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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 6, 2019 6:00am-8:32am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: the moment a british airways flight filled with smoke 10 minutes before landing. one passenger compares it to a horror film.
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a teenager is charged with attempted murder after a 6—year—old boy was allegedly thrown from viewing platform of the tate modern art gallery. eu officials say they currently have no reason to hold any further brexit talks with the uk. england's batsmen crumble. australia rip through england's batting line—up to take a 1—0 lead in the ashes. ‘s an icy swim, a 100—mile cycle uphill, and a marathon. how louise took on one of the toughest triathlon events in the world. today we are looking at a mixture of sunshine and showers once again. the heaviest showers in the north and west that they'll be slow—moving and thundery. —— west. they'll be slow—moving and thundery. more in 15 minutes. it's tuesday, august 6th. our top story: holidaymakers on a flight from heathrow to spain, had to be evacuated after smoke filled the cabin shortly before landing. the 175 passengers on board
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were told to use emergency exits to leave the plane and slide down the chutes. british airways has blamed a technical issue. our reporter michael cowan has more. the final minutes of a british airways flight to valencia. one passenger described it as being like a scene from a horror film. ba flight a scene from a horror film. ba flight for two to took off from london heathrow yesterday morning, but ten minutes before landing in valencia, passengers were surrounded by an acrid smoke. very quickly you couldn't see the passenger two seats down from you. it became very thick. we were descending quite quickly at that point. there wasn't an official announcement about what was happening. people were saying get down, get down as we were trying to breathe in the cleaner air towards the floor of the cabin. it's being reported the cockpit was so
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smoky the pilots also wore oxygen masks. another flyer told the bbc as the plane came into land, some passengers were crying. fire crews greeted the flight on the runway in valencia, where all the passengers we re valencia, where all the passengers were helped to safety. british airways says three customers were taken to hospital as a precaution but have since been discharged. but the airline has drawn criticism from those travelling, with one passenger taking to social media, saying: ba has apologised, saying: michael cowan, bbc news. a teenager has been charged
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with attempted murder after a boy was allegedly thrown from the 10th floor of the tate modern art gallery on sunday afternoon. the 6—year—old is currently in a critical but stable condition, as marta newman reports. detectives from the metropolitan police say there is no link between the suspect and the boy who fell. the six year is still in hospital in a critical but stable condition. he was found on a fifth or roof after falling from the tate's viewing platform on sunday. the boy, who is from france, was visiting the uk with his family at the time of the incident stop you officers have issued an appeal from witnesses to come forward. they say their full would have been incredibly stressful to but are urging people to contact them if they have any information to do with the investigation. the 18—year—old is due to appear at
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bromley court later today. martin newman, bbc news. downing street says borisjohnson will enter into any fresh brexit talks with the greatest energy and the spirit of friendship. eu negotiators had told european diplomats that they believe there is no basis forfurther negotiations with the uk. adam fleming reports from brussels. the eu is inching closer to accepting that the most likely outcome of the brexit process is the uk departing without a deal on october the 31st. after discussions last week with the prime minister, his europe advisor david frost and the brexit secratary stephen barclay, brussels negotiators have concluded the only way to avoid a no—deal brexit is with major changes to the withdrawal, changes that the eu finds unacceptable, such as the removal of the irish backstop. and official told a meeting of european diplomats yesterday that with only a few weeks to go, we're back we were three years ago. they haven't given up three years ago. they haven't given up completely, though. further talks with the uk haven't been ruled out
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and the moment of truth may not come until a meeting of g7 leaders in france towards the end of this month. the government also rejected the eu's assessment is that there may be no point talking at all, with a downing street spokesman saying the uk would throw itself into further negotiations with the greatest energy and a spirit of friendship. adam fleming, bbc news, brussels. fresh vigils have been held in the texan city of el paso, in which 22 people were shot dead on saturday. it was the first of two mass shootings, nine people were also killed in ohio. in a rare intervention, former us president, barack obama, has urged americans to reject language coming out of the mouth of us leaders that feeds a climate of fear and hatred or normalises racist sentiment. north korea has fired two unidentified missiles into the sea. it's the fourth such launch in less than a fortnight. the south korean military claim the devices are short—range ballistic missiles. the united states has said
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it is monitoring the situation. residents in villages close to a military base in siberia have been evacuated after a fire broke out in the ammunition store which sparked a series of explosions. this video shows the huge ball of fire which led to thousands of people being asked to leave their homes, while russian soldiers at the base were forced to hide in bomb shelters. it's thought eight people have been injured. sales in shops are rising at the slowest rate for 2h years, according to the british retail consortium. july was up by 0.3% compared with an increase of 1.6% in the same month last year. poor weather, slow real wage growth and brexit uncertainty are being blamed. crews need to spend at least two more days pumping water from a reservoir to stop its dam bursting and flooding a town, firefighters say. hundreds of whaley bridge residents are spending a fifth day out of their homes because of the partial collapse of the dam wall.
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our reporter dave guest is there for us this morning. we know they've been working incredibly hard on it. what's the latest on it, dave? well, the drone of those pumps continued through the night and will continue through today but they're doing theirjob. they've lowered the level of the reservoir considerably. it needed to get eight metres below where it has been and by last night it was six metres and they hope to reach the target today. when it is down to that level engineers can see the extent of the damage and make a decision about when it will be safe for people to go back to their homes. that's what the people want to know, they've been out of their homes since thursday and they want to know when they can return. around 20 people in 16 properties have steadfastly refused take police advice and leave their homes, much to the annoyance of police, but the majority have heeded their advice. last week, we saw the true new codec t last week, we saw the true new codec dropping last week, we saw the true new codec opt dropping ballast to plug the
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hole in the dam wall —— tunic. it's back today and it will be robbing sandbags. it appears to be holding but they have to do more work on it —— dropping. when will the dam be in a position where the engineers and authorities feel it is a? the danger we saw last week has receded greatly, but they're not out of the woods just yet stop —— it is safe? thanks very much. —— woods just yet. i was supremely confident that england would be ok yesterday! this is why we love you! there was a chance to hold out for a draw but it went horribly wrong yesterday. the word i'm seeing in all of the papers todayis word i'm seeing in all of the papers today is crumbled, because they really did, they fell apart. crumbled, crushing, ripped apart, shattered! i couldn't watch it
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because of nathan lyon's faced was really annoying me. what was it? his little smirks. the way he looked at moeen ali when he got him out really took me around the bend. but remember to,000 five! remain positive! —— 2005. england fall to a crushing defeat in the first ashes test. they were well beaten by australia, losing by 251 runs at edgbaston. the second test starts at lord's next wednesday. harry maguire has completed his £80 million move to manchester united. the england international becomes the most expensive defender in football history. huddersfield town started their return to the championship with a defeat, after tom lawrance's double helped derby to a 2—1win at the john smith stadium. and it's defeat for johanna konta in herfirst match since wimbledon. the british number one was beaten in straight sets in the first round of the
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rogers cup in toronto. lots of great stuff to talk about in the papers, including perhaps a surprise return for a former england international. lovely! and we'll be talking triathlon later as well. as you can see, i can't walk very well! you walked a bit like a thunderbird this morning when you came in!|j thought you walked really well actually! he is being mean! understandably, having gone through what you have been through over the weekend... we are both surprised you are actually here! am i here? you are actually here! am i here? you are definitely here! how has the weather been? forget about that... sorry, carol, butare weather been? forget about that... sorry, carol, but are you still on a mental high? very much though, still a bit giddy. i might be a bit sore but it was an epic experienced. we have a film later on which shows what you've done. i'm a bit nervous! it looked like game
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of thrones, all of that scenery! the planes above the mountains and on top of the mountains, amazing! quite a few proud family members featuring in this film as well! i'm going to see it later for the first time with all of you... it later for the first time with all ofyou...| it later for the first time with all of you... i think i'm looking forward to it! here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. it was very hot in norway stop not just your immediate family proud of you, so are your tv family. -- it was very hot in norway. the weather has been mixed, sunshine and showers for the last few days but some have been merging to give longer spells of rain and today, a similar story with sunny spells and heavy downpours and they've been slow—moving across the north and west. low pressure is driving our weather and here it is in the atlantic, systems rotating around it bringing in those showers and rain. at the centre, no isobars, and that's why the showers are slow—moving. but further south, still quite breezy
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today. yesterday we had gusts in the south coast of 45 mph and we could see similar today. this is the centre of the low pressure and the showers wrapped around it continue to move east through the day, rattling along quickly in england and wales but slower in scotland in particular and also northern ireland. some of those will be thundery, as i mentioned, and if you're caught in one, it will cool the temperature down but generally temperatures today ranging from 15 in loic to highs of 23 in london. through this evening and overnight, some of the showers will fade but they'll continue across scotland, where there will still be thundery showers, and a smattering and scattering of them across northern england, wales and a view on the south coast. equally, some cleared spells and temperature range, 13 in the north, 1a or 15 further south. tomorrow, many will start on a dry note and a bright note, even with sunshine.
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still breezy in the south, but not as breezy in the south, but not as breezy as today with a few showers, but a breezy as today with a few showers, butafair breezy as today with a few showers, but a fairfew breezy as today with a few showers, but a fair few showers across parts of scotla nd but a fair few showers across parts of scotland and some of those getting in across northern ireland and also northern england. but the showers... and as is the way with showers, not all of us will catch one, they are fairly hit and miss. temperatures, 15 in lerwick and 2a into the south—eastern corner. thursday sees a bit of a change in that we've got a transient week ridge of high pressure across us, so it settles things down to a point. still showers around in parts of scotla nd still showers around in parts of scotland and northern england and a few across wales, the midlands, east anglia and a view dotted in the channel islands and a view on the south coast, but a lot of dry weather as well and not as windy. temperatures, 13 in lerwick and 23 or 2a as we come to the south—eastern corner. but then, later in the day on thursday and
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into friday, look what happens, we've got this unseasonably low area of pressure coming across the uk with attendant fronts. that will bring strong winds with it and also some heavy rain as well. of course, it's the school holidays and you might be camping, or indeed you might be camping, or indeed you might be camping, or indeed you might be at some of the various events taking place this weekend. the trees are also in full bloom so it could lead to some issues. the weekend forecast, rain at times and windy means to keep in touch with the forecast wherever you're going to be. will do! thanks very much, carol! let's take a look at today's papers. sally will take us through some of the back pages as well. dame barbara windsor is on the front page of the mirror and a few of the other papers this morning. she's urging the prime minister to act to help solve a dementia funding "scandal". the eastenders star — who has alzheimer's — has signed an open letter to the government to mark her appointment as an ambassador of the alzheimer's society. brexit is the lead
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story in the telegraph. it says the eu expects the uk to leave the bloc without a deal. there's also a picture of james anderson leaving the field at edgbaston after a 251—run defeat against australia. we talked about it. the guardian also leads with brexit. it says european diplomats have been told a no—deal brexit is mrjohnson's "central scenario". the times writes that facebook friends are better than neighbours, that's according to a cultural historian who says the facebook generation is able to forge more worthwhile social connections based on choice and not proximity. which i think is very interesting, actually, isn't it? yep. and the talk about millennial is as well. we get so much contact with everyone here on breakfast. so much information, so many lovely things we communicate on social media. i don't think it is about. and they've been commuting this does make communicating that sally doesn't have an
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official bbc breakfast today. don't get me in trouble. those flowers that i bought, they've gone missing. someone said louise's presents have gone missing. gone. they must be somewhere. presents have gone missing. gone. they must be somewherelj presents have gone missing. gone. they must be somewhere. i have a mug thatis they must be somewhere. i have a mug that is breakfast dan, breakfast louise. what else do we have in the papers? we have a little bit of cricket, we've already talked about cricket. i don't want to talk about it too much. england had australia, leading on the first day and then we lose by 251. are shocking, isn't it? the back page of the guardian, the papers are full of really uncomfortable moments from the cricket yesterday. talking in the
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guardian, defiant. the back page of the times, abject england. joe root defines again, ok, the cricket is a bit depressing to talk about. i'm going to change the subject. in this corner here, derby want wayne rooney to come back from the united states. they're saying wayne rooney is posed bya they're saying wayne rooney is posed by a remarkable return as a player— coach. that is in the times. in the mail today, an astonishing return to football, 13 months into a three—year contract. according to the mail, he flew to england last night about the potential move to pride park. it seems very settled in the united states. i'm not sure if for family reasons you would want to come back. this one,
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the world's second largest sharks spotted in british waters. don't panic, i know we mention the word shark... that eat plankton, don't they? they weigh five tons, 25 foot long commerce when close to the surface and what is gonna happen, they found a shark camera, i love these amazing robot cameras, it's been in the hebrides of the north coast of scotland and has captured footage of them. i think, if this is correct, at 8am we have moving footage of it. stay with us have moving footage of it. stay with us for that because it is absolutely stunning. and they have found a lot more information about them, they think that perhaps they may be breeding in the hebrides as well which isjust such breeding in the hebrides as well which is just such a beautiful shot. it sounds incredible. there was a story which i can't find now, but you know las vegas has lots of crickets because of the temperature? there is a pizza joint in las vegas that has turned crickets into a topping, cricket sauce on top of the
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pizzas. 0h! topping, cricket sauce on top of the pizzas. oh! it's sort of a joke, topping, cricket sauce on top of the pizzas. oh! it's sort of ajoke, but it turns out to be incredibly popular. we talk a lot about mark busheu popular. we talk a lot about mark bushell being on the street lately, and, sally is a big fan of the latest contestant. mike, you are my favourite, but this from the daily mail, will bailey, jamie lag. michelle already my favourite. i love her. she, well, she dresses for daily life. you know ru paul is drug race? the famous programme? she is already written a book called the dever rules for outback life —— diva. —— diva rules for life.
