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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  August 7, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at five... the uk food industry demands a relaxation of competition laws to avoid food shortages if there's a no—deal brexit. retailers say they must be allowed to talk to each other on pricing and supplies, which is illegal under competition law. the minister for no—deal brexit planning, michael gove, has been meeting dover port officials as lorry drivers‘ leaders fear delays for thousands of lorries. we'll have the latest, live with our correspondent in the port of dover, and we'll be talking to the road haulage associaton. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... british airways says its resolved a technical issue that left hundreds of flights
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being cancelled or delayed, and passengers stranded. we need to prepare a whole new flight, and our bag is gone so it's a complete nightmare. we're trying to get to stockholm. our next flight, we're being told, is friday. i rang british airways, and they said they can't do anything for us over the phone. about 1,500 whaley bridge residents who had been moved out of their homes becuase of fears the dam there could've burst have now been told they can return. ministers unveil an overhaul of pension rules for senior nhs staff — after they were linked to growing waiting lists for patients. an estimated 55,000 music fans who were going to the boardmasters festival in cornwall are told it's cancelled — just hours before it was due to go ahead — because of fears of severe weather.
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hello, it's five o'clock — our top story... the uk food industry has asked the government to waive competition laws to help cope with possible shortages if britain leaves the european union without a deal in october. existing rules prohibit suppliers and retailers discussing supply or pricing — but industry bosses say they will need to work together to prevent shortages and other problems. today, bbc news is taking a close look at the implications of a no—deal brexit. the phrase refers to the uk leaving the european union with no formal agreement in place about the future relationship between the uk and the eu — in other words, cutting ties immediately. it means there would be no transition period where rules and regulations would remain largely the same while talks are held about a trade deal. if a deal is not agreed, leaving without one
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is the legal default — unless parliament prevents it. 0ur correspondent victoria fritz is ata birmingham marketand has been talking to suppliers about why the food industry wants a change to the regulations. the unlikely front line in the latest battle over brexit. half of the food we consume, we buy in from abroad, mostly from the eu. the industry is calling on the government to relax competition rules so companies can better coordinate britain's food supply. as we understand it, this is a power that the secretary of state for business has. it was used last, i think, during the financial crisis when there were talks between the banks. so i don't think it's a very difficult thing for government to do, though obviously it is a big signal of no—deal preparedness. for government to do, though obviously it is a big signal of no—deal preparedness. we have mushrooms here which have come from poland...
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mark's business is the oldest fruit and veg wholesaler in europe. he has been planning for brexit for months, assurances from the government or not. we spoke to logistical companies over in france, in spain. we made all the necessary attachments here. we spoke to suppliers, we've done all the paperwork. and we are ready to roll with it now. whether it is deal or no deal, we are ready, and i don't think, with the supply chain as it is, i don't think we'll have a problem at all. for some here it's notjust about managing risk — it's about seizing opportunity. no—deal brexit, come the 31st of october — good or bad for your business? necessary, i do believe. unless a deal can be struck on favourable terms for britain, it looks like it will be, regretfully, necessary. i don't think it will make a lot of difference to us in the fish industry. 0ur british water areas are going to be expanded again so we have more control over british seas and also a lot of the stuff that we buy is from outside the eu, india and asia and that. so it shouldn't make that much difference. the consensus here is that there could be longer term benefits to being out of the eu.
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but today's warning is about how to keep shelves stocked in the meantime for the busiest time of year for the industry, the run—up to christmas. i don't want no—deal. i want a deal with a big trading partner. but, believe me, brussels have got to understand they have a responsibility here and they've got to stop being in their bunker, blaming britain. and once we know in business where we are, you leave it to us. the government says it is working closely with the food industry. but, for businesses here and across the country, the detail of that support will be crucial. victoria fritz, bbc news, birmingham. 0ur correspondent, andy moore, is at dover. a host of government ministers have been there talking in preparation for a possible no—deal brexit?
