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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  August 16, 2019 5:00pm-5:46pm BST

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today at five — berkshire police launch a murder inquiry after an officer is killed on duty. 28—year—old pc andrew harper was married just 4 weeks ago — and due to go on his honeymoon. he'd been called out to investigate reports of a robbery. the prime minister pays tribute to his courage. when i think of the bravery that pc andrew harper showed in intercepting those criminals i think of the risk the police run every day to keep us safe. police are still here where they are conducting investigations to find out exactly how pc andrew harper
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died after he was struck by a vehicle. its five o'clock — our top story. a murder investigation has been launched after a police officer was killed as he attended a reported burglary in berkshire. thames valley police say pc andrew harper died following a serious incident on a road near the village of ufton nervet. 10 people have been arrested. the prime minister has said he is deeply shocked and appaled. this was 28 year pc andrew harper who was killed in berkshire as it went to a colleague to attend a
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suspected burglary. this tent is all that can be seen today of what is now a murder scene. he was part of thames valley policing proactive unitand thames valley policing proactive unit and the force is now investigating the murder of one of its own. good afternoon, we are all shocked and saddened by the death of oui’ shocked and saddened by the death of our colleague pc andrew harper. thames valley police were called on the a4 at 11:30pm yesterday evening. tragically andrew was attending a reported burghley along with a crewmate and was killed at the scene whilst performing his duties. our thoughts are with andrew's friends and families who are being supported by specially trained family liaison officers and two are further axed, and it was only married four weeks ago. —— to ourfurther angst.
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the incident happened at the crossroads of ufton lane and lambdens hill, near the village of ufton nervet. ten males have been arrested between the ages of 13 and 30. we have to examine the exact cause and death of andrew and there is a postmortem taking place. we know at some point andrew has been dragged along by a vehicle. prime minister boris johnson offered his condolences. this murder was a mindless and brutal crime and all our thoughts are with his family, his friends and his colleagues. my condolences to andrew harper's family and his colleagues must be devastated. he was doing his duty, examining what happened at a burglary and was killed in the line of duty. as
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tributes pour in police are appealing for witnesses. this was near a busy stretch of road between reading and newbury so they want drivers who were passing through the area last night to come forward. this is the third serious attack on a police officer in recent weeks. a much loved pc and a newlywed husband has lost his life as a result. chi chi izundu is at the scene near the village of ufton nervet in berkshire. the remainder of the dangers of policing in this country are many outstanding questions. indeed, what we know so far is that at around 1130 pm pc andrew harper was called to this area on reports of a burglary. there is two sites of police activities. there is a sight
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to the left, jess cordoned off and a lot of forensic activity up and down this road. there are two forensic tents that have been erected and police are conducting investigations on that side of the road where they believed he was dragged by the vehicle that struck him earlier last night. there are two vehicles that have been there and we have seen those yellow forensic triangles. thames valley police have also confirmed they are going to be conducting a postmortem on pc andrew harper's body to determine exactly how he died. he has been described asa how he died. he has been described as a significant loss to the force and his family and friends, and that he was a highly regarded, popular member of the team. a couple members of the public have passed by the scene of the public have passed by the scene and left some floral tributes and member of —— in memory of pc
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harper. deputy police officer has reiterated the point that flags will fly at half—mast and has asked anyone who is been driving along this road to come forward in case they can scratch might have witnessed anything that could help with these investigations. our home affairs editor mark easton is here with me now. very sad day for all who knew pc andrew harper. i suppose this is a rare incident but is it rare enough, and can more be done? any death is appalling and thousands of police officers are injured in the line of duty every year. we have had two serious incidents in the last couple of weeks but thankfully, for an officer to be killed is rare. but every violent or life—threatening incident is a reminder of what we
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ask our incident is a reminder of what we ask oui’ emergency incident is a reminder of what we ask our emergency services to do and ask our emergency services to do and a reminder of the values that underpin our society, public service. notjust doing your bit but on occasion taking risk. the values of selflessness, courage, valour and gallantry. he was not armed. most police officers say they do not want to be because that would separate them from the people they are pledged to serve but the principles of policing to which robert peel gave his name include this, the police and members of the public who are paid to give full—time attention to duties which are incumbent on every citizen. that is what we should remember this evening. he died during his duty, as citizens we might reflect on what duties are incumbent upon us. that is a good message, thank you. ron winch is a senior lecturer in policing at birmingham city university — and a former superintendent at west midlands police.
