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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  August 8, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me, rebecca jones. the headlines. a policeman critically injured in a "frenzied" machete attack in east london will make a recovery, according to the metropolitan police. police! a sharp rise in the number of women and girls carrying knives in england — police have found blades hidden in babies‘ prams and designer handbags. i used to have knives in my backpack andi i used to have knives in my backpack and i would use it to threaten people, give me what you have got, ta ke people, give me what you have got, take it and run off then. eating less meat could help slow down global warming, according to climate scientists. torrential rain causes disruption for travellers in parts of scotland, as flooding closes the main rail line from edinburgh to glasgow.
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using computers to detect disease. the nhs is to get £250 million to build an artificial intelligence lab. and it's set to be a busy transfer deadline day. manchester united have agreed to sell striker romelu lukaku to inter milan in a deal worth up to £74 million. good morning, and welcome to the bbc news at 9. police say an officer who was attacked with a machete in east london is seriously injured, but will recover. the policeman was stabbed several times after he tried to stop a van in leyton at around midnight. a man in his fifties
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has been arrested. our correspondent andy moore is in east london. andy, what do we know so far? this incident happened just behind me just before midnight last night. two officers in a marked patrol car were following a large white van, and we think it was not insured, which is why they were following it. they had the blue lights on and were trying to get it to pull over and it eventually did, just behind me and when the officers got out they were confronted with an attack from this man and an officer was stabbed or slashed and the incident lasted a minute or so slashed and the incident lasted a minute orso and slashed and the incident lasted a minute or so and was described as frenzied, unprovoked, and despite being repeatedly attacked, the officer managed to taser his
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assailant and the man in his 50s was arrested. a short time ago there was arrested. a short time ago there was a press c0 nfe re nce arrested. a short time ago there was a press conference nearby. let's listen to what was said by chief superintendent richard tucker. the circumstances are that the officers were in a marked police vehicle and stopped a van for not having insurance and having engaged the driver who was quite aggressive, and we are fortunate we have a body worn camera footage of the whole incident, and in dealing with that offence he tries to make off, gets back in the van and a violent struggle ensues where he produces a weapon and stabs our officer in the head and around the body, and during the struggle the officer managed to get his taser and deploy it, which stops the incident. the officer is at the royal london hospital and i went to visit him the early hours of this morning, and he is fine. he is seriously injured but he will make a recovery.
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as we heard, despite the serious injuries, we expect that officer to make a recovery. the extent of those injuries, apparently, he had a cut on his head which has stitches and fairly serious injuries to his hands, he was trying to fend off the attack and he will have an operation in the next hour or so. we understand he is conscious and his family are around him, so everybody hoping he will make a recover from the physical recovery, but the mental injuries sustained in an attack like this, they will take some time to recover from and we understand the police are not treating this as a terrorist attack and the man who has been arrested, he has no injuries and has been questioned on suspicion of grievous bodily harm. andy moore, thank you very much. the number of offences involving women carrying a knife has increased dramatically in england over the past five years — that's the finding of exclusive bbc research.
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youth workers say knife crime is seen as a male problem, and the role of females is often overlooked. sarah corker reports. the first thing i would go do is run for a knife. i would go for a knife, threaten, cut. as a teenager, carrying a knife was part of everyday life for louise—anne. then, in her 20s, it was a way to protect herself in abusive relationships. i remember i used to have knives in my backpack. i'd use it to threaten people — "give me what you've got," take it off of them. i used to sleep with a knife under my bed, because i started to get quite paranoid. i remember my boyfriend bought me this — he actually bought me knives. women are often overlooked or ignored when it comes to tackling britain's problem with knife crime. it is framed as a male problem. but figures obtained by the bbc show that, on average,
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one woman is caught carrying a knife here in the north of england every single day. in the west midlands, these weapons were found hidden in a designer handbag. in england, there has been a 73% increase in knife possession cases involving women in the last five years. since 2014, there's been more than 5,800 cases of women caught carrying knives. around a quarter of those involved girls under the age of 18. youth workers in leeds say some women willingly carry knives to rob people. others are being manipulated by men. they're asked to maybe be the courier of these weapons. they will agree to do that ‘cause they're wanting to please their partner. so what we've come across are women who will hide the weapons, saya knife, in a pram. police! women carrying knives has often been described as a hidden problem, but with the numbers increasing,
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the pressure is on police to tackle it. the home office has told us that it funds schemes to help gang—affected women and girls. just wanting to take you back to the news about the policeman stabbed several times after he tried to stop a van in leyton at around midnight. the home secretary has been tweeting about this in the last few minutes and written that she is horrified by the shocking stabbing of one of our brave police officers in leyton over night. his courage in the face of danger shows how police put their lives on the line to protect us everyday. i wish the officer a full recovery and my thoughts are with him. that is the home secretary,
