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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 17, 2019 7:00am-8:01am BST

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as the festival comes to a dramatic close, my time in hokkaido finishes in what feels like a world away from where it started. good morning. welcome to breakfast i have found a place that has with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. our headlines today: in a short time adopted so much of japanese culture, but within that has found its own way of expressing itself. the police officer killed a week before his honeymoon. detectives continue to question 10 people. labour warns who knows what the next 150 years of a retail apocalypse as it calls for action to tackle empty shops. might bring to this unique hollywood actor japanese island. peter fonda who starred in the cult movie easy rider has died aged 79. in the cricket at lord's, check that out, that is an act! there should be better weather ‘soran bushi' plays. for england today. after more rain on day three, they say they need to get australia out by lunch to have a good chance of winning the second ashes test.
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well, after yesterday's washout, the weekend is looking a bit more promising. sunshine and showers, but quite windy at times too. it's saturday, 17th august. our top story: detectives investigating the killing of a police officer in berkshire have sealed off a nearby caravan site. pc andrew harper, who only got married four weeks ago, died after he was dragged along by a vehicle as he was attending reports of a burglary. our correspondent ben ando has the latest. roughly three miles from the crossroads where pc andrew harper lost his life, caravans behind a fence at a site now linked to the investigation into his death. ten people are in custody and are likely to face questioning today. all male, ranging in age from 30 down to 13. pc harper died near the a4 between reading and newbury in berkshire. he was responding to reports
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of a burglary when he was apparently struck by a vehicle and dragged beneath the wheels. some reports suggest he was subsequently hit by a police car arriving at the scene. his chief constable says andrew will be missed as a friend, colleague and a fine officer. we deal with a number of challenging police environments, we have experienced police officers on that team. he was well regarded, and is a significant loss to the force and also to his colleagues and friends. pc harper was married just four weeks ago. he and his bride were about to go on their honeymoon. he is the first policeman to die in the line of duty since an officer was stabbed at the houses of parliament two years ago. flags were flown at half mast yesterday at thames valley police
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stations. today, pc harper's colleagues will resume their investigation into how a routine call to a seemingly petty crime turned to tragedy. just after 8:00 this morning we'll speak to deputy police and crime comissioner for thames valley police. labour has warned that high streets are facing a "retail apocalypse" and has announced proposals to tackle the number of empty shops. jeremy corbyn has promised to give councils powers to reopen shops that have been left vacant for more than a year. it's estimated that 29,000 shops have been vacant for more than 12 months. a postmortem examination has determined that the death of the disgraced us financier jeffrey epstein was suicide. the chief medical examiner's office said that epstein, who was found dead in his cell in manhattan a week ago, had hanged himself. 0ur washington correspondent chris buckler has more.
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a postmortem was carried out last weekend. the details were not immediately released, which led to a flurry of stories and speculation in the us media. the washington post at one stage reported that one of the bones broken injeffrey epstein's neck was more consistent with the case of somebody being strangled than a case of hanging. however, that is not always true in cases of older men, and the new york medical examiner's office say that having looked at the results, they are convinced and have determined that he died as a result of a suicide. however, there are still many questions about the circumstances of his death. particularly about irregularities at the prison itself, and also questions about why he was taken off suicide watch just days after an earlier attempt to kill himself. the us department ofjustice is also pursuing inquiries into some of epstein's associates, whom they believe abused and groomed underage girls. china's ambassador to britain has warned there'll be military intervention in hong kong should further clashes arise between police
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the united states has made a last—ditch attempt to prevent the release of an iranian oil tanker seized by royal marines last month in gibraltar. ajudge in gibraltar ruled on thursday that the vessel could leave, if assurances were given that the cargo would not be delivered to syria. but now the usjustice department has issued a warrant to seize the tanker, which is still at anchor. police in barbados say there is nothing to suggest that an intruder killed a british woman who died while visiting her family in the west indies. officials say cctv footage showed that no—one entered the building where natalie crichlow was staying. a postmortem revealed that her death was caused by infection following serious burns in a fire at the house. nasa says it's planning to send a female astronaut to the moon for the first time. the us space agency says the artemis lunar project will be based in alabama and they will aim to complete the mission by 202a. the estimated cost could be as high as £24 billion.