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that's right. 0bviously for a possible no—deal brexit? that's right. obviously an incredibly important port for the uk. 17% of the incredibly important port for the uk. i7% of the entire trade of the uk. i7% of the entire trade of the uk passes through the sport. as you say, not one minister in here today but three in town today to look at those preparations —— through this port. we have had michael gove, in charge of no—deal brexit planning, chancellor of the duchy of lancaster, and we have had pretty patel, home secretary, and we have also had grant shapps, the transport secretary. they are talking to people in the industry who are speaking with one voice i think, seeing the port is not ready yet, the country is not ready yet —— priti patel, the home secretary. calling for more detail from the government on customs declarations, precisely what paperwork is needed, and what they are worried about is long queues. the road haulage association said they expected there
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would be choose here at dover, but the only thing is they didn't know whether lorries would be queueing for 2h, whether lorries would be queueing for 2a, 48 or whether lorries would be queueing for 24, 48 or 72 hours. we have seen queues like that in the past when there were problems on the french side, strikes over there. you may remember 0peration stack four years ago with 30 miles of queues, costing the country something like £250 million per day. there is now a better plan in place that will use rf manson, the disused airfield near here, to stack about 6000 lorries and pack them up there if needed. there are also plans to put lorries on the m20 whilst having a co ntraflow on the m20 whilst having a contraflow system on the m20 whilst having a co ntraflow system in on the m20 whilst having a contraflow system in place so the m20 will be open, but there are still fears about long delays. 0thers still fears about long delays. others say, of course, europe needs us as others say, of course, europe needs us as much as we need them. and that maybe there will be some sort of waiver in place at the last minute, and if there is that short—term pain
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in dover, there will be long term gain. andy miller in dover, thank you very much indeed. —— andy moore. richard burnett is chief executive of the road haulage association. give a picture of what you think it will be like if we leave the european union on october 31 without a deal, what will this and i would be? looking at things now, 70 days away from a potential exit from the eu without a deal. there are an enormous amount of eu without a deal. there are an enormous amount of unknowns, and then processes the handshakes that will take place between the port, the customs declarations, the vehicles arriving, and we still have i'io vehicles arriving, and we still have no clarity, and that is on both sides, notjust the uk but the french side as well. part of the issue is that business simply isn't ready, and we have been saying to government for some time, in terms of the customs process, you need to
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clearly communicate what that is and be able to train. 0ver clearly communicate what that is and be able to train. over the last 30-40 be able to train. over the last 30—40 years we have lost a lot of the experience and knowledge and know— how of how to do these the experience and knowledge and know—how of how to do these things. and we simply haven't got enough resource to do it now. the concentration has to be on the customs process, through hmrc, the treasury, to make sure that is being dealt with properly, and that is the only way we have a fighting chance of stopping the queues, by making sure we have the appropriate paperwork filled out and ready for when those vehicles start to arrive. write back what were those queues be like? give write back what were those queues be like ? give may write back what were those queues be like? give may be the best and worst case scenario. —— and what will those queues be like? simon talking about a 20 mile tailback. chances are to check the paperwork we are looking at will take maybe 4-6 minutes, so if you multiply that thatis minutes, so if you multiply that that is potentially thousands of vehicles queued up. we need to try to make sure —— we vehicles queued up. we need to try to make sure “ we are vehicles queued up. we need to try to make sure —— we are talking about 20 mile tailbacks. if vehicles don't
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have the paperwork they simply will not be able to get on a ferry and transit to europe. that means delays for hours and hours for these truck drivers. what will that be like, for them and the cargo they are carrying? you have to remember our industry is made up of small and medium—sized businesses. these are small businesses making very little money. there is a financial burden and cost to this. most hauliers make probably £60 profit per truck per week, and if you have a vehicle standing for 24 hours you are talking about £6,000 in terms of standing costs, and that willjust wipe businesses out. we need to make sure that is clearly understood by government, that there is financial support for those hauliers likely to be tied up in those queues, but we need to focus on that customs process. it will be misery for small businesses. in a nutshell, what would you like the government to be doing in preparation for no—deal
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that it isn't doing now? give your wish list of what you would like them to get on with doing? so i have had some feedback from my team who are there this afternoon and they say government are listening, they feel that gove and priti patel and grant shapps have been listening to what they have been saying. the focus has to be on the customs process, on training, providing teams of people that are capable of training businesses and talking them through, educating them, in terms of what that process needs to look like, and that is where the focus needs to be. if we are relying on a truck parking intent to deal with this problem, we have seriously failed i think, fundamentally. 0k, chief executive of the road haulage association, many thanks for being with us, thank you for coming in. meanwhile, foreign secretary dominic raab has been meeting president donald trump and secretary of state mike pompeo on a trip to washington dc — where he says he received a very
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warm welcome from the president. amazing to hear an american president talk about our country in such warm terms. he expresses high regard for borisjohnson such warm terms. he expresses high regard for boris johnson as the prime minister, and we talked about all the things we want to do together in the post brexit era for the uk, whether getting a free trade deal done, and their obviously will bea deal done, and their obviously will be a lot of work to make that happen, but there is a huge appetite on both sides to achieve that, and then all the range of security issues that we share in common and wa nt issues that we share in common and want to make sure we strengthen the relationship and build our capacity to tackle those issues together. that was the foreign secretary there talking in washington after seeing president trump. and we'll be talking to the liberal democrat's treasury and business spokesman, chuka umunna, after 5.30. british airways says it's fixed an it problem which led
