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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 13, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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hello. this is bbc news with shaun ley. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first, the headlines. the family of more quoirin, the 15—year—old who went missing in malaysia, has identified the body found in the jungle as hers. violence at hong kong international airport as police clash with pro—democracy demonstrators who'd forced the cancellation of more flights. police say they're struggling to cope with the number of children in care being recruited as drug dealers. and, sailing to new york to address the un — teenage climate change campaigner greta thunberg will be taking to the ocean in a zero—carbon—emitting yacht. i feel a ifeel a bit seasick, and it is not going to be comfortable, but that i can live with.
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hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are the defence correspondent for the times, lucy fisher, and the political editor of the new statesman, stephen bush. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. in the daily mail, britain's jobs boom thanks to a record number of women in the workforce. in the times, downing street risks betraying the people by forcing through no deal, warns phillip hammond in his first public intervention since resigning as chancellor of the exchequer. in the telegraph, the speaker of the house, john bercow, says he'll stop borisjohnson shutting down parliament in order to force through a no—deal brexit. "an insult to over 75s", says the express.
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the paper leads with anger over pay rises for bbc staff as free tv licences are being axed for millions of pensioners. the guardian leads with a 2.9 per cent hike in railfares due to be confirmed tomorrow. it says commuters are being priced out of train travel. and the sun leads with warnings social media apps are damaging children's mental health, according to a new study. it lucy and stephen, we will come to that in a moment. firstly let's take a look at the front page of lucy's paper, and this intervention from philip hammond. yes, in his first major public remarks since becoming unemployed, he is now back to being a backbench mp, he has told the times that he believes borisjohnson
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and dominic cummings are leading us toa no and dominic cummings are leading us to a no deal brexit deliberately by making a series of demands that the eu cannot and will not meet. he quotes michael gove as saying that the campaign he helped lead was not one for a no deal brexit. he is saying this cannot happen, the government needs to show it is serious about preventing a no deal brexit, and if it is not we will do it for it. so in a sense he is laying down his redlines. presumably, those people have been very well aware of how philip hammond things about these things, so hammond things about these things, so he is kind of yesterday's news. he is past history. i'm not sure that's right. he knows the ins and outs of the treasury, he will be able to fill it all the figures that are put in and out. i think he makes are put in and out. i think he makes
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a compelling case, arguing about the damage tojobs, a compelling case, arguing about the damage to jobs, to the economy, potentially to the future of the union, which is all based on inside knowledge he had as part of government. given boris johnson knowledge he had as part of government. given borisjohnson has a majority of one, the fact that he hasn't ruled out being willing to vote down the government to stop no deal, i think that should have people in downing street quite concerned. is here dangerous man in downing street? every disgruntled backbencher is a dangerous man when you have a majority of one. this is someone you have a majority of one. this is someone who has had a distinguished and successful career, whatever you think about what he has achieved. he is near the end of his career, and he is independently wealthy. he is not someone who says, if i got the wrong way i will lose my seat, he is not going to worry about how he can make a living. there are many people
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at the end of their careers who have nothing to lose. it shows that the problem they have, that parliament does not want a no deal brexit, hasn't gone away. it also shows that parliament might shy away from those things they would have to do to prevent a no deal brexit. let's have a look at the telegraph. the speaker of the commons, john bercow. yes, he has made clear that he will try to stop any attempt by number ten to pro— rogue parliament in order to push through a no deal brexit. in some ways, his willingness to make an intervention like this is no surprise. he deviated from convention earlier this year by allowing tori remainers to amend regulations to make it impossible to push through a no deal brexit, and
