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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 15, 2019 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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tell me. it's a quieter day, we have blue skies and sunshine here this afternoon, a very different data yesterday when many of us saw plenty of rain. the satellite picture tells a story, this is yesterday's weather, the band of cloud moving away, this is coming our way tomorrow, but in between a slice of something drier. there are one or two showers around this afternoon but few and far between, most having a dry day, some spells of sunshine. a fairly gusting westerly wind but despite that temperature is 20—23dc for england and wales, 16—19 for scotla nd for england and wales, 16—19 for scotland and northern ireland aren't clear skies through this evening before the cloud starts to gather in the west and that will bring outbreaks of rain into parts of scotland, northern ireland, the far western fringes of england and wales by the end of the night so further west temperature is not much lower than is-mdc, west temperature is not much lower than is—ilidc, further east we could see them dipping into high single figures across parts of eastern england and east anglia, but this is what we've got tomorrow, this fairly deep area of low pressure. isobars
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are deep area of low pressure. isobars a re close deep area of low pressure. isobars are close together, wet and windy. the rain initially across scotland, northern ireland, northern england and wales, south—west england, it will slide south and east through the day, quite persistent. turning dryerfrom the day, quite persistent. turning dryer from the north through the afternoon albeit with blustery showers and it will be a windy day again, those gusts micro quite widely 30—a0 miles an hour, perhaps 45 for some southern and western coasts, a call feel was persistent rain and tricky travelling conditions across england and wales. 18-19dc conditions across england and wales. 18—i9dc here, in the sunshine further north maybe 20—21. the rain slowly slides of scotland, northern ireland, the far western fringes of england and wales by the end of the night so further west temperatures not much lower than is—ilidc, further east we could see them dipping into high single figures across parts of eastern england and east anglia, but this is s what we've got tomorrow, this is s what we've got tomorrow, this fairly deep area of low pressure. isobars are close together, wet and windy. the rain initially across scotland, northern ireland, northern england and wales, south—west england, it will slide south—west england, it will slide south and east through the day, quite persistent. turning dryerfrom the north through the afternoon albeit with blustery showers and it will be a windy day again, those
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costs micro quite widely 30—a0 miles an hour, perhaps 45 for some southern and western coasts, call feel weather is persistent rain and tricky travelling conditions across england and wales. 18—i9dc here, in the sunshine further north maybe 20-21. the the sunshine further north maybe 20—21. the rain slowly slides south and east woods overnight into saturday morning but across northern ireland and scotland could merge to give a longer spell of an area of low pressure, strong winds and fairly frequent showers across northern ireland and scotland could merge to give a longer spell, sunshine and showers. there is a potential through the end of next week things will turn quieter, drier, and for some a little bit warmer. give it a few days and by next week things will look a bit north like summer. i will hold you to that! a reminder of our top story. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn urges mps to install him as a temporary prime minister in order to avoid a no—deal brexit. that's all from the bbc news at one. so it's goodbye from me. on bbc one we nowjoin the bbc‘s news teams where you are.