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to flight cancellations and thousands of passengers being delayed today. the airline has apologised for the disrupation and said flights were returning to normal — but warned there may be "knock—on operational disruption." more than 100 short—haul flights were cancelled at the uk's two busiest airports, heathrow and gatwick, and more than two hundred others and more than 200 others were delayed. in a statement british airways said, "we have resolved the temporary systems issue which affected a number of our flights today. "0ur flights are returning to normal, however there knock—on operational disruption." 0ur correspondent leigh milner sent this update from heathrow airport. well, we've got some good news. british airways has just told us they've managed to fix the problem and flights will be returning back to usual this afternoon
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into the evening. however, as you can imagine there will be some knock—on delays but the main news is that people were a debtor might be able to catch their flight this afternoon. we were told earlier today there was a possibility that all short—haulflights are going to be cancelled. i was here this morning at half past eight and when i walked through the door i saw hundreds of passengers queueing up at check—in, desperately trying to find out what was going on with their flights. i was talking to one family, actually, who told me that they managed to check—in online the night before, but when they came here and saw the departure board, they were told to check with their airline. if you've been watching social media, you'll see there have been plenty of people complaining that they couldn't get in touch with ba for the rest of the day. now you have it, the update. if you are travelling with ba on a short—haul or a long—haul flight, you are now able to catch that flight you originally booked. if you did rebook, because earlier people who had booked a short—haul flight had been advised to either go home check—in at a hotel, they are being reimbursed for that, but if you have rebooked, don't worry, that flight
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will hopefully go ahead. ajla turkovich was meant to be flying to croatia for her cousin's wedding on friday but had herflight cancelled by british airways this morning — are you going to make it to the wedding? thank you for being with us. are you going to make it to the wedding on friday? no, i'm not. iwaited for that. 0bviously friday? no, i'm not. iwaited for that. obviously you couldn't go online because the website was down and there were literally no staff for hours at terminal five, well finally when i made it they are they said, no, there are no other flights, with croatian airlines or anyone else, all fully booked, and tomorrow all the direct flights are booked, so i would have had to go indirect and probably spend about 12 hours travelling, by which time i would have barely made it, so u nfortu nately would have barely made it, so unfortunately not. what a disappointment! you must be
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devastated? i am, but all! can do is wish them all the best. 0bviously the party is not going to be as fun without me but what can you do? i mean, ba were good in the end. there is only so much that is in their power to do, but sad to be back home, yeah. iwas power to do, but sad to be back home, yeah. i was looking forward to a few days of sunshine. needed it. but what can we do? a lot of people have said that although they understand ba have these technical problems, there was a lack of information, and nobody really explaining to passengers what was going on? no, there wasn't. there was absolutely no one telling us what was going on for 3—4 hours, a lot of conflicting information, well then all we could do was stand in then all we could do was stand in the queue we were standing in for hours and hope to speak to someone at the desk. ajla thank you very much indeed. sorry you couldn't make it to the wedding, and thanks for
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giving your time. the latest headlines on bbc news... the british food industry calls for competition laws to be relaxed to prevent food shortages in the event of a no—deal brexit. british airways says flights are returning to normal, after technical problems caused cancellations and severe delays for passengers. derbyshire police say it's now safe for residents to return to their homes in whaley bridge, after the town was evacuated last week, overfears of a damaged dam. in spirit, less than 24 our is before the premier league transfer window closes tottenham have ended their interest in signing philippe coutinho from barcelona on a season—long loan deal. the player could interest his former club liverpool still, or manchester united. and away in the qualifying tie for the champions league tonight, the winners will face
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prague for a place in the group places. and they have been unable to keep their coach following the world cup semifinal. south africa did has been tipped to take over from trevor bayliss following the world cup. —— the south african has been tipped. i will have more on that after have passed. —— in the next hour. thank you. police in derbyshire have said residents in whaley bridge can return home nearly a week after they were evacuated over fears of a damaged dam. people were told to leave their their homes last thursday after the structure at toddbrook reservoir was affected by heavy rain. 0ur correspondent fiona trott is in whaley bridge for us now. fiona, there must be some relief people going back to their homes?
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yes, you can't imagine the relief at the being back home. mike is back in after a week. tell us, i bet it is so nice to sit on your own sofa for the first time. what was the best thing you did when you set foot in your own home? put the kettle on. marvellous. yes, such a relief. it is quite unbelievable. but i would just like to thank my partner linda. my eyes are open. a tired man, and you are awake now, back in. you have been staying with her for the past week, so she has been very patient. friends and relatives of those bee have been very patient, but you get the sense of relief coming back home, because at your own home you get a sense of, this might not have been here, there was that window of time, that reality, wasn't there? yes, because it has never happened before and it can't happen again. quite strange. we have never had