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peter fonda, star of the 1969 cult classic, easy rider has died at the age of 79. his family said he passed away peacefully at his home in los angeles after suffering from lung cancer. 0ur correspondent, peter bowes takes a look back at his career. easy rider, the counterculture classic. the open road, sex, drugs and rock ‘n' roll. the film was written, produced by and starred peter fonda, along with dennis hopper, playing a pair of long—haired bikers travelling through the american south—west and deep south. it touched a nerve with the country's youth and the mood of the times. it also spawned a new era in filmmaking, focused on younger generations. it earned peter fonda an oscar nomination for best original screenplay, and catapulted him
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to start in hollywood. —— stardom. later in his career he was nominated for best actor in the 1997 drama ulee‘s gold, in which he played a florida beekeeper. he won a golden globe for the film. peter fonda was part of hollywood royalty, the son of the actor henry fonda and younger brother ofjane fonda. like his father, he was honoured with a style hollywood's walk of fame. —— staron. a lasting tribute to the actor, and as news emerged of his death, a place for his fans to remember their hero. in a statement peter fonda's family said they were mourning the loss of a sweet and gracious man who had an indomitable spirit and love of life. jane fonda said he was her sweet—hearted baby brother and went out laughing. china's ambassador to britain has warned there'll be military intervention in hong kong should further clashes arise between police and pro—democracy activists. as protests continue on the island today, the local police force say they are capable of maintaining law and order. we'rejoined from hong kong by our china correspondent stephen mcdonell.
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good morning, stephen. we have been watching the images from where you are for sometime now, and seeing many, are for sometime now, and seeing any are for sometime now, and seeing many, many people joining those marches behind you. us more? this is a much by teachers, actually. thousands of teachers have come out in support of their students, participating in the pro—democracy movement. in their thousands, they are walking through the streets, and it is very peaceful. last night's rally in china gardens which spilt out into the cbd was also very peaceful, and it does seem to be that this weekend there is a big effort by lots of those in the pro—democracy account to try to keep some sort of peace on the streets. i think many were shocked by those images we saw at the airport, especially for example a police officer being bashed with his own function, having to pull out his own function, having to pull out his service revolver to get people
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to clear away. —— truncheon. because of that, word is spreading on these chat groups to try to calm everything. that doesn't mean everything. that doesn't mean everything will become, this is the first of several rallies today and it could be that we will still see the street clashes which will become ever more violent. it is interesting, this prediction, or warning, really, which came from the ambassador in britain, but there would be intervention from the central government of violence continued here. we had an off the record briefing with police on thursday night. they spoke to several journalists. he thursday night. they spoke to severaljournalists. he wrote police headquarters. the police told us, admitted, they were really stretched at one point. especially with these wildcat strikes from the protesters. when that strike was going on, but widespread strikes, they were 12 different flareups at once to handle. they say they have reorganised their deployment, they have 3000 riot police which they can put out on the streets, and they can 110w put out on the streets, and they can now move in much more quickly. they also say that a have used undercover
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officers within the ranks of protesters to grab a so—called ringleaders or troublemakers, as the police would do. now, for this reason, they say that there is no need for intervention because they can handle it. we will see what happens in the coming months. stephen, thank you. labour has warned that high streets are facing a "retail apocalypse" and has announced proposals to tackle the number of empty shops. let's talk to our political correspondent tony bonsignore. an interesting time, tony, because just this week we had the retailers coming together and saying they want to see action about empty shops, they say that business rates are something which is a big problem for them. what are labour's plans in all of this to try to hold back from these empty shops taking over? yeah, good morning. 0ne these empty shops taking over? yeah, good morning. one thing everybody can agree with is that there is a problem here, but the high street is suffering in a big way yet again.
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you can see it over the past year or so. you can see it over the past year or so. what are labour are suggesting today, jeremy corbyn is going to be visiting bolton and is going to speu visiting bolton and is going to spell this out in more detail. the idea is that local authorities will be able to take over shops that have been boarded up, but have been va ca nt been boarded up, but have been vacant for 12 months or more. we are talking here about 29,000 odd shops and a position across the country. what labour are saying is, well, local authorities should be able to turn them into new start—up firms, for example, or cooperative businesses, or even community projects. the idea, they say, is to stop what they are calling this retail apocalypse, this concern at the moment that lots of high streets, lots of town centres, are turning into ghost towns. as you can imagine, the tories are unimpressed. they say what this will actually do is have the opposite effect. they say what you will do is end up scaring off investment, and they will be even more boarded—up shops. they've got their own plan, the conservatives. it is called the future hi streets fund. hundreds of