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i think she is in it for the long run. thank you, we will see you in a minute. we've been hearing this morning about the british airways flight evacuated after smoke filled the cabin. people on board the aircraft have been talking about what happened. it was about ten minutes, i think, before we were due to land and we noticed the cabinet was starting to fill up really quite quickly with smoke, almost like it was coming through the air—conditioning system. and people sort of started shouting, we we re and people sort of started shouting, we were sitting with family who largely remain calm, and very quickly you couldn't see the passenger sitting two seats down from you. he became very sick. and we we re from you. he became very sick. and we were moving quite quickly at that point. there wasn't an official announcement about what was happening but people were saying get down, get down, so we were — trying to breathe in the cleaner air at the floor of the cabin. and then we came
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inforan floor of the cabin. and then we came in for an emergency landing. it was a pretty smooth landing, the captain did a really good job i think, because we later found out the cockpit was full of smoke and he had a gas mask on. and then we landed, but the cabin staff had a real problem getting the doors open, so we had to stay on the runway for maybe three or four minutes in the cabin full of smoke. then an air hostess arrived with an oxygen mask on asking if we could breathe. and then they opened up the shoot and we came down the slide. when we came off on the runway there was a fire engine, a number of policemen, lots of people running towards the plane and we were just told to run. we're joined now by consumer rights expert, martyn james. clearly, a terrifying situation for everybody onboard the plane. i mean, what is the normal procedure when that happens? it is such an
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unusual set of circumstances, i'm pleased to say, that there aren't any real set procedures when it comes to how do people get help after the incident. that is what a lot of the passengers have expressed today. certainly there are worrying things, the oxygen masks are supposed to drop automatically, so there has been quite a lot of concern about this this morning. but a lot of passengers have felt a little bit bereft because once you have gotten through that, what happens next and where is the after—care? many of them wanted things like an alternative way of getting home, you can imagine you might want to get on a plane after that, so it is important to speak to the outline and the airline comes up with some alternatives for them. really, eve ryo ne alternatives for them. really, everyone wants the flight to be as forg etta ble everyone wants the flight to be as forgettable as possible and went something like that happens you can understand that the panic that spreads very quickly... you genuinely, and you heard that from a passenger, you have no idea what is happening and you really need clear direction, don't you? that is all
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you need. absolutely. anything we all tend to be quite british when things like this happen. we know we have to get off the plane quickly and if it has touched down and we are allok, and if it has touched down and we are all ok, there is a tendency to wait for are all ok, there is a tendency to waitforan are all ok, there is a tendency to wait for an authority figure to step in and tell us what to do. the moral is, don't wait for that person. look at what it says on the card and do that as soon as you can. we wanted to talk to you are about strikes that are happening or not happening. let's talk about compensation for these particular passengers. if that's to you on a plane, is there any records, and you have any rights, as it were? there is nothing enshrined in law, and this is one of the frustrating things we find it comes to compensation. but generally, airlines can see recognise the impact of what's happened under these circumstances, obviate somewhat late in this particular set of circumstances. —— albiet, anything from missing out on albiet, anything from missing out on a day of holiday or having to go to hospital, or indeed, repatriation, if you want a ferry to get back from spain, that is understandable. just speak to the airline, the impact, and what you are looking for.
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bae have said that they experienced a technical issue upon landing in valencia, and that the safety of our customers and crew are our highest priorities. should they be investigating what is going wrong? behind—the—scenes there will be a lot of questions asked. flying is still really the safest way to travel, but a lot of people are going to need a bit of reassurance. it only takes one incident for us to get a little bit nervous. also talking about other things going on. strike action called off at heathrow and there are other strikes planned. lots of people have been affected, so what have people gotten from the strikes that were cold? it hasn't beena strikes that were cold? it hasn't been a great week for aviation, it has to be said. and a lot of people who might have flights booked, might be on the hook. the heathrow strikes have been delayed until the 23rd and 24th. 50 have been delayed until the 23rd and 24th. so you still do have some is that our rights when it comes to strike action, but that is only if
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the airline is responsible for the strikes. if it is the airline's own staff on strike, then you are entitled to compensation and that is quite considerable. but if it is something like heathrow, it is the ground staff who have been striking, it is really only the airline's responsibility to get people on another fight as soon as possible. my inbox has been heaving this morning from people who have panic booked other fights with other airlines thinking they would be cove red. airlines thinking they would be covered. unfortunately, they wouldn't be. if you are really worried about getting to your destination, then it makes sense to speak to the line you are booked with first before you go away on book. so many airports can be stressful places at the best of times, can't they? but when you're there, you don't know if you'd be able to travel. people have saved up able to travel. people have saved up a whole year to go on a holiday, just a really frustrating time for a lot of people. no as a of airports. -- is lot of people. no as a of airports. --isa lot of people. no as a of airports. —— is a fan of airports. but a couple of things to bear in mind, if
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you are going to book flights, i say morning flight will look something in the early afternoon, because then if you get caught out by the knock—on effects of flight delays, or other things that can usually happen, it is easy to rebook and you can probably get there. that is a very good point. martyn james, thank you very much. if you are a fan of our forts, please get in touch. laughter —— airports. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. we will have the mean national headlines are just we will have the mean national headlines arejust a we will have the mean national headlines are just a few minutes' time. —— main headlines. good morning from bbc london. dean barbara windsor has called on the prime minister to sort i care for people who have dementia. she has put out an
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open letter coinciding with her appointment for the alzheimer's society. the government says local authorities have been given nearly £4 billion in extra funding for adult social care this year. it is mrjohnson is committed to fixing the care system. a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after an 89—year—old woman was killed in her home. her body was discovered on sunday morning in sydenham, police say she had been assaulted and have not ruled out burglary as a motive —— tottenham was not a man is in custody. much of london may be busy and crowded, but there are a number of places across there are a number of places across the city that are empty and abandoned. one man is on a mission to visit all the capital's derelict sites, pole telling's activities are potentially dangerous and involve trespassing so aren't to be copied. one of his biggest fines is an old fireworks factory near dartford. the design goes back to the 1930s, there are all very 1a homes on this site, quite farapart so are all very 1a homes on this site,
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quite far apart so should there be an explosion they aren't going to catch on fire. you can see the safety catches here are made of wood rather than metal to avoid any possible sparks. and just to reiterate, his activity should not be copied as they are potentially dangerous and involve just passed. 0k, dangerous and involve just passed. ok, let's look at the travel situation now. on the dues there are minor delays on the victoria line. turning to the roads now, accuser building into town on the 813 through the gauze brook interchange. in victoria, there are temporary traffic lights for gas mains on buckingham palace road at the junction with ecclestone street. there are also temporary traffic lights and water mains works in west norwood on crown lane. whether than with lucy martin. hello. good morning. yesterday we recorded 26.5dc in heathrow, today we will see the temperatures coming down a notch with a mixture of sun and sunshine and also some showers.
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it isa and sunshine and also some showers. it is a mostly dry start this morning. but as the day wears on, the chance of the exams i was feeding in from the west. those i was could be heavy, but a good chance of the old rumble of thunder. damages down yesterday, 33 celsius. it will be windy with a south—westerly breeze. overnight tonight it will turn dry for a time of some clear spells but a growing chance of clear spells. damages similarto chance of clear spells. damages similar to what we saw last night, around 12— 1a celsius. tomorrow then, some early so as to the morning but as the day wears on more on the way of dry weather to come. there will be some good spells of sunshine in the temperatures at a maximum of 2a celsius. to move into thursday, more in the way of dry weather to come with highs of 2a degrees celsius. turning unsettled though, towards the end of the week as some unseasonably windy weather comes and also some rain. i'll be back with the latest from the bbc in 30 minutes. now back to dan and louise. goodbye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin.
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we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: she's undertaken many challenges, but the norseman extreme triathlon is her toughest yet. we'll find out how louise got on. what a way to finish with a little flick across the line! we'll meet the delivery driver known as white van gogh man, who transforms old bangers into works of art. and as the final series of poldark heats up, actor kerri mclean is here to tell us about bringing to life the true story of a former slave. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: passengers on board a british airways flight from heathrow to valencia had to be evacuated after smoke filled the cabin minutes before landing. the 175 passengers on board were told to use emergency exits to leave the plane and slide down the chutes. british airways has blamed a technical issue.