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it is unclear how this will unfold. it seems there are suggestions that john bercow couldn't do anything to prevent parliament from being closed. a lot of this is covered by the royal prerogative. things like, for example, we say that the queen gives royal assent to bills, which she does because she is told to buy parliament, and sheep are rugs parliament, and sheep are rugs parliament, but that is because the prime minister has asked her to, all calls a general election, which the prime minister asked for. in a sense, she didn't have a choice to summon sense, she didn't have a choice to summon him, because he had been elected as leader of the party. yes. one sub law says that we have a bunch of powers that are normally
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called the crown in parliament, but the word crown is reallyjust fiction. the big power of buckingham palace, in a time when you look at how constitutional monarchies around the world have fed and the shrinking of their prestige, that is a bit of an anomaly. they will be looking at this, this thing that means that suddenly these weird powers are exercised on behalf of the crown may be become quite controversial and criticised, and they will ask, how do we avoid being sucked into this? she has managed on several occasions, during her very long rain, to navigate this. first when ted heath failed to win the 1974 election, and he tried to cobble together a coalition for a few days and eventually resigned, so she gave the opportunity to howard wilson. and when gordon brown was accused of
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skulking a number ten, she gave the opportunity to form a coalition again. it could have gone wrong, but this seems like even more dangerous territory. i think it also shows the limitations of not having a written constitution, a document that can be appealed to for having a definitive a nswer appealed to for having a definitive answer on this. let's move on to the i. this is something we can all grasp a little bit more easily, university admissions. not everyone will have to deal with this, but if they haven't had to deal with that their children or grandchildren or children or grandchildren or children of friends may have had to. people may know this time of year is a bit ofa people may know this time of year is a bit of a nightmare. predicted grades and then the grade you actually get, will determine whether you can take up a place. this is a move to get rid of any grades based on those predictions. a recent study
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showed that as few as 16% of pupils got, achieved all of the grades they we re got, achieved all of the grades they were predicted to get, and 73% had predicted grades that were higher than what they achieved. the concern is that essentially some schools, particularly with a good record of getting people into top universities, our gaming universities, our gaming universities by predicting higher grades to help them win places, and hoping that they will be able to follow through on picking them up. i think there are some counterarguments, not least the fact that as it currently stands, the idea that a pupil will have to wait until they have their certificate in hand before they apply, there is no current support in place to support people who do resets or take a year out. i think this would have to change that policy came in. stephen, when you take into context all this
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business of making an increased number of unconditional offers, which kind of almost makes it pointless having to worry about what grade you get, and therefore takes some of the pressure off perhaps for exams, doesn't push people as far as perhaps they would have to achieve their results, there is an idea that something has to change in a hurry. i think most people kind of accept them, especially that weird. called clearing, where if you don't meet your grades, the universities that still have places go into this bit ofa weird still have places go into this bit of a weird transfer market. it works very well for some people, they end up very well for some people, they end up doing a great because they might not have done, but for others they might end up with something they are not happy with. we are not the only country in the developed world that does this, we are actually the only country that only started doing it 30 years ago. there is a strong case
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to tinker with it. it is one reason why governments have tended to go, this looks good, the reward is quite small if you are the government. i think it is a good idea, good that the opposition is raising it. will it happen when they get into office? it feels like something that will be the first thing on the back burner when they have a crisis to deal with. when you look at policy ideas, often they can seem very rational, but you know that because it involves change there will be howls of protest. they are always loud, and the people who are pleased tend to make less noise about the changes. that's true, there are also bureaucratic issues, a lot of cost involved in redesigning a system. there is also potential for involved in redesigning a system. there is also potentialfor things to go wrong, for them not to end up achieving the outcome that is wanted. let's move onto sun.
