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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  August 16, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me, rachel schofield. the headlines: a 52—year—old father is stabbed to death with a screwdriver in a shopping centre in newcastle — seven teenagers are arrested. kim jong—un rejects further peace talks with south korea, as he test fires two more missiles. the power cut that brought large parts of the uk to a standstill — the national grid has until the end of the day to submit a formal report into what went wrong. of the day to submit a formal report my of the day to submit a formal report understanding power my understanding was that of the power came on relatively quickly but it was not quick enough. and something went wrong and we need to get to the bottom of it. a cyber attack on the uk's biggest provider of forensic services leads to a backlog of more than 20,000 samples.
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and coming up in sport, england have a battle on their hands to keep their ashes hopes alive after australia dominated. good morning and welcome to the bbc news at nine. the family of a lawyer who was stabbed to death with a screwdriver outside a busy shopping centre in newcastle, have described him as "a kind and caring man who was always first to help others". peter duncan died in hospital following the incident near eldon square on wednesday evening. seven teenage boys — aged between 1a and 17 — remain in custody on suspicion of murder. andy moore reports. it was an attack in broad daylight, just outside this busy shopping centre. peter duncan, a lawyer,
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was taken to hospital after being stabbed, but could not be saved. his family described him as a kind and caring man who was always first to help others. they said he would be deeply missed, and his death would leave a huge hole in their lives. it appears to have been a chance encounter between the victim and the offender, which then led to again what appears to have been an unprovoked attack. we believe the weapon to have been a screwdriver and the fatal injury to be as a result of a single puncture wound. seven boys aged between 1a and 17 remain in custody after being arrested in connection with the murder. police said one of them is believed to be the main suspect. andy moore, bbc news. some breaking news coming in from
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reuters. this is all concerning the fate of british steel. you may be aware that there were talks after british steel went into compulsory liquidation in may. thousands of jobs at risk. a lot of talks going on about how it may be saved, it may be taken over. we are hearing news from istanbul that turkey's military pension fund has reached what they are calling a provisional agreement to ta ke are calling a provisional agreement to take over british steel, saying they plan to close that deal by the end of the year. so that coming out of istanbul. turkey's military pension fund will take over british steel. you may recall the owner of british steel had been seeking financial support from the government here but had failed to reach an agreement. the union have previously said they would be watching any bid from the turkish military fund closely, and speaking with our turkish sister unions given
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tu rkey‘s record of with our turkish sister unions given turkey's record of repression. that is the unite union. there may be some concerns among union members about this. but it does sound like there has been a solution found. that turkey's military pension fund is set to provisionally sign an agreement to take over british steel. most of those jobs are at risk at the site in scunthorpe. north korea says it has no intention of holding any more direct talks with south korea — a day after its neighbour called for reunification in the next 25 years. the north has also carried out another suspected missile test. 0ur correspondent in seoul, laura bicker, says north korea issued a sharp response to president moonjae—in's suggestion of reunification. let's get more on this from our correspondent, laura bicker, whojoins me now from seoul. the war of words continues? war of words and also the sound of the door of diplomacy closing on
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soul, which will be difficult for president moonjae—in, the south korean leader, to hear. he worked so ha rd to korean leader, to hear. he worked so hard to bring together kim jong—un and donald trump for talks. it now appears that north korea wants him frozen out. first of all, back to the missile test, we know that north korea fired off what has been described as two unidentified projectiles. we are hearing that they could be more short—range ballistic missiles, the sixth missile testing 23 days. north korea has managed to build three new weapons systems, despite being under sanctions, weapons that are faster, fly very low and certainly, in one case, are able to manoeuvre within flight. case, are able to manoeuvre within flight. that means they could potentially avoid radar. at the same time they issued a blistering statement against south korea's president, describing him as shameless. that the idea that he
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would take part in dialogue as delusional. and also, they said his remarks and re—unifying the korean peninsula are so preposterous it would make the boiled head of a cow laugh. some quite vivid language. the third player in all of this remains the united states. where does this leave their role in this relationship? i think what you are seeing is pyongyang signalling they would rather deal directly with the united states, they would rather freeze out soul and deal directly with donald trump. by putting this they are putting pressure on south korea. south korea has said all along they would quite like to take pa rt along they would quite like to take part injoint projects, economic projects, port and industrial park that used to work together at together. washington has always said no. all of a sudden pyongyang are beginning to realise that washington
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is the one making decisions. so we have to go to washington and not to south korea. they also want to put pressure on south korea to put pressure on south korea to put pressure on south korea to put pressure on the trump administration to sit down and talk. we haven't seen to sit down and talk. we haven't seen substantial talks since that summit in hanoi in february. yes, there was the handshake between donald trump and kim jong—un there was the handshake between donald trump and kimjong—un in there was the handshake between donald trump and kim jong—un in the demilitarised zone in june. donald trump and kim jong—un in the demilitarised zone injune. it was heavily publicised. but no deal has come from all of this. north korea is continuing to make weapons. and donald trump says he is open for talks. but nothing is set in stone. and no deal has yet been done. the clock is ticking because north korea has said that it may find a new path, a new way, by the end of this year. laura, thank you. laura bicker. the national grid is to send its initial report to the energy regulator 0fgem, looking at the power failure which caused such widespread disruption a week ago.