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priti patel. un scientists have released a major report into how to help fight climate change, following discussions in geneva. their findings focus on land use, and the damage done to the world's eco systems through farming and agriculture. the report, prepared by more than 100 scientists for the un's intergovernmental panel on climate change, says that if land is used more effectively, it can store more of the carbon emitted by humans. so what exactly do scientists suggest we do? they say that cutting down on meat and switching to a plant—based diet could help fight climate change — though they've stopped short of calling on people to become vegatarian or vegan. they suggest adopting farming practices that work with what nature offers us, rather than forcing crop production with fertilisers. and they say we should work to halt deforestation
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and restore the ecosystems we have damaged. 0ur environment analyst roger harrabin has more. this alpine landscape was once covered by forest. the trees sucked carbon dioxide from the atmosphere and regulated the climate. then, humans cleared some of the land for food. but cattle burp methane, and that strongly heats the atmosphere. this sort of low—intensity grazing may produce protein from poor soil, and it does have some environmental benefits, but it still creates more greenhouse gases than growing plant protein. scientists meeting here in the alps are not saying we've all got to go vegan to protect the climate. they are saying that we do need to cut down on red meat and dairy produce, and shift on towards eating more vegetables. and that message may not go down very well in a region that is so heavily dependent on cheese and
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meat. debate here has been fraught because the way we use the land is so complex. among the experts‘ recommendations are: on biofuels, limiting the area used to grow trees to be burned to make electricity. this could conflict with feeding the world. 0n deforestation, working harder to protect the trees that protect us from climate heating. 0n desertification, finding ways to feed people that don‘t involve degrading the soil through overgrazing. then there is the way we eat. in the west, we over consume meat and dairy and that is bad for our health, bad for the climate, and it‘s bad for water and land degradation so if we could reduce our consumption in the west of meat and dairy, that could have benefits of the climate but also our health. scientists also wa nt to also our health. scientists also want to stop food being discarded because wasting food means greenhouse gases produced to make the fertiliser to grow the crops
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have been for nothing. a charity in geneva redistributes waste food. here they are taking stale bread and turning it into new cookies. this avoids having to produce fresh flour to make the cookies. here is a positive sign. these peter moores in the north of england where previously drained so animals could green —— greys. when peter is exposed to the error greenhouse gases so exposed to the error greenhouse gases so now they are soaking the peat again, one of the easier options in what for scientists has become an increasingly desperate attempt to save the planet. roger harrabin sent us this update about how exactly our use of the land contributes to global warming. when it comes to the emissions that are fuelling climate change, most of us will think of cars and planes and factories. in fact, they constitute about 75% of our total emissions. about a quarter of our emissions from humankind actually come from the way we use the land.
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so ideally the land is a sink for carbon dioxide. trees suck in co2 from the atmosphere and they fix it into the ground through their roots. that is great, but the way we are using the land at the moment, deep ploughing, intensive farming, mono crop agriculture and forestry, some of those processes are actually abusing the land and allowing the soil to give out c02 instead of taking it in. the scientists are saying we have really got to reverse this trend. they talk about the complexity of the issue. we are using the soil for so many things. we are trying to grow bio crops as a substitute for fossil fuels and energy production. we want plants for fibre and also for pulp and paper and timber and of course we want plants for food. that is a critical issue because the scientists are saying if you have a heavy, meat—based diet, if you eat a lot of red meat, lamb and beef, you are creating a lot of greenhouse
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gases and they would like us to shift towards more of a plant—based diet. their recommendations on biofuels are very interesting because they are saying biofuels can be a good thing, helping us reduce fossil fuel emissions if they are used correctly, but if they are used too much then they will compete with the land needed to grow food. this is a very complicated report and very important, in my view, because it is so rare to get the issue of soil onto the global agenda. joining me now is doug parr, uk chief scientists at greenpeace. thanks for coming in to talk to us. iam assuming thanks for coming in to talk to us. i am assuming that you agree with roger, that this is a complicated but very important report?m certainly a very important report and it‘s the first time scientists have come together and to have it signed off by government. we have some problems with the way we use
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land in terms of climate and food security but there are solutions as well and roger was outlining some of those things that we can do in the uk because if you think of the footprint internationally, it‘s quite large, so some of the things in terms of deforestation, because of the demand we have in the uk for things like meat and dairy and other imports. so to what extent will we need to change the way we eat? we can evolve the way we eat but it‘s certainly true that what we should be aiming to do is reduce the amount of meat and dairy in our everyday lives. in the first instance, that‘s a good thing, because as a country we eat more than the health guidelines say we should in terms of those meat and dairy products so in the first instance we have to improve our health and we know we can eat healthily on a plant —based diet so in the long term we can