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millions of pounds up for grabs at the moment, lots of town and city centres across the country bidding for that number. what does this tell us? ithink for that number. what does this tell us? i think the politics of this are all about those towns up and down the country, many of them feeling like they have been forgotten over the past few years, and i think both parties are making a bid for voters in those towns. on the topic of property, we also have the new chancellor, sajid javid, talking this morning and the times newspaper about potential changes to stamp duty when it comes to buying houses. what is he saying? yeah, an interview today in the times newspaper. he is a new chancellor, sajid javid, and everybody is trying to work out what he might do. it looks like he might have to move relatively quickly because we have the possibility of a no deal brexit, and of course the possibility of a general election as well. he was asked about the various things he might do, and one of the issues which inevitably came up or stamp duty. it is a really emotive subject, this, for obvious reasons. what he said was actually pretty
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noncommittal. he said he is looking at all sorts of things but the times newspaper run without today, saying is something the government might look at. again, what do we take from this? i think it is a government looking very, very closely at the moment at what it can do over the next few months, especially as i say with this growing possibility of either a no deal brexit or a general election. lots of possible policy options being thrown around at the moment. tony, thank you. 7:13am. depending on what you are up to this weekend, you may have your eyes on the weather. the big picture is that it is quite u nsettled the big picture is that it is quite unsettled but the weather is going to be overall better today than it was yesterday. yesterday was a washout, it was pouring with rain in some parts of the country. this is the weather front which brought that weather yesterday. notice that the clouds have now pulled away towards the east. we are still under the
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influence of this really big low pressure system dominating the north—eastern portion of the atlantic, and this low pressure is going to stick around for the whole weekend and even into monday. 0verall, not a huge load of change to the feeling of things out there. locally, of course, from day—to—day, it does change a bit. this is what we have this afternoon. frequent showers and strong winds in western scotland, the north of northern ireland as well, but for england and wales today, predominantly sunny. the chance of catching a showers low. even if you do, it is probably going to be brief. 22 in london and in the high teens in the north. notice the show is becoming frequent and heavy in scotland and northern ireland this evening and overnight. winds around the coast will be up to gale force 15 miles an hour gusts. across england and wales the weather is going to be mostly clear. the chance of a few showers appearing during the night and into tomorrow
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morning. that is pretty much it. here is that low pressure, i mentioned it will be here all weekend. it is certainly with us tomorrow. for a time there is a chance they could be a little bit of rain early in the morning in the south—east, but i think that will be out of the way before most of us are awake. the weather overall, sunshine and showers, cracks of thunder are possible. gusty winds as well, especially around the coast. england and wales, again, a predominantly sunny day. actually, across england and wales, but saturday and sunday are not looking bad at all. it doesn't feel like the middle of august, but, you know, to than what it was yesterday, if you don't like the rain. monday, the low pressure system is still with us, starting to push away, pushing away meaning it is taking its unsettled weather weather. in the wake of it, we still have some showers northern ireland and scotland. again, england and wales not looking bad at all. 21, 16 in the north. at this time of year thatis in the north. at this time of year that is a little disappointing. we would like those temperatures to be a bit higher. the chances are that since next week the weather will be improving and settling down, in the
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north, i think the risk of showers continues. so that's it. nothing too glorious on the horizon. and again, it isn't looking to. do you like it when it is all over the shop, because then we have to listen to you more to prepare for the day? when it is all over the shop the weather is quite easy because you can say it is a mixed bag and cover all the bases. i quite like that. it is when there is uncertainty, that is what i don't like it, when i am not sure. can you believe he nearly considered putting his heating on yesterday as well? what did he say? he got as far as standing next to the device that changes it. then he realised the batteries had gone and he couldn't be bothered. but he was close. you're watching breakfast from bbc news, it's 7:16am. time now for a look at the newspapers. let's look at the front pages. the daily mail leads with tributes
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to pc andrew harper who was killed after attending reports of a burglary. it has a photo of the officer at his wedding just four weeks ago. the mirror also has a picture of the officer with his wife and says they were planning to go on honeymoon next week. the times also has the couple on its front page, but leads with news of the chancellor's "radical plan for his first budget". the paper says sajid javid is considering a change to stamp duty which would "switch the burden from buyers to sellers". and the daily telegraph leads with reports that ken clarke has volunteered to become caretaker prime minister to avoid a no—deal brexit. it says he has also given his
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backing to a proposal by the lib dem leaderjo swinson, to lead an "emergency government to sort brexit out". it's now 7:17am. we are going to talk about a remarkable sporting event now. a baton representing the lives of those saved by organ donation has been travelling the country to mark the beginning of the world transplant games. yeah. thousands of athletes, all of whom have received a transplant, are taking part. kathryn stanczyszyn has more. craig jones trains every week with his volleyball club in leeds but this is a practice with a difference, his final one before coming an international competitor. let's go! he's heading to a sporting event with one criterion, they have to have had a life changing