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good afternoon — it's 1.30pm and here's your latest sports news. the second ashes test finally got under way this morning at lords, after a wash—out on day one. australia, remember, lead the series 1—0. and after winning the toss, they're bowling first. england found it tough going early on — losing the wickets of jason roy and captainjoe root. so let's see how they have fared since then and speak to our correspondentjoe wilson. it was a brave decision from australia's captain to be standing out there in sunshine at around 1030 this morning and deciding they would bowl. instinct and experience would tell most captains you would decide to bat, but the first hour of play things went their way. notjust to bat, but the first hour of play things went their way. not just that they decided to bowl, but also that they decided to bowl, but also that
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they decided to selectjosh hazelwood in their bowling attack for this match. they have a group of fast bowlers, we haven't yet seen mitchell starc, and fast bowlers, we haven't yet seen mitchell sta rc, and they fast bowlers, we haven't yet seen mitchell starc, and they are rotating them. hazlewood came in and took two wickets very quickly, roy out for a duck and route to follow lbw. what we saw in the latter hour of the morning session, was rory burns and joe denly re—bending england's england's innings. both quys england's england's innings. both guys were england's england's innings. both guys were building their england careers, their ashes career, we saw what rory burns did at edgbaston, 76-2 at what rory burns did at edgbaston, 76—2 at lunch. if that could become 176-2 at 76—2 at lunch. if that could become 176—2 at tea, england will start to think tim paine made a bad decision this morning. and you can follow that on the bbc website. three weeks into the new english football league season, and we have news
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of the first managerial departure. sol campbell is leaving maccelsfield town by mutual consent after eight months in charge. the 44—year—old took over in november last year with the silkmen bottom of league two and managed their survival, thanks to a run ofjust two defeats in their final 10 games. so far this season they've lost their two league matches and beaten blackpool in the efl cup, but the club is struggling off—field with financial issues. great britain's georgia taylor—brown and jess learmonth have been disqualified at the triathlon olympic test event in tokyo after crossing the line hand in hand in first place. although learmonth was initially given the win, both were later disqualified under a rule that says you can't intentionally cross the line together. it meant bermuda's flora duffy was given first place, and great britain's vicky holland was upgraded to third. it's really disappointing and i feel for them because they both raced exceptionally well today and, as far as i'm concerned,
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they smashed it and they deserve that first and second place. but the rules are the rules, u nfortu nately. yeah, itjust shows that even with those two disqualified, we still end up with someone on the podium and other people coming in in the top ten, so real strength and depth in ourteam. mcconnachie was ruled in the starting 15 but he was a shock call—up to the world cup squad. three changes to the starting side. forward will captain again with owen farrell a replacement. warren gatland has made a few changes to his starting 15, the centrejonathan davies will be joined by his younger brotherjames for the first time in a wales shirt. they will be the first brothers to play alongside each other since 2000. dan biggar
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comes in to replace the injured fly—half. barry's next fixture has been suspended against rotherham united. more details on the bbc sport website. didn't get all the latest news on that and all the day's sport. we will be back again in the next hour. you are watching bbc news. let's ta ke you are watching bbc news. let's take a look at some of the main stories this lunchtime. jeremy corbyn has urged mps to install him as a caretaker prime minister to stop a no—deal brexit. the labour leader wrote a letter to the leaders of other opposition parties, and tory rebel mps, asking them to back his idea of a temporary government. earlier, bbc reality check‘s tom edgington spoke to my colleague rachel schofield about the options for mps looking to block a no—deal brexit. there are two broad routes available. number one — the opposition could try to use a motion of no
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confidence to bring down the government and then a new government could in theory extend the brexit deadline beyond the 31st of october, to try to give the new government a bit of breathing space to work out what it wants to do — for example, holding a new referendum, possibly. the second route is to hijack the parliamentary timetable by proposing legislation that effectively forces the government to extend the current deadline. so let's look at the first route — how would a no confidence vote work? jeremy corbyn, as he set out in his letter, would probably call that confidence vote as soon as mps come back in september from their summer recess. it would require a straight majority in the house of commons and if it succeeds, you have this 1a day period, let me explain how that works, opposition parties can try to come together to form their own government during this period. if it is successful, and borisjohnson would be expected to resign, and a new pm, possiblyjeremy corbyn, could then take over.