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manage that as well but that long—term change has to happen and certainly by 2050 we should have an 80% cut in meat and dairy consumption in the uk and other shorter term targets as well to relieve the pressure on the land where we are currently seeing deforestation. so does there need to bea deforestation. so does there need to be a move to make meat more expensive and possibly taxed? there area expensive and possibly taxed? there are a variety of ways in which we can look at that. in the first insta nce can look at that. in the first instance i think we should say that public procurement and education would be the way to go. we wouldn‘t rule out taxes, but stimulating behaviour change in this way is not as simple and straightforward as a thing and rushing straight to a tax can have negative consequences as well so we need to be careful about that. what else can we do that perhaps doesn‘t require a fundamental change to the way we live? let's think about the things we can do. the public sector, in terms of schools and hospitals buys an awful lot of food and we can shift that towards a plant —based
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diet, because as i emphasise, some of this is very good for people‘s health broadly as well and one of the things we need to do, the mantra is, less meat but better so what we do think is wrong is that we have meat that is produced in intensively farmed places where a lot of the feed that the animals are eating, particularly chicken is coming in from outside the uk and we know sawyer is heavily associated with deforestation in the amazon where there is a big climate impact, so if we can reduce the amount of animal feed which means reducing some kinds of meat, it means we are having a bigger impact on the climate problems outlined by this report than some others. one final question, you will be aware that people think we can make all the changes we like in this country but if people in other countries don‘t make any changes, what difference
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does it actually make? that's exactly right and that‘s why there isa un exactly right and that‘s why there is a un convention which could be coming to the uk and it‘s the next important meeting next year and the important meeting next year and the important thing about it is that every country can say that if we don‘t do it, or we can act on our own and others can follow. what the uk is doing is being a good thing in saying we can be a leader and we can demonstrate to others about how to do it in making the economy and population and our people move in the right direction but in a way thatis the right direction but in a way that is supported and good for us andi that is supported and good for us and i think that‘s perfectly possible even given the considerable challenges that the report lays out. a positive note on which to end. really good to talk to you. a major clear—up operation is under way following torrential rain in various parts of scotland. rail engineers worked through the night to pump waterfrom the main rail line from edinburgh to glasgow after it was shut due to flooding
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at winchburgh tunnel in west lothian. passengers on five trains were trapped for several hours. scotrail says the line is currently under two feet of water in places. there was also flooding elsewhere, this mobile phone footage shows a determined cyclist making it through flood water in edinburgh. and police in fife warned motorists to take care as water levels reached up to car bonnets. the headlines on bbc news. the home secretary says she is "absolutely horrified" after a policeman was left critically injured in a machete attack in east london overnight. police! a sharp rise in the number of women and girls carrying knives in england — police have found blades hidden in babies‘ prams and designer handbags. eating less meat could help slow down global warming, according to climate scientists.
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and in sport. the latest movers and shakers on transfer deadline day, including romelu lukaku, as manchester united agree a deal to sell the striker to inter milan. the fee could rise to around £73 million. arsenal have agreed an £8 million deal with chelsea to sign defender david luiz on a two—year contract. and tottenham are close to reaching an agreement to signjuventus and argentina forward paulo dybala. it isn‘t done yet, but spurs are hopeful of completing a deal before the deadline at 5pm tonight. i‘ll be back with the latest news just after 940. young offender institutions in england and wales are failing to provide necessary support for children to succeed in life after custody, according to a joint report released today by the inspectorate of prisons and inspectorate of probation.
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the report found that, in many cases, secure accommodation is not lined up for children returning to the outside world, while mental health support, education and employment also often fall short of what‘s required. joining me now to discuss the report‘s findings is the chief inspector of prisons peter clarke. tell us a bit more about what is going wrong. what we found when we carried out the inspection with our collea g u es carried out the inspection with our colleagues from the probation inspectorate is was, in essence, too little too late is being done in terms of resettling children and young people back into the community after their sentences. resettlement work, which is all about finding accommodation, training, family linkages and ensuring that proper health services are provided on release, that work should start at
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the time of the sentence and not wait until the last minute before children are released back into the community. we found that far too little is being done and that is prejudicing chances of being productive in the communities when they rejoin and also it means that they rejoin and also it means that they are more likely to fall back into bad ways and we already know that about 70% of children who serve less tha n that about 70% of children who serve less than 12 month sentences, short sentences, reoffend in any case so it‘s an important issue both for the children and wider public. it's worth saying that we are talking about young people aged between 15 and 21. why is it not being done? we are talking predominantly about children between 15 and 18. why is it not being done? well, that is a good question because four years ago we carried out a similar inspection and found the same failings, so clearly the previous recommendations
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have not been acted upon and that is a question which i think the prison service, the youth custody service need to ask themselves as to why it is that this essential work is not being done in an effective and efficient way as it should. the youth custody service has its working to improve support on release. what are you recommending? we are recommending that there needs to be greater training of caseworkers within young offenders institutions there needs to be a much sharper focus institutions there needs to be a much sharperfocus on institutions there needs to be a much sharper focus on resettlement and we found, for instance that feltham and wetherby young offenders institutions, because of the restrictions on the regime, the daily timetable, caseworkers sometimes had to interact with children through locked doors or sometimes even pushing bits of paper under doors. clearly this is no way to carry out this important work. it's