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one of the passengers on board has been speaking to the bbc. very quickly you couldn't see the passenger two seats down from you. it became very thick. we were descending quite quickly at that point. there wasn't an official announcement about what was happening. people were saying, "get down, get down" as we were trying to breathe in the cleaner air towards the floor of the cabin. a teenager has been charged with attempted murder after a child was allegedly thrown from the 10th floor of the tate modern art gallery on sunday. the 6—year—old who was found on the fifth—floor roof is in a critical but stable condition. he was visiting london with his family from france. 2 brussels officials say there's no basis for meaningful brexit talks because borisjohnson's insisting that there have to be changes to the withdrawal agreement. the government has rejected the claim that it isn't willing to talk to the eu and its main objective is to leave without a deal. fresh vigils have been held in the texan city of el paso, where 22 people were
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shot dead on saturday. it was the first of two mass shootings, nine people were also killed in ohio. in a rare intervention, former us president, barack obama, has urged americans to reject language that feeds a climate of fear and hatred. an extensive search is under way in malaysia for a 15—year—old british girl who has disappeared whilst on holiday with her family. nora quoirin, who has special needs, was reported missing by her parents on sunday when they woke to find her hotel room empty. local police say they are treating the incident as a missing persons case and not an abduction. villages close to a military base in siberia have been evacuated after a fire broke out in the ammunition store which sparked a series of explosions. this video shows the huge ball of fire which led to thousands of people being asked to leave their homes, while russian soldiers at the base were forced to hide in bomb shelters. it's thought eight people have been
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injured. 2 two incredible pictures, though! sales in shops are rising at the slowest rate for 2h years, according to the british retail consortium. sales figures were up by 0.3% injuly, compared with an increase of 1.6% in the same month last year. poor weather, slow wage growth and brexit uncertainty are being blamed. that's what's been going on in the news. not great news with the cricket. what can we blame? poor weather? brexit? there isn't really much! it was one of those days, sally, wasn't it? you've got to lift your spirits and get ready for the second test. which is next week, so plenty of time to get over it! it was australian delight and english disappointment at edgbaston after england lost the opening ashes test. england needed to bat the day out to earn a draw but australia's bowlers, especially nathan lyon
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and pat cummins, were too much for them. they were bowled out for 146, losing by 251 runs. it's frustrating that we've, you know, not started in the manner we wa nt know, not started in the manner we want but still fully believe we're in this series. things can turn around very quickly off the back of one win. seeing emotionally how things changed throughout that world cup, and! things changed throughout that world cup, and i think actually that's probably a good example to the group. the star with the bat was undoubtedly steve smith, who made a total of 286 runs playing in his first test match since being banned for ball—tampering last year. steve smith was unbelievable. i mean, there's no doubt about that. he's the best player in the world for test cricket at the moment he's probably the best ever statistically, and while he's at the crease i think our team's got real confidence stop ei think peter siddle digging in with him was crucial. then i thought for
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the majority of the game we bowled pretty well. england defender harry maguire has signed for manchester united for a world record fee for a defender. the 26—year—old joins from leicester for £80 million and has agreed a six—year contract with the option for a further year. ole gunnar solskjaer looks really pleased with him, doesn't he? maguire is now the second most expensive signing in english top flight history after his new teammate paul pogba joined united for £89 million from juventus in 2016. so who is harry maguire? he made his debut for boyhood club sheffield united in 2011. in 2014, he signed for hull city for £2.5 million. maguire moved to leicester city for £12 million in 2017. at the 2018 world cup, he scored in a quarter—final for england. now he hasjoined manchester united for £80 million. now he is the most expensive defender in the world, and according to his mum zoe, he's always dreamed of playing
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for manchester united. she posted on twitter saying how proud she is of her son. there you go! and there he is! a little beach photo! he has barely changed! a great hat! a super hat! i wonder if he still has it? the united academy reduced kyle walker, so the two most expensive defender is... amazing! and apparently he a lwa ys is... amazing! and apparently he always wanted to play for manchester united, who knew? his dream has come true! huddersfield town started their campaign back in the championship after their relegation from the premier league with a home defeat to derby county. tom lawrence scored twice for the visitors in the first half including this superb finish from outside the box. karlan grant did pull one back for huddersfield, but it wasn't enough as derby saw the game out, winning 2—1. derby county are keen to appoint wayne rooney as a player—coach. the former england captain still has over two seasons left
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on the contract he signed with mls team dc united last summer, but derby feel rooney could provide the impetus required to get the rams back into the premier league. jo konta has lost in the first round of the rogers cup in toronto. the british number one was beaten in straight sets by the ukrainian teenager daya na yastremska. it was the world number 14's first match since wimbledon. i believed you! thank you! the rugby football league and super league have said they are appalled by clashes between catala ns dragons and warrington wolves fans on saturday. a joint statement said there will be an investigation into the trouble during the super league game in perpignan. it said, "the scenes are alien to super league and have no place in ourgame." carl frampton is out of this weekend's bout against emmanuel dominguez in philadelphia. frampton has reportedly suffered a freak injury, dropping an ornament on his hand, breaking two bones. the northern irishman has not fought since his defeat tojosh warrington in december
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last year. that is appalling timing. that is a properfreak injury. that is appalling timing. that is a proper freak injury. dropped something on his hand and broke two bones in his hand. that can happen. all these sports people train and then something random!‘ all these sports people train and then something random! & feet, fingers and toes, really easy to break. david james, now in strictly... of course he is! we have got so much to tell you! he was the first one announced i think and i think he dropped a bottle of salad cream on his foot and a few years ago and he was out of a quite important match! the old glass bottles before they went plastic a few years ago. very heavy! before everything was recyclable... but is it, sally, is it? that's the question! mcdonald's has admitted that the paper straws it introduced to replace plastic ones can't be recycled. victoria is at a recycling
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plant to find out why. we've got some straws here. this is a plastic straw, a black one in the middle. thanks for telling me! a paper one on the left. this one can't be recycled but this metal one can't be recycled but this metal one can be reused. three different types of straw for you! victoria is there ata of straw for you! victoria is there at a recycling plant to find out the truth about this story, which was all over the papers yesterday. good morning! exactly, good morning! i'm at one of the biggest and most advanced recycling centres in the country, certainly in london. we are in south london, and we are here to find out why. surely you would think you could recycle here. mcdonald's gets through something like 1.8 million straws every
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single day, so no wonder their customers turned around last year and said to them, can you do something about this single—use plastic and switch to paper? so they did, and now it transpires those paper straws aren't recycla ble transpires those paper straws aren't recyclable either. we went out and about around manchester to find out your thoughts on straws. ican see i can see what everyone's trying to do these days with metal, plastic and paper ones. but, yeah, obviously metal's going to last you forever. plastic, you've got the stigma of your damaging the environment. and paper'sjust useless. i personally do users straws because i've got sensitives teeth, sol i personally do users straws because i've got sensitives teeth, so i do use straws, unless i'm having a beer. ido like beer. i do like a beer so i tend to use a straw, unless i'm in mcdonald's, and that's just to pour your drinks. i should carry a metal straw with me ina i should carry a metal straw with me in a little pouch in my back pack,
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so in a little pouch in my back pack, so then! in a little pouch in my back pack, so then i no i can't use it if i need to see, i'm aware, but i don't make a conscious effort. need to see, i'm aware, but i don't make a conscious effortlj need to see, i'm aware, but i don't make a conscious effort. i should, but when i'm out its convenience. a can all be quite confusing all of this, should you go plastic or should you go metal or paper? here i've got richard kirkman, the chief technology innovation officer here. richard, good morning. what goes on here? i hear it is pretty advanced. we built this facility and spent £16 million on the infrastructure to recycle all of the recyclable waste in southwark and the surrounding counties burrows, and that means we can recycle 100,000 tons of bottles, ca ns can recycle 100,000 tons of bottles, cans and paper mainly using machines and a few people. you've got domestic waste coming in here, household rubbish, all that stuff, and you've got commercial
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contracts, including mcdonald's. why can't you recycle mcdonald's straws? we recycle a lot of materials from places like that. commercial contracts exist where we collect the recycla ble contracts exist where we collect the recyclable bottles, paper and cardboard and they already do a good job but now we're looking at more difficult things. we need to build more infrastructure and we're rolling different collection schemes for different items like toys and straws to recycle more. they're saying that it's because the paper involved in these straws are too thick. does that wash with you? when you make a new material you have to do think about how you are going to recycle it. we need to develop the infrastructure to do it. we will crack these problems. we will crack these problems. we know there a ban on the sale of plastic straws coming in to england from 2020, so next year. what should we all be replacing these things with? obviously some people want to
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use straws and some people have too, people with disabilities, for example. what should we tell the public? if you can avoid using a straw, don't use one. if you need to, paper or plastic, it's not the biggest point because a paper straw can have a bigger impact than a plastic straw on the environment. it goes into the waste management system and it doesn't escape into the ocean is the biggest thing. straws are the tip of the iceberg. hundreds of thousands of bottles need to be recycled that aren't being and that's the tonnage we are missing. thanks, richard. that's it, so straws make up a small proportion of the overall waste. things like plastic bottles and plastic bottle tops are the big problem, especially when it comes to ocean plastic. mcdonald's and say they are working on a solution. do we need a new straw? who knows? send yourideas we need a new straw? who knows? send your ideas into breakfast.
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it is getting hot and sweaty so we will hand back to you! people who don't need to use them can just hand them back! christopher has said he uses straws made out of straw. brilliant idea! bioproducts would normally be thrown away, they are fully cleaned and they don't add a taster to the drinks and they protect against deforestation and no plastic! keep sending your ideas in! it wasn't david james with the salad cream injury, it was dave beasant! david james did... he dropped a tv remote on his foot! david batty, he played for leeds amongst others, he got in a tussle with his kids tricycle and damaged his achilles. there's some classic sporting injuries out there! shall we ask you about the weather instead of that, carol? good morning! look at this beautiful sent in from one of our weather watchers. it's
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from kent, that beautiful sunrise. the forecast today is a mixture of sunshine and showers, some will be heavy, thundery, and parts of the north and west they will also be slow—moving. low pressure is dominating our centre, and we've got various fronts wrapped around it. so they are producing some sours, some will emerge to give longer periods of rain. in the centre of this low pressure, there was not an ice about to be seen, and because of the lack of wind, those jobs will be slow—moving. gusts in the south coast, up to 45 mph. as the low pressure d rifts coast, up to 45 mph. as the low pressure drifts through scotland, you'll see the fronts are dragged from the west to the east. the heaviest and most slow—moving will be across scotland and northern ireland. northern england two. some of those will also be thundery. further south, showers we have will come through quite quickly on the breeze. and if you're in the
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sunshine temperature is 22—23, quite pleasant. chilly air up north where we are looking at 15. this evening and overnight there will still be some sours, essential for them to be thundery across scotland, but equally there will also be some clear skies. temperature—wise, well, no problems with the frost. temperatures will stay in double figures across the board, between 11- 15 figures across the board, between 11— 15 degrees. so that is how we start the day tomorrow. quite a lot of dry weather around, a lot of great weather, even some sunshine. still those showers rambling away across the north of scotland. that is where we will see if you sours coming across northern ireland and northern england, as well as parts of wales and southern counties. there is won't be as strong tomorrow so it will feel even more pleasant in any sunshine. but with the showers, they are hit and miss, is of course is the way with the showers. you may mist them altogether. 19 in newcastle and belfast, 21
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in cardiff. on thursday we have a weak ridge of high pressure coming across, that will settle things down a touch and that doesn't mean it is going to be bone dry, there will still be sour dotted around. —— showers,. temperatures up to 24 but it is later in the day the cloud is going to thicken across south—west england and that is heralding the arrival of a deep area of low pressure. now this low pressure is unseasonably deep for this stage in august. it comes from the south—west and through the weekend it is going to continue to push steadily northwards, taking its wet and windy weather with that. so if you are camping, do about that in mind. the other thing of course is trees in full bloom, it could lead to some issues. if you are out and
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about this weekend, do stay tuned to the weather forecast. we always do, carol, thank you. it is now 6:48am. it's a big day for students in scotland, as they wait to find out how they did in this year's national 5 and highers exams. good luck. keep talking. good luck. our correspondent james shaw is with some pupils in paisley. 0h! good morning, james. good morning. yes i'm in a cafejust down from glen afar high school. this is where people do come to talk about whatever the subject of the day is, but of course the subject of the days those all—important exam results and we have two of those pupils with us this morning. please introduce yourself. i've been studying english, maths, german angiography. i'm also 17, i'vejust sat my hires. i sat english, maths, chemistry, biology and modern studies. did you get any sleep? how are you feeling? yes, got a bit
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of sleep. it is a long time to wait for your results. i got some sleep, it's never outing —— your results. i got some sleep, it's never outing — — nerve your results. i got some sleep, it's never outing —— nerve wracking, but i'm 0k. how important are these results do you? i haven't decided what i'm going to do yet, but ijust wa nted what i'm going to do yet, but ijust wanted to do as well as i could. what does it mean to you? it is difficult because it's determining what happens next year for me. depending on what i get today depends on the subjects soldiers next year and what happens after that. it has a big part to play for university applications as well so it is really important. it does depend on what you get today, it will make a huge difference to what your options are in the future? yeah, it will. well, iwanted your options are in the future? yeah, it will. well, i wanted to do medicine but i wasn't open for five days, but i'll have to see what i got. and the results will come in in
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about five hours time? —— 5as. got. and the results will come in in about five hours time? -- 5as. so you get a text message, but you also can fill out a form in paper. if the phone buzzes, with new get a look at it? i got a text and e-mail, i signed up for them both, then we have the certificates as well. fantastic. we wish you all the very best of luck. we will meet up with you and see what those results are going to be. so after 8am we will be back with lionel and nathan —— laney and nathan, and we will see what those results are going to be. i really feel for them. they are very brave to be on the telly as well. really feel for them. they are very brave to be on the telly as weltm isa brave to be on the telly as weltm is a nervous day, isn't it? it's arguably one of the toughest race events in the world — the norseman extreme triathlon kicks off with competitors jumping into icy waters from the back of a car ferry. i'm getting sweaty palms even thinking about it. this year i was among those to take the plunge to swim, run and cycle through norway's
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spectacular scenery. thank you for all your lovely messages. i chose tojump thank you for all your lovely messages. i chose to jump from that ferry, swim, run and cycle a very long way through norway's the calculus scenery. it ended with an epic marathon, i say epic because it was very hot, that was the only thing. it got to over 30 degrees. that was the one thing i hadn't trained for. it was a tough day, let's see how it went. this is not for you. nothing personal, but it's not. this is for people with fight, resilience and minds tougher than their bodies.
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4am and louise gets a final good luck hug from her husband dave. the norseman is the most extreme triathlon in the world. it starts with a triathlon in the world. it starts withajump off triathlon in the world. it starts with a jump off a ferry. this is the moment where i seriously question my life choices. don't think, just jump! i am shaking, i am nervous, andi jump! i am shaking, i am nervous, and ijust jump! i am shaking, i am nervous, and i just kind jump! i am shaking, i am nervous, and ijust kind of want to get in and ijust kind of want to get in and get the first 100 metres done. commentator: and that is the horn that signals the start of the norseman proper. the swim is two miles long and is louise's strongest event. come on, louise, keep going! on the shore, her support team, her
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dad, daughter and husband. on the shore, her support team, her dad, daughterand husband. as on the shore, her support team, her dad, daughter and husband. as she finishes the swim, she is fourth in the women's's race, 29th overall. where am i going? thank you. goodbye! a great start, really great start. we are pleased. the cycle ride is more than 100 miles, most of it upheld. it is brutal. this is hard! you look at the view down there, it's like standing on top of a ski slope. louise's family with her mother after male, but she's also getting inspiration from remarkable landscape here. —— with her mile after mile. louise from great britain! well done. ijust can't believe i've done that! i can't believe i've done that! i can't believe i've done that! i can't believe i've done it!