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operation. after multiple infections destroyed craig's lungs aged 18, he spent the best part of his 20s house bound on 24—hour oxygen. spent the best part of his 20s house bound on 24-hour oxygen. nine years later my lung capacity went down to 996 later my lung capacity went down to 9% and the doctors told me that i needed a transplant immediately. 9% and the doctors told me that i needed a transplant immediatelym 2017 he received two new lungs. needed a transplant immediatelym 2017 he received two new lungsm isa 2017 he received two new lungsm is a completely new lease on life. before i couldn't breathe, now i'm here. i'm playing volleyball! i'm still pinching myself. for some reason, i don't know why, but it feels good. it feels really good. more than 2500 athletes take part in the world transplant games was not like the olympics, they moved around the globe. this summer there in newcastle. it's been 2a years since the uk hosted the event, and the 2019 there is something new, especial baton relay visiting key
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transplant centres with hundreds of lives are transformed every year. transplant centres with hundreds of lives are transformed every yeahm represents the comfort people get from the giving and receiving, whether you are the donor family or the recipient's stop this baton represents the donors who made all those transplants possible. tom wilson died aged 22, he had already signed the donor register. he helped save and improve the lives of up to 50 people. how do you feel about that? i'm proud. seven-year-old brandon is there. i woke up with a scar on my belly. and you had a new kidney, is that right? yeah. currently 7000 people are on the waiting list, less than a third will get the operations they need. the world transplant games aims to raise
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the awareness for needed transplants. the biggest success of all, being there in the first place. kathryn stanczyszyn, bbc news. we have some very happy people in the studio right now. lisa wilson, who we just saw in that report, joins us now along with 6—year—old fatima and her mum lubna. good morning to you. good morning. fatima received an organ donation from lisa's son tom. so there is an extraordinary link between your two families. lisa, first of all, i know you are on bbc brea kfast, first of all, i know you are on bbc breakfast, what? three years ago? tell us about that. tom was killed playing hockey, a tragic accident. he was hit on the back of the head and he had a brain haemorrhage.
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there was nothing he could do. 22 yea rs there was nothing he could do. 22 years old, very fit and healthy, but when we knew there wasn't anything we could do for tom, it was my husband in the middle of the night he said lisa, we can't do anything for tom but tom might be able to do something for others. i was very proud of my husband, looking at his son knowing we were going to lose him, of thinking of others just like tom did and suggesting organ donation. we ask to see an organ donation. we ask to see an organ donation nurse and she came in and said tom has already signed up. he is on the electronic register. he signed up at nottingham trent university. that semi was the moment we knew we were going to support tom's decision, it made it easy for us. tom's decision, it made it easy for us. so we went ahead. but of course we came on to tell you that we were so we came on to tell you that we were so proud of tom. just before his funeral, my husband came onto brea kfast to funeral, my husband came onto breakfast to tell everybody and say it was a really good thing we felt
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we had done, on the way of the train you sent me hundreds of messages of support from people all around the country which made me feel we did the right thing coming on, and then eight weeks later graham passed away. your husband passed away shortly afterwards? that is so tragic. especially even what you said about his support. some of his last words to me on that awful morning were when he died was please try and keep tom's memory alive. that's what i've had the opportunity to do. you have certainly done that because fatima here and her child lubna here. we're so grateful. we can't believe the transformation from before the transplant and until i'iow from before the transplant and until now we just — it's phenomenal. from before the transplant and until now we just - it's phenomenal. tell us more now we just - it's phenomenal. tell us more about what was needed? so basically fatima had and illness
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that meant its liver was attacking itself. it was a normal sized liver, about this much, but hers was increasing in size at which a rate. it was enormous. she was this big. we can see from the pictures. yeah. she was huge. and even after the transplant it took some time for everything to come down. and the symptoms she had were just really horrible. things like vomiting blood, over a pint of blood in one go, you know? we were in hospital forjust ongoing days. it would just never end. we were always in hospital. it is lovely to see you 110w. hospital. it is lovely to see you now. now she is a new girl. sure, there are problems sometimes, minor
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rejection, which is normal with any major transplant, but the amount of admissions we have now has significantly reduced. yeah. part of this is the medical procedure, but it isa this is the medical procedure, but it is a very, very personal and emotional links that you... i'm sorry you're sitting on separate ends of the sofa. you've met before? we have. and i'm very gratefulfor you getting in contact. that doesn't happen with every family. it is a careful process of writing to each other, the donor can write and the recipient can write back, but it is a gradual process. what did you want to say? thank you from the bottom of out to say? thank you from the bottom of our hearts. you're really our hero and we just wanted to let people know how much they've helped us. we can't ever thank everyone enough. we
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just had to know who saved fatima and we needed to know. i had to know. it took some time. they obviously wouldn't tell you where, you know, the contact details are and such, but i think in the end lisa plucked up the courage to ask. we should actually meet up now, because, i didn't know if i was overstepping the boundary. it took a while for us to get there. pippa and i lost both boys and the family —— in the family and we just wanted the comfort of knowing to hugh thomas' organs were going —— to whom. we wa nted organs were going —— to whom. we wanted to meet and just know tom's recipients. and we met gordon as well, who has tom's hard. and that all links into the baton. so this is