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to carry out this important work. it‘s clearly being marginalised when compared to other aspects of work, so it needs to be brought to the fore and there needs to be clear leadership, good coordination, good monitoring of what is happening so leaders can be clear that they are delivering what is required. so i suppose the question is, in your view, that is what needs to be done but realistically, can it be done? it can be done. we have seen better work at wetherby young offenders institution in yorkshire where there isa institution in yorkshire where there is a better focus and staff are not diverted onto other things that concentrate on and most importantly they insist the agencies in community engaged early in the process so they are ready to receive these children back into the communities when they are released. peter clarke, thanks for joining communities when they are released. peter clarke, thanks forjoining us this morning. thank you. some of the uk‘s newest and most popular cars are at risk of being stolen in as little as ten seconds by exploiting weaknesses
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in keyless entry systems. car theft rates in england and wales have reached an eight—year high. in 2018, more than 106,000 vehicles were stolen. neil thomas is a director of investigative services at automotive firm ax and he specialises in protecting vehicles from theft. hejoins me now. are you surprised at all by these findings? i'm not surprised by the findings? i'm not surprised by the findings at all. we work, obviously, with manufacturers and dealers and we have noticed a massive rise in car crime as yourfigures we have noticed a massive rise in car crime as your figures have just shown, so i‘m not surprised but i welcome the report to highlight it and enable the manufacturers to deal with it. so what do they need to do? a lot of the manufacturers now are looking at different solutions. the thieves are quite resourceful so they buy equipment off the internet to enable them to steal keyless cars and what the manufacturers are
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doing, is to go one step ahead and try to disable the key, so there are different motion sensors for high—end cars and it is high end ca rs high—end cars and it is high end cars predominantly, so the thieves cannot steal the car from your drive. i cannot believe that, the key problem is key less technology. it is at the moment because what happens is the thieves turn up on your drive with clever technology and convince the cart that the key is closer than it is and they get in the car and drive it away, so the problem at the moment is keyless thefts. is there anything we can do to help prevent this? yes, there's a number of things, really. 0bviously keep the key downstairs. some people say they keep the key upstairs, but the problem with that is for me, personally, i wouldn‘t want to be coming into my house and coming u psta i rs to coming into my house and coming upstairs to steal the key from my bedside cabinet, if you like. 0nly four weeks ago one of my neighbours
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was confronted by a guy on his stairs, with a knife, who was doing exactly that, so to prevent khaki theft and keyless theft people promote faraday pouches, which is a device where you put your key in a pouch, or a tin box, to prevent the signal being transmitted between the ca rs. signal being transmitted between the cars. the other thing we do is accompany is we specialise in tracking technology, so we have some technological devices that will prevent the theft and also find your car if it is stolen. somebody suggested to me that it might help if you bought strangely coloured ca rs if you bought strangely coloured cars so thieves were less likely to target a bright pink car. any truth in that? i have noticed it, to be honest. we had experience in the last few weeks of thieves going out with a shopping list and they will ta ke with a shopping list and they will take preprinted, false number plates and they know where the cars are, so they will go round and steal them.
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if you have a pink car or something like that, bear in mind most of the thieves are targeting the parts so they get rid of the body parts but they get rid of the body parts but they will also sell the seats, the engine, so the colour doesn‘t really affect it. a quick final thought there might be some more old—fashioned people there might be some more old —fashioned people amongst there might be some more old—fashioned people amongst us who think it might just old—fashioned people amongst us who think it mightjust be easier to go back to physical keys. 0r safer anyway? it could be, but the manufacturers and dealers, my advice is to speak to the dealer because this technology can be turned off on most ca rs this technology can be turned off on most cars and it probably isn‘t the solution. we like the convenience now of keyless technology so that probably isn‘t the solution. now of keyless technology so that probably isn't the solution. neil thomas, really good to hear your thoughts. thanks for joining thomas, really good to hear your thoughts. thanks forjoining us. a new national artificial intelligence laboratory is to be created by nhs england. the health secretary matt hancock says artificial intelligence can improve the treatment of diseases from cancer to heart disease. here‘s our health and science correspondent, james gallagher.
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artificial intelligence is already showing its potential in medicine. algorithms can analyse scans of organs, such as the eye or heart, to diagnose disease. 0ther ais are being developed to predict cancer survival or which patients are most likely to miss appointments. health secretary matt hancock says artificial intelligence has enormous power to improve people‘s treatment and to save lives. he‘s announced £250 million will be spent on boosting the role of ai within the nhs in england. he also expects the nhs‘s national ai lab to organise hospitals more efficiently to help doctors spend more time with patients. the power of artificial intelligence to improve medicine, to save lives, to improve the way treatments are done, that power is enormous. in this country, we‘ve got an opportunity really to be one of the leading countries in the world at using this new technology.