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it's expected to give more information about exaclty what happened, but is unlikely to offer much insight into why certain services like trains were so badly affected. theo legget reports. trains stopped, passengers were left stranded, and railway stations were in chaos. nearly a million homes were plunged into darkness across the country, and traffic control systems stopped working as well. national grid says last week's power system failure was exceptional. today's initial report is expected to provide more detail about exactly what happened, and when. we already know what triggered the blackouts. first, this power station in bedfordshire developed a problem and disconnected itself from the grid. at almost the same time, a wind farm in the north sea also went offline. that created instability in the grid, and triggered an automatic 5% cut in supplies. within seven minutes, new sources of power had been brought in, and the system was running normally again. but, across the country, disruption lasted for hours. 0fgem will want to know why the knock—on effects were so severe,
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and why critical infrastructure such as railways and hospitals like this one in ipswich lost power. normally, their supplies are protected. some experts believe the growth of renewable energy sources has made the electricity grid more difficult to manage, while critics say a lack of investment has left it more vulnerable to serious failures. today's report is unlikely to provide comprehensive answers. investigations including a separate government inquiry will take weeks. but answers will eventually be needed, because it is clear that something, somewhere, went very badly wrong. theo leggett, bbc news. the leader of the liberal democrats, jo swinson, claims she has talked with senior figures in the conservative and labour parties who would be prepared to lead an emergency government to stop a no—deal brexit. it comes afterjeremy corbyn's plan to prevent a no—deal brexit, by being installed as a caretaker pm, was met with opposition from key potential allies.
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let's get more on this with our political correspondent, nick eardley. so what has changed? what more do we know about this plan? 10 swinson got quite a lot of criticism yesterday for being so dismissive ofjeremy corbyn's plan, which was basically bring down borisjohnson, putjeremy corbyn in numberio, bring down borisjohnson, putjeremy corbyn in number 10, extend brexit and have a general election. she is also coming up with her own plan, basically saying she doesn't think mr corbyn's plan will get enough support from across the house of commons, from different parties, from different people opposed to leaving without a deal. so she wants to look at somebody else. the two people she is suggesting are the longest serving male mp, ken clarke, conservative, and the longest serving female mp, harriet harman, who is a labour mp and has been
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acting leader of the labour party. what is interesting this morning is thatjo swinson what is interesting this morning is that jo swinson says she has spoken to both and both, in principle, are up to both and both, in principle, are up for it. what we need to do... you have suggested somebody else ought to take leadership of this government, somebody, you suggested, like ken clarke or harriet harman. have you actually asked either of them if they would be prepared to do it? i have been in touch with them because, obviously, you don'tjust mention people's names without checking that they are ok with that. i mean, both of those are long serving member of parliament, the most experienced mps in the house, the father and mother of the house, as they are called in the house of commons. and did they actually say to you that they were prepared to lead a government of national unity? they... they put public duty first and they don't want to see a no—deal brexit and if the house of commons asks them to an emergency government, to get our country out of this brexit mess and to stop us driving off the cliff to a no deal, then yes, they are prepared to do that. and i think that is to their credit.
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i should say, we haven't actually heard from harriet harman or ken clarke, but we are trying to figure out if they are up for this plan. as that means this is something that could work? i wouldn't be so sure for the simple reason jeremy could work? i wouldn't be so sure for the simple reasonjeremy corbyn is pretty adamant it should be him. for the simple reason he leads the biggest opposition party in the commons. he thinks he is the inevitable man to take over if there isa inevitable man to take over if there is a vote of in the prime minister at the start of september. the big danger that the opposition parties haveis danger that the opposition parties have is that they are all squabbling over who is plan is better. if they can't compromise enough, they might end up without a plan at all and the government has made perfectly clear that they are going to leave on the 315t of october whatever happens. if the opposition parties can't get their house in order, they may not be able to stop them. nick eardley. thank you. a civil rights group has warned the use of facial recognition systems in public places across the uk has reached epidemic levels. big brother watch
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says the technology, which can scan people's faces in crowds, comparing them with databases of criminals, is a threat to privacy. here's our technology correspondent, rory cellan—jones. the king's cross development in london has shops, offices and an arts school, and this week the site's owner confirmed that cameras using facial recognition technology are scanning visitors. now, big brother watch says it has uncovered other examples of where the controversial technology is being used. the meadowhall shopping centre in sheffield has confirmed that it used it last year in two trials with south yorkshire police, one lasting two days, the other a month. and liverpool's world museum used facial recognition to scan visitors to an exhibition about china's terracotta warriors. the museum says it acted on advice from the police, and may use the technology again, in line with guidance from the information commissioner. big brother watch is calling for
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a ban on its use in public spaces. the data watchdog has now launched an investigation into the use of facial recognition at the king's cross development, and says it is deeply concerned about the growing use of the technology. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. earlier this year dr daragh murphy published a report on the issues with live facial recognition technology. hejoins us now from galway. thank you very much for being with us. thank you very much for being with us. before we talk about perhaps some of the moral, privacy issues, tell us a little bit about what people need in place to use this technology? there are already regulations, and there? well, there area certain regulations, and there? well, there are a certain amount of regulations but one of the big issues around facial recognition being deployed by a private company, as seems to be the case in kings cross, the amount