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something you got commission? yes from the thomas memorial fund. so many people gave us money and we thought it would be lovely. it represents the donor and the recipient, the giving and receiving. the way the silver baton is that the precious organ and the hands holding the button so closely. i was a pe teacher and i know about how nervous you can be about dropping the baton. at the hands are very safe on the baton. i was just about triggering conversations. people have looked at it and talked about it, and it inspires people to talk about organ donation and doing the right thing. and i think on behalf of lots of people who have made this decision, they have made similar decisions to they have made similar decisions to the ones we have. we've travelled the ones we have. we've travelled the country with it. the first of all it was that new boat —— newport, and then it was handed to cover
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injury. every year it will go to the host city. and the world transplant games, it will go to the next country and tom's legacy will live on. can i ask lubna and fatima as well, how much, how much have you been able to explain about what happened in terms of the transplant and how that will sit in what fatima knows? she knows about tom, and you knows? she knows about tom, and you know that tom donated all his organs to over 50 people, not so much detail, but that he donated his liver to you? detail, but that he donated his liver to you ? yeah. detail, but that he donated his liver to you? yeah. fatima, can you tell us about tom ? liver to you? yeah. fatima, can you tell us about tom? there is make hero even — he gave me his liver. yeah, that was not right. have you seen yeah, that was not right. have you seen his picture? yeah. -- that's
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right stop and he's your hero, yeah stop it means so much to me. can you remember the first time you...? stop it means so much to me. can you remember the first time you. . . ? yes. we met in the park. and i made with fatima, you said come behind me, but be careful of my liver. you knew at five years old that you had to be careful. and then you met pippa and you told us about what happens to butterflies, and what happens to them. you were very much into them. it's the gift of life, isn't it? you have the bracelet from lisa, don't you? you love butterflies, is that your special thing? why are they so special? because they have beautiful wings. that is a lovely, lovely bracelet. and she has a lovely song all about recycling. i like to think
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tom all about recycling. i like to think to m re cycle all about recycling. i like to think tom recycle his organs. she has a brilliant recycling song. can you remember what the song is? when you come back to see us, a little bit later, come back on the sofa and sing your song for us? yes. let's all sing it together. that is a good point, actually. it's so lovely to see you well. thanks, lisa for coming out as well. but we'll see you again on the sofa, won't we, you too? it is now 7:30am. we are going too? it is now 7:30am. we are going to ta ke too? it is now 7:30am. we are going to take a break for a moment. the headlines are coming right up.
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hello, this is breakfast with steph mcgovern and charlie stayt. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. detectives investigating the killing of a police officer in berkshire have sealed off a nearby caravan site. andrew harper, who only got married four weeks ago, died after he was dragged along by a vehicle as he was attending reports of a burglary.
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labour has warned that high streets are facing a "retail apocalypse" and has announced proposals to tackle the number of empty shops. jeremy corbyn has promised to give councils powers to reopen shops that have been left vacant for more than a year. it's estimated that 29,000 shops have been vacant for more than 12 months. a postmortem has found that the disgraced us financier jeffrey epstein took his own own life. epstein was found dead in his cell in manhattan a week ago. the 66—year—old was awaiting trial on child sex trafficking charges. peter fonda, star of the 1969 cult classic, easy rider has died at the age of 79. his family said he passed away peacefully at his home in los angeles after receiving treatment for lung cancer. in a statement they said they were mourning the loss of a sweet and gracious man, who had an indomitable spirit and a love of life. china's ambassador to britain has warned there'll be military intervention in hong kong should further clashes arise between police
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and pro—democracy activists. as protests continue on the island today china's paramilitary police have been practising crowd—control tactics and hong kong's police force say they are capable of maintaining law and order. the united states has made a last—ditch attempt to prevent the release of an iranian oil tanker seized by royal marines last month in gibraltar. ajudge in gibraltar ruled on thursday that the vessel could leave, if assurances were given that the cargo would not be delivered to syria. but now the usjustice department has issued a warrant to seize the tanker, which is still at anchor. police in barbados say there is nothing to suggest that nasa says it's planning to send a female astronaut to the moon for the first time. the us space agency says the artemis lunar project will be based in alabama and they will aim to complete the mission by 202a. the estimated cost could be
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as high as £24 billion. have you ever fancied have you everfancied going have you ever fancied going to the moon? maybe one day. the weight is going, we could be going there soon. mars is well, perhaps. what do you know that we don't? it sounds like you have big news for us this morning. i do have big news when it comes to the cricket. it looks like play should be getting under way as normal. most of the day on day three was rained on. england needs some wickets. it is not going their way in the series so far, they are 1—0 down. australia will resume on 84 —— 80-4. 178 down. australia will resume on 84 —— 80—4. 178 was the high for england in the first innings total. we only got a morning session on day three, but that was enough forjofra archer to get his first test wicket. play was abandoned late in the afternoon but the forecast is better for the weekend. there could be quite an interesting and intriguing game left in this test match. 0ur bowling unit's came is to get