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increasing use of ai will also pose challenges for the health service, from training staff to enhancing cybersecurity and ensuring patient confidentiality. james gallagher, bbc news. joining me now to discuss how this funding for al in the nhs might be used is doctor indra joshi, the head of digital health & a! at nhs england. thanks so much forjoining us. can you give us some examples of the sorts of changes that al might make in the way that perhaps we are diagnosed and treated ? in the way that perhaps we are diagnosed and treated? yes, so, we‘ve got to be really clear what artificial intelligence can do and it is ina artificial intelligence can do and it is in a basic form about maths and numbers and using large parts of information to make decisions so some of the things we are excited about is how we can collaborate some
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of that information to bite sized chunks to help clinicians make decisions on the front line. one thing might be about triage, so when you come into a hospital it can help the clinician understand who really needs care at this point in time versus a little bit later, and another thing we mustn‘t forget is how we can optimise some of the care pathways, so how can we identify diseases that sometimes might be a bit more difficult, and that‘s because they have lots of different sources of information, and one of those can be sepsis, which we can identify early and that can help improve outcomes. is this essentially about the sheer quantity of data that the nhs holds in helping doctors and collisions —— clinicians to collate it? as a doctor, you have quite a lot of information to try and digestive this ina information to try and digestive this in a short amount of time, and what we are hoping to do with some
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of this information is help the clinicians, but also the other members of the workforce across the nhs and the social care system to help them make better decisions and hopefully then pre—empt —— free up time to spend time with patients and those they need to care for. time to spend time with patients and those they need to care fonm time to spend time with patients and those they need to care for. it all sounds very positive, but i wonder if there are any drawbacks. for example, around privacy or security perhaps? so, i want example, around privacy or security perhaps? so, iwant to example, around privacy or security perhaps? so, i want to be brutally honest. 0ne perhaps? so, i want to be brutally honest. one of the things we need to make sure that we do is create a robust framework around some of these things. we have made a first step and earlier in the year we published what we called a code of conduct for data driven technology which outline some of the things you have mentioned, and now we have to build on that and understand how to create evidence and ensure that these technologies are safe and effective to deploy at scale. and we are hoping that with some of these findings we can do that and therefore make us one of the leading places to develop the technology.
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therefore make us one of the leading places to develop the technologym good to talk to you. thanks for coming in. british airways says it will operate a normal schedule of flights today, but warned that there may still be some "knock—on" disruptions after wednesday‘s it problems. there‘s more bad news for travellers. uk—based ryanair pilots have voted to strike in a row over pay and conditions. in a moment the weather but first let‘s here‘s matthew price with what he‘s got coming up in the victoria derbyshire programme at ten. following the beyonce 22 day diet could be dangerous, that is the warning this morning. the singer‘s trainer who created the plan says the pop icon is mindful of proper nutrition and exercise as part of a healthy and happy lifestyle. we will
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look at what is involved in following the diet and some of the criticisms around it. my my first breakfast is a chia seed pudding with cashew milk, 75 grams of blueberries and 85 grams of frozen mango. join us for that at ten on bbc two, the bbc news channel and online as well. we will indeed join matthew a little later. now it is time for a look at the weather. it looks wet in scotland. we have got wet and windy weather coming our way, but today high pressure is across as so things are settled. we will see some showers in scotland, northern england, northern ireland and wales, and there could be some thunder in them. the temperatures today will feel quite
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pleasant. but then in the south—west this low pressure is coming our way with its low front and it brings rain this evening and overnight and tomorrow it continues to advance across scotland, northern england and northern ireland. tomorrow it will be windy, but there will be some sunshine. strong gusty winds in the western isles, 53 miles an hour in the south—west. friday has got heavy rain for a time with strengthening winds, but on saturday we are looking at gales for england and wales. hello, this is bbc news, the headlines... the home secretary says she is "absolutely horrified" by a machete attack in east london that has left a policeman criticially injured. priti patel says it shows officers "put their lives on the line every day". there‘s been a sharp rise in the number of women and girls
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caught carrying knives — police have found weapons hidden in babies‘ prams and designer handbags. high consumption of meat in the west is fuelling global warming, according to climate scientists. torrential rain causes disruption for travellers in parts of scotland as flooding closes the main rail line from edinburgh to glasgow. using computers to detect diseases, the nhs is to launch an artificial intelligence lab with £250 million of new funding. time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. let‘s start on the phone this morning. a little earlier matthew price was telling us what was coming
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up price was telling us what was coming up on the victoria derbyshire programme and one of the stories there is about beyonce‘s diet. beyonce diet plan could be dangerous. this is a diet endorsed by the american pop singer beyonce, but the british association for nutrition and lifestyle medicine has told the bbc‘s victoria derbyshire programme that it could be dangerous. the most read story this morning, that awful story from leighton about the police officer who has been stabbed in what has been described as a frenzied attack as he tried to stop a van in leighton, in east london. the officer, who was in his 30s, was stabbed many times but managed to use his taser to subdue the suspect and a colleague then stepped in to arrest the suspect. that is the most read story on the bbc website this morning.