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and extent of regulation is limited. data protection applies and that is why you have the information commissioner's offers conducting an investigation. but there is no real regulation around kind of the circumstances of use, whether it is appropriate to use the technology, what the restrictions are, and that is really a big issue. you feel there is a much wider discussion to have in society in general? yeah, absolutely. there are two key issues. one is the lack of transparency around the issue. and a component of that is that it took an investigative journalist to uncover the fact that facial recognition was being used across a huge area of london. and the other element is that we don't know how it is being used. when people think of facial recognition technology, they often think of it as just about the identification of individuals faces, which of course it is, but that is the first step of the technology. the second element, which has the potential to be much more invasive in terms of human rights and civil
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liberties, is that it can conduct analysis on you, so it can build a profile. if you work or live in king's cross, the technology can monitor you effectively all the time, and it allows you to build a detailed profile of your life. what is done with that information, that is done with that information, that is something we should have access to. how much do you feel that debate is already going on, or do you think this has come so speedily it has caught us unawares? to a large degree it has caught us unawares. certainly of mainstream level. there have been elements of debate that i think really the extent of the facial recognition at kings cross, the number of people affected and the number of people affected and the fact it is a private company doing this, has caught us unawares. i think what that really indicates is that we need a public discussion and regulation. it should not be the
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case that tech companies, or private companies, are determining what is appropriate to use in society or not. that is a decision for the government. and the public. i am interested in how this can be used by private companies. we talked about the fact that it takes people's faces and cross—references them with data bases people's faces and cross—references them with databases of known criminals. that would require access to presumably police files and so on. if a private company is using it, how can it be of help to them? well, it doesn't have to be a database of criminals. if it is a private company, they may well have access to employee and photographs, for your access to employee and photographs, foryour id access to employee and photographs, for your id cards. they may access facebook. they might pull pictures from a social media. we just don't know. so the availability of information is obviously very significant, it opens doors to information, or even companies giving their own employees information is one potential source. it is not restricted to criminals.
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but the other thing is we don't know how it is being used and what it is being used for. and i think that is where the ability to analyse people's patterns of life and then to potentially monetise it is something that has to be of concern. for example, if you are at king's cross and you go for a run at lunch ora cross and you go for a run at lunch or a smoke at lunch, and that is picked up and analysed on facial recognition technology, it could be sold to an employment company and affect your job sold to an employment company and affect yourjob prospects. these are things we need to know and have a discussion about. you raised some really interesting concerns. do you feel there is a positive, useful side to this technology, or do you see it predominately as threatening? no, i wouldn't say it is predominantly threatening but it has the potential to have significant human rights harm. so what we need to have is a discussion to identify those circumstances where it can be used appropriately and whether it can be beneficial to policing or
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intelligence, say, and a discussion about when we don't think it is acceptable. doctor darren murray, i do apologise, i got your name wrong when i introduced you, thank you for talking to us. the headlines on bbc news: turkey's military pension fun 0yak reaches a provisional agreement to take over british steel. a 52—year—old father is stabbed to death with a screwdriver in a shopping centre in newcastle — seven teenagers are arrested. kim jong—un rejects further peace talks with south korea — as he test fires two more missiles. and in sport, england's hopes of getting anything out of the second test against australia rest with their bowlers. they were bowled out for 258 in theirfirst innings. wolves and rangers keep their europa league dreams alive. wolves beat armenians pyunik 8—0 on aggregate to set up a play—off tie with italian side torino.
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rangers beat midtjylland and will play legia warsaw. they won at queen's together and now andy murray and feliciano lopez book their place in the cincinatti masters quarterfinals, where murray will face his brotherjamie for only the second time in their professional career. i'll be back with more on those stories after half—past. thank you. bbc news has learned that a cyber attack on the uk's biggest provider of forensic services has led to a backlog of 20,000 samples. the company — eurofins scientific — was affected by a ransomware virus, which prevented staff accessing its computer system. police say the problem has now been resolved and emergency measures are being gradually lifted. here's our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. it is painstaking work, but vital for solving crimes. scientists at eurofins analyse
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evidence from 70,000 criminal cases every year. the company accounts for more than half of forensic science provision in the uk, but injune, police suspended all work with eurofins after its computer systems were frozen by cyber criminals. police have now revealed the impact of the cyber attack. it led to a backlog of 20,000 samples, including blood and dna from suspects and crime scenes. it will take two months to clear most of the cases, and police warn there will be delays to investigations, with criminal trials also affected. what has had more of an impact is the delays to forensic testing, so that has led to some adjournments at court. but again, what we've tried to do around our contingency planning — working with the forces around the country to make sure we're prioritising cases. the cyber attack that struck eurofins probably looked like this — a computer virus that blocks access
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to files unless a ransom is paid. last month, bbc was told that eurofins had paid the perpetrators to restore its services, though the company refused to comment. the national crime agency is still investigating what is said to be a complex case. danny shaw, bbc news. events are taking place this afternoon to commemorate the 200th anniversary of the deaths of 18 people in the peterloo massacre. hundreds more were injured when the authorities in manchester tried to shut down a peaceful demonstration calling for political reform. to mark the anniversary descendants of those involved have been learning about what happened to their relatives. nina warhurst reports. on these busy streets, you'd never know that this is where they died fighting for nothing more than the rights of men to vote. it was a baking hot day by the time they arrived here at what was st peter's fields.