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however, this scenario is completely reliant on the no—confidence vote passing and then mister corbyn commanding the majority or at least enough support of mps to install him as a new pm. and if that doesn't happen, if nothing is resolved in those 1a days, then you have a general election. but here is the big but, if the timetable of the election is ultimately in the hands of the prime minister, so if the prime minister is ultimately determined to take the uk out of the eu on the 31st october, he could schedule that poll after the 31st by which time we would already have left, which is why you have some mps say that if such a scenario unfolds they would take the government to court. and you mentioned a second route — proposing legislation. some mps don't like the idea of a no—confidence vote because if it leads to an election
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parliament shuts down a campaign. and if that was to happen then it could potentially close of some other avenues that could potentially prevent a no—deal brexit outcome. so such other avenues could be mps trying to take control of the parliamentary timetable, hold emergency debates, that would force the government to seek an extension from the eu. that won't be easy to accomplish either. first, it would rely on the speaker of the house to allow mps to propose such legislation, so his role could be crucial in the weeks ahead. and secondly, i was speaking to the institute for government think tank yesterday, and they said if the legislation was successful, yes, the government could indeed go to brussels to seek that brexit extension from the eu, but in theory it could just simply refused to accept the terms the eu lays down, so the government could hypothetically — and this is uncharted territory — it could say we have complied with the law, we have asked for the extension,
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but the terms it set down are not acceptable to us so we are not going to go ahead with the extension. so if that scenario unfolds then mps will be looking to the courts. so overall for mps determined to stop a no—deal brexit it will be a very fractious period ahead, and if we hadn't already thought the gloves were off, they certainly will be soon! tom, thank you. before we move on, just to bring you a small update coming through from police in london, they are telling us police in london, they are telling us there has been a stabbing of some kind outside the home office in london. i should stress, however, police are saying they do not believe it is linked to terrorism, they say they don't believe it is, but there has been a stabbing and clearly a degree of police activity outside the home office in central london. there is a pictures that have come through in the last little
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while, lots of them by the looks of it on twitter. we will keep an eye on that. convicted paedophile vanessa george is due to leave prison next month — ten years after she pleaded guilty to abusing children at a plymouth nursery. in a television exclusive, victoria derbyshire has spoken to a father whose child attended little ted's nursery while george was employed there; and also to a former colleague of hers. the father has urged george to finally reveal the identities of those children she abused. va nessa vanessa george was a nursery assistant in plymouth where instead of caring for the children she abused them in the worst possible way. some of the families sobbed and swore when they heard that george could be freed from jail in seven yea rs. could be freed from jail in seven years. in a matter of weeks, vanessa
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george is due to be released. one of her colleagues from the nursery wa nts to her colleagues from the nursery wants to speak out. alongside the father of one of that expected victims. their names and voices have been changed to protect their identity. ten years is not enough for what she has done. she has been rehabilitated, we have had nothing. we were promised help from day one. we were promised help from day one. we haven't received anything. we as workers were close to the children, you have let them down, you have let yourself down. everything we were taught about safeguarding, and she fooled us all. people were jumping, saying they must have heard the children scream, why did they do nothing? we all felt, how did we not know? police found 124 sexual images of the children on her phone. there isa of the children on her phone. there is a george was not acting alone. she started sending images to colin blanchard, a paedophile she met on
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the internet. one day a child is going to ask a question about whether they went to the nursery, andi whether they went to the nursery, and i don't know what i will tell them. do you want to know with absolute certainty whether your child was sexually abused by vanessa george? yes. i would rather hear bad news $0011 george? yes. i would rather hear bad news soon than no news, so i can deal with it. news soon than no news, so i can dealwith it. according news soon than no news, so i can deal with it. according to this serious case review, vanessa george talks at work in the nursery about sex a lot. i challenged her directly, as i know other staff did, i know there was a reference in the serious case review that should have beena serious case review that should have been a flag. i don't know how you would go from being someone wanting men to someone wanting children. the pa role men to someone wanting children. the parole board say the reason she is being released now is because she is not a risk to the public anymore. she took part in programmes to address a sexual offending behaviour. she has presented as
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showing remorse. i believe that women are still a danger to children. she has had those urges before. i don't think they will ever go away. what would you say to her if you are able to talk to her? tell us if you are able to talk to her? tell us the truth. tell us the names. she still has that hold on us. and you can watch the full interviews on the bbc website at bbc.co.uk/victoria. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news: labour leaderjeremy corbyn sets out his plan to block a no—deal brexit — asking mps to make him temporary prime minister and writing to opposition parties inviting them to work with him. drug deaths in england and wales soar to their highest level since records began 25 years ago. no suspicion of foul play in the death of teenager nora quorin — police in malaysia say there is no
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indication of violence or abduction. in the business news: online spending is growing at its fastest pace in three years. stay—at—home shoppers continue to support the british economy — according to the office for national statistics. monthly retail sales volume rose by 0.2%, well ahead of a decline predicted by most economists. the office—rental company wework is worried about a recession. the firm has warned that an "economic downturn or subsequent declines in market rents" could cause wework members to cancel and hurt its operations. banana drama! a fungal disease that kills cavendish banana plants has been detected in latin america. the vast majority of bananas exported to the eu and the us are cavendish varieties. while the fungus is not harmful to humans, it has the potential to eventually wipe out all cavendish bananas.