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this in whaley before. you say it can't happen again but we have actually spoken to the flood minister therese coffee, and she said flood protection for the government is a priority. we have been spending approximately £2.6 billion, protecting homes over a five year period, and it is important we want to continue to do that. i am conscious people will be thinking about the next big rainstorm, but as far as people in whaley bridge and the local surroundings should be assured, we have done the modelling, we do forecasting, and the reservoir is down at around 10% so even if there was a down at around 10% so even if there wasa minor down at around 10% so even if there was a minor breach it would not have the same catastrophic effects it would have done if it had breached la st would have done if it had breached last week. mike, what are the plans for the next few days? i have heard rumours, you know, we know there is a real strong community spirit here. people are talking about street parties? i have heard that as well, yes. but i am going across there
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every night now. the pub across the road? yes. not even any beer in, but such a relief because you can walk where you want now, i've not been able to do that. and practical things. i suppose you will have to go and get groceries and that kind of thing. you don't realise what you've not got until you can't do it. thinking further, itjust doesn't bear thinking about. but, as i say, it cannot happen again, this. they can wave their hands about, but it can't happen again, we don't want this again. it has been a bit of a shock? terrible. and everybody, not just me. no matter, it is not on. we will see what happens. mike, thank you very much for speaking to us. very pleased that you and hundreds of people are now back in their homes now in whaley bridge. indeed. the owner, thank you so much, and to your guest, fiona trott in whaley
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bridge. a round—up of some of the day because my other news now... —— des's other news now. —— day's other news now. a conman has been sentenced to five years and eight months for defrauding his ex—girlfriend out of three hundred thousand pounds. mark acklom, who is 45, convinced carolyn woods to lend him her life savings to help him renovate several properties — after promising to marry her. the body of a cambridge university student, who died after falling from a plane in madagascar, is to be taken back to the island's capital. alana cutland is thought to have opened the door of the light aircraft — investigators say it's still not clear why. police searching for a british woman who disappeared while jogging on a greek island have found a body. astrophysicist dr natalie christopher, who lives in cyprus, went for a run on the island of ikaria on monday morning, and has not been seen since. a future labour government would not block a second scottish
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independence referendum, according to the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell. in an interview in edinburgh, which appeared to contradict the view of scottish labour leader, he said any decision about holding a vote would be up to the scottish parliament. 0ur political correspondent is at westminster for us. pete, 0ur political correspondent is at westminsterfor us. pete, a lot of talk in the papers about a possible pa ct talk in the papers about a possible pact between the labour party and the snp to try to oust boris johnson? yes, a lot of people speculating this is labour giving a potential olive branch to the scottish nationalists i have a snap general election or if there were to bea general election or if there were to be a no—confidence vote in the boris johnson government, and labour then having to form a government potentially relying on the vote of the scottish nationalists. i think thatis the scottish nationalists. i think that is perhaps a little overblown at this stage. there is no talk, i don't think, of any coalition happening, but certainly if the snp we re happening, but certainly if the snp were to get behind labour i think they would in return ask for some movement on a scottish independence referendum. the 2017 labour general election manifesto makes it clear that the party opposes another
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scottish independence referendum, butjeremy corbyn has hinted that he would be open to the idea of it happening, should that be the request of the scottish parliament, and the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell has gone one step further, in the past 24 errors or so, speaking at an event at the edinburgh festival, in which he said a labour government would not stand in the way of the will of the scottish parliament. the scottish pilot will come to a considered view on that and then they will submit that to the labour government and the english parliament itself and if the english parliament itself and if the scottish people decide they want a referendum that is up to them.|j thought your official policy was you would not allow a second scottish referendum? you're would not allow a second scottish referendum ? you're saying would not allow a second scottish referendum? you're saying of the scottish parliament wants one, you would... zion i r they'd delete my obviously we would consider that at the time. we wouldn't block something like that —— the time. we wouldn't block something like that -- obviously, we would consider that at the time. this has started quite a row in the conservative party. take for example
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the leader of the labour party in scotland, richard leonard, who said he spoke tojohn mcdonnell today and made it clear it is not the will of the scottish people to go to another device of poll just like the scottish people to go to another device of polljust like the one that took place in 2014, and others have gone even further in their criticism. douglas alexander, secretary of state for scotland under tony blair, said john mcdonnell‘s comments were strikingly ignorant. but as you might imagine the first minister of scotland, leader of the snp, nicola sturgeon, has welcomed it and says she is surprised actually that it has created so much controversy. surprised actually that it has created so much controversym should be for the scottish parliament to decide the timing of an independence referendum and it should be for the people of scotland to decide whether or not the country becomes independent. you know, it amazes me that that should be a controversial statement. westminster government lanai are entitled to argue against independence, but they are not entitled to block the right of the people of scotland to make that choice. so it is a statement of democracy, it shouldn't be controversial. the other labour and people are not entitled to block the
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right of the people of scotland to make that choice. so it is a statement of democracy, it shouldn't be controversial. the other labour and people might have actually supported john mcdonnell in this as well. they have said, look, we now to put a can brag that referendum, so it would be a little churlish of us might not to keep up the idea of a second scottish independence referendum. but i suspect this argument could go on for some time inside the labour ranks as we move towards party conference season where labour may well firm up some of its policies ahead of a possible early general election. pete, thanks very much indeed, from westminster. police say that 15—year—old nora is most likely to have wandered off and got lost. her aunt has been giving a statement to the bbc on behalf of the family. nora's family wish to