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well, knife possession offences involving women in england have increased steeply over the past five years, according to police figures. youth workers say some women carry weapons for gangs as they are less likely to be stopped by police. bbc breakfast‘s naga munchetty has been speaking tojennifer blake, a community support worker who was in a gang for more than 20 years. jennifer explained how she came to be part of a gang. when you live that kind of life, and my life started when i was about 13 years old, and being groomed into that kind of a lifestyle and living the life of being out there, robbing people, selling drugs, you feel that you need something to protect yourself. it gives you that protection, it gives you power, it gives you that tool that you would use as a utensil in the home that you have now taken out of the home and it is something totally different. so having that knife with you, it kind of gives you status to say that i can protect myself,
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i‘m bad, i‘ve got a knife and i can use it. it‘s used as a deterrent and also as a way of robbing somebody as well, so there is all different ways and reasons why. one of the things that has come out today is that knife possession offences involving women in england have risen by nearly three quarters, 73%, and that there are more than 5800 recorded night possession 73%, and that there are more than 5800 recorded knife possession crimes involving women. people are going to be shocked because traditionally people think that men would be holding knives, not women. why are we seeing a rise in the number of women possessing knives? let me shock you a bit more, you need to double that figure. if females are less likely to be stopped by police, then that way the figures are going to be higher. when you look at those form of statistics you have also got to look at the fact that the majority of young people stabbed are young men.
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so if so many girls are being found with knives that is an indication that they are couriers. they are not using it to protect themselves. so they are using it because they are being used by male members and they are giving them to the girls to take the rap so to speak? so they are being used to courier it. so if they are going county lines and they are working with drugs, obviously they have got a knife to say that they are protecting what they have got. by county lines just to explain you mean when suburban gang members or drug pushers take it to rural areas? rural areas, females are used for that because they are less likely to be detected. jennifer blake. over the past three years, lavenderfields in the uk have been getting a new type of visitor. people from around the world have been flocking to fields like this one in the hope of taking the perfect picture for instagram. the growers of these lavender fields used to make most of their profit from lavender products but now many of them are making more
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money from ticket sales. let‘s go back to the phone because i wa nt let‘s go back to the phone because i want you to look at one of the most popular videos on our website today. you can see uk lavender blooms on instagram. this is an interesting story. two saudi sisters have fled theirfamily. this story. two saudi sisters have fled their family. this is story. two saudi sisters have fled theirfamily. this is about story. two saudi sisters have fled their family. this is about two sisters from saudi arabia who are seeking asylum despite their father denying their claims of abuse. the sisters aged 20 and 22 ran away when they were on holiday with him in turkey. this is proving so popular on our website we thought you might like to look at it as well. mark lowen has been talking to the two sisters. my my father, if he caught me escaping
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from the hotel, of course he will kill me. since i was kept, they forced me to wear the niqab and they were beating us wear the niqab and they were beating us for a reason wear the niqab and they were beating us for a reason or no reason. wear the niqab and they were beating us for a reason or no reason. like ifi us for a reason or no reason. like if i want to play, they would take it off me and beat me. when did you first start thinking about escaping? after they kicked me out from the university. why did they kick you
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out? because i am gay and i had a girlfriend and they knew about her. did your parents know you were gay? yes. they think if i married a man i would change my sexuality. so they a lwa ys would change my sexuality. so they always put pressure on me to get married but i always refused and they beat me. sometimes my mother got angry they beat me. sometimes my mother gotangry and they beat me. sometimes my mother got angry and she took all my clothes and threw it to the garbage. every time i cut my hair she beat me, but! every time i cut my hair she beat me, but i still cut it. my father told me, i have someone i want to marry you and he is my friend and he has two wives and children and he is old. i was like shocked. i told him like i don‘t want to marry an old
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man who has two wives. he told me it was ok, he has money. girlsjust ca re was ok, he has money. girlsjust care about money and children. what went through your mind is when you started running? when i was running i thought i would see my father. what would he have done if he caught you? oh, my god, he would kill me. lam i am still in the room, i have no choice. how does it feel to be in canada? we don't feel safe. 0f we don't feel safe. of course i am scared. sometimes when i go out if i
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see saudi people i hide my face. do you think your father is watching you? sometimes i think yes because sometimes my father like tries so ha rd to protect sometimes my father like tries so hard to protect me and sometimes not. when he is not i feel there is something wrong because i know my father, i know him so well. if he wa nts to father, i know him so well. if he wants to do something he will keep silent. where do you want to go? i just want to feel safe. if any country will accept as we will go off course. what is your message to other saudi women who want to escape? be patient. when i think about it i think like it is so impossible and i will never do this, but i did it. like don't think it's too late or something else, it's never too late. yes. that report
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from mark lowen. that report from mark lowen. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning... it‘s transfer deadline day — lots of deals already being done this morning, with plenty more to come before the window closes at 5 o‘clock tonight. let‘s have a look at some of this morning‘s back pages. luiz wants out — this is chelsea‘s david luiz who last night was forcing a move to arsenal. gunning for the exit is the headline in the express this morning. and luiz is on the back of the metro too alongside wilfried zaha who‘s submitted a transfer request at crystal palace. let us leave is their headline. and the bbc website and app is the place for all your transfer updates throughout the day. when we know, you‘ll know.