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millions of people around the world rely on bananas and plantains as a staple food and as a cash crop. asda has updated us on how business is going. the group, which is owned by us retail giant walmart, reported a 0.3% fall in like—for—like sales for the first half of the year. earlier this year, the competition and markets authority blocked a merger between asda and sainsburys — ruling that the deal threatened to push up prices. thomas brereton is a retail analyst, globaldata. no merger — what next for asda? as the said consumer confidence levels are at a six—year low, they blame brexit and the weather and sporting events against the same period last year. is that a fair assessment of the reasons why they have seen this slight fall in profits? yes, they have seen this fall, but when we look at the likes
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of tesco and sainsbury is they are also experiencing these declines, it is competing against a very difficult year last year, not enough good weather this year, so far asda it presents a real challenge. he also discussed falling consumer confidence and that has a lot to do with brexit on the horizon, still not really any closer to working out what will happen and supermarkets have to deal with that uncertainty. soafair have to deal with that uncertainty. so a fair assessment from the boss of asda. we heard earlier in the year that they will not be a merger between asda and sainsbury‘s, so what next for asda and its owner, walmart? as it were pretty quick after the merger was announced it wouldn't happen that their plans wouldn't happen that their plans would be to launch an initial public offering within the uk, some people valuing that at around 8.5 billion pounds. but that's still years away so pounds. but that's still years away so until then it's about keeping the supermarket competitive and trying
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to invest in their prices in the stores which they've also outlined they will do, and prepping for that. in terms of their relationship with walmart, they have a lot of problems of their own in the us, they have reported growth in sales and online sales but that is hard work. they also have to compete with amazon in the us. so the uk to them is a small headache that they don't necessarily need. and another headache,... hundreds of asda workersheld a rally and march in leeds over the details of a new contract. asda announced in april they wanted to streamline their contract from six to one and that would marginally increase basic pay for a lot of those workers. but the workers have not responded in the way i'm sure asda were hoping. there were protests yesterday from leeds city centre up to the headquarters. and i think that is reflective of some of the little changes in those
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contracts, such as not being paid for breaks and possibly being forced to work bank holidays or weekends. so if you look at it from asda's point of view, they need to protect their margins, so they are trying to do the best they can. if we look at tesco, they've made similar changes this year or madejob tesco, they've made similar changes this year or made job cuts, so for asda it is kind of a reflection of how people are shopping, more shopping online and whether we need as many roles in that same sense is what they are trying to target. but for the employees it is a bit of a slap in the face. thank you. a sliver of good news for the bosses at metro bank. customers have rated it the best bank in britain. 82% of customers said they'd recommend it to family and friends. the bank is on the unt for a new chairman and its share price has taken a nosedive in recent months. rbs was the worst rated bank, again. "non—doms" — uk residents who are not required to pay tax on overseas earnings — are fleeing for fear of a corbyn
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government and/or a hard brexit. this is according to the law firm pinsent masons. treasury figures reveal that the number of wealthy non—domiciled residents, who pay no uk tax on their offshore accounts, has fallen to its lowest level ever. that suggests britain is losing out on the tax revenue those individuals pay on their uk earnings. its thought to amount to around £45 billion over the last five yea rs. like stock markets, oil prices have also headed downwards. fears of a global slowdown and depressed remand are weighing on oil prices. let's ta ke let's take a quick look at the markets. as you can see, big falls across the board for the markets. fears over the trade tensions between china and the us, the bond markets are causing all kinds of issues for investors, both in asian trade earlier and european trade today. the us markets open shortly.
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i will have the latest in about an hour. goodbye for now. the green party mp, caroline lucas, has complained to twitter over a tweet by brexit campaigner, arron banks, aimed at climate change activist greta thunberg. ms thunberg, who chooses not to fly, is sailing from the uk to attend un climate summits in new york and chile. yesterday, mr banks referred to ms thunberg's sea voyage across the atlantic and tweeted: "freak yachting accidents do happen in august...". mr banks later said it was a bad joke. ms lucas said "arron banks‘ vile tweet about greta thunberg makes me sick to the stomach" and made a formal complaint to twitter. dentists are asking schools in england to remove all sugar from their menus to help fight tooth decay. the faculty of dental surgery says that in the past three years, there were more than 100,000 hospital admissions for young children with tooth decay. dentists also want more supervised teeth—brushing in schools and would welcome guidelines
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on healthy packed lunches. many of us who are unable to get online during our trips away from home suffer anxiety, frustration and other withdrawal symptoms. that's according to researchers from the university of east anglia who also found that, over time, people without a phone or tablet actually become happier and calmer. richard daniel has been to a campsite in suffolk, where people are undergoing a ‘digtal detox'. come and grab some knives and forks... breakfast time on the newly opened campsite at easton farm park near woodbridge. the wi—fi signal here is awful. friends lisa and karen, plus children, are therefore on a digital detox. james was told to leave his tablet at home. you do miss it? yes. how much? out of 100, i would say 70.