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louise is on the go forjust under ten hours, it's blisteringly hot, and she is starting to struggle.|j hours, it's blisteringly hot, and she is starting to struggle. i do know that i am resilient and my mind is tough. so, yeah, resilience when things get tough, i think i've learned a bit more. as she climbed the mountain towards the finish, her husband joins her. you made it! oh! well done. 0h, husband joins her. you made it! oh! well done. oh, well done. well done. iam,a well done. oh, well done. well done. i am, a norseman! well done. oh, well done. well done. iam, a norseman! iam well done. oh, well done. well done. i am, a norseman! i am a well done. oh, well done. well
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done. iam, a norseman! iam a norseman! 0h, oh, goodness me. 0h, goodness me. that looks tough. the worst bit was... the worst thing was, we have a bit later, i was saved by people on the road, on the marathon with their hoses out who hosed me down because it was so incredibly hot. could you have, i know you are sick or does i know you had family there, could you do it without your family? you are not allowed to do it without support. there are no aid stations. what am i doing there? a mini match snog? i was on the run there, but there are no aid stations, no support at all, so yourfamily no aid stations, no support at all, so your family or whoever you choose basically try to help you. and this was one of my favourite moments. you walk along and somebodyjust
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standing there with a hose to cool you down. and that, for those who don't know, it is about a four kilometres swim, 180 kilometres on the bike, 112 miles, and then a full marathon on, but up a significant claim? it goes up a significant claim, and i'm not good going up the top of the mountain, you get a black t—shirt, it is a black t—shirt, and for us mere mortals, we still finish the marathon on halfway up the mountain. louise won't tell you this, but she said swimming was her strongest event, she swam at the same time as the person who won the whole thing. i did it all in just underan whole thing. i did it all in just under an hour. whole thing. i did it all in just underan hour. —— whole thing. i did it all in just under an hour. —— the swim, so next time i'll stick to swimming races. my time i'll stick to swimming races. my t—shirt is over here... oh, i've lost it, oh, here it is. it was a lot of hard work going into this one dessert. you don't even get a medal, you get a t—shirt. but there is no way t—shirt, and there are the distances on the back of it. get it framed. i did was sit before i brought it in! it is very thin. i
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hope it holds. thank you for all your messages, it is so — it is absolutely brilliant to know you are sending it in and wasn't what i was doing. we are also very proud of you. once again, you wonder woman. so... it's a pleasure to sit next to you this morning. —— you are wonder woman. time to get the news, weather and travel wherever you are. you very much. good morning from bbc london. dean barbara windsor has called on the prime minister to sort out care for people who have dementia. the former east end as dahood has alzheimer's has put out an open letter coinciding with her appointment as an ambassador for the alzheimer's society. the government does local authorities have been given nearly £4 billion in extra funding for social funding this year. it is mr johnson is fixing the care system. a22—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after and
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89—year—old woman was killed her home. dorothy warmer‘s body was discovered on sunday morning in totte n ha m. discovered on sunday morning in tottenham. police say she had been assaulted and had not rule out burglary is the motive. much of london may be busy and crowded, but there are number of places across there are number of places across the city that are empty and abandoned. one man is on a mission to visit all the capitals done a capital's derelict sites. his activities are densely dangerous and involve trespassing, so they are to be copied. one of his biggest fines was an old fireworks factory near da rtfo rd. was an old fireworks factory near dartford. the design goes back to the 1930s. there are over 14 huts on this site, they are separated, quite farapart, so this site, they are separated, quite far apart, so should there be an explosion they won't borrow. you can see the safety catch is here for the door actually made of wood rather than metal to avoid any possible sparks. and just to reiterate his activities shouldn't be copied as they are potentially dangerous and
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involve trespassing. ok, let's check the travel situation now. the overground is the travel situation now. the overg round is part the travel situation now. the overground is part suspended between richmond and the junction. overground is part suspended between richmond and thejunction. on overground is part suspended between richmond and the junction. on the trains, there are disruptions between thameslink services. and the traffic is building at elephant & castle, that is at thejunction of walworth road. and gas means work on buckingham palace and ecclestone street. ok, whether now with lucy martin. hello. good morning. yesterday we recorded 26.5 in heathrow, today we will see the temperatures coming down a notch with a mixture of sun and sunshine and also some showers. it is a mostly dry start this morning. but as the day wears on, the chance of showerws feeding in from the west. those could be heavy, but a good chance of the odd rumble of thunder.
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temperatures down yesterday, 33 celsius. it will be windy with a south—westerly breeze. overnight tonight it will turn dry for a time of some clear spells but a growing chance of clear spells. temperatures similar to what we saw last night, around 12—14 celsius. tomorrow then, some early so as to the morning but as the day wears on more on the way of dry weather to come. there will be some good spells of sunshine in the temperatures at a maximum of 24 celsius. to move into thursday, more in the way of dry weather to come with highs of 24 degrees celsius. turning unsettled though, towards the end of the week with some unseasonably windy weather comes and also some rain. i'll be back with the latest from the bbc in 30 minutes. goodbye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: the moment a british airways flight filled with smoke 10 minutes before landing. one passenger compares it to a horror film. a teenager is charged with attempted murder after a 6—year—old boy was allegedly thrown the top of the
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tate. eu officials say they currently have no reason to hold any further brexit talks with the uk. mcdonald's has admitted that the paper straws it introduced to replace plastic straws cannot be recycled. i'm here at the most technologically advanced recycling centre in london to find out why. england's batsmen crumble. australia rip through england's batting line up to take a 1—0 lead in the ashes. an icy swim, a 100—mile cycle up hill, and a marathon — how louise took on one of the toughest triathlons in the world. wow, good morning! this lovely picture of devon shows we have bright skies this morning but the forecast is one of sunshine and showers. some heavy, thundery and slow—moving in the north and west. i'll have more in the next
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15 minutes. good morning to you. our top story: holidaymakers have been speaking of their fear after smoke filled the cabin on a flight from heathrow to spain. three people were taken to hospital after passengers on board the flight to valencia had to use emergency exits to leave the plane once it had landed. british airways has blamed a technical issue. our reporter michael cowan has more. the final minutes of a british airways flight to valencia. one passenger described it as being like a scene from a horror film. ba flight 422 took off from london heathrow yesterday morning, but 10 minutes before landing in valencia, passengers were surrounded by an acrid smoke. very quickly you couldn't see the passenger two seats down from you. it became very thick. we were descending quite quickly at that point. there wasn't an official announcement about what was happening. people were saying, "get down, get down" as we were trying to breathe in the cleaner air towards
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the floor of the cabin. it's being reported the cockpit was so smoky the pilots also wore oxygen masks. another flyer told the bbc, "as the plane came into land, some passengers were crying." fire crews greeted the flight on the runway in valencia, where all the passengers were helped to safety. british airways says three customers were taken to hospital as a precaution but have since been discharged. but the airline has drawn criticism from those travelling, with one passenger taking to social media, saying: ba has apologised, saying:
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michael cowan, bbc news. eu negotiators have told european diplomats that they believe there is no basis forfurther negotiations with the uk, a teenager has been charged with attempted murder after a boy was allegedly thrown from the 10th floor of the tate modern art gallery on sunday afternoon. the 6—year—old is currently in a critical but stable condition. marta newman reports. detectives from the metropolitan police say there is no link between the suspect and the boy who fell. the 6—year—old still in hospital in a critical but stable condition. he was found on a fifth floor roof after falling from the tate's viewing platform on sunday. the boy, who was from france, was visiting the uk with his family at the time of the incident. officers have issued an appeal for witnesses to come forward. they say the fall would've been incredibly distressing to see, but are urging people to contact
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them if they have any information that would help with the investigation. the 17—year—old is due to appear at bromley youth court later today. marta newman, bbc news. eu negotiators have told european diplomats that they believe there is no basis forfurther negotiations with the uk, but downing street says borisjohnson will enter into any fresh brexit talks with the "greatest energy" and the "spirit of friendship". adam fleming is in brussels. adam, are they going to talk or aren't they? certainly not at the moment, the keywords being at the moment. there's been some talking in the last week or so between london and brussels. there was a phone call from the prime minister and a phone call from the brexit secratary to michel barnier, the chief negotiator, and borisjohnson's europe advisor, a guy called david frost was having meetings with his opposite numbers. yesterday there was another meeting where the eu brexit negotiating team spoke to diplomats from the
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other 27 national governments and they concluded at this point there was no basis for what they called meaningful discussions with the uk because the uk is asking for things the a you can't accept, not just uk is asking for things the a you can't accept, notjust getting rid of the bit of the deal to do with the irish border but also to do with the irish border but also to do with the uk's financial organised no obligations and the role of the european court of justice obligations and the role of the european court ofjustice overseeing the brexit deal, if there is one. so the brexit deal, if there is one. so the eu is getting closer to the point where they think the only possible outcome to the whole brexit process is the uk leaving on october the 31st with no deal whatsoever. on the eu side, they haven't totally given up hope yet. they're looking ata given up hope yet. they're looking at a meeting of the g7 leaders, the prime minister of the seven richest countries, in france towards the end of the month. lots of people here think that could be the moment of truth where it becomes clear whether a no—deal brexit is inevitable or not. although you get some eu
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officials and saying it would be a week later that really matters, because that's when the british parliament comes back and can react to whatever has or hasn't happened over the summer holidays. it is one of those moments when you step back and think for there to be a deal, either the uk or the eu will have to execute an absolutely massive climbdown from where they are now. well, that's a thought, isn't it? adam, i'm not going to ask you another question, but how likely is that! thank you very much indeed. much to ponder! north korea has fired two unidentified missiles into the sea. it's the fourth launch of its kind in less than two weeks. the south korean military claim the devices are short range ballistic missiles. the united states has said it is monitoring the situation. residents in villages close to a military base in siberia have been evacuated after a fire broke out in the ammunition store which sparked a series of explosions. this video shows the huge ball of fire which led to thousands of people being asked to leave their homes, while russian soldiers at the base were forced to hide in bomb shelters.