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express our deepest gratitude to the malaysian police and rescue teams for all they have done for us in this difficult time. we would like to thank our embassies, the local community, and the staff here at the hotel and anyone who has offered to help find nora. we also welcome the assistance of the french, british and irish police. we are so com pletely and irish police. we are so completely overwhelmed by the support we have received from all over the world. this is extremely traumatic for the whole family. we are understandably devastated and nora and sebastien —— maeve and sebastien are understandably devastated and unable to speak at this time. our family devastated and unable to speak at this time. 0urfamily is unable devastated and unable to speak at this time. our family is unable to deal with this at this moment. but
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we must remain hopeful... and we ask eve ryo ne we must remain hopeful... and we ask everyone to keep nora in their thoughts and continue to support the ongoing search for her. nora is still missing and she is very vulnerable, and we need to do everything we can to bring her home. that was nora quoirin‘s aren't speaking on behalf of the family about the missing teenager in malaysia. it is just approaching half past five. let's look at the latest weather forecast with darren. thanks, ben. some sunshine to end the day across many parts of the country. we have seen some showers, seen some showers, particularly heavy focused on scotland and northern ireland. some flashes of lightning earlier on. these main areas of showers across the north
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will drift down through the irish sea then fade away and it becomes dry overnight, for all but central and northern scotland where the northerly breeze continues to feed ona northerly breeze continues to feed on a few showers. temperatures around about 11—13 and it clear skies, and many places will have a dry day with some sunshine. a few showers around. mostly for scotland and northern ireland. not as many as today. cloud amount is increasing across the southern counties of england and may bring spots of rain in the afternoon but elsewhere plenty of sunshine. light winds, and it will feel a bit warmer, temperatures higher than today, in the mid—20s or so. things going downhill overnight and into friday, a spell of heavy rain followed by some strengthening winds, very windy conditions across a good part of england and wales on saturday.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: the british food industry calls for competition laws to be relaxed, to prevent food shortages in the event of a no—deal brexit. the minister for no—deal brexit planning, michael gove, has been meeting dover port officials as lorry drivers‘ leaders fear thousands of tuckes being delayed. —— trucks. british airways says flights are returning to normal, after technical problems caused cancellations and severe delays for passengers. derbyshire police say it's now safe for residents to return to their homes in whaley bridge, after the town was evacuated last
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week, overfears of a damaged dam. ministers unveil an overhaul of pension rules for senior nhs staff, after they were linked to growing waiting lists for patients. now for a look at the sport with 0lly foster. just less than 24 hours to go until the premier league transfer window closes — there's been a frenzy of speculation on social media. we know that tottenham have ended their interest in signing phillipe coutinho from barcelona. they were pursuing a season—long loan deal. the brazilian has been told he can leave despite onlyjoining from liverpool for £140 million a year and half ago. liverpool could be one of those
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teams that come in for him. manchester united have gone cold on taking spurs' christian eriksen to old tarfford. the dane has expressed a desire to leave spurs but united have halted transfer talks with the player believed to favour a move to spain. erickson said at the start of the summer erickson said at the start of the summer that he wanted another challenge. manchester united are basically trying to find out whether or not that challenge could involve him coming to old trafford. they are now backing away from those talks because they have come to the conclusion that if he does leave totte n ha m , conclusion that if he does leave tottenham, which is not certain, he would prefer to go to real madrid or possibly barcelona. the premier league's ceo richard masters has spoken to the bbc for the first time since replacing richard scudamore at the start of the year — he was the third candidate after two others turned down thejob. he's spoken on a number of issues including what football can do to tackle racism
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inside premier league grounds. we are determined to tackle discrimination, and we did have some insta nces discrimination, and we did have some instances last season, had one incident is one too many. those incidents do make you take back and ask whether you are doing right, enough, and y we are working with the fa and with government to work out some measures where we can do better in this area. celtic are away in romania facing cluj tonight in the first leg of their champions legaue qualifying tie. the winners will face slavia pargue fro a place in the gorup stage. neil lennon dismissed the suggestion from opposing manager dan petrescu who said his side, the romanian champions, will need a miracle to progress. jack nowell remains a world cup injury concern with the england camp unable to put a timeframe on his return. the exeter player flew home from the training camp in italy last week and doubts linger over nowell‘s availability, with boss eddiejones naming his 31—man squad on monday.
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england play four warm—up games in the coming weeks — starting with wales at twickenham on sunday. mickey arthur says he's disappointed and hurt to lose hisjob as head coach of pakistan. the south african has been in charge for the last three years and wanted to stay on, but his contract isn't being renewed. he's being tipped as one of the front runners to replace england head coach trevor bayliss when he steps down after the ashes series. judd trump is snooker‘s new world number one after over taking ronnie 0'sullivan. the current world champion achieved the feat after reaching the quarter—finals of the international championship in china with a 6—2 victory overjoe perry. it's the first time since 2013 that he's topped the rankings. former world champ carl frampton has been talking about the freak accident that saw him break a bone in his hand
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and call off a fight next weekend's comeback fight against emmanuel dominguez. the northern irihsman says he was lucky not be more seriously injured after a free standing pillar in his philadeldia hotel fell on him. i was feeling sorry for myself, but right now i am angry. why it has happened, not angry that it was accidental, someone knocked into it, but why is something of that size hang around a hotel lobby and not screwed into the floor? and i have lost potentially a shot at the world title. i have lost 12 weeks away from my wife and kids. i am angry more than anything.