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some people had walked for more than 20 miles all through the night, and they couldn't have known about the violence, the panic and the bloodshed they were about to witness. one of them is david hilton, standing at the back of this photograph. a weaver from east manchester, he met up with peterloo victims every year to remember and to fight on. and this year, manchester metropolitan university is uniting as many descendants as possible. so, this gentleman here, he is your great, great, great, great grandfather. that's amazing. it's like goosebumps, isn't it? even in his 805, he's still campaigning for people to get the vote. for equal and fair representation. he looks proud, he looks like the boss, and i think it's amazing how 60 years later he's still actually trying to get the vote for the poor people.
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fighting for the working man all those years later. still. it's pretty damn amazing. it is, i'm well chuffed. david did not live to see all working men granted the vote, that didn't happen for 100 years. we've also got here a newspaper article from washington, the national... but these newspaper articles in the people's history museum showed the global impacts peterloo had and its ripple effects through history. peterloo was hugely significant for campaigners calling for the right to vote. so after the massacre, there's a real crackdown on movement, but when the chartists come about in the 1830s, the peterloo massacre is hugely significant. it's a huge inspiration. but also for the suffragettes, it was a kind of key moment in that campaign for democratic rights. so they didn't die in vain? they definitely didn't die in vain, and many protesters who were there continued the memory, continued the organisation to make sure we'd never forget
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the peterloo massacre. today thousands will gather at the site of st peter's field to remember the protesters and how things have changed but somehow stayed the same. nina warhurst, bbc news. let's get more on this now with robert poole, who's professor of history at the university of central lancashire. he's the author of "peterloo: the english uprising", and of the graphic novel "peterloo: witnesses to a massacre". i would imagine a lot of that would be news to people? it is not something a lot of younger people will necessarily have heard about? yes, peter lou has rather dropped out of sight in the schools curriculum. i learnt about it in the 60s and early 70s. mike lee learnt about it. it was always considered a bit of industrial trouble up north, something that concerned manchester and not the country. but it was the centrepiece of a national campaign
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of mass platform, mass democracy meetings, that the eyes of the whole country were on manchester, and there was a political event of national importance, part of a democratic story. why has it taken a while for it to be seen in that context? well, it took a long time before reform actually got under way. in the short term the pro—democracy movement of 1819 was defeated. but in 1832, we got the great reform act. it was only a small advance but the reason that it passed was because the government did not dare again to send in troops against unarmed civilians. we then got about one a generation reform acts. all adult males got the vote in 1840. then women. it was a long time before that gradual process towards democracy became apparent. and only now can we really look back and see that behind britain's
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well—known stage by stage gradual process to democracy, lay the shock of peter lou, which unblocked everything. at the time what was the response to the deaths of those people and the fact that those protests turned so violent because of the involvement of the government, essentially, of militia men, hjohlman? was that this taste ora men, hjohlman? was that this taste or a sense that these people need to be put in their place? the response was as you would expect, absolute outrage. the politicalfault line was between high tory loyalists to the government and practically everybody else, including the moderate press in the middle. the process itself did not turn violent. the authorities turned violent. the authorities, particularly the volu nta ry authorities, particularly the voluntary manchester cavalry, after arresting henry hunt, the main speaker, went on to attack the platform, the hustings, the flags and the banners and the people defending them, including many women. it was that violence against women. it was that violence against women that made peter lou
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unforgettable and unforgivable. we look at democracy being under scrutiny still, as we find ourselves in the 21st—century. do you see any parallels looking back that we can learn lessons from history that would inform what is happening around the world today? certainly. we can see if not the same format, we can see the same forces at work. democracy seemed so simple in 1819. hardly anybody had the vote. if you give the people of the interests would at last be heeded and the world would be a better place. we know now, particularly this year, democracy is much more complicated than that. but in the end what britain had was a tradition of constitutional reform. even the reform of two of 1819, radical though they were, using mass non—violent force, although they did, they still believed that ultimately the solution would have to come from parliament giving way through a constitutional solution. i think what it teaches us is that firstly, popular pressure is a very
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powerful force. and secondly, firstly, popular pressure is a very powerfulforce. and secondly, we need to look to the long—term, not panic too much about the short—term, and in the end parliamentary democracy will ultimately be able to find some kind of solution to our present difficulties as it eventually did. it will take a lot of shoving to get there.|j eventually did. it will take a lot of shoving to get there. i like that! that is a relief to hear. great to have your analysis. thank you. in a moment the weather but first let's joinjoanna gosling to find out what she's got coming up in the victoria derbyshire programme at ten. good morning. in our exclusive film today, campaigners are calling on the nhs to do more to help patients who are trying to get medical cannabis on prescription. it has changed my life. i can't imagine my life without cannabis. i am so imagine my life without cannabis. i am so grateful i found it. they says nhs prescriptions are impossible to get, forcing those who need it to go private, at a cost of hundreds
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of pounds every month. that full report at just after 10 on bbc2, the bbc now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. good morning. it's probably going to feel more like an autumn day rather than a summer's date today. an area of low pressure moving its way in from the atlantic. weather fronts associated with it. you can see from the satellite imagery, a lot of cloud across the uk, with that some heavy rain, particularly in south—west england, wales, parts of north—west england. localised flooding. the rain eventually eases its way to the south—east of england. it will clear for northern ireland and scotland this afternoon. quite blustery conditions. potentially 50 mph around the irish seacoast. maximum temperatures, highest in northern ireland. elsewhere, very disappointing. as we go through to night of the brain will eventually clear towards the east. they will be some clear spells
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developing into saturday. for many of us it will be dry with sunny spells. a few more showers on sunday. sting quite windy. you hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. turkey's military pension fun 0yak reaches a provisional agreement to take over british steel. a 52—year—old father is stabbed to death with a screwdriver in a shopping centre in newcastle. seven teenagers are arrested. kim jong—un rejects further peace talks with south korea — as he test fires two more missiles. the power cut that brought large parts of the uk to a standstill — the national grid has until the end of the day to submit a formal report into what went wrong. the lib dem leader says she's got the support of senior mps who'd be prepared to lead an emergency government aimed at stopping a no—deal brexit.