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it's thought eight people have been injured. sales in shops are rising at the slowest rate for 24 years, according to the british retail consortium. july was up by 0.3% compared with an increase of 1.6% in the same month last year. poor weather, slow real wage growth and brexit uncertainty are being blamed. people in whaley bridge are being told the emergency services need to spend at least two more days pumping water from the reservoir that's threatening to flood their town. hundreds of residents are spending a fifth day out of their homes because of the partial collapse of the dam wall. our reporter dave guest is there for us this morning. dave, you can see behind you, the work continuing and quite some place good morning dan. it is. those pumps have been going 24 hours a day and they've been doing theirjob. they had to lower the reservoir by eight metres and i'm told in the
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past few minutes they reached 7.6 metres and they're confident they will get to eight metres by lunchtime. that's significant because they needed to get it low so engineers can expect the hole in the dam and inspect what needed to be done to make it com pletely needed to be done to make it completely safe and enable those people from whaley bridge to get backin people from whaley bridge to get back in their homes. five nights out of their beds since the emergency started on thursday and they want to get home. there's a meeting at around 5pm when they will be updated on the latest, and they will be hoping they can return to their homes at last in whaley bridge. about 20 people have defied police orders to leave their homes and have stayed despite the police advice and despite police warnings of putting themselves and rescue workers in danger. however, the catastrophe we we re danger. however, the catastrophe we were staring at at the end of last week appears to have receded as the waters did so from the reservoir. where is all
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this water going? they've been pumping it into the nearby river guide and other watercourses and they've been monitoring that to stop it causing problems down the line and they're happy that's working well. the chinooks we saw what, dropping ballast —— we saw dropping ballast. they will come back later and hopefully people will be back in their homes as soon as possible. interesting that work continues and quite a bit to be done before they can go back to their homes. let's talk about something else that's been making the news as well. the two mass shootings in the us over the weekend left 31 people dead and further intensified the debate over gun control. farquharfor you farquhar for you flocking
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another vigil. mourners in el paso remember saturday's victims from a mall. a tragically familiar scene following a mass shooting. donald trump has responded in a sombre address from the white house. the president condemned what he called the monstrous evil behind the killings. the shooter in el paso posted a ma nifesto the shooter in el paso posted a manifesto online consumed by racist hate. in one voice, our nation must condemn racism, bigotry and white supremacy. while the president condemned white supremacy, his opponents have argued his use of racist language in the past could be partly to blame for attacks like the shooting in el paso. ina rare shooting in el paso. in a rare public statement, the former president barack obama has issued a thinly veiled attack on his successor:
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coming to terms with their overwhelming grief is the immediate concern of el paso's residents. president donald trump will visit el paso on wednesday. his actions in the coming weeks will be closely watched, with a majority of americans looking for action rather than words to tackle the scourge of gun violence. peter bowes, bbc news. let's talk about the impact of this, we can talk to eric pearson from the el paso community foundation. thanks for talking to us, and this is having a huge impact on the community. what are your thoughts at the moment? i think el paso has been really trying to rise above a lot of the fray that's been thrown at us for the last 2.5 years under the trump administration. on saturday, we were humbly and quickly brought down—to—earth, and it was really
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hard. there are a lot of people trying to express themselves in positive ways. we are coming together. this dark act is not com pletely together. this dark act is not completely darkening our skies. there are a lot of light moments. we have set up a fund for victims and we have seen over the last three days about 6000 e—mails of support, people sending monetary gifts to try to help people out, but mostlyjust wonderful, wonderful sentiments from all over the world. i understand your organisation's member has a family link to one of the victims? yes, the aunt of one of our employee's best friends was killed and wejust employee's best friends was killed and we just found out she had employee's best friends was killed and wejust found out she had been travelling abroad and was just about to be visiting home. her mother stop at that store and was shot dead. —— stopped. it gives you the sense of the chances of being there
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and the familiesjust torn the chances of being there and the families just torn apart! you never know what's going to happen, and my advice to everybody is hug ones you love and let them know how you feel because you never know... our president has let us down over the last 2.5 years and fermented this vitriol against immigrants and mexican americans and mexicans in general. my family came across from mexico in 1915 during the woodrow wilson administration. he was an isolationist president but not as bad as what we've got now, and i'm sorry to say that. par has been talking about the of language. what effect will that have? i think it's palatable enough by the folks that hear the message —— barack obama. i think it's really important we all try to speak openly about groups of people as individuals and try to address individuals for their merit. i feel like we've lost a basic
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respect for people that were ignorant. it is pure ignorance to carry racism and hatred for anybody that's different or thinks differently or loves differently or looks differently from you. one of the things, of course, when we hear about this in the uk, we have very different rules about guns. what are your views on gun control? i was thinking about it... in 1982, the united states passed the brady bill when president reagan was shot, and that was an attempt to curb the sale of semiautomatic weapons. now we've gone too far and we are trying to peel it back to assault rifles, so that tells you the gun culture in the united states is here and alive and well and it is wrong. we shouldn't be manufacturing or selling guns designed to kill people, that's it! there are hunters and they don't need a semiautomatic rifle with a bump stock or whatever
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it is called to take down a deer or a rabbit. this is a plague upon our society and we need to really... someone needs to step up and have the courage to stop it. the gun lobby in the united states is out of control. eric pearson, i really appreciate your time talking to us this morning in really difficult times for your community stop in thank you very much indeed. as usual, let us know what you think about that or any story we're covering this morning. we are also on social media on twitter and facebook this morning. always a nice conversation that goes on on facebook particularly on mornings like this. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning both. look at this staggering view in wales. a lovely start that the day with a beautiful picture of a sunrise. the forecast todayis picture of a sunrise. the forecast today is once again one of sunshine and showers. some of
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the showers we re and showers. some of the showers were merged to give longer spells of rain and some of us will have them pretty slow moving across the north and west of the uk. low pressure driving our weather. we do have a lot of weather fronts across our shores, which is producing all those showers. in the centre of the low pressure, there is hardly a breath of wind, hence the slow—moving showers. the isobars are closer together further south, sue showers. the isobars are closer togetherfurther south, sue briese and southern counties. gusts of wind about 40,000 hours at the south coast —— 45 mild an hour. the showers, not all of us will catch one, but if you are in scotland, parts of northern england, northern ireland, you may find it isn't going to be just heavy and thundery, but it will also be slow—moving stop as they will move through a lot quicker across western england and wales. 15 in the north two highs of 23, maybe 24 in the south.
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overnight we still do have those showers, rumbling away across the north of the country with some thunder and lightning in there. further south, if you wish hours, more clear skies and still quite breezy but the breeze continues just to come down. temperatures, 11 to 12 - 15. to come down. temperatures, 11 to 12 — 15. tomorrow we will start on a largely bright note. heavy across pa rt largely bright note. heavy across part of scotland, you can also hear the odd rumble of thunder, once again there will be slow—moving because the low pressure is still very much with us. themselves across northern ireland, some of those getting into wales, if you into northern england. —— showers across northern ireland. temperatures 15-24. northern ireland. temperatures 15—24. then, as we move into thursday, we do have a weak ridge of high pressure across us and that will settle things down a touch. it isn't going to be bone dry, there
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will still be showers around. you can see them here in the charts, parts of scotland, northern england, parts of scotland, northern england, parts of scotland, northern england, parts of the midlands and southern counties. but it was mike later in the day we start to see the cloud thicken across the south—west, heralding the arrival of an unseasonably deep area of low pressure. now, on thursday night and into friday and saturday, the progress this makes moving from the south—west heading towards the north—east taking its rain with it. a squeeze on those isobars, that is also telling you it is going to be windy. school holidays are on. if you are camping, do bear in mind the winds are going to be strong in the rain is going to be happy. and it is also that we have trees in full bloom, so this may lead to some issues. do keep in touch with the weather forecast. sound advice as ever. we do always keep in touch. thank you for the reminder. we will see you a little bit later. seven 20 seven a.m.. “—
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see you a little bit later. seven 20 seven a.m.. —— 7:20am. we've been hearing this morning about the british airways flight evacuated after smoke filled the cabin. people on board the aircraft have been talking about what happened. it was about ten minutes, i think, before we were due to land and we noticed the cabinet was starting to fill up really quite quickly with smoke, almost like it was coming through the air—conditioning system. and people sort of started shouting, we were sitting with family who largely remained calm, and very quickly you couldn't see the passenger sitting two seats down from you. it became very thick. and we were descending quite quickly at that point. there wasn't an official announcement about what was happening but people were saying get down, get down, so we were trying to breathe in the cleaner air at the floor of the cabin. and then we came in for an emergency landing. but it was a pretty smooth landing, the captain did a really good job i think, because we later found out the cockpit was full of smoke and he had
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a gas mask on. and then we landed, but the cabin staff had a real problem getting the doors open, so we had to stay on the runway for maybe three orfour minutes in the cabin full of smoke. then an air hostess arrived with an oxygen mask on asking if we could breathe. and then they opened up the shute and we came down the slide. when we came off on the runway there was a fire engine, a number of policemen, lots of people running towards the plane and we were just told to run. it sounds really quite something. rather morning here we are also looking at some of the stories the papers as well. let's have a look at the front pages for you this morning. starting off with a mirror, then barbara winds are is there, saying the prime minister's acting to help solve the dementia funding scandal. the east
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end is star —— eastenders star is now the ambassadorfor the eastenders star is now the ambassador for the other simon society. the telegraph shows james leaving the field at edgbaston after a 251 defeat against australia. the guardian leads with brexit, saying a no—deal brexit is misterjohnson's central scenario. you may be interested in this story. the time says facebook friends are better than neighbours according to a cultural historian whose as the facebook generation is able to forge more worthwhile social connections based on choice and opportunity. do get in touch with us about that. here is the golden age of tightknit communities was an age of squabbling neighbours, feuding families and difficult friendships. here said neighbours in towns and inner cities of postwar britain often had brought relationships and people jealously guarded their privacy.
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basically saying millennial is, particularly, have more meaningful friendships saying millennial is, particularly, have more meaningfulfriendships by what here is calling the facebook generation, friendships based not on where you live, but what you find interesting. we should look after our neighbours. of course, but we get so many people getting in touch on facebook and twitter. you feel pa rt on facebook and twitter. you feel part of different community. there isa part of different community. there is a lot of negativity out there but for every idiot, there is at least 50 people who are quite nice. i don't know any idiots at all. do get in touch with us. lovely to hear your thoughts. and we're still waiting for the final few. have you seen my jump over the waiting for the final few. have you seen myjump over the finishing line? doi seen myjump over the finishing line? do i look like i would be able to? that was one of the only bits of news i saw in the last week, i thought that was exciting. your
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birthday party, i saw some serious moves on the dense floor. unconventional, i would say. moves on the dense floor. unconventional, iwould say. -- dense floor. dan does as well. i need a big space, a needed big space. a few spots left as well. thank you. i have a significant wingspan. this is a lovely story about the basking shark as well. they've got this shark camera, down, obviously when we talk about sharks gets nervous, but they only eat plankton. eight o'clock we have pictures of this amazing basking shark which has been found in the hebrides. i wish i could find the paper. wait for the image? no, that isa paper. wait for the image? no, that is a different one. wait for the actual pictures coming your way in 30 minutes. you are watching brea kfast 30 minutes. you are watching breakfast from bbc news. mcdonald's has admitted the paper
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stores it introduces to —— introduced to replace plastic ones cannot be cycled. —— recycled. victoria is at a recycling plant top find out why. good morning, victoria. yes, it is curious, isn't it? we are going to do the right thing when it comes to plastic so it is no surprise something like 51,000 people signed a petition last year to try to get mcdonald's, who of course are selling a load of plastic straws, in all those drinks, to try and swap them for something a little more eco— friendly. the response last year was to turn them over to these papers draws, but the problem with these papers draws, we found out, is that they aren't recyclable either. now mcdonald's have said this is because the material that is used, the cardboard, is to speak and the stores themselves are just too small. they just stores themselves are just too small. theyjust effectively get put in landfill. they end up being just mummified in the ground. so we're here at this recycling centre here to try and find out a little bit
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more about what is going on with all this, trying debunk some of those myths when it comes to plastic and what you can do in terms of your recycling. is there anything better, can we find other possible materials instead, for example? can they do better when it comes to collection. one thing they are certainly doing here is they're trying to make compost with a lot of the stuff that comes in here. so things that are being reused in the end of going back into your garden. but these things here, seem to be causing quite a storm. plastic bottles and bottle tops are the main problem. but we have lots more of all of this and lots of experts to talk to in 30 minutes' time. first, the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. dame barbara windsor has called on the prime minister to sort out care for people who have dementia. the former eastenders star who has alzheimer's has put out an open
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letter coinciding with her appointment as an ambassador for the alzheimer's society. the government says local authorities have been given nearly £4 billion in extra funding for adult social care this year. it says mrjohnson is fixing the care system. —— committed to fixing. a 22—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after and 89—year—old woman was killed her home. dorothy warmer‘s body was discovered on sunday morning in tottenham. police say she had been assaulted and had not rule out burglary as a motive. much of london may be busy and crowded, but there are number of places across the city that are empty and abandoned. one man is on a mission to visit all the capital's derelict sites. his activities are dangerous and involve trespassing, so they aren't to be copied. one of his biggest finds was an old fireworks factory near
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dartford. the design goes back to the 1930s. there are over 14 huts on this site, they are separated, quite far apart, so should there be an explosion, the whole lot aren't going to catch fire. you can see the safety catch is here for the door actually made of wood rather than metal to avoid any possible sparks. and just to reiterate, his activities shouldn't be copied as they are potentially dangerous and do involve trespassing. ok, let's check the travel situation now. the overground is part suspended between wilsonjuction and richmond. and in victoria there are temporary traffic lights for gas mains work on buckingham palace and ecclestone street. ok, weather now with lucy martin. hello. good morning. yesterday we recorded 26.5 in heathrow, today we will see the temperatures coming down a
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notch with a mixture of some sunshine but also the risk of some showers. it is a mostly dry start this morning. but as the day wears on, there's a growing chance of showers feeding in from the west. those could be heavy, but a good chance of the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures down yesterday, a maximum of 33 celsius. it will be windy with a south—westerly breeze. overnight tonight it will turn dry for a time of some clear spells but a growing chance of showers in the early hours. temperatures similar to what we saw last night, around 12—14 celsius. tomorrow then, some early showers, i think, through the morning, but as the day wears on more in the way of dry weather to come. there will be some good spells of sunshine. again, the temperatures at a maximum of 24 celsius. as we move into thursday, more in the way of dry weather to come with highs of 24 degrees celsius. turning unsettled though, towards the end of the week with some unseasonably windy weather to come and also some rain. i'll be back with the latest from the bbc london in 30 minutes. plenty more on our website. goodbye
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for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news: a british airways flight from heathrow to valencia had to be evacuated after smoke filled the cabin minutes before landing. the 175 passengers on board were told to use emergency exits to leave the plane. british airways has blamed a technical issue. one of the passengers on board has been speaking to the bbc. it was about ten minutes before we we re it was about ten minutes before we were due to land and we noticed the cabin started to fill up quite quickly with smoke, almost like it was coming through the air conditioning system. people were shouting, we were sitting with families who tried to remain calm, and very quickly you could see the passenger two seats down from you.