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we'll have more for you in sportsday at 6:30. michael gove has been in discussions with the food industry, he has been talking to reporters. let's listen to what he had to say.|j talking to reporters. let's listen to what he had to say. i think if we leave without a deal, there will inevitably be bumps on the road, but it is myjob to make sure we are as ready as possible for all contingencies, add one of the reasons why i am here is that i have been talking to the people who manage their support, who are responsible forfreight manage their support, who are responsible for freight that travels to europe, and i have been talking to europe, and i have been talking to those who manage other ports in order to make sure that good can flow, people can receive and their supermarkets everything that they need, and britain's industry and commerce and carry on going. have you been too optimistic? are we not
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entirely relied on france's preparations? i think it is important we work with the french at others to ensure we have the smoothest possible exit from the european union. in the event of no deal, the eu has its obligations, but we the uk are doing everything possible in order to make sure that we are ready, come what may, to honour the instruction of the british people to leave the european union. i do going to lift the competition law for the food industry so they can coordinate food supply and the rt of a no deal?” industry so they can coordinate food supply and the rt of a no deal? i am confident that the uk has a resilient system that we can make sure that people have a wide—ranging of all the choice that they need, but of course we are constantly talking to supermarkets, food distributors to make see what more the government can do to help and we stand ready to make sure that the regime that we put in place as a government is responsive to their needs. is that there is the worst possible time for food supply? if we have a no deal and october, it makes
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us more of a light on eu food imports out there is particular shortages? living on october the 3ist shortages? living on october the 31st without a deal would certainly mean that there was pressure on warehouse space. it is also the case that at different times of the year there are different issues, part of there are different issues, part of the reason why i am here is to make sure we can leave on october 31 and we can make sure that food gets to consumers in the uk but also our high—quality food produce manages to reach the many consumers in the eu who british food. the liberal democrats have consistently backed remain since the referedum, and we are joined from westminster by one of their newest members — chuka umuna — now the party's treasury and business secretary. we were just hearing from michael gove who has been end over saying that the government i doing all they
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can to make preparations for leaving the european union on october 31.|j think michael gove is incredibly blase, complacent, he is living in cloud cuckoo land everything to be going to actually be ready, our businesses will be ready to leave the european union without a deal and october. just to take two examples, we know from later that we government to produce that they stand three in ten of our exporters to the eu have the requested registration to continue export to the eu markets. from october 2019. with the registration that is needed, not going be ready until 2021. the way she dismisses the concerns of the food and drink industry, these are very real. there are major issues and terms of warehouse space to stockpile the goods that will be necessary to be able to cope in a no deal situation,
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because the warehouses that a lot of our retainers and goods benefactors use at that time of year are already being used in anticipation of christmas, but also argues more because seasonally we do not reduce fresh produce ourselves in the uk, so have to actually import more of it. there isn't actually that much warehouse space at all. you are talking a very gloomy terms about a no—deal brexit, ad brexiteer is was a this is a project fear mark two, scaremongering, yes to will be temporary problems and frustrations but nothing we cannot overcome, and in the long run a no—deal brexit would lead to opportunities for more prosperous britain to strike free trade deals with the rest of the world. in terms of uk exporters' readiness, after a no—deal brexit, i am sick to providing you with the figures that those brexiteer is provided to me. so they cannot deny
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the fact that they are being forced to disclose. when it comes to our food and reckon whether we have those kinds of produce, and can get them, who would you rather listen to? the people working there those businesses who regularly import and export, or some ideological politician for whom this is all a bit of a game and ideological project, and they are not particularly experts in food and drink? who are you going to believe? of course they are going to claim everybody who raises concerns, engaging in project fear and predicting doom, that is because they do not want to hear what people have got to say, and we are simply giving them fact you do not get to choose your fax. what i am saying is, it is argued that it will be bumpy for is, it is argued that it will be bumpyfora is, it is argued that it will be bumpy for a few weeks, if you months, but in the long—term the brexiteers would argue that it is worth it, and it will be worth it, and after all this will be what the people voted for. i don't think
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people voted for. i don't think people voted for. i don't think people voted to be poorer, and remember, boris johnson, people voted to be poorer, and remember, borisjohnson, michael gove and all the others were saying that it would be highly unlikely that it would be highly unlikely that would would be leaving the without a deal. their basic promise was not just without a deal. their basic promise was notjust that without a deal. their basic promise was not just that you would without a deal. their basic promise was notjust that you would get £350 million extra pair which going into the nhs but they asserted time and again that we would be leaving with again that we would be leaving with a deal, and that if people go and look at the bbc‘s reality fact check page on the claims that were made by the foreign secretary dominic raab that during the 26 the referendum campaign people like borisjohnson and others actually said we could leave without a deal, bbc‘s reality fa ct leave without a deal, bbc‘s reality fact check cannot find any record of dominic raab or any of these people having said we would be leaving the eua having said we would be leaving the eu a deal. the long and short of this is that brexit and the form that it was sold to the british people has proved to be completely undeliverable and now they are trying to deliver a no—deal brexit for which they do not have a
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mandate. arguably, theresa may was trying to put a hard brexit to the british people and the 2017 general election as she lost her majority. these people are engaging in something that is a political choice, an irresponsible choice, but they do not have a mandate from the british people to do that. thank you very much for being with ours. president trump has arrived in dayton, ohio. any last hour he has been visiting the miami valley hospital to meet first responders and victims and their families. and then the present is due to leave for el paso shortly after, the scene of the other shooting. let's go to gary who is in el paso where president trump will arrive a little bit later on after his visit to ohio. huge
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controversy about president trump's visit, because some of his critics say he has contributed with his rhetoric, perhaps, to what happened, particularly n el paso. to what extent will he be welcomed in el paso? the real truth is that the visit has polarised views here. there are some who thinks he absolutely should not come, but as you say the kind of rhetoric he has used in this very town before, back in february, has led to what happened on saturday, been a contributory factor. others say, he is the president, the commander—in—chief, the man who can do something about all this, let's get him here, tell him what we think i see what he has to say. you get a range of views stop what will be interesting as it will be a controlled visit, his exposure to the general population will be
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limited. however, he does say he will meet some of the victims at the relatives of those who have been injured and killed. and you cannot predict what people will say in those circumstances. his people will no that there is an element of unpredictable and potentially an element of anger out of frustration on behalf of those people who will feel that this shooter published his anti—hispanic manifesto, echoing some of the language that the president himself has used in the past. in terms of any kind of meaningful reform on gun control, is there any likelihood of any movement on that? the president says he takes background universal checks are something that he can get done. he has said that before and failed. the point about background checks is that they, you get them at the
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moment on a state—by—state basis, but you can go to places like a gunfire or online and you can buy staff without any background checks whatsoever, either has been called repeatedly for that process to be tightened. the national rifle association is not very keen on that and stopped at happening last time on the question of assault weapon ban, this is something that was in place during bill clinton's presidency add then lapsed. the president said this morning there is no chance of getting, no appetite for that whatsoever, assault weapons fire lots and lots of rounds very quickly, they were the weapons of choice for the two shooters at the weekend. use come again, we have been getting reports of a gunman at the usa today office in tysons corner virginia.