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well, david luiz wanted a move to arsenal, and this morning he‘s got his wish. he‘s moving for £8—million on a two—year deal. just one of a few deals to talk to jermaine jenas about. morning, jermaine. we will talk about arsenal first of all and david louise. it does feel like arsenal are finally dealing with those defensive frailties? yes, to an extent in terms of bringing another body in. a lot of the purists in terms of defenders would not agree with the fact that bringing him in cure their problems. what i would say is if he plays within three at the back, it massively helps them defensively. he has proven that when he plays within three he can be an asset. in a four he isa three he can be an asset. in a four he is a bit ofa three he can be an asset. in a four he is a bit of a liability. he showed that at chelsea. but unai emery likes playing three at the
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back and if he is going there, for £8 million, it is a huge purchase. you can understand the move with kieran tierney coming from chelsea as well. you can understand why chelsea have done this as well. something you said before about having somebody like luiz in a changing room can be a problem. when he was at chelsea previously, then paris came through for him and he made that move go through and then he came back to chelsea. maybe he got a bit of an insight into the fa ct got a bit of an insight into the fact he was not going to be starting for chelsea and he thought, i want to get out of here. frank lampard has laid down his cards pretty early and said either you are not going to bea and said either you are not going to be a part of my plans, and if you don‘t want to be, move on. i only wa nt don‘t want to be, move on. i only want people pulling in the right direction for chelsea football club.
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i believe the figure is quite low personally, but at the same time you don‘t want people around the football clu b don‘t want people around the football club that can hinder the mentality of a squad. romelu lukaku moving from manchester united to inter milan. manchester united are getting a pretty good deal in the end. i think in terms of the money, they probably got a decent deal out of it. we are yet to see any real replacement with regards to the goals that romelu lukaku will bring to the table. that is one thing he has done throughout his whole career, he scores goals and he strikes fear into defences. it did not work out for him in manchester united, but him leaving and with nobody coming through the door as yet, they are being linked to athletico bilbao and a young player called williams, we will see, but with not filling that void it is worrying for the manchester united fans. it will be a busy day for
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spurs who looked like they will be getting new players. they have had an incredible window. they will have if it comes off. we don't want to speak too soon. spurs do not like to count their chickens too much. it will be very exciting. there has been a drought for them over the last couple of transfer windows. tha nkfully last couple of transfer windows. thankfully for the club the players have come through and deliver it and off the back of the champions league final last year it is nice to see that they are putting in huge bids for top players. they are about to ta ke for top players. they are about to take that next step in terms of the team‘s development. it gives them an opportunity to chase the pack a little bit longer next season. are you excited for the new season?” can‘t wait. i have waited so long
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throughout the summer. i can‘t wait for the season to get started. i can‘t wait for the season to get started. we‘re expecting a very busy day and we‘ll bring you all the details of the big deals in sportsday, on the bbc news channel at 6:30 tonight. that‘s all the sport for now. more from the bbc sport centre at 11:15. thank you, holly. let‘s get more now on the flooding that‘s hit parts of scotland after torrential rain. the main rail line from edinburgh to glasgow was shut after flooding at winchburgh tunnel in west lothian resulted in passengers on five trains being trapped for several hours. (read 0n) let‘s talk to our reporter katie hunter who‘s in glasgow. what is the latest? the problem started yesterday evening when there we re started yesterday evening when there were torrential downpours and some passengers were stuck on trains near
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linlithgow in west lothian and the trains had to turn back. those problems have continued this morning. scotrail have posted pictures on social media showing the extent of that flooding in the wench for a tunnel. they say pumps are working to get rid of the water but that progress is slow. they are bringing in higher capacity pumps. but it is notjust on the railway lines where there have been problems. there was flash flooding on the roads around edinburgh airport. when it comes to the roads the water has cleared, but no such luck on the railway line between glasgow and edinburgh where there are still problems. passengers can ta ke are still problems. passengers can take alternative routes to travel between glasgow and edinburgh, but they will take more time. scotrail say the extent of the problems this morning mean it will be foolhardy to estimate when the line will reopen. they say staff are working flat out
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at the moment and they are advising passengers to make alternative travel arrangements or to allow extra time for their journey travel arrangements or to allow extra time for theirjourney on the railway stop katie hunter in glasgow, thank you so much. it‘s the legendary birthplace of king arthur. now a specially designed footbridge is going to link the island fortress of tintagel to the cornish mainland in the southwest of england, recreating a journey that hasn‘t been possible for hundreds of years. the bbc‘s fiona lamdin is there. for centuries, tintagel castle has been split in half, divided by the sea. but for the first time since the middle ages, the island on the mainland have been reunited with a new footbridge. people can actually walk from the original entrance, through the mainland courtyard, across this bridge over into the island where the great hall lies. it‘s about creating a sense of wonderful people, and also for people to be able to understand the actual castle better. because they can actually progress through it as our ancestors did.