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a teenager has been charged with attempted murder after a child was allegedly thrown from the 10th floor of the tate modern on sunday. the 6—year—old boy, who was found on the fifth—floor roof, is in a critical but stable condition. he was visiting london with his family from france. brussels officials say there's no basis for meaningful brexit talks because borisjohnson is insisting there has to be changes to the withdrawal agreement. the government has rejected the claim that it isn't willing to talk to the eu and its main objective is to leave without a deal. fresh vigils have been held in the texan city of el paso, where 22 people were shot dead on saturday. it was the first of two mass shootings — nine people were also killed in ohio. the former president, barack obama, has urged americans to reject language that feeds a climate of fear and hatred. an extensive search is underway in malaysia for a 15—year—old british girl who has disappeared whilst on holiday with her family. nora quoirin, who has special needs, was reported missing by her parents on sunday, when they woke to find her hotel room empty. local police say they are treating
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the incident as a missing persons case and not an abduction. sales in shops are rising at the slowest rate for 24 years, according to the british retail consortium. sales figures were up by 0.3% injuly, compared with an increase of 1.6% in the same month last year. poor weather, slow wage growth and brexit uncertainty are being blamed. got a bit of hippo news for you! have you ever seen a hippo having its teeth cleaned? no! now you have! this is marushka and her son fanda having their teeth cleaned with a hose, which has apparently become the highlight of their day. their keepers at prague zoo say using a hose is good way to dislodge the remains of food from their teeth, which can grow up to half a metre in length. wow! really! how amazing.
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one of the most dangerous animals on the planet by the way. they are quite swift removers. and quite aggressive. and like you, quite good swimmers!” would beat them on a bike! they can't swim, can they? they can, can't swim, can they? they can, can't they? i think we might be finding out a bit later!” can't they? i think we might be finding out a bit later! i won't be taking ona finding out a bit later! i won't be taking on a hippo! i'm a big fan of being hosed down. every time i see one, over my head! why not? good morning sally! good morning! what are we talking now about, how you deal with someone like steve smith? i think we might be 24 hours too late. i know his weakness, he 01:34:48,1000 --> 01:34:49,347 is rubbish when he gets into the 140s! he can't convert! he has no
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resilience! terrible! let's see if we can get him down to the 130s! it was australian delight and english disappointment at edgbaston after england lost the opening ashes test. england needed to bat the day out to earn a draw but australia's bowlers, especially nathan lyon and pat cummins, were too much for them. they were bowled out for 146, losing by 251 runs. it's frustrating that we've, you know, not started in the manner we want but still fully believe we're well in this series. things can turn round very quickly off the back of one win. seeing emotionally how things changed throughout that world cup, and i think actually that's probably a good example to the group. public service announcement time, how do you stop a batsmen that seems to be in the form of his life? well, joining us from our london newsroom is former cricketer and analyst simon hughes. good morning assignment. might be a bit late for the first test, but there's my question, how do you stop him? ——,
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simon. steve smith is a disruptor and he plays unconventionally to most batsmen. bowlers are conditioned to bowl mostly to a channeljust outside the off stump here to most that's meant to try to get them to getan that's meant to try to get them to get an edge off the bat because this is the area outside their eyeline, and they have their fielders on the offside and they're trying to get the edge by bowling in what geoff boycott likes to call the corridor of uncertainty outside the eyeline. steve smith steps across and he cove rs steve smith steps across and he covers that line really effectively. he gets right across here and he works the ball from this line over to the legside, where there no fielders. that is the disruptive kind of method, which is hard to combat because bowlers are conditioned to bowl that way. they got to adjust. he does play very late. he watches the ball right onto the bat and plays it in little gaps, almost with
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a mathematician's precision. england need to counter that by bowling right down here, the leg side or on the leg stump, because he's moved over already so try to get him behind his legs. shane warne had the famous pick pocket delivery that went around behind the batsman's trousers. obviously england don't have a shane warne but they could try angling the ball full like a yorker around the leg stump and he mike misso one. that i think is the best plan.” hope they are watching! i hope someone was taking notes! you know steve smith quite well, you spent time with him recently? he's got an amazing attitude. we haven't mentioned the patients and the concentration and the desire and insatiable to. he wants to make runs and runs and runs and runs and he never stops —— patience. he's got this incredible appetite. he will practice for three hours and then go in and have a rest
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and practice again. he's got this insatiable desire so i don't know how you upset that. its unique and that's why he's gotan that. its unique and that's why he's got an average of 62, second best in test history. he's a very sincere, decent incredibly humble man who is totally dedicated to his art and england have to find a different way and go out of their comfort zone and try something different to unsettle him. do you think england are suffering a world cup hangover? that's a good point. england really focused all their resources on winning the world cup and they did that, it was a triumph, but the ashes so soon after that means it's ha rd to ashes so soon after that means it's hard to change tack and refocus. australia have come over here, they didn't get too far in the world cup and they've really focused with bringing some players over to play cou nty bringing some players over to play county cricket and australia a games before the test cricket started. they focused on the ashes and there preparation has been better,
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and england have been disrupted by them aim priority, the world cup. we asked many people whether they would prefer the world cup or the ashes, and most people said the world cup because they've never done it before but the australians' main focus has been on the ashes and they are 1—0 i been on the ashes and they are 1—0 up! brilliantly explained. i love it when a guest brings on a prop! you noticed what he said, he sees the ball early but plays it late stop a clever! basic! —— but plays it late. clever! england defender harry maguire has signed for manchester united for a world record fee for a defender. the 26—year—old joins from leicester for £80 million and has agreed a six—year contract with the option for a further year. maguire is now the second most expensive signing in english top
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flight history after his new teammate paul pogba joined united for £89 million from juventus in 2016. so who is harry maguire? he made his debut for boyhood club sheffield united in 2011. in 2014, he signed for hull city for £2.5 million. maguire moved to leicester city for £12 million in 2017. at the 2018 world cup, he scored in a quarter—final for england. now he hasjoined manchester united for £80 million. now he is the most expensive defender in the world, but according to his mum zoe, he's always dreamed of playing for manchester united. she posted on twitter saying how proud she is of her son. huddersfield town started their campaign back in the championship after their relegation from the premier league with a home defeat to derby county. tom lawrence scored twice for the visitors in the first half including this superb finish from outside the box. karlan grant did pull one back for huddersfield, but it wasn't enough as derby saw the game out, winning 2—1. derby county are apparently keen to appoint wayne rooney as a player—coach.
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the former england captain still has more than two seasons left on the contract he signed with major league soccer outfit dc united last summer but derby feel rooney could provide the impetus required to get the rams back into the premier league. reports in the papers say he is around to talk to derby today. carl frampton has had to pull out of this weekend's bout against emmanuel dominguez in philadelphia. frampton has reportedly suffered a freak injury, dropping an ornament on his hand, breaking two bones. the northern irishman has not fought since his defeat tojosh warrington in december last year. this is the reconstruction stop eno hotel, someone walked through there, knocked that ornament and it fell on his hand. how freakish is that? two hotel staff trying to
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hold the ornament —— this is the reconstruction. this is the hotel, someone walk through their knock to the ornament and it fell on his hand. we will speak to you later, thank you! mcdonald's has admitted the paper straws it introduced to replace plastic ones can't be recycled. that was to be more environmentally friendly. the straws have arrived again. plastic straw, metal straw and paper straw. what is going on today? victoria is at a recycling plant. good morning. good question! what's going on? this appears to be the straw that mcdonald's back. 53,000 people complained about the use of plastic straws and single—use plastic, mainly due to things like blue planet and the sea turtle with a straw up its nose. lots of people decided they didn't want to use
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plastic straws and mcdonald's said we will change our policy and start using these paper straws instead. yesterday we found out from an internal memo to all staff that they shouldn't try to be recycled that they should be burnt instead. what's going on? i'm at a they should be burnt instead. what's going on? i'm ata big they should be burnt instead. what's going on? i'm at a big recycling plant, a really technologically advanced recycling plant. all the busy, hard, heavy, smelly stuff goes on outside but this is the weird stuff people chuck away. can't believe it! poise, a wheelchair, bicycles... all this looks like it could be reused and so if it is still working or repairable, they try to sell them to community centres —— boys. the big problem seems to be these things, in terms of what the media and consumer groups are focused on certainly —— toys. but recycling groups say plastic bottles and bottle tops are the big problem. we did a bit of a straw poll in manchester to find out
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what you think of plastic straws. i can see what everyone's trying to do these days with metal, plastic and paper ones. but, yeah, obviously metal's going to last you forever. plastic, you've got the stigma of your damaging the environment. and paper are just useless. i personally do users straws because i've got sensitives teeth, so i do like using straws, unless i'm having a beer. see, i don't mind a beer so i tend to not use a straw, unless maybe in mcdonald's, and then it's just habit for your drink. i usually carry a metal straw with me in a little pouch in my backpack, so then i know i can use it if i need to. see, i'm aware, but i don't, like, make a conscious effort. i should, but when i'm out, it's convenience.
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that's the big thing, the whole throwaway convenience culture. when you're on the move, perhaps you don't do what you might at home. i got some experts to find out why we have this problem with recycling. margaret bates is here. margaret, explain, what is the problem with plastic straws? the plastic straws themselves are actually recyclable because they are made from polypropylene. there's nothing wrong with the plastic. there's a market for it and it can be recycled and people want the material to turn into something else. so what's the problem? probably it's because it is a straw. there can be quite high levels of contamination, but also people buy stuff from places like mcdonald's and take it out. if you look at our recycling infrastructure, it's not really fit for purpose. places like the high street, you're walking down the high street, you're walking down the high street with a drink and the fa ct the high street with a drink and the fact is, you're most likely to chuck
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it there than back at home? yes, and if you do take it home and you put that straw in your household collection scheme, when it comes to things like this, it's unlikely to make it through the system because they are so small. they drop through they are so small. they drop through the holes and then they go with the waste. let's bring you julian cadman. julian, lots of people have contacted us about what we can do in terms of alternatives. bamboo, straw, seashells one pub is using apparently, is there a material solution to this problem? that may be the wrong question if you like, the plastic straws, the chances are they would be recycled of though. what we need to do is look at a step change away from the single use throwaway model we're looked into —— locked into at the moment. we all learn at school is reduce, reuse and recycle, but we need to focus on the reduce and
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reuse level, we're in recycling. mcdonald's should be reducing how many mcdonald's should be reducing how ma ny stores mcdonald's should be reducing how many stores it is giving out. some people need to have them, some people need to have them, some people need to have them, some people need them, and the stores should be reusable. that's really interesting. thanks. so there is this law coming into force next year in england where the sailor things like plastic straws and cotton buds will be banned. so things are changing, but will the rest of us be ready? no need to have a hard hat today, victoria's got one on. and you are saying it is very important to pay attention to the weather forecast, so you have the full attention of everyone watching bbc brea kfast. attention of everyone watching bbc breakfast. thank you, no pressure. good morning, everybody. we have another cracker picture sent in from the chair. we can see blue skies, we've had some showers here, and that sums up the forecast for today. it's sunshine and also some showers.
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some of the showers will be heavy and thundery and slow—moving, particularly in the north and west of the uk. low pressure is driving our weather. the centre is in this circle here, and we have lots of weather fronts wrapped around it. they are producing the showers. in the centre of the low pressure, as you can tell from the distinct lack of isobars, there is no wind to talk of. further south, the isobars are further together. so it is breezy there. most of the showers across there. most of the showers across the south of england or wales will rattle off quite quickly. but in the north it will be slow—moving and thatis north it will be slow—moving and that is where they will merge. this showers continue to be dragged along from the west towards the east. not all of us will catch a shower, but if you do catch one in the north of the country, as we mentioned, it could be heavy, thundery, prolonged andindeed could be heavy, thundery, prolonged and indeed slow—moving. temperatures 15- 23 and indeed slow—moving. temperatures 15— 23 degrees and as we head into the evening and overnight there are
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still quite a few showers around tonight. thundery in the northern half of the country and in the southern half we're looking at clear skies. now, it will still be breezy but not as breezy as during the day and that wind will continue to fall as we had through tomorrow. temperatures falling to a very similar level as we saw nightjust gone. tomorrow, still a mix of sunshine and showers, have winds across scotland, a rumble of thunder here, but we will see some showers across northern ireland, england, wales, getting into the midlands and southern counties. very much hit and miss. temperature—wise, up to 24 degrees and the slacker breeze will feel quite pleasant. there a weak ridge high pressure move across our shores. that means more settled conditions usually, but this is a wea k conditions usually, but this is a weak one, so there still will be some showers dotted around here or there. later on, we watch the
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cloud build across the south—west, heralding the arrival of an unseasonably deep area of low pressure. so here it is. it's going to come in from the south—west, thursday night and rattle steadily northwards, taking strong winds and heavy rain with it. so that is the forecast for this weekend, it is going to be windy and we will see that rain moving from the south—west to the north—east. thank you very much thank you very much for thank you very much for that, thank you very much for that, carol. thank you very much for that, carol. thank you very much for that, carol. i saw norway up there. it was unseasonably hot. for those of you who don't know, louise has been there, preparing to take on this ludicrous race cold the norseman extreme triathlon which involves, amongst other things — you started jumping off the back of a car ferry into a fjord. then you swim, nearly two mild or so —— two miles or so, ta ke two mild or so —— two miles or so, take a left turn, hop on your
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bicycle and cycle about 112 miles. yeah, about 112 miles. it was an epic day, i think that is the best way of describing it. quite a bit of support from louise's family as well. we sent gramm satcher, who is magnificent, along with you to film your journey. magnificent, along with you to film yourjourney. the one thing about this race, you can't do it unless you have support, nobody helps you along the way. this is what happened. this is not for you. nothing personal, but it's not. this is for people with fight, resilience and minds tougher than their bodies. 4am and louise gets a final good luck hug from
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her husband dave. the norseman is the most extreme triathlon in the world. it starts with a jump off a ferry. this is the moment where i seriously question my life choices. don't think, just jump! i am shaking, i am nervous, and ijust kind of want to get in and get the first 100 metres done. commentator: and that is the horn that signals the start of the norseman proper. the swim is two miles long and is louise's strongest event. come on, louise, keep going! on the shore, her support team, her dad, daughter and husband.