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time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. the leader of the liberal democrats, jo swinson, claims to have secured the support of senior figures in the conservative and labour parties who'd be prepared to lead an emergency government, with the goal of stopping a no—deal brexit. it comes afterjeremy corbyn's plan to prevent a no—deal brexit, by being installed as a caretaker pm, was met with opposition from key potential allies. 0n the bbc radio 4 today programme, ms swinson was asked if her priority was to stopjeremy corbyn rather than stop a no—deal. not at all, look, even if the liberal democrats did supportjeremy corbyn, the numbers don't stack up because of those eight mps on the opposition benches, and you know, we're all sort of looking at, there are about ten mps who have left the labour party because ofjeremy
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corbyn's leadership who are sitting on the opposition benches, many of whom, ithink, are unlikely to support him. and for every one of those, he needs to get a conservative mp to back him in this way. you know, of course, it is important that we have talks and i am engaged in those talks and have been for months through the people's vote campaign and beyond. but those conservative mps are very clear, they are not about to put jeremy corbyn in number ten. and actually, in my letter to him, i said if he has had commitments from conservative mps that they will back him in this way, then please, please let us know. but i would just like... who are these eight tory mps going to be that are going to backjeremy corbyn? so you have suggested somebody else ought to take leadership of this government, somebody you suggested like ken clarke or harriet harman. have you actually asked either of them if they would be prepared to do it? i have been in touch with them because obviously, you don'tjust mention people's names without
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checking that they are ok with that. i mean, both of those are long serving members of parliament, the most experienced mps in the house, the father and mother of the house, as they are called in house of commons. and did they actually say to you that they were prepared to lead a government of national unity? they... they put public duty first and they don't want to see a no—deal brexit and if the house of commons asks them to lead an emergency government to get our country out of this brexit mess and to stop us driving off that cliff to a no deal, then yes, they are prepared to do that. i think that is to their credit. it does not need to be them. ifjeremy corbyn has got another suggestion of, you know, an experienced mp who has that respect across the house, let's talk about it. the national grid has until the end of the day to send a report on last friday's major power failure to the energy watchdog, 0fgem. it's expected to give more information about what caused the power cut, but it's unlikely to offer much insight into why critical infrastructure, such as train services, was so badly affected.
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energy minister kwasi kwarteng told bbc breakfast that the power outage was a "once in ten year" event. the main way to mitigate any kind of failure is to have a substitute, to have some kind of reserve in place. now, what happened is that our reserve is a gigawatt of energy, but the two power stations in theirfailure, there was a bigger, there was a bigger lack of energy, as it were, more than the one gigawatt reserve limit. that is what we have to look at. we have to look at why these two failed roughly at the same time. it is very unusual to have two generating facilities fail at the same time in that way. that is another thing that we need to look at. but there's also the concern about what happens after they failed, what happened to the ones that were using it, the infrastructure,
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the transport system, hospitals, the structural systems. that's what i'm saying, once they fail, you have to have a reserve in place that can pick up the slack in terms of substituting the power. that is another critical thing that we need to look at and that is what we are trying to get to the bottom of. are you not surprised that these reserves are not in place? look, there was a... it was a very freak occurrence. it was something which we need to be resilient about and we need to be able to withstand. my understanding is that the power came on relatively quickly but it was not quick enough. something went wrong and we need to get to the bottom of it. i fully accept that. a civil rights group has warned the use of facial recognition systems in public places across the uk has reached epidemic levels. big brother watch says the technology, which can scan people's faces in crowds, comparing them with databases of criminals, is a threat to privacy. the government's data watchdog is investigating cameras installed at king's cross station in london. facial recognition is surveillance software that in real time compares
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the faces of people passing by normal—looking surveillance cameras with lists, or it can build lists. essentially, they are ordinary—looking cameras that are performing, normally secretly, identity checks on members of the public. when we see these cameras in places like king's cross or in shopping centres, that means that millions of people are having their identities checked and sensitive biometric data taken about them without even knowing about it. so we have become familiar with the idea of cctv, the footage which is captured when you go somewhere and you could well be filmed. what is different about this? it is light years away from ordinary cctv. what is happening with live facial recognition is that you are having a biometric identity check, a bit like you do when you go through a border, for example. so the use of live facial recognition cameras is a bit
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like putting in place a fingerprint check point or a dna checkpoint. data about you, identifiable to you and your body, is being collected through these ordinarily looking cameras. can you just do a little tie—up for me? supposing you go into a shopping centre which has one of these systems. it does facial recognition on you, but how does that then link up? how does it then identify you from the image that has been taken? there are different ways that facial recognition systems can work. one of the ways is that, if you are not already known to a database or a system, it may track you within a certain space. so you could be tracked around a shopping centre, for example. it still doesn't know who you are necessarily? it may not, no, but one of the disturbing things about what we found in the investigation is that there is a significant private police partnership in doing this. in two of the major shopping centres that have been
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using live facial recognition, they have been fed photos from the police, but at the same time, the shopping centres will have their own photos, that could be of people who might be suspected of being shoplifters or of being troublesome in some way, but who are actually not convicted. when you put this in the context ofjust how inaccurate facial recognition systems currently are, often in excess of 90% inaccurate, that poses a real risk to people's rights. we have seen when we have been observing the use of the technology that ordinary people, innocent members of the public, are being stopped and asked to prove who they are, asked to prove their innocence by police. that is going to be an awful lot worse when we see that happening at the behest of private security and security guards. us president donald trump has talked to aides and allies about buying greenland for the united states. an ally of mr trump told the associated press on thursday that the president had discussed the purchase, but was not serious about the proposal.