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your reflections on this incident tonight? shocking, i hope i speak for the whole of the police summary and public in expressing deep condolences for his family, friends and colleagues at this shocking incident yesterday. do you think there is a problem of increasing violence targeted at the police? we have heard of a couple of big problems in the past couple of weeks alone. yes, we know we get something like two and a half thousand incidents of this assault on police officers during the year. that is around 28—30 per day which is a surprisingly high number. what we experience is levels of violence
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that the police experience in terms of thejob that the police experience in terms of the job they are asked to do and the traditionally asked to do, in terms of responding to dangerous situations. policing is by definition a complex and dangerous occupation and often, police are going into situations at risk and danger where other individuals are doing their best to escape. we ask the police to do a massive job, doing their best to escape. we ask the police to do a massivejob, it has risks and it is dangerous. we heard mark talking about british police being traditionally unarmed. you think there is anything in terms of equipment or protocols that can be done to make police officers safer? i think we have seen enormous advancesin safer? i think we have seen enormous advances in police safety equipment, sta b vests, advances in police safety equipment, stab vests, incapacity and spray, development and handcuffs and
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battles a nd development and handcuffs and battles and protective measures, and around the personal use of video which has an effect in reducing assaults and elements of violence directed towards the police. the training supports those protective measures and is very robust and strongly governed. but we cannot a lwa ys strongly governed. but we cannot always eliminate risk, however much we wa nt always eliminate risk, however much we want to maximise the safety of police officers going about their work, which can be complex and dangerous, you are never going to actually take away completely the risks of policing. in fact, in a sense, we expect a lot from our police and the public need to be aware, and the tragic incidents we have seen it recently brings home the police are there day in day out protecting the public. support from the public is essential but it is also support from the courts and
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other public justice also support from the courts and other publicjustice agencies in terms of protecting the police and understanding the difficult role they engage in. and other emergency services and some of the difficult challenges we face in protecting people in society. thank you very much. there is some hope for the 11,500 people employed by british steel, after the announcement of a tentative deal to buy the firm. the investment division of turkey's military pension fund — oyak — has been given time to carry out detailed inspections, before potentially completing the purchase later this year. british steel, whose largest manufacturing site is in scunthorpe, went into insolvency in may after rescue talks between the government and the company's owner, greybull capital, broke down. our business correspondent emma simpson reports. for nearly four months, the future of british steel has been hanging in the balance.
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here in scunthorpe, its main plant dominates the landscape and provides most of the work. today, news of a tentative deal to rescue the business. it's a move forward from may when we were in a period of extreme uncertainty and obviously concern, to now where we have a preferred bidder and an announcement from the official receiver that they are entering into more detailed discussions with the hope of a purchase by the end of october, is extremely positive. the scu nthorpe steelworks and its other assets in the north—east, are an important strategic asset for the uk. british steel employs around 11,500 workers, the vast majority here at scunthorpe. another 800 on teesside. 20,000 jobs in the supply chain also depend on it. steel production in an industry that's been feeling the heat. this loss—making business was bought by greybull capital for a pound three years ago, but it collapsed. the government's official receiver took control
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and the search for a buyer began. ataer, the investment arm of turkey's military pension fund, has now clinched a provisional deal. sources told the bbc it was the best offer, saving morejobs. the next stage of the process from our perspective is we now expect ataer to engage with us, present their plans for proper scrutiny. right from the beginning we've always said that this business needs to be kept together. the long—term future of steel—making in scunthorpe needs to be secured, and there needs to be an investment plan which takes the business forward and secures steel—making in scunthorpe and the north—east of england for generations to come. there is some way to go though before this deal is complete. and it's clear government financial support will be crucial to getting it over the line in the coming weeks. emma simpson, bbc news. jonathan perraton is an economist at the university of sheffield. thank you very much. emma said a