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as she finishes the swim, she is fourth in the women's race, 29th overall. where am i going? thank you. goodbye! 0h oh my gosh, that was amazing. quite scary. eat something. where am i going? a great start, really great start. good — no, we are pleased. come on! this is crazy. the cycle ride is more than 100 miles, most of it upheld. it is brutal. this is hard! you look at the view down there, it's like standing on top of a ski slope. louise's family with her with her mile after mile, but she's also getting inspiration from remarkable landscape
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here. louise from great britain! well done. i knew norway was kind of beautiful, but look at this place. when you are cycling in the middle of nowhere,, you just get a sense of what a lucky person i am to be a small part of that beautiful landscape. 134, louise minchin from great britain! well done! oh, ijust can't believe i've done that! i can't believe i've done it!
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life is for living! louise has been the go forjust under ten hours, it's blisteringly hot, and she is starting to struggle. why why do i do what is a stupidly ridiculous and challenging thing to do? i know that the only thing that was not going to get me 220 clement is away from here is pretty much myself, and thatmarked and incredibly empowering thing to do. 0h! incredibly empowering thing to do. oh! i do know! am resilient and my mind is tough. so, yeah, resilience when things get tough, i think i've learned a bit along the way. as she climbs the mountain towards the finish, her husband joins her. they will finish the race together.
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(applause) you made it! 0h! well done. oh, well done. well done. i am, a norseman! i am a norseman! how does that make you feel, watching that? exhausted. you've obviously done the swim, then the 12 hours cycle. that was really hard. at the beginning a claim for 2.5 hours at the start of that. and what
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point during that run, a full marathon, by the way, did your body just shut down? mentally, you have to be so strong. i was ok until ten kilometres and then the one thing i had trained for was that he and the heat went straight up over 30 degrees and then things got really, really ha rd. i degrees and then things got really, really hard. i was there with a hose, and incredibly grateful. but without the support of my family, thatis without the support of my family, that is not possible. and your husband was sponging your head. he was as well as mac absolutely. incredible work. thank you so much for your messages of support. i really appreciated. go out, you have to try and do things that you don't think you can do. but you don't have to do that. but... i did have a good game of tennis last week, i managed to beat an eight—year—old. good morning from bbc london.
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dame barbara windsor has called on the prime minister to sort out care for people who have dementia. the former eastenders star who has alzheimer's has put out an open letter coinciding with her appointment as an ambassador for the alzheimer's society. the government says local authorities have been given nearly £4 billion in extra funding for adult social care this year. it says mrjohnson is committed to fixing the care system. a 22—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after and 89—year—old woman was killed her home. dorothy warmer‘s body was discovered on sunday morning in tottenham. police say she had been assaulted and have not ruled out burglary as a motive. much of london may be busy and crowded, but there are number of places across the city that are empty and abandoned. one man is on a mission to visit all the capital's derelict
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sites. his activities are dangerous and involve trespassing, so they aren't to be copied. one of his biggest finds is an old fireworks factory near dartford. the design goes back to the 1930s. there are over 14 huts on this site, they are separated, quite far apart, so should there be an explosion, the whole lot aren't going to catch fire. you can see the safety catches here for the door actually made of wood rather than metal to avoid any possible sparks. and just to reiterate, his activities shouldn't be copied as they are potentially dangerous and do involve trespassing. ok, let's check the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the overground, otherwise there are minor delays on the overg round, otherwise it there are minor delays on the overground, otherwise it is a good service. in victoria, there are temporary traffic lights on buckingham palace road and ecclestone street.
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ok, weather now with lucy martin. hello. good morning. yesterday we recorded 26.5 in heathrow, today we will see the temperatures coming down a notch with a mixture of some sunshine but also the risk of some showers. it is a mostly dry start this morning. but as the day wears on, there's a growing chance of showers feeding in from the west. those could be heavy, but a good chance of the odd rumble of thunder. temperatures down on what we saw yesterday, a maximum of 33 celsius. it will be windy with a south—westerly breeze. overnight tonight it will turn dry for a time of some clear spells but a growing chance of showers in the early hours. temperatures similar to what we saw last night, around 12—14 celsius. tomorrow then, some early showers, i think, through the morning, but as the day wears on more in the way of dry weather to come. there will be some good spells of sunshine. again, the temperatures at a maximum of 24 celsius. as we move into thursday, more in the way of dry weather to come with highs of 24 degrees celsius. turning unsettled though, towards the end of the week
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with some unseasonably windy weather to come and also some rain. i'll be back with the latest from the bbc london in 30 minutes. plenty more on our website. goodbye for now. good morning and welcome to breakfast with louise minchin and dan walker. our headlines today: the moment a british airways flight filled with smoke ten minutes before landing. one passenger compares it to a horror film. a teenager is charged with attempted murder after a six—year—old boy was allegedly thrown from the top of the tate. eu officials say they currently have no reason to hold any further brexit talks with the uk. the straw that broke mcdonald back, lam finding the straw that broke mcdonald back, i am finding out why mcdonald's new paper straws
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are not being recycled. england's batsmen crumble. australia rip through england's batting line up to take a 1—0 lead in the ashes. an icy swim, a 100 mile cycle up—hill and then a marathon — how louise took on one of the toughest triathlons in the world. a day once again of sunshine and showers, some of them will be heavy and thundery and slow—moving, particularly so in the north and the west. i will have more later. our top story: holidaymakers have been speaking of theirfear after smoke filled the cabin on a flight from heathrow to spain. three people were taken to hospital after passengers on board the flight to valencia had to use emergency exits to leave the plane once it had landed. british airways has blamed a technical issue. our reporter michael cowan has more. the final minutes of a british airways flight to valencia. one passenger described
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it as being like a scene from a horror film. ba flight 422 took off from london heathrow yesterday morning, but 10 minutes before landing in valencia, passengers were surrounded by an acrid smoke. very quickly you couldn't see the passenger two seats very quickly you couldn't see the passenger two seats down from you. it became very thick. we were descending quite quickly at that point. there wasn't an official announcement about what was happening. people were saying, "get down, get down" as we were trying to breathe in the cleaner air towards the floor of the cabin. it's being reported the cockpit was so smoky the pilots also wore oxygen masks. another flyer told the bbc, "as the plane came into land, some passengers were crying." fire crews greeted the flight on the runway in valencia, where all the passengers were helped to safety.
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british airways says three customers were taken to hospital as a precaution but have since been discharged. but the airline has drawn criticism from those travelling, with one passenger taking to social media, saying: ba has apologised, saying: michael cowan, bbc news. a teenager has been charged with attempted murder after a boy was allegedly thrown from the 10th floor of the tate modern art gallery on sunday afternoon. the six—year—old is currently in a critical but stable condition. marta newman reports. detectives from the metropolitan police say there's no link between the suspect and the boy who fell. the six—year—old still in hospital
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in a critical but stable condition. he was found on a 5th floor roof after falling from the tate's viewing platform on sunday. the boy, who was from france, was visiting the uk with his family at the time of the incident. officers have issued an appeal for witnesses to come forward. they say the fall would've been incredibly distressing to see, but are urging people to contact them if they have any information that would help with the investigation. the 17—year—old is due to appear at bromley youth court later today. marta newman, bbc news. eu negotiators have told european diplomats that they believe there is no basis forfurther negotiations with the uk. but downing street says borisjohnson will enter into any fresh brexit talks with the "greatest energy" and the "spirit of friendship". adam fleming is in brussels. i have asked you this before, are they going to talk? at the moment it doesn't look like they are, this
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follows a series of discussions last week when boris johnson follows a series of discussions last week when borisjohnson phoned brussels, brexit secretary steve barclay did, then the new europe adviser, david frost, came to meet his opposite numbers last week and then the brexit negotiators for the eu side were then debriefing officials from the 27 other countries yesterday. a very downbeat assessment here, they said, at the moment, no basis for what they described as meaningful conversations with the uk because the uk is asking for things that the eu cannot give, notjust giving up the backstop, the irish border, but also the uk has raised concerns about the financial settlement, the financial obligations, and the role of the european court ofjustice. so, for the moment, of the european court ofjustice. so, forthe moment, no discussions, because the eu feels there will not because the eu feels there will not be any point. they have not yet given up hope, they are looking at a summit of g7 leaders, including borisjohnson, which summit of g7 leaders, including boris johnson, which will take summit of g7 leaders, including borisjohnson, which will take place in france towards the end of the
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month. they think that could be the moment which, if it comes clear, it'll be a no—deal brexit or not. so, doesn't look like there will be any negotiation for now. some people think that actually, the real moment of truth will be one week later, when british parliament comes back and assesses what has or has not happens diplomatically during the summer holidays. how many moments of truth will we have(!) thank you very much. an extensive search is under way in malaysia for a 15—year—old british girl who has disappeared whilst on holiday with her family. nora quoirin, who has special needs, was reported missing by her parents on sunday morning when they woke to find her hotel room empty. local police say they are treating the incident as a missing persons case and not an abduction. north korea has fired two unidentified missiles into the sea. it's the fourth launch of its kind in less than two weeks. the south korean military claim the devices are short—range ballistic missiles. the united states has said it is monitoring the situation.