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it would not be the first time an american leader tried to buy the world's largest island, which is an autonomous territory of denmark. a bandstand where david bowie played soon after the release of his first hit single, space 0ddity, has been protected with a grade 2 listing. the 1905 bandstand is in beckenham, where bowie lived and he is thought to have penned the lyrics to life on mars from its steps. the singer performed from the stand to a small audience in croydon road recreation ground exactly 50 years ago to this day. let's ta ke let's take a look at what has been catching your attention on the website. looking at the most read stories, understandably, number one is the tragic death of peter duncan, the father who has been stabbed to death in newcastle. we will have more on that through the morning. but perhaps a more cheerful story at numberfive,
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but perhaps a more cheerful story at number five, lots of people looking at the story of a police constable, who has been tweeting about his journey to becoming a police officer. it is fascinating stuff, he has basically been sharing the fact that he went from suffering abuse, being a rough sleeper, having a really difficult time of things, to eventually training as a police community support officer, and then going on to become a police officer proper. a lovely picture of him with a thumbs up, saying, "beaten as a child, homeless as a teenager, brother abuse, parents alcoholics and mental health problems, but i rose above is good. his twitter feed has been doing really well, people inspired by that, 16,000 likes on some of the posts. 0n the most watched, some lovely pictures to show you can if you have not already see that it magazines, the british fireworks championships happened in plymouth, and we can show you some of lovely pictures. tens of
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thousands of people gathering on plymouth oh and roundabouts to see this brilliant sight, and self starting fireworks from chichester, west sussex, where the winners, a greatjoy, and west sussex, where the winners, a great joy, and one west sussex, where the winners, a greatjoy, and one of the people watching it said it was all free, you could find yourself a nice spot and watch as the five displays went on through the night. that's it for today's morning briefing. a little bit of an update, i hope, on british steel. i am just looking for this to come through. yes, this isa for this to come through. yes, this is a statement following the news, we we re is a statement following the news, we were saying earlier, it had broken this morning that british steel was to be taken over by a turkish military pensions fund. this isa turkish military pensions fund. this is a statement from the official receiver. you will recall that british steel went into receivership and they are saying they have now announced exclusive sales talks with announced exclusive sales talks with a preferred buyer for announced exclusive sales talks with a preferred buyerfor british announced exclusive sales talks with a preferred buyer for british steel. following discussions with a number
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of potential purchasers, they say, over the past few weeks, they are pleased to say that they have now received an acceptable offer for the purchase of the whole business and the receiver is now focusing on finalising the sale, they say. that is the turkish military pension fund that we were discussing earlier. essentially confirmation coming through from the official receiver for british steel that the talks are under way and that they are hopeful that they can conclude the process in the coming weeks. they say during that time, british steel will continue to trade and supply to customers as normal. we will be keeping an eye on that through the morning. and we will speak to are corresponded in a short while. sport now and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's holly. good morning. england with plenty to do if they're to level the ashes series after they were bowled out on the first day's play of the second test at lords. after being put into bat, england lost openerjason roy for a duck. there was a 50 for rory burns to follow his century in the first test, but a brilliant catch from cameron bancroft
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got rid of him. and england were 138—6 at one stage. they partially recovered through a stand of 72 between jonny bairstow and chris woakes but were 258 all out. england did get david warner out before the close with australia finishing on 30—1, trailing by 228 runs. competitive total. like i said, we could've eked out a few more and could have got a few more and extended it out at the end, but i think it's game on, and we're right in amongst it. obviously batted at a few balls in this test series, and they're looking at a few different ways of getting me out. nathan lyon ran past and mentioned it within about three balls. i was well—versed in what i was looking for, and prepared for what i was getting. but yeah, it's just a good battle, isn't it? let's have a look at some of this morning's back pages.
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the ashes dominates, with the daily mail leading with it, joffre archer pictured on the right, england hoping that he will be the man, as he gets his first cap, hoping that he gets his first cap, hoping that he can pull them back into the match. and the daily mirror have gone with tammy abraham, who has been the victim of racist abuse on social media, after he missed the penalty for chelsea in the european super cup this week. the daily express also leads with the ashes, ben stokes pictured but they have also mentioned sol campbell's departure from macclesfield, they say he left after not being paid for five months. wolves and rangers are both one match away from reaching the group stage of the europa league after victory in the third round of qualifying. both teams held leads going into last night's matches. wolves were already 4—0 up against armenians pyunik. and there were four more, including a first senior goal for teenager morgan gibbs—white and a brilliant finish from diogojota saw them go through 8—0 on aggregate.
