like fabric dyes and the food industry. so many ways to apply science. there is a technical role you might not be aware of. fascinating to hear. thank you for coming in and all the success with your business. and glowing skin. just to prove it works.
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let's return to one of our main stories now. a further 55 homes have been evacuated in derbyshire, amid fears bad weather could hamper efforts to fix a dam that's at risk of collapsing. 1500 whaley bridge residents have already left their homes, but many have had to leave their pets behind. charity animal search uk is now working round the clock to rescue stranded pets and reunite them with their owners. andrew mcnair is working with them, he joins us now. a very good morning to you. this is something people have not necessarily thought about them in a pets that got left behind. how big a challenge has it been to make them more safe? it has been very difficult. we have to follow all of the guidelines put in place by the local police. we have to go to regular briefings, we have to follow a strict procedure pull in and out of the exclusion zone. as long as we
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stick to that, we are able to enter the area and remove pets. as far as you know, have all the pets be made safe from down there or are there any still in danger? -- been made. there are three we are after today, three cats. we have a specific address to go to. we will be proceeding to that area today again to try and retrieve those animals using a humane cat rescue page. talk using a humane cat rescue page. talk us through that then. you might know the address but you may not know where the cat is and how to find it. we saw them there yesterday but we we re we saw them there yesterday but we were unable to actually get them to go into the cage, so we're going back to that area today. they are staying quite local to their address, so we are feeding them and we will be there again this morning to see if we can coax them into the pages. presumably you have to be in and out without taking too long because you have to make sure that
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you stay safe. absolutely. we are still under the same process of 15 minutes. we login at a checkpoint, we are gone but we are there on the address and 15 minutes later we had to be out. it is an in and out process. the best of luck today finding the remaining pets and make sure you do stay safe. thank you. here's susan with a look at this morning's weather. it looks very calm at the moment. this is the outlook for nearby buxton. the forecast obviously for today has the met office yellow warning for later on. the concern is the risk will continue to be high through the coming week. today we are in line for heavier thundery showers, breaking out across the north of britain. we have already seen some meaty ones in the south
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west of scotland by tracking north and east witsel to any afternoon, the son and checks energy into the atmosphere and that is what will help to bring their thunderstorms. the heat basically equates to the energy to help their showers form. here is the met office warning area from the north midlands into southern scotland. we are anticipating the most active showers developing probably somewhere in the middle of the afternoon and persisting into the early evening. potentially hazardous if you are heading the reds. lots of surface water spray and localised flooding with the showers clearing out into the north sea as we move into the small hours of monday. possibly more problematic again another band tracking across northern ireland, into southern scotland and northern england first thing on monday. cloud and merck in the south—west as well.
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you will see plenty of this picture in the week ahead. these two bands are starting to push away eastward through the morning, allowing generally a try and write a story through the second half of the day but we will see showers on monday. —— a try and brighter story. highs of 23, 24. the most important thing is, even if we do fare reasonably well in terms of the showers, we will not be out of the woods with that outlook. all of our thoughts are with the people in whaley bridge. we're getting reports of a second mass shooting in the united states, in the city of dayton, ohio. local police say they are responding to an active shooting situation near the city centre — with unconfirmed reports that up to seven people
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may have been killed, with one gunman still at large. police have said they are investigating an act shooter in oregon district. localjournalist derek myers is on the scene and joins us now on the phone. good if you to join us. good if you tojoin us. things good if you to join us. things a little bit sketchy at the moment. what can you tell us? -- good of you. there is still an active scene at the intersection. thejust you. there is still an active scene at the intersection. the just about 15 minutes ago watched the fire and paramedics walk from the scene of where the shooting took place to a nearby club. in that club, they are repositioning to where eyewitnesses are being held by police right now and being interviewed. the area of oregon, the oregon district
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presumably on total lockdown at the moment? it is. there is some police crime scene tape. they are going to go over this step—by—step, centimetre by centimetre, as they look for evidence. i spoke with an eyewitness, a few actually, from the club, he showed me photos of a man who was handcuffed and laying face down on the ground. they said they saw him shooting and he was a suspect and that he is dead and he was laying on the ground. we also saw pictures of other people covered up saw pictures of other people covered up on the sidewalk as well. at this time we know one gunman as of an hour ago is still at large. they are saying he was wearing a mask, he had a rifle with multiple magazines and they were still searching for at
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least one other gunman. how many do we think may have been killed? we know that late cpr was being done on at least three people. we saw one being taken out in an ambulance. i spoke with hospital officials a couple of hours ago, he said they had several dozen people coming in to hospitals around the area. we know from the pictures that were shown to me by a local bouncer, he works the front doors, checking identification cards. he tells me there were four people at least lying lifeless on the ground. thank you for the update. anyone who has had to clear out their childhood home after the death of their parents will know how hard it can be. but when photographer aram balakjian faced that task, he found a way to bring the empty rooms back to life.
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take a look at this. beautiful photos. good morning. talk us through the idea behind those photographs. we saw in the foreground the photographs he found,
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which it came across. in the background the empty house, which is so emotive. the idea was to try and convey the feeling i had while i was clearing, going from these highly, emotionally charged rooms. as they became clear, they became an empty room without emotion in it. i wanted to convey that feeling i was feeling. the contrast between the highly emotional memories. how did you come to the idea? was it the fa ct you come to the idea? was it the fact that really the house was not the important bit, it is the stuff in the house that was important that you are clearing out? more important than that, it was the memories attached to the house. the house was just the empty space. i thought at the beginning, how i ever going to go of this has? in the end i realised it was the memories i did not want to let go of. the physical
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aspect was not as important. what was important was important was the memories. i was trying to capture that idea. it was an intelligent way to let yourself go. there is a photograph of your mum in the garden. lots of your family going about their everyday business. that says so much more than a posed photograph. people all around the country will be saying, i wish i had done that, before we cleared it out. do you think it helped you to deal with the grief? i think it allowed me to separate the grief, in a way, and realise they said it was what was inside i was missing and i wa nted was inside i was missing and i wanted to hold onto. that was not going anywhere. it allowed me to let going anywhere. it allowed me to let go of the house and let go of the physical aspect of the grief and just deal with what is inside and be like, there's memories will always be there and i don't have to let go of them anyway, ijust had to let go of them anyway, ijust had to let go of that there side of things. the
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nice thing is there is another family are their making their memories. it is nice in the end to be able to handle the house over to them. we buy the houses for 30 yea rs, them. we buy the houses for 30 years, make our memories in them and thenit years, make our memories in them and then it is time to hand on to someone else to make their memories and now there is a new family. how many pictures did you take?” and now there is a new family. how many pictures did you take? i took about 3000 in total. could you do an exhibition? i would love to. i hope to exhibit them somewhere at some point. it is such a smart idea and i am sure yourdad point. it is such a smart idea and i am sure your dad would be incredibly proud. we have just am sure your dad would be incredibly proud. we havejust been through it in myfamily proud. we havejust been through it in my family with my grandfather's property. you realise how futile of the things are the other but the things i want the memories are attached to and that is what is important, isn't it? that is it from us today. dan and sally will be here
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at six o'clock. me either to the news channel for the latest on the developing story in america. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... twenty people have been killed and twenty—six injured in a mass this shooting in a walmart store in the us city of el paso, texas a suspect has been taken into custody by police — he's been identified by local media as 21—year—old patrick crusius a second mass shooting has taken place in the us, in dayton, ohio — local media say up to ten people may have been killed, and a gunman is still at large. another 55 homes are evacuated as heavy rain is forecast in derbyshire where emergency services are battling to prevent the whaley bridge dam from collapsing

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