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moment ago that there is some way to go to get this deal over the line. how hopeful are you? it is a positive sign, the company has made very positive noises about investment over the coming years, substantial sums of money and a commitment to very green production. the investment group owns almost half of turkey's largest steel producer so there are signs of expertise on running steel firms. do you think there is synergy with british steel? why would become an by this company? that has to be the assumption there are potential synergies, there is experience of running steel firms. turkey is one of the top ten largest steel producers in the world so it has some success in establishing a global steel industry and that presumably is what has made it the front better. 0ther presumably is what has made it the front better. other companies have a p pa re ntly front better. other companies have apparently been interested but this
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has made it the front better. front line jobs, has made it the front better. front linejobs, four and has made it the front better. front linejobs, fourand a has made it the front better. front linejobs, four and a half thousand but many otherjobs down the supply chain. how hopeful do think those work in the supply chain should be about this tonight? it is a first optimistic sign for a while, especially with the effective colla pse especially with the effective collapse of the company. as the initial plan, we don't have a great deal of detail at this stage but the initial plans suggest an ongoing commitment to the plant and its production which would help reserves jobs in the supply chains as well. it is as encouraging news as we have had for quite some time. if you are one of those british steel workers in scunthorpe this evening and you are looking ahead to the next couple of weeks and the detail coming out of weeks and the detail coming out of the plan, what would you want to see? what detail should people be looking for? i want detailed plans
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of the timescale of the sorts of investment that they are planning. the contingency plans they might have, uncertainties going forward that the economy in general but inevitably brexit which, if when it happens, without a trade deal would mean britain would face tariffs exporting to the european union market. they will also be questions raised around employment practices in the company in turkey so the trade unions and others have wanted reassu ra nces trade unions and others have wanted reassurances about conditions for the work force. thanks so much for your expertise this evening. thank you. a man has admitted trying to murder a bulgarian teenager, in what prosecutors say was a far right terrorist incident. vincent fuller has pleaded guilty to four charges in relation to the attack in surrey, in march, the day after the christchurch mosque attacks in new zealand. richard galpin is at kingston crown court in south west london.
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hey, hello everybody, how are you doing? vincent fuller has admitted the attempted murder of a bulgarian teenager, in what the prosecution say was a far right terrorist incident. the attack came the day after the fatal shooting of 51 muslims in new zealand by a white supremacist. shortly before vincent fuller started his attack in stanwell, he posted a message on facebook, saying: he also wrote: he then went out onto the streets of stanwell carrying a baseball bat. at first, he tried to break into the house of a south asian neighbour. then he hit cars. he soon moved into a tesco car park, armed with a knife.
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he approached a bmw car with a bulgarian teenager at the wheel. he said to him, "you are going to die", and thrust his knife through the open car window, injuring the man in the neck and hand. but the teenager was able to drive away and get help. shortly afterwards, fuller was arrested. richard galpin, bbc news, at kingston crown court. the liberal democrat leaderjo swinson says the senior conservative ken clarke and former labour deputy leader harriet harman have both said they'd be willing to lead a unity government committed to try to stop a no—deal brexit, in the event that mps pass a vote of no confidence in boris johnson's government. ms swinson has rejected jeremy corbyn's proposal that he should be installed as a caretaker prime minister. 0ur political correspondent matt cole is in westminster.