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suggestions by researchers that social media is actually damaging children's mental health, in particular some of the apps they are using, undermining their sense of self—worth. using, undermining their sense of self-worth. yes, this is a repeated fear. the latest studies found that the big social media companies are harmful to the mental health of children, particularly snapchat and instagram. partly because instagram, we have, most of us have a very curated version of ourselves on instagram and it can be hard if your own life doesn't feel like it matches up. it is a call for social media companies to take some more responsibility. i think there is a pretty strong case. there is a position where government says this is what we think you should and shouldn't do, rather than government throwing its hands up in the air and
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saying, this is a problem, why doesn't facebook fix it?|j saying, this is a problem, why doesn't facebook fix it? i think it would be difficult to regulate on the time usage per week. would be difficult to regulate on the time usage per weeklj would be difficult to regulate on the time usage per week. i guess you would have a minimum age to use some apps. would have a minimum age to use some apps, but with all the demands by government on social media companies, particularly with encryption and getting hold of the m essa 9 es encryption and getting hold of the m essa g es of encryption and getting hold of the messages of criminals and potential terror suspects, i'm not sure this would be top of the list. it is a great front page for the sun, to have a nice big mod, assad mig to talk about it, and it is focusing on facebook, where the logos next to it show there are plenty of other forms of social plenty of apps that people are using. i suppose it goes back to what we are able to teach people about the use of social media from a young age. i remember meeting a bunch of law students on a train to
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london and they were telling me that their lecturers were telling them to go back and clear their social media history, warning them that employers and law firms were trawling social media to see what the students were really like. never mind what they say they are like in their cvs and applications, what are they really get up to? and all those things that perhaps i may be in the curated version, they aren't there. our perceptions of people are determined by what we see about them on social media. igoogle an interviewer before igo and media. igoogle an interviewer before i go and meet them. lots of people look up somebody on social media now and doa look up somebody on social media now and do a quick search and find out who the person is. before they know it, there is a linkedin profile and their instagram page. if they haven't locked them there is a lot of access to information that i think maybe people don't realise they are giving out. i think the younger generation are much more savvy about that, which i think explains the soaring popularity of
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snapchat, whether messages disappear. a lot of people know that these images and silliness out partying and drinking could follow them around later in life. i think it is probably those who are our age, the first generation to post pictures that we probably may be wish we hadn't. don't look either of them up! don't look me up, you will be very disappointed! let's move on to the mail. stephen, britain'sjobs boom is all down to women. the number of britons working is up, strong and healthy employment growth even while wage growth is struggling, and the majority driving thatis struggling, and the majority driving that is women. the mail has pro—brexit, project fear et cetera, but the reality is that to things together point to the paradox of our very strong job growth. part of the
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reason why very strong job growth. part of the reason why women very strong job growth. part of the reason why women have disproportionately driven the amount of newjobs disproportionately driven the amount of new jobs created disproportionately driven the amount of newjobs created is one, women who are in receipt of state pension or who have who are in receipt of state pension orwho have a... who are in receipt of state pension or who have a... have gone back into the workplace. two, women who have gone into part—time work are looking after their children. it's good when people have this work but it's not the strong wage growth that would ideally help us close the deficit and mean people were able to get on the housing ladder et cetera. it's pa rt of the housing ladder et cetera. it's part of the general pattern of uneven... ouron the part of the general pattern of uneven... our on the one hand, jobs miracle but on the other hand, sluggish wage growth. lots of this is gender specific because it's the case that more of the caring responsibilities are taken on by women, notjust children, elderly relatives and other members of the family, and their working pattern is fitting around that and that means often multiplejobs and around that and that means often multiple jobs and short—term jobs and a few hours here and there. it's not necessarily fulfilling