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the next six wickets by lunch, and then i suppose ideally about an hour or an hour and a half before lunch on day five, trying to force a result that way. —— bowling unit's aim. we are only three games into the new season in the championship, but already one side relegated from the premier league last season have sacked their manager. huddersfield town lost 2—1 to fulham last night, and that was the end forjan siewert, who'd managed only one win in his seven months in charge. after they failed to reach the champions league group stage in midweek, celtic turn their attentions to the scottish league cup this afternoon, when they host dunfermline. hearts are already through to the quarterfinals, thanks to a 2—1victory over motherwell last night, in absolutely atrocious weather conditions at fir park. all today's fixtures are on the bbc sport website. liverpool's adrian is hopeful of starting against southampton despite being injured by a fan who ran onto the pitch during the team's super cup celebrations. adrian only made his debut
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when alisson came off injured against norwich last week. managerjurgen klopp had this to say to the unwelcome pitch intruder. no line the on cm points for barcelona, after this stunning strike from outsiders. he gave athletic bilbao a 1—0 victory at the age of 38. he will be retiring at the end of the season, although after seeing that, they may not want to let him go. what a strike. a beauty, wasn't it? liverpool's adrian is hopeful of starting against southampton despite being injured by a fan who ran onto the pitch during the team's super cup celebrations. adrian only made his debut when alisson came off injured against norwich last week. managerjurgen klopp had this to say to the unwelcome pitch intruder. no doubt about how much we love our fans, no doubt about that. but if they could stop doing that — that is not the worst example, actually, that i have so far heard about. it's not funny. what can i say? i don't know what you can do against it, but it is not...
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i like the fact that we don't have fences in the stadium, but that means there is a lot of responsibility for the supporters as well. wales and england continue their preparations for the rugby world cup later when they meet in cardiff. it's only six days since england beat wales at twickenham but head coach eddiejones says they need to be "absolutely brutal" if they want to win this one, and wales boss warren gatland says that defeat means his players have to prove themselves to secure a world cup spot. there is a lot of pressure on those guys on the weekend, because if some of them do not front—end do not perform, then they are opening the door for somebody else. you win last week in committee this weekend, and you are pretty much with a sealed, potentially a starting spot for the first game for the first couple of games in the world cup. meanwhile, scotland are taking on france in nice, and head coach gregor townsend says he's using these warm—up games to study how his players perform.
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the positive about these games as you can focus a lot more about yourself. we have not done that much analysis on france. they have changed the coaching staff and added people today coaching staff, so they may change the way they play. we just want to make sure that we get our details right, our systems and defence and attack. how we work to win the game, and how our players showed their strengths. in rugby league, wigan beat warrington wolves for the first time this season to move level on points with them in second place in the super league table. a dominant first half from the warriors, saw tries from bevan french and george williams to give them a comfortable lead on their way to a 20—6 victory that was warrington's 5th defeat in a row. andy murray will switch his focus back to his return to singles
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judy murray, she knew she was in for a hard watch at the cincinnati masters last night. in the end she was congratulating older sunjamie and commiserating with his brother andy. jamie murray came out on top with his doubles partner in the quarter—finals. a tight three setter against andy murray and his partner feliciano lopez. andy will play in the singles at next week's atp event in north carolina. and surfing will make its 0lympic debut at tokyo next year. mike busheu debut at tokyo next year. mike bushell has meant to newquay to find out more about body surfing. surf's up off the cornish coast. as we swoop down, you might notice something's missing. where are the surfboards? for once, it's time to leave those on the shore and rely solely on body power. it's the original form of surfing, the one that was around long before
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we had the luxury of boards. the art of body surfing. just you and the waves, and 0k, flippers to give me a bit of extra power. but that is it. pete connolly is one of the originals. he has been body surfing since he was 11. he's now 74. you're in touch with nature. it's just wonderful to be in the sea with nature. to me, it's much better than being on a board, it's just you and the waves. it isa it is a thrilling experience. and the word of warning, it is a drug. the most important thing is, you have got to get on the wave. you've got to time it right, that is really crucial. as the sport of body surfing has grown over the years, so it has developed with the use of hand boards, which are now used in certain competitions to give you extra power and speed and also more street cred.
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and you wear these colourful hats to make it more visual as a spectator sport. you can see me disappearing under the waves. now, the hand glove gives you the control to get started, and while i didn't get all the way to the beach, i did begin to feel liberated in the water, albeit at times i may have looked like a telletubby in a washing machine. i like the freedom. that you can swim out, you don't have a board, it's just you and the sea. it's amazing. i find with a board, itjust gets in the way. it's fun to just duck under the waves. it's just a closer connection to the water that you've got. it's a different experience than i know i sound lazy, but it is a bit easier to run down to the beach and have a paraffins and one of these. although, i do love surfing, it'sjust different. it's just, yeah, just a different connection.