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two plans, are either of them going to work? sorry, could you repeat the question. we have a corbyn plan and ajo swinson question. we have a corbyn plan and a jo swinson plan, question. we have a corbyn plan and ajo swinson plan, are either going to work? it is difficult, jo swinson says she does not thinkjeremy corbyn could get a significant support from his mps to get it to work. jeremy corbyn says he is disappointed to hear that and you can win heraround.jo disappointed to hear that and you can win her around. jo swinson says she has spoken to ken clarke and harriet harman, both of whom she said would be willing to fulfil that role of interim prime minister if they were called upon to do so. jeremy corbyn says no, i am leader of the opposition, if there is a va ca ncy of the opposition, if there is a vacancy it should be me. it is not justjo swinson who has reservations aboutjeremy
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justjo swinson who has reservations about jeremy corbyn. justjo swinson who has reservations aboutjeremy corbyn. for justjo swinson who has reservations about jeremy corbyn. for example g reaves about jeremy corbyn. for example greaves says jeremy corbyn about jeremy corbyn. for example greaves sasteremy corbyn is a deeply divisive figure and whilst he wa nts to deeply divisive figure and whilst he wants to stop brexit, he does not wa nt to wants to stop brexit, he does not want to help him into number ten. interestingly, we have heard from labour sources that while jeremy corbyn is proposing a vote of no—confidence in boris johnson corbyn is proposing a vote of no—confidence in borisjohnson with idea of deposing the prime minister, taking on the job idea of deposing the prime minister, taking on thejob of interim prime minister so they can ask for an extension from the eu to scratch my ankle a general election —— and call for a general election, we have also heard he might try to seize control of the parliamentary order paper. to rule out in law having a no—deal brexit. looks likejeremy corbyn might be open to a plan b if his preferred option not working. there are negotiation with the likes of
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the snp, they have been talking to jeremy corbyn but it is a number game, many mps are opposed tojeremy corbyn heading up an interim government so it does not look like much of a starter but people are still talking. thank you, we have a line of copy coming in from anna soubry, the leader of the independent group for change who said her party will not support nor facilitate any government led by jeremy corbyn so echoing what we we re jeremy corbyn so echoing what we were hearing there. in an e—mail to party supporters, she said, mr corbin cannot command unity of support amongst his own mps and government led by him would result ina government led by him would result in a general election. she said that would solve nothing. the five mps of the independent group will support a unity government on the basis it will stop no deal and return brexit
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to the british people with remain on the ballot paper. going back to matte, confirmation of what you are saying, the numbers are very difficult. absolutely, it is interesting there are others who are favouring the idea of this way of taking control of the order paper, passing legislation. if labour are supporting that, it is not an omission scotchman admission that the first time will not work, but i think that there is a plan b will suggest they are open to the possibility. jeremy corbyn has said he is disappointed thatjo swinson would not support him as the leader of the opposition stepping in to become interim prime minister but numbers are tight in parliament. there lies the problem for the prime minister himself and any brexit plan he might have. he is reliant on the dup, he only has a working majority
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of one. things are so tight on all sides which adds a dimension of difficulty for everyone as they pick their way through this thorniest of brexit problems. we hope later this hour to speak to one of the candidates that jo swinson hour to speak to one of the candidates thatjo swinson has been talking about, the father of the house, ken clarke, who has according tojo swinson said he is willing to serve as interim prime minister. if we get him up we will put that question to him directly. now some of the other main stories on bbc news this hour. north korea has said it will never sit down for talks with south korea again. in a statement the north said it was an illusion for south korea to expect talks to resume after the south's joint military exercises with the us. the north has also carried out another suspected missile test. riot police in zimbabwe have attacked demonstrators with batons and fired tear gas —
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in a crackdown on crowds who ignored a ban on protests. the demonstrators tried to assemble elsewhere in harare, but were again cleared by the police. people are protesting about zimba bwe's worsening economic situation — the un say about 5 million zimbabweans are in need of food aid. the energy regulator 0fgem says it expects to publish an initial report from the national grid into what caused last week's power cuts next tuesday. almost1 million homes were left without electricity for an hour after a power outage last friday evening. critical infrastructure such as railways, hospitals and traffic lights were also affected. edinburgh city council has voted to allow only one day per school year for young people to protest over climate change. the council's education committee approved a motion by the snp—labour coalition to limit authorised absences to just one day —
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despite a plea from activists to back their strike action. however, no punishment will be levelled at pupils or parents if they choose to strike more than this. edinburgh city councillor ian perry, who chairs the education, children and family committee said after the ruling that this new rule matters otherwise the education of school students would suffer. if child takes more than one day off the evidence suggests they will be affected. if they are taking 5—6— seven days of their attainment will be affected so we need to protect that, educational attainment. we are at the education committee, it would not look good if we were giving people days off and their attainment of suffering. it would not look good and it is not properfor us to do