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employment the headline speaks to. interestingly, these statistics say it's a record low for stay—at—home mothers. ifind it's a record low for stay—at—home mothers. i find working very fulfilling and imagine many mothers wa nt to fulfilling and imagine many mothers want to continue working but the cost of childcare is probably informing... might explain a lot of that. necessary rather than a lifestyle choice. it's interesting, there's a slight rise in unemployment, which amber rudd, the work and pensions secretary, is saying that's because people are preparing to go into the workforce but also she kept going back to, as ministers do with employment figures, saying we have the biggest number of people ever employed but that's because of population growth so we need a sense of proportion reading these statistics. it's easy to say the biggest number ever. . . it's easy to say the biggest number ever... the government can say genuinely it's had very strong jobs growth. the interesting thing with the rise in unemployment is although
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the rise in unemployment is although the changes amber rudd has made to the changes amber rudd has made to the universal credit are perhaps overstated by her boosters in the press, she has made it, you know, the kafkaesque system that was designed to discourage people from... it might mean you have some people not in work but are just deciding it was easier to be miserable doing piecework than it was to go into a job centre. they might have started to come online, as it were, so there's lots going on. could be a transition in lots of ways. let's go inside the mail, a fun ways. let's go inside the mail, a fu n story ways. let's go inside the mail, a fun story but it points to more serious questions, which is, lucy, about advertising and new powers that have come into effect to try to deal with adverts people think are basically sexist. yes. this is interesting. we hear so much about regulators who are toothless and can't take action, but since the new rules for adverts avoiding gender stereotyping were
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put into place, we've had two adverts found to have fallen foul of this. interestingly, one of them only faced one complaint from the public but nonetheless the investigation found against the advert. edge sounds like a pretty lazy and boring advert for philadelphia cheese. it showed... potentially designed to be humourous, it showed a father eating philadelphia cheese and found it so delicious that he leaves his baby son on a conveyor belt travelling into the distance, conjuring up the idea of a hapless father. yeah, i'm not sure reaching for regulations is a lwa ys not sure reaching for regulations is always the best way, but i find these adverts lead to a pernicious continuation of stereotypes and it's quite boring. it's the old thing, the idea is it is humourous to subvert the traditional idea. the mum and the baby, but now the dad who is a bit tipsy. that's often how a woman was portrayed. but by
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inverting it, you're repeating it and underlining it rather than breaking away from it. we're all led by what we see. i do think that young dads get this really hard time with the idea they are thick and unable to care for their child but a friend of mine recently had a child and his partner alternate the days they pick her up from the nursery, and he continually faces questions from other parents. who are you? that's despite his been seen with his wife. are you sure you're ok? it's because of this type of thing. the dads can't cope stop lou it causes dads quite a lot of anxiety as well. i don't think it's anxiety as well. i don't think it's a good thing. the other ad that polled three complaints and also deemed to be breaking the rules was an advert for volkswagen. what was wrong with that one? it showed men
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in adventurous activities in contrast to women in caregiving roles stop being men out having fun and the women stuck at home. the same sort of thing. you said you thought these are boring but they also counter—productive in terms of selling the product. i would say so. they are boring, lazy, not particularly eye—catching. they fail on the advertising front as well. copywriters, you've been told! let's move on to the news of the day. let's move on to the news of the day- happy let's move on to the news of the day. happy for them and it's all down to their cat, stephen. tell us about this. they went to the off—licence to pick up... they went toa off—licence to pick up... they went to a petrol station... they went to get some petrol... they went to pick up get some petrol... they went to pick up some cat food because they've forgotten it. of course the petrol station! you can get everything these days! they got a lottery ticket and they won a the raffle! an awful lot of cat food! there will be
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eating from a golden bowl from here on in and they are quids in! the premium cat food in future! do either of you have pets?|j premium cat food in future! do either of you have pets? i don't, but when i do go to the newsagents for a pint of milk, i am partial to a scratchy but i'm yet to win £1 million. one day you're not going to turn up to the paper review because you have won. make sure you ring us! thank you, lucy fisher and stephen bush. don't forget, you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you, seven days a week, at bbc.co.uk/papers. and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. thank you, lucy fisher and stephen bush. coming up next, the latest sports before the weather and news day at midnight. from all of us on the bbc news channel, have a good evening —— newsday.