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and with the uk championship taking in the next month, dozens of athletes will be attempting to surf their way to various trophies, some with the hand gloves, others with nothing but their own steam. the bigger the wave the better, is what we like. it is more extreme that way and you get better manoeuvres and that sort of thing. 0ffshore winds help. ah, so there obviously wasn't enough offshore wind for me. so let's just sit back and enjoy the ride with 0wen, one of the uk's best. are you inspired? absolutely, yeah. i think so. especially since surfing will be on the olympic calendar. it could be the start of a whole new mainstream movement. and those caps, they are admired. i am not sure how well they will take off. but so that the surface can hear each other when they are talking and chatting about
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imminent dangers and stuff that is in the waves. i don't know, it is a strong look from mike, isn't it? did you hear, steph, a woof during the sports presenting? i don't know if it was audible at home. it set you up it was audible at home. it set you up in giggles. it was a reaction to the goal. it was a very good goal. 38 years old as well, this guy is kicking off. you know, he is... literally kicking off. to get to that point in his career and score goals like that is brilliant. well—deserved. goals like that is brilliant. well-deserved. thank you. we will see you later on. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. it's 7:43. the headlines: the police officer killed a week before his honeymoon — detectives continue to question ten people. labour warns of a "retail apocalypse" as it calls for action to tackle empty shops. this week, the paracanoe world championships take place
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in hungary and for one british athlete on the start line, it'll continue a remarkable journey. three years ago, suffering from an agonising condition, hope gordon made a life—changing decision to have her leg amputated. now after switching from competitive swimming to paracanoe, she's hoping to make waves in the sport. ben croucher has the story. when i was to 12 i went to school and was absolutely fine, just your average kid. and then eventually my right leg stopped working. i went through nearly ten years worth of treatments and most of them made me worse instead of better. eventually i elected to have my leg amputated. we often hear how athletes make tough decisions. hope gordon knows all about theirs. three years ago,
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she took the drastic decision to have her leg removed, after having it caused her pain constantly for a decade. the nhs does not offer amputation, as there is no guarantee it would stop the pain. she raised money privately for a doctor to perform the surgery. my life is just better. everyone tells me my quality—of—life is just through the roof. and just a year after her operation, she became a national champion in the swimming pool.|j went from being able to do anything i want, to not being able to walk in a space of a day. i've used it to get me through some tough times and i don't want to imagine what life would be like otherwise. some three mark —— hope gordon took to an ad looking for paracanoists. she's
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worked on the talent programme and has progressed very well. she is really blossoming, really. the next target is to perform at the world championships in hungary, only then can gordon start to think of a paralympic debut. i want to go in and enjoy it and put down the best race a can. if! can do and enjoy it and put down the best race a can. if i can do that, hopefully that will put me in a good position. she is now in the starting line of the next phase of her life, just a flat out sprint ahead. then croucher, bbc news, nottingham. a really inspiring story. brilliant. 7:46am. i don't know what you have planned for the weekend, but thomas, what we all want is a little bit of summer, maybe stop how about that? you know what? the number of times i say, oh, it's going to be such a much better day today. we still get
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messages, and we still get tweets, saying no, iwant messages, and we still get tweets, saying no, i want the rain. so what we have to do is balance the message of little bit. compared to yesterday, i think for most of us, it's going to be a better day because there will be more sunshine. now a low pressure system is driving our weather through today, tomorrow, monday and probably early week and next week as well. it is a big blow. it really is. so it will take a whole lot of time for this slow to shift away out and for some better weather to come. for the moment we are dealing with very strong winds around the coast, possibly 50 mild an hour. these are the occasional gust there. england and wales, sunnier and better and some temperatures reach in london, 17 expected in glasgow. if you love the rain, then you'll love the scene in glasgow, it will be raining, it winds quite strong as well. that should move belfast, too, but across
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england and wales being being is dry. —— of the evening is dry. now, there is just a dry. —— of the evening is dry. now, there isjust a chance dry. —— of the evening is dry. now, there is just a chance early on sunday morning there will be a lot of rain. this weather front is just sliding to the south, that is what they sometimes do, they can mrs by ten, 20, 50— they sometimes do, they can mrs by ten, 20, 50- 100 they sometimes do, they can mrs by ten, 20, 50-100 mild. -- they sometimes do, they can mrs by ten, 20, 50— 100 mild. —— they can mist us. apart from the odd sprinkle just splashing and dusting, the same goes for northern ireland and scotland. some of these could be power showers, bringing one or two rumbles of thunder. 19 degrees the average temperature tomorrow. so i mentioned that low, how big it is. it is still there on monday but drifting out into the norwegian sea. it will trouble the vikings there. in its wake we have a breeze, with occasional showers as well. on the whole, not a great deal of change. i think the winds will be later on
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monday. —— later on monday. this is the outlook for next week. you can see in london it stays around the very, very low 20s. in the north it will be in the high teens, you can see icons showing weather symbols. soi see icons showing weather symbols. so i don't think there is a whole lot of change on the way for the next few days or so. back to you two. you deliver it with such poetic love. larson and asked, sprinkles, kisses. it's all going on in the weather. ——/ and dash —— splash. time now for the travel show.