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that. even if they do take it off and we can't force them to come to school, what we are suggesting is they need to get their parents consent. if the parents and themselves agree that they take more then one day off and are willing to run the risk of their attainment suffering, that is up to them but they must understand their attainment will suffer. if they are willing to take that risk, it is up to them. that is one perspective, let's hear another. steve burgess is education spokesperson for the greens on edinburgh council. you voted against this motion...why? we voted against limiting school strikes to once a year. we think young people should be supported to come out on climate strikes when they feel there is a real issue that they feel there is a real issue that they want to speak on and we shouldn't arbitrarily limit them to just one day a year. i understand it
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is likely they will now choose to have a climate change on the 20th of september which is the global climate strikes. the problem is for the rest of the academic year they will not be supported in coming out to make their voices heard and at a time where the school climate strike movement has huge move movement around the world, this was the wrong decision not to support them. would you say to the argument that attainment is suffering? absolutely, attendance at school is absolutely important but we have to put this into perspective. we are only talking about a very limited number of half days. these climate strikes happen on a friday which is a half day, they only happen every couple
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of months, it is a small amount of time in the whole school year of hundred and 90 or so days. you have to balance this with the issue that the school climate strikers are trying to address, their very features under climate emergency. —— their futures. features under climate emergency. —— theirfutures. educational experts have said there is educational value in children getting together for a climate strikes, debating the issues, looking at science, politics, it is a real life experience that is hard to get in a classroom. why can they not do it at a weekend? classroom. why can they not do it at a weekend ? they classroom. why can they not do it at a weekend? they could be getting the attainment at school and protesting on behalf of the climate on saturday 01’ on behalf of the climate on saturday or sunday? the whole thing started in sweden and was a straight, withdrawing attendance at school, to make that point that the issue is so serious they are willing to do that
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and it wouldn't have that impact if it was outside the school time. that is what we are hearing from the school youth strikers. here is another point, why make such a fuss, given that no one is really going to suffer? they just have given that no one is really going to suffer? theyjust have to get pa rental suffer? theyjust have to get parental consent. the problem is it will still be an unauthorised absence on the school record, it is absence on the school record, it is a black mark about their attendance and actually, i think children and young people and their parents are responsible. if they feel they are going to be marked down for not attending school on that day then i think they will be wary of that and we heard today in the deputation of the school strikers, that they feel it will have a real impact in the number of children and young people taking part. many thanks for coming
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on with your point of view. now it's time for a look at the weather with mel coles. good evening, wet and windy has been the order of the day. we have seen some improvements to northern ireland and scotland, further showers around but it has remained blustery, courtesy of this unseasonably deep area of low pressure which will remain dominant through this coming weekend. we have a lot of rain to get through across wales and england which is working eastwards, some heavy bursts. behind it during the early hours of the morning, clearing skies but a couple of showers for parts of scotland, northern england and northern ireland. because it is blustery, saturday will be a mild start. saturday will be a mild start. saturday remains blustery, for england and wales more dry weather. some sunshine as well. the showers are more concentrated in northern ireland and scotland, they may merge together to form longer spells of
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rain and forthe together to form longer spells of rain and for the west coast of scotland, the winds strengthening for the day. blustery for all of us but in the sunshine, feeling more pleasa nt but in the sunshine, feeling more pleasant than today. this is bbc news. the headlines. a police officer is killed while investigating a robbery. pc andrew harper was 28—years—old and had been married just four weeks ago.
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hope for 5,000 british steel workers, after a tentative deal to rescue the company from insolvency. jeremy corbyn dismisses plans for a caretaker government put forward by the lib dem leader jo swinson — saying they're too divisive. and 200 years since peterloo, we look back on the massacre that changed britain. now the sport. we are joined by sara. good evening. good evening. thank you very much. liverpool's reserve goalkeeper is hopeful he can start against southampton tomorrow. the spaniard was injured midweek in the super cup win over chelsea. an ankle injury for him after a fan collided with him. if he is not fit third choice andy lonegan could start. he onlyjoined the team as a