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sales in shops are rising at the slowest rate for 24 years, according to the british retail consortium. july was up by 0.3%, compared with an increase of 1.6% in the same month last year. poor weather, slow real wage growth and brexit uncertainty are being blamed. people in whaley bridge are being told the emergency services need to spend at least two more days pumping water from the reservoir that's threatening to flood their town. nonstop now for quite some time. hundreds of residents are spending a fifth day out of their homes because of the partial collapse of the dam wall. our reporter dave guest is there for us this morning. we have been there for a few days, bring us up—to—date. we have been there for a few days, bring us up-to-date. good morning, dan and louise, the story is that these pumps behind me have certainly been doing their job, these pumps behind me have certainly been doing theirjob, they needed to get the water level in the reservoir down by eight metres, the latest
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news we have is that it is down by 7.8 metres, very nearly there. by lunchtime, the fire service are confident they will have reduced the level to where they wanted to be. that is not the end of the story, then they must send in engineers to examine the dam wall behind me, to assess the full extent of the damage, before they can say whether or not people can go back into their homes. 1500 people have spent five nights away from their homes and they are desperate to get back. there is a meeting planned for five o'clock tonight, where they should get the latest news and maybe get some idea of when they will be able to return to their homes. as we have been reporting, 20 people in whaley bridge have steadfastly refused police advice to leave, much to the annoyance of police, but the majority of people have heeded advice and left homes. certainly, the catastrophe we thought we were facing at the end of last week has receded as the water level has dropped in the reservoir, also helped by the fact that bad weather, expected at the weekend, did not
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materialise, making the job that much easier. once we have the water level down, we have to decide how we will repair it and make it safe in the long term. good news. but, long term, it is an issue. in terms of getting the water down, that has been a major concern. long—term efforts and quite a few engineering considerations coming into that. amazing footage to see here, we have not yet seen it, this is the first time we are able to play it. footage revealing the secret lives of basking sharks has been captured off the coast of scotland. an underwater robot named sharkcam was used to capture movements and behaviour of the world's second largest fish. despite their prevalence in scottish waters, little is known about the species. they can grow up to 36 feet in length, the basking shark, and their mouths, they can open up to three feet wide. and they do not feed on
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anything other than microscopic prey, which is very good! they dive incredibly deep in order to do so. more information about them, they used to be called sunfish because they were often seen near the surface, and they looked to be floating up towards one other statistic, you said they can dive deep, they can go to the surface, they can go down to 3280 feet, significant depth! 20,000 leagues, something like that(!) beautiful, hopefully we will be able to see more of those pictures later. it's a sad fact of the news that there are conflicts going on around the world every day that don't always make it to the headlines. one of those is in syria. but some new figures this week show the terrible effect the conflict is having — particularly on children. lets take a look. the charity save the children says that in the last five weeks, the
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number of children killed in idlib has exceeded the total for 2018. at least 33 children have been killed sincejune least 33 children have been killed since june 24, compared least 33 children have been killed sincejune 24, compared to 31 children killed during the whole of last year. the escalation in violence, which started at the end of april, has now resulted in the deaths of at least 400 people. since the syrian regime started the campaign in idlib back in february, 715,000 people have been displaced, according to the monitoring group response coordinators. across syria, 2.1 million children are out of school. paul conroy is a war photographer, who spent time in syria. those were some of your pictures. thank you so much for coming in. it is staggering, those figures from save the children. as we said in the introduction, ongoing story for
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yea rs introduction, ongoing story for years and every now and again comes back to the minds of many people. but i know that it must weigh heavy on your heart all the time. eight or nine years now. it is the story of one city and then another and then another and it has worked its way through, in idlib, most people have known this latest bout of violence was on the card, most people who watch syria. 3 million people, 1.5 million of them are already displaced, completely surrounded, and, they have held off for a while, while they regroup and rearm, and now this is more or less the final onslaught of the regime, backed by vladimir putin. it is wholesale murder, what is happening with the kids, the hospital. . there was a ceasefire, did you have hopes?m was a kind of ceasefire, it was called a deconfliction zone but it
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was organised by the russians, by vladimir putin, and by the turks, which... a ceasefire organised by vladimir putin...! and it is now over, it was never going to be let's live in peace and harmony, it really was setting the ground for this final assault, whereas all the other cities, aleppo, homs, they put them on green buses and ship them to idlib, that is where everyone was sent after they had been besieged, staff, attacked. now there are no green buses. the turkish border is closed. they are attacking the hospitals. that is a cycle that we have seen time and time again. it has hit the hospitals. using wide area battlefield weapons, things that destroy tanks, on hospital and children and women and the world is seemingly sitting by silently. the united nations special
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representative for syria said to the security council the other day, this is wholesale, this is happening now, this is slaughter, are you going to sit by and watch? and it seems, yes. we showed some of your photographs, you have seen some things which are unspeakable, how do you come back to the uk and readjust to normal life? it isa the uk and readjust to normal life? it is a bit tricky to come back and worry about the phone bill, the mot, something like that! i have come back and i have tried to keep this as much as possible in the spotlight, because... because it fades from the news cycle, but, while it is off the new cycle it does not mean it is not happening, this continues to go on. i came back from syria, quite badly wounded when marie was killed. this is marie colvin. and remi, my other colleague, but the amount of journalist, mostly syrian, but
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marie, remi, steve, gym, so many have died trying to get the news out to the world. it is so painful to see the world look the other way. —— jim. there are some of those photographs of children, children dying, and it has an impact on their lives, because many of them are unable to go to school. the damage doneis unable to go to school. the damage done is immeasurable, this is generations worth of damage. some kids now are nearly ten years old, all they have known is starvation and warand siege. all they have known is starvation and war and siege. and the world has watched. my own personal view is that the veto at the un has been the main problem for syria. when a country like russia can turn around and block any attempt at humanitarian aid, orany and block any attempt at humanitarian aid, or any form of intervention to stop the death of the people, the veto has been recognised, and i think that is something that the world has to look
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at now, when you have a country like syria, a country like russia, vetoing any effort at intervention to stop the slaughter, and this is slaughter. and it is slaughter of civilians. we are in a bad it needs addressing. as you said, the thing you can do is keep talking about it, keep mentioning the things you have seen and the things you want to change. would you ever go back?” we nt change. would you ever go back?” went back about three months ago. would you go back again? for the right reasons, yeah. what with the right reasons, yeah. what with the right reasons, yeah. what with the right reasons be, to document things? there isn't a single photograph that i could take now that would make a difference. that is what i wanted to ask, photographs, special skill, incredibly powerful, you think you cannot change things. the world has seen it, when me and marie were in and getting stuff out, we were showing the world something that the world had not really saying that
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clearly. now, eight years, many brave photographers have been in, all the evidence is there. i don't think there is a photograph that i could take now that would change what is happening. the world has to condemn these people. they do need to stand trial, they do need to be put up forwar to stand trial, they do need to be put up for war crimes, because, you know, it is specifically against international law to target women, children, hospitals, civilians, and they are doing it. syria, backed by vladimir putin, on a daily basis and this is what we are seeing now, this is daily. how are your injuries? they fixed my leg so i can go forward quickly but i'm not so good sideways and backwards with heavyweights, but i am all right. good to speak with you, thank you for joining good to speak with you, thank you forjoining us. thanks for having us. let's find out what is happening with the weather forecast.
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here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. mixed fortunes with the weather forecast, this picture from the highlands, quite a cloudy start, also looking at some hefty showers and thundery slow— moving also looking at some hefty showers and thundery slow—moving ones as well. that is the forecast for many, but the heaviest will be across the north and the west. on the satellite picture, you can see that the centre of the low pressure is to the west of the low pressure is to the west of northern ireland but we have an array of weather fronts wrapped around it and this is what is producing the showers. in the centre of the low pressure, hardly a breath of the low pressure, hardly a breath of wind. further south, more of a breeze, blowing showers along a bit quickly. you can see as well that the showers are moving from the west towards the east, heaviest in the north, but in the south, not immune to a shower but more likely to miss one. and the showers are hit and miss. gust of wind, 45 mph, you could see similar, and in between showers,
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some sunshine, temperatures ranging from roughly the mid—teens, in the north, to the low 205 in the south. now, as we head into the evening and overnight, 5till thundery, there will be clear 5pell5, particularly across southern part5 will be clear 5pell5, particularly across southern parts of england and wales. temperature wise tonight, similarto wales. temperature wise tonight, similar to the night just wales. temperature wise tonight, similar to the nightjust gone, low to mid teens. breeze still starting to mid teens. breeze still starting to lighten across the south coast, that will continue into tomorrow as well. tomorrow, a lot of dry weather but there will be showers around from there will be showers around from the word go across scotland, for example, like today, they need to be heavy, slow moving and thundery. showers in northern ireland, if you getting in across wales and the midlands and also the south coast. temperatures tomorrow, up to 24 degrees. by the time we get to thursday, weak ridge of high pressure will be
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across us, normally that means weather will be more settled, and it will be, but there will still be some showers around, dotted across parts of scotland, northern england and again the south coast, later in the day, things start to liven up across the south—west as, initially, more clout will build and then we will see some rain. that is courtesy of unseasonably deep area of low pressure which is coming our way on friday and for the weekend. —— cloud. comes in on thursday night, from the south—west, moving steadily north—east, through friday and into saturday, and with it, heavy rain and also some strong winds. that means for the weekend forecast, it is going to be unsettled with that forecast, so if you are camping this weekend, do bear this in mind, equally, the trees are still in full bloom, so there may be issues with that as well. keep tuned to the weather forecast.
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we shall do, thank you very much. it's a big day for students in scotland, as they wait to find out how they did in this year's national 5 and highers exams. i always feel nervous for people at this point, especially when they are going to be on the television! our correspondent james shaw is with some pupils in paisley for us now. moments of high drama in this cafe just along the road from the high school in paisley here, pupils finding out their results, which could make a difference to what they do with the rest of their lives, and they have kindly agreed to share some of that with us. let's talk to nathan, give us your full name, tell us what you have been studying, and a bit about your results. nathan lawson, 17, i studied five highers this year. i was waiting on those results this morning. the subjects i needed for later in
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life and stuff. quite high anticipation this morning to get these results through! and what... to get these results through! and what. .. have you to get these results through! and what... have you got what you needed? any disappointment? it has gone as expected. everything has passed, everything is in the top of the grade so i am quite happy with myself. everything ready for next year. that is good for me. you were hoping to be a doctor, 17 years old, how has it gone for you? it has gone well, i am how has it gone for you? it has gone well, lam happy, it is how has it gone for you? it has gone well, i am happy, it is howl expected it to go. what does it mean for you? it means that if i want to go on to bea for you? it means that if i want to go on to be a doctor, i can, i have still not fully decided, not settled on one thing, but i did well, i am happy. fergus, nationalfive, you still have your highers to go, a little bit away from university if you choose that, how are you feeling? i'm feeling quite happy and confident with next year, i'm going on to highers. this gives me a bit of confidence going into that.
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and, holly, how about you? yes, i'm really pleased, really happy with them. what is it mean for you, what will you be able to do with your results? i can do advanced highers next year and hopefully go to uni after that. i'm being very rude, looking at the certificate... it is a long line of a5 which is pretty daunting to me! laughter lam daunting to me! laughter i am surprised but i am really happy. cameron, how about you? i let myself down with maths, but apart from that, quite happy. not everything has gone as you would have hoped? not everything that i will redo maths next year and get a better result. do you feel you can keep going? this is not the end of the world, you can still get the results you need. yes, apart from the maths, i results you need. yes, apart from the maths, lam happy. results you need. yes, apart from the maths, i am happy. what this it mean for you? what do you plan to do? hopefully go to university after next year. what is your aspiration for a career, do you get to have
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one? not yet! iwill decide for a career, do you get to have one? not yet! i will decide soon. and, tell us about your results and what you hope to do? i'm really happy with what i have got, gives me confidence for next year, because i also want to be a doctor. it is what is needed to do that. do the results give you what you need to carry on in that direction? yes, it's what i was aiming for. 0k, thank you. mixed bag of results, we should stress, obviously some people have done incredibly well, some not so well, there is support and help for people who think they need to get some advice about their results, perhaps they are better—than—expected, maybe not as good as they expected, either way, people should seek the information and the help that they need to make the most of their exam results and we really should thank all the pupils from this high school, who were kind enough to share those tense and nervous moments that we have had in the last
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hour or moments that we have had in the last houror so, moments that we have had in the last hour or so, thanks to the pupils from gleniffer high school and hopefully they can make the most of those results in the future.” hopefully they can make the most of those results in the future. i take off my hat to them, being on television, it is a really important day in their lives! and... it is not the end, if it has not gone... may not get what you want, necessarily, but, it is all or right. a little bit of drive and determination, sometimes a piece of paper can open doors for you, but it doesn't mean they have to be shot if you don't have it. on behalf of louise, who has achieved this amazing triathlon victory over the weekend. just finishing was a victory! well, yes, getting to the end was what i wanted to do. all your messages have been amazing, reading through, some people have been crying watching you cross the line, talking and working so closely with your family to get there, and those who are saying they may even go out for a run this
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weekend! come on, everybody, let's do things we don't think are possible. you don't need to run a marathon, just a few steps.” possible. you don't need to run a marathon, just a few steps. i ran, i walked, i ran, i did a bit of running... bit of walking... walked, i ran, i did a bit of running... bit of walking. .. we will show your film running... bit of walking. .. we will show yourfilm again running... bit of walking. .. we will show your film again later. and my family are watching, so thank you! you're watching breakfast from bbc news. coming up. we'll meet the delivery driver known as ‘white van gogh man', who transforms old bangers into works of art. he uses mud from the road and a secret ingredient. which we will not tell you about. it is notjust dirt, it isa tell you about. it is notjust dirt, it is a bit more talented than that!
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this area of low pressure is moving its way eastwards across northern ireland and scotland. that means the showers will be fairly slow moving. it is very similar to yesterday, with some places getting some intense downpours and others not so many. showers spreading their way eastwards a cross many. showers spreading their way eastwards across england and wales, heavy and thundery in places. but with a strong wind the showers should move through fairly quickly. about 19-23d should move through fairly quickly. about 19—23d today. tomorrow there will be showers, particularly in scotla nd will be showers, particularly in scotland and with some thunder into the evening. showers in northern
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parts of england and even in southern areas there will be showers moving their way eastwards. overnight temperatures 11—14. on wednesday more showers and the focus in northern parts where they will be heavy and even thundery at times in scotland, northern ireland and northern parts of england. one or two showers further south, but largely dry here. 19—24d. thursday will be the quietest day and the pressure m oves will be the quietest day and the pressure moves away to the east and a ridge of high pressure developed on thursday. for most of us it will bea dry on thursday. for most of us it will be a dry day with some sunshine. perhaps some showers in the east of scotland. temperatures will get up to about 21—24, but by friday low pressure m oves to about 21—24, but by friday low pressure moves in again and it will be wet and windy.
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this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and ben thompson. america labels china a currency manipulator in another sharp escalation of their trade war. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday 6th august.
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the us decision is largely symbolic and comes after a sharp fall in the value of the chinese yuan against the dollar and prompts yet another fall on stock markets. also in the programme profits rise at intercontinental hotels but the boss of brands including holiday and crowne plaza tells us he's not losing too much including holiday inn and crowne plaza tells us he's not losing too much sleep over the us china trade war. after heavy losses on monday across europe you can see a mixed picture today with the ftse100 proving to be the laggard. and what if you have so much money you don't know how to spend it? we meet the man behind the personal concierge service that books those

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