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eltingh has been evacuated, that is according to fairfax county police in the last few minutes. this is what we are seeing at the moment. a tweet from the police say they are responding to reports of a man with a weapon at the building. and we will bring you more details on that as it comes into us. the police saying to people to avoid the area, no more confirmation about what has been going on apart from that. reports of a gunman at the usa today office in virginia. the building has been evacuated. the british food industry is coy for competition laws to be relaxed to prevent food shortages in the event ofa prevent food shortages in the event of a no—deal brexit. british airways
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says flights are returning to normal after technical problems caused cancellations and severe delays for passengers. derbyshire police say it is now safe for residents to return to their homes in whaley bridge at any time was evacuated last week over fears of a damaged any time was evacuated last week overfears of a damaged dam. plans have been announced to reform pension rules for senior staff in the nhs in england and wales. some clinicians were refusing to work extra shifts because changes to pension regulations meant they were being hit by bigger tax bills. the rules have been blamed for making it difficult to fill rotas and bring down waiting lists. our health correspondent nick triggle reports. the pensions dispute has been wreaking havoc in the health service, with hospitals reporting their waiting lists were going up because doctors were refusing to do extra shifts. senior medics have blamed changes to pension rules, which meant some had been facing huge tax bills. in 2010—11, workers were only taxed if their pensions
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grew by £255,000 a year. that has now been reduced to £40,000, and dropped still further for the highest earners. around one third of senior doctors and gps may be affected. theresa may's government put forward plans last month to allow doctors to reduce payments into their pension. but, after criticism the measures did not go far enough, the new administration has had a rethink. it is now proposing greater flexibility, and allowing doctors to take any pension payments their employer would have paid as cash. the plans apply to england and wales. it has become a significant problem. it is unfair that, if you do overtime, you should get a big tax bill for it, that often has wiped out the increased pay. so we are changing those rules, which means there will be more flexibility for doctors. the government has also said the way public sector pensions are taxed will be reviewed by the treasury. the move has pleased the british medical association. we think it is a positive step by the government,
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it was a necessary step, because we have a ludicrous situation at the moment where doctors are effectively punished for going into work and doing their normal hours, or doing extra shifts. the government said it would put out a formal consultation in the next few weeks, and have a new system in place by april. in the meantime, doctors are being allowed to opt out of the pension scheme for this year, to encourage them to start doing more overtime. justin king is the former chief executive of sainsbury‘s. from a food point of view, supermarkets, what do you think a new deal brexit would mean?|j supermarkets, what do you think a new deal brexit would mean? i think it depends entirely what happens at the border. the government's
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preparations which appeared now to be in full swing for significant problems at the border, we have seen the coverage of the lorry park, the extra customs officers. indicating that they expect there to be a problem at the border. any problem at the border is going to have very significant impact on food availability in the uk. and very quickly, because there is 8—10 days' food, a bit more if it is packaged and frozen, a lot less if it is fresh. even a small delay of a day or two will completely disrupt the way food supply chain works today. for the customer, what are they likely to see? empty shelves? not empty, because everything or supermarket will fight hard to get theirfair supermarket will fight hard to get their fair share supermarket will fight hard to get theirfair share if not more of supermarket will fight hard to get their fair share if not more of what they can successfully import, but you will see gaps. you will see price increases, because cassidy leads to higher prices. very likely,
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if we have extra tariffs in food, and that is one of the areas left out of the government's advice for dell tariff post brexit, they will be passed on in high prices. supermarkets are talking about to work together to set aside some of the competition regulations that mean they could coordinate more closely. how would that work and why would that be important? the presumption in that suggestion is that there will be shortages, and therefore in the event that there are, whether it be as a direct result of what happens at the border or because so many vehicles are tied up or because so many vehicles are tied up in these ferries and lorry parks, that somehow the industry can get together and share it out more evenly, rationing if you like. that is incredibly unlikely because it requires the government to change the law, and for the government to do that they really are going to have to accept and publicly accept
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that food shortages are likely and therefore waving competition law to allow retailers and manufacturers to talk together, to ration what supply there is, is something that i cannot see the law being changed to allow, i differed has not changed then you will not see those conversations taking place. michael gove is endeavour, saying the british food industry is resilient, there will be bumps on the road he says in terms of the food chain. he sounds optimistic. i would say that bumps on the road as little speak for there is going to be a problem. if he didn't think that, he would not be referring to bumps on the road. there is a failure to understand how significant and swift any disruption at the border will change food availability in the uk. it has been estimated that an extra two minutes, just two minutes for every lorry, could lead to queues of 20 miles on the m25 if those 20 miles of lorries heading out to collect food, they will not be able to, if they are on