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late free signing after first choice keeper alisson was injured last week. an unuk lucky turn of events for liverpool and klopp explained how the injury happened. when we were all together, a supporter jumped over something, was chased by some security guy, slipped and kicked his ankle. yeah. crazy, so, yesterday it was swollen, today, i spoke to him, he is here, he said it is better, much better, than yesterday, but we have to see. there is no doubt about how much we love oui’ is no doubt about how much we love ourfan, there is no doubt about how much we love our fan, there is is no doubt about how much we love ourfan, there is no doubt about that, but if they could all stop doing that, that is now the worst example i ever. chelsea manager philip hammond said social media companies need to do more to stop players being targeted. after
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striker abraham was players being targeted. after striker abra ham was subjected players being targeted. after striker abraham was subjected to racial abuse, he was sent the m essa g es racial abuse, he was sent the messages after missing the decisive penalty in the super cup shoot out defeat on wednesday. he asked me to take the fifth penalty because he wanted to take it, wanted to stand up, be brave on a night when the world is watching and at the same time, within a moment or hours after, somebody behind a keyboard or phone, said the most disgusting things possible. you can say. so i don't know how the platforms, it is allowed that people can do it. it is too easy, to be done. so something needs to be done as well as people obviously changing their mind—sets completely. as well as people obviously changing their mind-sets completely. two lord's where the weather has dominated proceedings for the afternoon. let usjoin dominated proceedings for the afternoon. let us join our sports correspondentjoe wilson outside the ground. in terms of the action, three wickets for england early today, but efforts of building on that have been frustrated by the
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rain. yes, absolutely, about 5.22 the umpires made a decision to abandon play for the day. it is sad but i think it seemed inevitable for several hours and frustrating for england because the rain came down just at the point in this test match when they felt they were on top. let us when they felt they were on top. let us reflect on the action we did see near the morning session, very bowler friendly conditions with the flood lights on, the ball still new and jofra archer may end up with, i don't know, 300 test match wickets for england. this will be his first. it was bankcroft given out lbw. he felt confident enough about that to review it. but we saw from the replays it was clipping the bail. so the umpire stayed with the decision and there you go jofra stayed with the decision and there you gojofra archer is up and running as a test match bowler. got it up to 90mph but all bowlers were accurate. chris woakes, a strong record here, 60—2, it became 60—3.
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then he got himself out. the wicket england would have loved this morning of course, was steve smith. didn't get him but they got are individual head. the umpire said that was not out. 0ut. broad thought it was and the review in this instance, showed that the umpire had to overturn his decision so stuart broad very relieved he convinced his captain to use the review there. so three wickets taken this morning by england. 80—4 was the score at lunch and no play possible thereafter so we will resume tomorrow and england will resume the conundrum of how to get rid of steve smith. the biggest question of all. thank you so much. now rory mcconaughey is a doubt for england. he was set toic many his test debut in cardiff but will be assessed on friday evening, it is is
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not the same hip injury that forced him to miss that win last sunday. that is all your sport now, remember, you can find more on the bbc sport website, i will be back in about an hour's time with sports day. thank you sarah. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has said he is "disappointed" injo swinson's response to his appeal to form a caretaker government to stop a no—deal brexit. the liberal democrat leader had said the conservative's ken clarke or labour's harriet harman are both prepared to lead an emergency government, but that mr corbyn would be too divisive. well ,let‘s talk to one of the two member of parliament thatjo swinson said would be prepared to lead that unity government. the father of the house of commons, ken clarke, joins us now live from our nottingham studios. thank you forjoining us. so, have have gratefulness thrust upon them, is this you and are you going to say
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yes. have been on holiday, jo said would i mind being mentioned but otherwise i out of touch with the news and i come back to find myself suddenly in today's newspapers and catching up we're vent, ringing up friends. the question of a government of national unity is a possibility that we may have to come to, if all else fails. the first thing to try is to get the majority in parliament, which is against boris's policy of leaving with no—deal to come together, pass legislation if we can that binds the government seek a more sensible outcome in whatever way the majority agrees on. if it is necessary, to get rid of the government, to do that, and form a government of national unity, then of course you could argue about who leads it, who is in it. the most important thing is in it. the most important thing is can the majority going for a political compromise, pragmatism, so that all actually agreed on a cross
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parliamentary party basis, what this government of national unity is going to do. and i hope that now we are coming back from holiday, some serious discussions with take place on that. to deal with those things and briefly get through some of the question, i mean you said that the borisjohnson government question, i mean you said that the boris johnson government is committed to a no—deal brexit. he says he wants a deal. yes, no, is there any chance in your view he will get a different deal from the eu? he would, if he stopped putting councilly condition, but he, i —— silly condition, he said he would prefer a deal. no—deal is a million to one chance and that kind of thing, he makes outrageous demands, which i think make it 99% certain that he is not capable of negotiating a deal, because he is ha rd negotiating a deal, because he is hard line right—wing nationalist supporters that he has surrounded himself with are determined to get no—deal. himself with are determined to get no-deal. turning to the other built of your first answer, —— bit. no-deal. turning to the other built of yourfirst answer, —— bit. the