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it has taken nine months to build the 70 metre bridge, using 47 tons of steel and 40,000 cornish slate tiles. but it actually isn‘t a new concept. if you go back to the 15th century, the castle was still one, joined by a narrow neck of land before it eroded and fell into the sea. it is one of the most important places in britain for that period after the romans. there was a myth that this is where arthur was conceived, so it is very closely connected with arthurian legend. that is probably why richard, who was earl of cornwall in the 13th century, decided to build this later castle on this site. we are finding incredible stuff on this site. over 100 buildings, it was bigger than london as far as we know, at the time.
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for the last 100 years the only way of getting from the island to the mainland was this way, let‘s go. it‘s a 57—metre drop down to the sea. well, i‘ve counted them, there‘s 272 steps and i can tell you, the last few, are pretty steep, whew. i think it looks absolutely amazing was not is an achievement and i think it it‘s in really well with the landscape as well it looks amazing and it ‘s an achievement. ifi if i brought my elderly mother along, then definitely the bridge. this landscape has been without its crossing for hundreds of years. the earth and rock now replaced by steel, reuniting a divided castle. fiona lamdin, bbc news.
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police are continuing their search for a vulnerable british girl who vanished on holiday in malaysia. the family of fifteen year old nora quoirin have said they remain hopeful after police leading the investigation refused to rule out what they described as a criminal element. nora, who is from london, disappeared on sunday from the dusun resort, 39 miles south of kuala lumpur. police have analysed fingerprints found in a resort cottage from which nora was reported missing, despite previously saying there were no initial signs of foul play. seniorfigures in northern ireland‘s dairy industry have warned that up to 45,000 dairy cows could be culled if there‘s a no deal brexit. they say the cost to export milk could almost double, forcing farmers to cut the size of their herds. but the department for the environment, food and rural affairs says a cull
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isn‘t something that the government is anticipating if there‘s a no deal. the victoria derbyshire show is coming up at ten with matthew price. in the meantime, let‘s catch up with the weather news and simon king has the weather news and simon king has the forecast. we are going to see some unseasonable weather as we go through tomorrow. in the meantime it is quite quiet out there. this is a developing area of low pressure and thatis developing area of low pressure and that is the system that will move its way in as we go through tonight and into tomorrow. as i mentioned, it is pretty quiet at the moment across the uk. a few showers in the north—east of scotland, one or two heavier showers in southern scotland in the afternoon. there could be the odd rumble of thunder. for most of
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us odd rumble of thunder. for most of us it is dry it with sunshine and temperatures feeling quite warm, up to 25 degrees. that system moves across the uk and that weather front brings heavy rain through the night into the early part of tomorrow morning. quite a messy picture first thing tomorrow morning, but you can see that heavy rain as it spreads northwards. as the main band cleared, it will be followed by heavy and thundery showers. that will move into scotland and northern ireland throughout friday morning with heavy showers embedded in that. behind that there are some showers and sunshine. not bad in the afternoon in northern and eastern areas. but the wind is increasing all the time, so gusts up to 45 miles an hour, perhaps 60 miles an hourin miles an hour, perhaps 60 miles an hour in the far south—west of england. the temperature is about 25 celsius, but feeling warm and windy. we keep the windy weather into
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saturday because the low pressure will move its way through scotland and northern ireland. gales are likely, especially in southern areas and quitea likely, especially in southern areas and quite a few showers again during saturday across northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england. temperatures 19—22. the area of low pressure moves away as we go into sunday. the winds to become a little bit lighter during sunday. but again there will be quite a bit of cloud and showers in northern areas. some sunny spells and a bit chillier in scotland and northern ireland. it is worth remembering that for friday and saturday not only heavy rain but a strengthening wind and during saturday gales are expected in many parts of england and wales. we have seen quite a few events cancelled and postponed or moved around. if
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you have got any outdoor activity plan, stay tuned to the forecast because the weather could disrupt your plans and travel may be disrupted as well.
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hello. it‘s ten o‘clock. i‘m matthew price. a diet endorsed by beyonce "could be dangerous," the professional body for uk nutritionists tells us exclusively. the singer says the 22 day plant— based plan helped her lose weight after she had twins. my main meal of the day is nachos with cashew nut cheese which i‘m going to make later, and these are the quantities of ingredients needed for the dish. don‘t know if that makes you feel hungry or not. we‘ll be hearing from a nutritionist and a vegan influencer about what they think of it plus someone who wants to stop celebs endorsing diets on social media. the number of women and girls caught carrying knives in england has risen 73% over five years.

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