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good evening. i'm chetan pathak with your latest sports news. we start with celtic, who will not be playing in the group stages of the champions league this season after being knocked out by romanian side cluj in the second leg of their third round qualifier at celtic park. it finished 4—3 to the romanian champions, who came from behind to go through 5—4 on aggregate. a huge blow for neil lennon's side, who were expected to progress. what worries me was our approach to the game. i don't think we work to the game. i don't think we work to the goalkeeper at all first half, andi the goalkeeper at all first half, and i don't think we played with any real intensity. the first goal, we got a warning before that and we still didn't stop the cross and he got the cross in and let it run and we let it go. with only got
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ourselves to blame, we had the lead and we are subject to our own decision—making really. much better news for linfield, though, they're through to the play—off round of the europa league. the first time they've progressed past two rounds of uefa competition in over 50 years. they beat the montenegrin champions fk sutjeska 3—2 and will face qarabag in the final round of qualifying two premier league teams will play in the uefa super cup for the first time ever tomorrow night. last season's champions league winners liverpool face chelsea, who won the europa league. for both managers it's a chance to win silverware at the start of the season. it's important as a club like chelsea that we give everything to try and win it, because yes, it does mean something, it means something for us as another trophy and for the clu b for us as another trophy and for the club and for me would be a really nice start for me personally, but more than that, the feeling for the
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players with the season coming up that we can compete against liverpool and win a cup in our name that goes down in history and go on from there. everything is prepared for a final obviously so we have to make sure we're ready for a final. we have to make a few decisions about lineup and stuff like this that can be kind ofa and stuff like this that can be kind of a little bit unpredictable, probably for the opponent as well, because we don't know how they play, they don't know how we play, especially in the early stages of the season. so we are here, everything is prepared, so let's go. stephanie frappart will take charge of tomorrow night's match in istanbul, becoming the first female referee to officiate a major european men's game. she recently took charge of the women's world cup final and will have the same female assistants tomorrow. i think there is not a lot of difference because for all is the same. only teams play differently, but as a man or as a woman, we
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cannot referee the same game between women and men, but for me it's the same because refereeing is the same. football is the same, it is the same ball so i will do the same as with the women's game. joe root says he's expecting a big response from his england team in the second ashes test that starts tommorrow at lord's. they suffered a big defeat in the first test against australia and there will be changes, withjofra archer expected to make his test debut. he missed out at edgbaston with a side strain, but withjimmy anderson out injured, england's pace options are limited, and archer's raw pace that saw him star at the world cup could be what england are missing. he might have lost on his singles return, but andy murray is into the last 16 of the men's doubles at the cincinatti masters. he and his spanish partner feliciano lopez beaten jean—julien rojer and horia tecau 3—6, 6—3,10—3. but kyle edmund has been knocked out of the singles. the british number one was beaten by russia's daniil medvedev 6-2, 7-5. plenty more on the website, including 33 ties in the carbao cup,
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but that's all the sport for now. hello. i think ithinka i think a pretty cloudy day on the way ahead of us with some on and off rain, even the chance of one or two thunderstorms across parts of the midlands, lincolnshire, east anglia, but that's not until a bit later on in the day. this is where our weather's coming from, you can see this weather front pushing in our direction. it was clear earlier but the clouds are now pushing into western parts of the uk and it's starting to turn wet. the forecast for early on wednesday morning shows the rain moving through the south—west, through wales and into the lake district but here it's also quite mild to start with temperatures around 12—14 and that's because we have mild, warm south westerlies coming in. quite humid
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air. notice how that rain moves through the midlands, the south and into parts of yorkshire through the course of the afternoon and this is where we could see thunderstorms almost from around about, say, the midlands into lincolnshire and east anglia and another separate area of rain moving into northern ireland and western parts of scotland. temperatures around the high teens for most, may be touching 20. wants that weather system is out of the way we're in between weather systems and this is thursday. you can see one out in the atlantic. where in this window of opportunity so the weather will improve temporarily in the week. on thursday, sunshine around and a pleasant day, and temperatures will rise because of the sunshine around. 23 in london and maybe we'll scrape 20 in newcastle, 19 or 20. then back down the hill again. low pressure swings off the atlantic, bringing is longer winds and in fact this low pressure will barrel across the uk through
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the whole of the weekend. friday sta rts the whole of the weekend. friday starts quite bright in the east but then the clouds will roll in and noticed the rain will improve. a cold front, blustery conditions with gusts of wind around 40 mph along the western and coasts and the rain at times will be heavy. notice, not too much rainfall in eastern areas on friday. that rain will probably reach you later on friday. friday night could be wet in east anglia and london. saturday and sunday will be wet and windy with on and off showers pretty much all the way through the course of the weekend. goodbye.
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i'm rico hizon in singapore, the headlines: violence breaks out at hong kong's airport, with clashes between riot police and protesters. more ominous warnings from china as chinese troops manoeuvre near the hong kong border. i'm ben bland in london. also in the programme: president trump delays a 10% tariff on some chinese imports to avoid christmas shopping price hikes. and, the long march — a british man becomes the first person to walk the length of china's yangtze river,

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