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question of you in a national unity government, you are prepared to serve, if you are called? if a whole series of events mean we get a government of national unity and everybody says that i am the obvious person to lead it but that is a long way down the track, and i can see why they want an elder statesman, i am no threat to anybody‘s political career, my views on europe coincide with the majority of those i am prepared to compromise. i voted to leave three times on the beginnings ofa leave three times on the beginnings of a sensible negotiated settlement, if because i am slightly elder statesman, ab to leave the house, none controversial, no threat to anybody, they ask me to lead, yes, i would lead it. i wouldn't want do it normally sitting as chairman, i would, but insist we all agreed on what policy this very short—term government was going to pursue, to
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resolve this brexit crisis. to clarify something else, of course, one of the other names in the frame or injo one of the other names in the frame or in jo swinson's one of the other names in the frame or injo swinson's leader of the him's frame is harriet harman, who of course is the mother of the house, the oldest serving female mp, on the other side, on the opposition side. what about a job share between the two of you? i would follow harriet if people preferred to have harriet. a senior labour backbencher might bea harriet. a senior labour backbencher might be a good idea, yvette cooper, somebody like that, it is, i quite understand why the media are obsessed about who might be leading it and who might be in it. the key thing is firstly agree on what we are going for, is it a negotiated deal or it's a second referendum, which some people prefer? i personally think a negotiated deal is the one that will carry the majority of the house of commons, and help reunite the public, but i am open for arguments about a referendum. agree what you are doing, and do it, under the
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preferred least divisive, most commanding leader. i follow preferred least divisive, most commanding leader. ifollow harriet, i would follow yvette, i think they would follow me, people would have to decide who they want to settle on. what about jeremy corbyn, the leader of the opposition says it is not up to the leader of the liberal democrats to determine who the next prime minister would be and convention says it's the leader of the opposition who tries to form an administration, in the event of a successful no confidence vote.|j don't want to annoyjeremy because he isa don't want to annoyjeremy because he is a key figure, i heard him say that and he is wrong about the convention, he becomes prime minister if he wins a general election, which i don't think he ever will. if he wins a general election if he has party majority he can form a government. when we have had governments of national unity in the past they have never been led by the past they have never been led by the leader of the opposition or the leader of the biggest party because it is too difficult to get all party, agreement. you are not going
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to get whatjeremy says which is a labour government that will get an extension to article 50 and go on and fighta extension to article 50 and go on and fight a general election and thenif and fight a general election and then if it wins it, negotiate a deal after, that is a non—starter. jeremy personally, precisely because he is a very controversial leader of the 0pposition, is quite unsuitable to lead a government of national unity, you have to get as many tories as possible to support it, and an awful lot of sympathetic conservative mps would find it very, very difficult tojoina would find it very, very difficult tojoin a government would find it very, very difficult to join a government withjeremy corbyn as prime minister, that in itself rules him out, let alone quite a lot of the labour party. we have time for one last question, the government says the opportunity for any of this won't arise because there will be no defeat in a vote of no confidence. what is your arithmetic say and what ya will you vote in a vote of no confidence?m
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they get the agreement across party, what they are all agreed they are going to do, if boris is so foolish as to defy legislation, believe that british government can govern without majority in parliament and the rest of it, he will wind up faces a vote of no confidence which he will lose, this idea that parliament's he will lose, this idea that pa rliament‘s an irrelevance, he will lose, this idea that parliament's an irrelevance, a nuisance and the right ideas of his aide, if you don't give him a chance to debate it you can sail sail on past letter, all that is dangerous, anti—democratic, ince constitutional nonsense. i don't think boris believes it either. many thanks for joining us. pleasure. coming up on bbc news, the rain has stopped play on a day two of the second ashes test at lord's.
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meanwhile, liverpool are facing a goalkeeping crisis as back up keeper adrian suffered a freak injury midweek with alisson already injured it could be up to the third choice keeper andy lonegan to play against southampton after he signed for the clu b southampton after he signed for the club this week. later today, the murray brother also face each other for the only the second time in their career, in the doubles at the cincinnati master, that is all to come at 6.30. now it is time for the film review. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is james king. so james, what do we have this week? well we have got leo, brad and
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margot, teaming up for

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