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rangers swept aside fc midtjylland to set up a play—off with legia warsaw. welsh side new saints are out, losing 9—0 on agregate losing 9—0 on aggregate to ludogorets, whilst aberdeen fell at the europa league third qualifying round for the sixth consecutive season with defeat to croatian side rijeka. andy murray will meet his brother jamie in the quarterfinals of the men's doubles at the cincinnati masters this evening. it's after andy and his partner feliciano lopez beat ryan harrison and jack sock. the murray brothers have faced each other once before in 2015. andy murray has also announced that he won't play in this month's us open, so that he can focus on the singles again. that match is expected to start around 8 o'clock tonight. it's certainly given judy murray a headache.
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she stars in social media herself on occasion, when lending her support to andy and jamie. and when andy was asked about the worst punishment he has received for misbhaving on court, following nick kyrgios's £93,000 fine in cincinnati, judy retweeted his response to her followers. i was playing a tournament when i was like 14, in the czech republic, and my mum and my gran came over to watch. and i swore during my match, and my gran didn't speak to me for about three months — so the rest of the trip, when she was there, and stuff. and i remember it really well, because i love my gran. she's the best, but when she didn't speak to me, i was gutted about that. but i still swear on the court, so... runaway super league leaders st helens warmed up for next weeks challenge cup final with a brilliant second half display to see off leeds rhinos 36—20 at headingley. the sides had been level at the break but a hat—trick
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from fiji international kevin naiqama sees saints head to wembley in good form. they are now 16 points clear at the top and take on warrington in the cup final a week on saturday. there were less dramatic scenes in the men's elite race in the triathlon 0lympic test event in tokyo than in the women's yesterday. jonny brownlee was the first brit to cross the line, in fifth place. it means he'll have to wait slightly longer to seal his place on the team for the olympics next year. it was canada's tyler mislawchuk who out—sprinted norway's casper stornes to win. we will keep you up to date on all the big sports stories throughout the day on the bbc news channel. tonight, though, tune in for a for a full round—up on sportsday at 6.30. we'll bring you a look ahead to this weekend's premier league fixtures and the action from the second ashes test at lord's. between now and then though, you can follow the ashes on bbc radio 5live sports extra where the test match special crew will be on air from 10.30 this morning. that's all the sport for now.
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more from the bbc sport centre at 11.15. but for now, goodbye. let's get more on the breaking news that turkey's military pension fund 0yak has reached a provisional agreement to take over british steel. our business correspondent katy austin is here. what do we know so far? yes, it looks like the investment arm of tu rkey‘s looks like the investment arm of turkey's army's pension fund, has entered into exclusive sales talks with the official receiver, the uk government's official receiver, which has been running british steel since it collapsed into insolvency in may. we have not had a lot of detail about what the deal entails but it will now go into a period of due diligence before it is signed, sealed and elements, before the ——
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the kameni checked out. they own a pa rt the kameni checked out. they own a part of turkey's biggest steel producer which is why they are interested in british steel. this may provide reassurance to workers at places like scunthorpe in north lincolnshire who are desperately waiting to hear news about whether a buyer would be found for the company. we knew there were several buyers in the bidding, perhaps, or who had shown an interest, but it looks like they have now almost got to the point where it is going to be signed off. it does and it is significant that the bid appears to be that the whole business which has a lwa ys be that the whole business which has always been the government's preference and a business's preference, nobody wanted to see british steel sold off in bits so it is significant that the whole business is on the table here. the official receiver says it has received an acceptable offer, and yes, this was not the only company which i expressed interest, there had been others who had also wanted to buy the whole business. —— which had expressed interest. it is fair to say the company will have to have
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fairly deep pockets to keep british steel going. the company had been in recovery since it was bought out of a previous collapse in 2016 but it seemed like factors including brexit we re seemed like factors including brexit were really making it struggle, leading to the insolvency we saw in may. but today, it looks like there is hope on the horizon now that british steel can continue as a viable business. and people might hear turkish military pension fund, british steel, and they might not see a link but explain to us in basic terms why they might have an interest. simply because they own a large stake, there's a few different layers to the steel —— to the deal and the company but they own a large sta ke and the company but they own a large stake in turkey‘s biggest steel producer. they must have seen something they wanted in british steel, which does have a number of quite specialist arms. it prides itself on making very high quality products like rail. there's very detail today on exactly what their plans are for the business, and exactly how much they are going to spend on it or how much they might
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invest, what they will do with it but we will hope to hear more about that in the coming weeks. it does not look like we will get a final deal sealed for at least a month or so but we will have to wait and see. i know you will continue to monitor this today. thank you very much. brad pitt, leonardo dicaprio and quentin tarantino have come together to make "once upon a time in hollywood", a film critics are describing as a tribute to the final moments of hollywood's golden age. in their only interview for tv in the uk, brad pitt and leo dicaprio have been speaking to breakfast‘s charlie stayt. i'm rick dalton. it's my pleasure... mr schwartz. call me marvin. put it there. that your son? no, that's my stunt double, cliff booth. this is serious hollywood i have in front of me right now. you clearly have a love for hollywood that's embraced in the film, right? absolutely. absolutely, yeah. and we wrestle with it, but ultimately a complete love
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for the industry, the town, the city, and this film reflects that. yeah, and i think we both mutually look at this as a gift, you know? you can do anything you want to me. i hired you to be an actor, rick. not a tv cowboy, you're better than that. i love the way quentin approached these two characters, a stunt double and an actor in an era that's passing them by, they're remnants of the past, and they're trying to adjust to the new era of cinema. and they're slowly realising that they've become irrelevant, and it's sort of their... well, at at least in rick's terms, it's his fight for his own mortality. cliff, the stu ntman, they're linked careerwise, and they're friends. the relationship between them is kind of lovely to watch as they bumble their way round hollywood. bumble... that's a great term. bumble! there's a lot of the two of you driving around, looking at the scenes and getting a realfeel for that time.