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the other side of the border because i suspected will cut both ways, it will be food coming our way. we will see a very impact on those so—called bumps on the road. the music festival boardmasters has been cancelled, just hours before it was set to begin. the three—day event, headlined by wu—tang clan, florence and the machines, and foals, was set to take place in newquay this weekend. organisers the decision was taken following extreme weather warnings. our news correspondent victoria graham is in newquay where the festival was due to take place. iam here i am here at the hotel at the beach in newquay, i havejust arrived, but the sunshine is certainly making for very pleasant conditions, so it is ha rd to very pleasant conditions, so it is hard to believe that boardmasters has been cancelled, but looking at the beach, it is aptly packed with visitors, there is lots of surfing
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going on. the organisers of boardmasters did going on. the organisers of boa rdmasters did say last going on. the organisers of boardmasters did say last night that at the 11th order, it was going to be cancelled because of met—office severe weather warnings of heavy rain, high wind and thunderstorms. the met office has said to us that they were not part of that decision—making, they just present the facts, but there were numerous meetings going on last night with various safety concerns, and that is what is paramount, that people are safe. lots of things going on, people have taken a long time to organise things, lots of money gone into it, so there is questions still outstanding about whether people will get their money back, the organisers have yet to tell us. 7000 passes due to arrive on the festival site this morning, where will they go? the thousands of people, 55,000 potential people coming here this weekend have travelled from the ad far. we have been getting e—mails, one from france, someone travelled all the way over, they say the festival has been cancelled because of the weather and are they cannot get back to france because of the
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weather, they will sit on this beach idrink weather, they will sit on this beach i drink beer weather, they will sit on this beach idrink beerand weather, they will sit on this beach i drink beer and maybe even have some pasties. we are enjoying the sunshine, hundreds of people are, and it is more than important to say that the surfing is still going ahead. newquay is still open for business. we are still waiting to hear from the organises at a whether people will get their money back i will not. jodie foster's daughter devonie was meant to go to the boardmasters festival along with her friends, but they've set up their own mini festival in the back garden instead, after it was cancelled. we can talk to them now. how disappointed are you that has has been called off? it is tragic, because we have spent so long working and saving our money for this, and we are gutted that for the people who have already travelled down there that they have had to now com pletely down there that they have had to now completely change their plans just because of the weather. you were
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obviously looking forward to it, do you think you will get any compensation for the money you have paid? boardmasters have actually e—mails are saying we will get a full refund, so that is the positive side. tell us, how much had to be looking forward to this, how much had you been saving up? we had saved up had you been saving up? we had saved up hundreds of pounds each, rebooted on christmas eve, so that is about seven months worth of savings. we we re seven months worth of savings. we were most looking forward to seeing lewis capaldi, were most looking forward to seeing lewis ca paldi, i were most looking forward to seeing lewis capaldi, i don't know he is on sunday, so if he wants to come over, that would be brilliant! that is an invitation. it has been cancelled because of warnings of severe weather. do you take that seriously? do you think there is an overreaction? i suppose it was based on safety fears. yes, a 17-year-old girls, we don't care about the weather. we had fake tans already,
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but obviously safety comes first, and if it is on the edge of a cliff we do not want to wake up falling offa we do not want to wake up falling off a cliff. laughter such a shame, but you seem to be taking it in good heart. tell us about your plans, your plans, your own festival. yes, we put the tent up in the garden and we have been having food and drink and listening to lewis, and we are off to london tomorrow for a bit of a replacement holiday. good luck to all of you, thank you for being with us. time for a look at the weather. unusually windy for this time of year, fairly quiet, thundery showers around, a good few of those focused on scotland and northern ireland where we have had most of the showers. we had a line of heavy winds and the south—east corner, fading. in the north, lasting longer, but most will decay through this evening at many places will be dry. clearer skies. the northerly breeze keeps cloud and showers going, particular leg northern parts
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of scotland, ten which is 11—13dc. tomorrow quiet, calm before so wet and windy weather. plenty of sunshine, showers mainly for scotla nd sunshine, showers mainly for scotland on northern ireland, but not as many as today. clouding for southern counties, sports or raid any afternoon but otherwise plenty of sunshine, feeling warmer, ten metres in the mid 20s. downhill from the south—west, a storm heading, deep area of low pressure, heavy rain sweeping northwards and eastwards. thursday night and during friday, followed by strengthening went, quite windy conditions across england and wales on saturday. there has been some impact already out there may be further impact over the next few days.
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travel chaos for thousands of british airways passengers, as computer problems cause cancellations and long delays. long queues at heathrow and gatwick. more than 100 flights cancelled, more than 300 delayed — including one woman trying to get to her own wedding. it's my wedding, but there'll be people who are trying to get to poorly relatives. there'll be people who are trying to get to births. we booked with the best airline in the world because of how important it was... reliability. ..and theyjust don't care. ba says the problem has been fixed, but there will be a knock—on effect. also tonight... going home at last — almost a week after whaley bridge was evacuated, amid fears the dam was about to burst, residents are finally allowed to return. the british food industry calls for competition laws to be relaxed if there's a no—deal brexit. president trump visits ohio and texas after the weekend's mass shootings, amid continuing accusations that his rhetoric has

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