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so, if you look out to where i'm heading, that is japan's most northerly point. but on the other side, just 40 kilometres from the japanese coastline is the great landmass, russia. now that is important because it was russia expanding eastwards that led to japan 150 years ago to annex that island and give it the name, hokkaido. the island isn't small. it's around a fifth of japan's total landmass but nearly a century and a half after the move to fully populate hokkaido, still only around 4% of japan's people live here. hello, hokkaido!
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initially, when the japanese were sent to colonise the silent, they sent to colonise the silent, they sent samurai. that influenced how it developed. this is mochi pounding. what might look to the untrained eye as hitting rice as hard you can with a mallet until it turns squidgy, is in fact a highly skilled and refined process done to create a sweet delicacy known as mochi. i am about to have a lesson from the real expert as to how to be a proper pounder. i've got to be honest, this is extremely heavy. stomp, stomp, stomp. hokkaido's climate is perfectly suited to cultivating the sweet, sticky rice needed for mochi.
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the region around nayoro has become japan's biggest producer. every year here, local farmers hold a competition to find the best mochi pounders. how do you become a good mochi pounder, like you? here we go. how does hokkaido rate in terms of its mochi?
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now then, this is where he risks the use of his hands for the rest of his life. what?! laughs. grunts. it takes 100 strikes of the mochi to make itjust right. and it's notjust about speed. i'm told how you hit it will affect that all—importa nt final taste. now i'm obviously holding back here forfear of outshining my hosts. grunts. applause. the proof, as they say, is in the pudding. and the tasting... so let's see what the judges think. laughs. that was not in the script! laughs.
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i reckon that was a fix. and after all that exertion, it is time for a well earned rest. i'm heading south, where my trip comes to an end in hokkaido's main city of sapporo. it's a fitting place to finish the trip around hokkaido, because here in sapporo, they're hosting a dance festival that pays homage to the whole island's connection to the sea. it's the fifth largest city in japan, sapporo, and hokkaido's biggest by some distance. and just down there is where the festival is taking place. yosakoi soran is one of the region's biggest international dancing competitions.
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teams dance to music which is all inspired by the hokkaido folk song soran. traditionally, this folk song was about hokkaido fishermen. it's come an awful long way since then! all: soran! and one of the teams here with their own take on this dance is. . .the russians! interesting, considering the history between the two nations. singing in own language. hats off to them, really good. i had arranged to meet someone who had taken part in this festival many, many times, since she was a child. but finding one dancer amongst 30,000 others was proving a little trickier than i had expected.
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hi! konichiwa! so you are a veteran of soran, of this dance festival, you are going to teach me about all of this? 0k. fantastic. so tell me, what makes this festival unique in japan? this yosakoi soran festival in hokkaido, you have two rules. first one, every team, every dancer, have this, naruko. the second rule is that, do you know... # yaren soran, soran...# soran music. ok, so what you're saying is, even though all the music might sound a bit different, and there is dancing and... inside each one you have the same melody. how does the melody go? # yaren soran, soran... and while it's something that clearly takes a lot of practice,
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i'm told that in my case, one hour should do it. that's what i have to wear? yes, yes! very happy. ah, 0k. ‘soran bushi' plays. a very public training session for newbies like me will be followed by a chance to take part in the main festival parade around the streets of the city. tell me about the first time that you entered the festival, tell me about how it felt for you and what you did? ‘soran bushi' plays. yeah! a bit of attitude.
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attitude is what you need for this. attitude. 0k, from the top. from the top! it's just dance move, on dance move, on dance move. so complicated! many of these dance moves are based on the tasks fishermen performed like dragging nets, pulling ropes and lifting luggage over their shoulders. can't you tell? 0k... laughs. that's only the practice. we haven't even started the real thing yet! i've just had a rigourous workout and lesson, i supposedly know my moves, and now to cap it all off, we're going to do the whole dance around the square in front of the crowds. help! thank you to your wonderful teaching, ifeel quite confident now that... 0h, let's go! 00:59:05,924 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 ‘soran bushi' plays.
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