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yeah. i loved quentin's approach to this. it was less about some trajectory of a dramatic story, and more about a day in the life. and i find it really compelling. but, yes, you know, we have those friends, we understood that, you know, the people you have over decades through... you know, as you negotiate your way through this industry, you sit with the quiet times, the laughs and really that's what makes it all worthwhile. so you're still with rick? still here. your stories as actors are very different, aren't they? leo, you were on screen, one way or another, from the age of about five, right? commercials or...? more 12, 13, but yeah. 12, 13 on tv. i did something on a kids show when i was five and got kicked off. what for? why? it was romper room, and i ran up to the camera...
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erroneous behaviour. yeah. you misbehaved? misbehaved. he was lascivious even then. but your story, brad, is more... you did the whole thing where you came in and you were a bartender. a very different route. and i was an extra for a good almost two years. really? wow. yeah. i was in less than zero, that was my... i was an extra in less than zero. that's the one i was proud of. is it still.... can you get the still from it? it's in the movie, i'm standing in the doorway with an outstanding mullet. outstanding! listen, i had a mullet in those days, so i miss... i mean, bono would genuflect when he saw my mullet. i don't know how you were! mine was magnificent. it was right down... sort of four inches down the back. serious mullet. tell me, in those days, were you trying to scene—steal? traditionally extras are trying to, sort of, get themselves seen... no, we'd try to get lines so we can get our sag card, and then we can be working... it's a catch—22. you can't be an actor without your sag card, at least at that time, but you can't have your sag card unless you have a line.
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i was an extra in a charlie sheen movie, and i was a waiter, and they were all... it was no man's land, db sweeney, and they were all sitting round, big table scene. and i come up with the bottle and i'm supposed to pour champagne. and i come around and i think, "man, i'm gonna try, i'm gonna try to get a line in, i'm gonna try, i'm gonna try," because they're all having a conversation i figure maybe i can slip this in. and i pour this young actress a glass of champagne, and i go, "would you like anything else? " and she looked at me and goes... and the director goes, "cut, cut!" and the first ad goes, "you do that again, you're off the set." oh, no! and i go, "alright." now it's time for a look at the weather. look away now if you want some summery weather because it is heavy rain across many parts of the uk at the moment. the pressure chart shows this area of low pressure which is responsible for the wet weather and on the satellite you can see this mass of cloud right across the uk at
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the moment. this is the scene currently. rain spreading from west to east across most parts. the rain is particularly heavy across south—west england and wales and into north—west england. it is where the greens are that you will see the highest rainfall totals as we go through the afternoon. it could lead to localised flooding. the rain pushing into eastern areas eventually, while it goes from scotla nd eventually, while it goes from scotland and northern ireland with sunny spells and showers. quite gusty winds for many. 30—40 mph, perhaps a bit higher than that around the irish sea coast. there will misplace as northern ireland with the best of the sunshine but elsewhere, with that rain and going to come it will feel critical. the rain will eventually clear eastwards tonight, showers into scotland and northern ireland still which could be on the heavy side into saturday morning. elsewhere, some clear spells and quite a mild night, temperatures are staying up at about 11-15. temperatures are staying up at about 11—15. for saturday, it is a largely bright start to the day. plenty of sunshine for england and wales, a
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bit of cloud across southern areas but showers moving their way into north—western areas. still quite breezy on saturday, the wind still coming from the west or south—west, temperatures up a little bit. an improved amount of sunshine, so feeling a little better than today. low pressure is still there across the finals and that is still giving very unsettled conditions. —— across the far north. rain perhaps skirting southern ends on sunday, rain showers and longer spells of rain across scotland, northern ireland and showers for wales and northern england on sunday. elsewhere, largely dry with a good deal of sunshine throughout sunday. but again, the wind could be the main feature of the weather, gusting at 35-40 feature of the weather, gusting at 35—40 mph and a bit higher than that in the west and temperatures on sunday at 17—21. going into next week, things improving slightly. there will still be some showers in the forecast but i think it is not going to be as wet as it has been
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over the last week or so. temperatures about the high teens to the low 20s and for many of us, it should be mostly dry throughout next week. goodbye.
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hello, it's friday, it's 10 o'clock, i'm joanna gosling. in our exclusive film today, campaigners are calling on the nhs to do more to help patients who are trying to get medical cannabis on prescription. there is a cannabis revolution needs to be learned about science under so far it has been led by politics. what people forget is that for many patients, including my sister, this isa patients, including my sister, this is a life and death situation. they says nhs prescriptions are impossible to get — forcing those who need it to go private, at a cost of hundreds of pounds every month. the sunbed association is threatening legal action over calls by cancer charity melanoma uk for sunbeds to be banned because of their links to the disease.

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