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that's quite a lot, isn't it? lois works at the park and is by her own admission a bit of a social media junkie. on a break you'll find her in the only place where she stands a chance of getting a signal. snapchat, instagram, facebook sometimes. but that's mainly... snapchat is kind of the one i use to talk to friends on. and you've just been talking to them now? yeah. you're up—to—date? i'm up—to—date. you know what they're doing? yeah. they know what you're doing? yeah. and you feel everything is ok now. yeah. brad mckenna from the uae is one of the researchers involved in the study into the effects of digitalfree tourism. it's really about the whole tourism industry. thinking about different groups of people. some might want to be connected, some might not be, so thinking about how they could cater for that wider range of people. cara edwards uses social media to publicise events on the farm park, but even she says she sometimes frustrated by her increasing reliance on it. sometimes it's the first question when they actually step
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into the farm, and i think, why do they need wi—fi when they've come to a children's farm park full of animals, activities, things to do and see. the message perhaps for all of us is we should sometimes learn to ignore the phone or tablet and instead pay more attention to what's before our very eyes. richard daniel, bbc look east, easton. before the weather, just a brief update about the stabbing we were hearing about outside the home office in london. just to say, the police are telling us one person has been injured but it's worth stressing they are saying it is not related to terrorism. they do not believe it is. but there has been a stabbing outside the home office. one person is injured. more coming up one person is injured. more coming up at all today's stories from tpm. now it's time for a look at the weather, with alina jenkins. another topsy—turvy week of weather. today is one of the quieter days, mainly dry, some warm spells
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of sunshine, quite noticeable and gusty westerly breeze, one or two showers around this afternoon, fairly few and far between. most will have a much drier afternoon than yesterday. in the sun, feeling warmer, 22 to 23 across england and wales, just 14 for the northern isles. dry this evening, clear skies before cloud gathers and then rain arrives in western scotland, northern ireland, north—west and south—west england. temperatures here not much lower than 13 or 14. could see them dipping to eight or nine across parts of east anglia under clear skies. tomorrow another fairly deep area of low pressure bringing rain to most of us through tomorrow. initially across western areas then sliding south and east through the day. turning dry across northern ireland in the afternoon, also across scotland and northern england. there we could see some showers. the rain lingers through much
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of the day across much of england and wales, with some gusty wind, quite widely 30 to 40 mph or higher. a blustery, cool afternoon with rain, sunshine across parts of north—west england and northern ireland, temperatures up to 20 or 21. on saturday a windy day with low pressure in charge. generating a few showers particularly across scotland, merging for longer spells of rain, but almost anywhere can catch a show through saturday. strong winds as well, temperatures up from friday with more sunshine, so 21 or 22. could see some persistent rain in south—east england overnight into sunday, then sunday has sunshine in blustery showers particularly for scotland, northern ireland, parts of north—west england, and again strong and blustery winds, 30 to 40 mph. even stronger thought coasts.
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temperatures in the high teens, low 20s. signs that things will turn quieter and warmer through next week. goodbye.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 2pm. make me care—taker: jeremy corbyn urges other party leaders and tory rebels to install him as pm in order to stop a no—deal brexit and call a snap election. hopes that they will all support the motion of no confidence that i will put, and that will then ensure that this government cannot continue with this headlong pursuit of no—deal brexit. drug deaths in england and wales soar to their highest level since records began 25 years ago. and, mission jurassic — the biggest british—led dinosaur hunt in decades hopes to uncover new species in the deserts of wyoming. coming up on afternoon live all the sport... england lose early wickets including
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captainjoe england lose early wickets including captain joe root in

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