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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  August 21, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and mega munchetty. our headlines today: borisjohnson prepares to meet german leader angela merkel as he tries to persuade the eu to agree a deal without the controversial irish backstop. more than 200,000 children in england are believed to be homeless, with some being housed in converted shipping containers. britain's top bosses take a pay cut. the average chief executive salary at the country's largest companies has fallen by more than 10%, but it's still 117 times that of an average full—time worker. enough is enough. manchester united players urge
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social media companies to react after paul pogba receives racist abuse. good morning, once again from the farm in leicestershire as the bbc continues its focus on farming. today will be talking about gm crops as the prime minister, boris johnson, comes out in favour. it's a beautiful start of the day, chilly, we could have some rain and increasing winds coming in from the north. in the south, were looking at drain cloudy conditions. we'll have further details in 15 minutes —— dry and cloudy. it's wednesday, the 21st of august. our top story: borisjohnson will repeat his demand for fundamental changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement, when he meets the german chancellor, angela merkel, in berlin later today. allies of mrs merkel have accused the prime minister of making
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a completely impossible request and actually not being serious. in a moment we'll get the view from germany, from our correspondent jenny hill in hamburg. but first, our political correspondent, iain watson in westminster. iain, what is borisjohnson hoping to achieve from these talks? i can't ican‘t imagine i can't imagine he's asking for anything different? what is effectively asking for in this letter to the eu yesterday which is to dig this controversial iris backstop. it's the insurance policy to avoid a hard border in ireland if trade talks between britain and the eu are unsuccessful. —— irish. clearly he is going to be repeating that the man, but is also going to be saying something else as well,
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something about his colleagues here at westminster. effectively his message is going to be don't listen to the anti—, no deal dissidents in the conservative party's ranks, and don't listen to the opposition. they say they can block no deal, but borisjohnson will say they can block no deal, but boris johnson will tell angular miracle, the german chancellor that they can't, he's going to be living 0ctober they can't, he's going to be living october the first, —— 0ctober they can't, he's going to be living october the first, —— october 31, come what may. they don't hedge your bets, don't wait till september, don't wait to see what happens in parliament. i can tell you, he will say, that we will live on october the 31st with or without a deal, so if there is going to be any compromise on the eu's side, why do we start talking about them now, rather than later? i'll provide you with one spoiler alert of this, naga, sources close to borisjohnson are not expecting a breakthrough. 0k, iain, thanks very much. that the stores of british perspective painted by iain. —— that is the sort of british perspective painted by iain. let's go to hamburg now and our correspondentjenny hill. jenny, how are the prime minister's demands likely to be received there? not terribly well, i don't think. prime ministerjohnson has made his
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opinion pretty clear. it's estimated a no—deal brexit per head of population could do more damage here than any other german region. does that mean they want mrs miracle to cave to borisjohnson‘s demands, it most certainly doesn't. german business, the economy, knows the damage is a no deal could reach year in germany and of course further afield. but mrs miracle, the eu have their redlines on brexit. it's worth emphasising two of those, she is going to stick with the eu line, eu unity ever since the brits first decided to leave the eu has been of paramount importance to the germans. secondly, this is a leader who not forget —— that is not forget, grip behind the iron curtain. she doesn't like walls, she doesn't want to see a hard border on the island of ireland —— she grew up. germany doesn't want to lose written, it
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values the relationship, but it values the relationship, but it values the relationship, but it values the eu and the single market more. “— values the eu and the single market more. —— lose britain. values the eu and the single market more. -- lose britain. we will be going back to hamburg throughout the morning. it's fascinating. 17 uk companies are based in hamburg, billions of pounds of trade going both ways. it is important and we will get more from jenny later in the programme. it is 6:05am. an extra £9 million is to be given to local councils to help them prepare for brexit, with a little more than half the money going to areas with major ports. ministers say the funding will help councils develop local brexit plans, and cover additional staffing costs. kent council will get more than £2.5 million due to the potential pressures around the port of dover. thousands of homeless children are growing up in converted shipping containers, office blocks and bed and breakfasts, according to a report by the children's commissioner for england. councils say the scale of the housing crisis and budget cuts are forcing them to place increasing numbers of families in temporary accommodation. 0ur social affairs correspondent
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michael buchanan reports. would you like to live here? this office block in essex was converted into flats to help housing homeless families. developers don't need permission after the government relaxed rules to boost the housing supply and tens of thousands of similar properties have been created in recent years across england. today's report highlighted some of the flats are tiny, however. whole families living in them in a area as big as a parking space. the children's commissioner says there are over 210,000 homeless children in england, 124,000 in temporary accommodation, office blocks, bed and breakfasts, even repurposed shipping containers. a further 90,000 are sofa surfing. children become very anxious, withdrawn, they feel ashamed that there homeless. they feel ashamed of where they live
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m, they feel ashamed of where they live in, and you would if you were living ina shipping in, and you would if you were living in a shipping container or converted office block. it's not nice to invite your friends there after school. that has an emotional impact and teaches dallas children's' ' education is suffering. ministers have been called on to ensure all homes are built to a high standard. michael buchanan, bbc news. cardinal george pell, the most senior catholic cleric to be found guilty of child sexual abuse, has lost an appeal in australia against his conviction. the 78—year—old was jailed for six years in march for abusing two boys in a cathedral in melbourne in the 1990s. 0ur correspondent phil mercer was at the victoria court of appeal when the judgement was handed down, and joins us now. phil, good morning. good to see you. does george pell continue
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to maintain his innocence? that is right. we understand his legal team is now considering trying to ta ke legal team is now considering trying to take the case to the highest court in the land, australia's high court. in a statement, george pell is that he was disappointed in the judges' decision earlier today. but it was a majority 2—1 decision and the chiefjustice did say getting rights of the heart of this case, that the complainant in the case, the accuser, who said that george pell had abused him and another boy in melbourne in the 19905 was a credible witness. the judge 5aying, the accuser wa5 credible witness. the judge 5aying, the accuser was not a liar, wa5 credible witness. the judge 5aying, the accuser was not a liar, was not a fanta5i5t. george pell wa5 the accuser was not a liar, was not a fanta5i5t. george pell was in the dock flanked by police officers, wearing a black suit and a white clerical collar. and as far as we could tell, there was no discernible emotion from him when that decision wa5 emotion from him when that decision was handed down. so his back behind bars and he could well be there for at least the next three years. 0k,
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phil, thank you very much for taking us phil, thank you very much for taking us through that. phil mercer there for us. the nhs is to fund a new treatment for 2,000 people in england with severe haemophilia. the new drug is said to dramatically cut their risk of "life—threatening" bleeds and reduce treatment time5. emicizumab is also much easier to take than current treatments. it's given as an injection just under the skin, rather than into a vein. a fundraising page set up for the family of pc andrew harper has raised nearly £250,000. pc harper was killed while attending reports of a burglary in berkshire on thursday. a man accused of his murder, 20—year—old jed fo5ter, will appear at reading crown court later. he denies any involvement in the officer's death. president trump has cancelled an official state visit to denmark after the nation's prime minister confirmed greenland was not for sale. announcing the cancellation, mr trump tweeted: "denmark is a very 5pecial country with incredible people, but based
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on prime minister mette frederik5en‘s comments, that she would have no interest in discussing the purchase of greenland, i will be postponing our meeting scheduled in two weeks for another time...." the danish prime minister described the suggestion denmark would be for sale as "absurd", and said she hoped the president was not being serious. thi5 this was a tweet from president trumpa this was a tweet from president trump a few days ago, with a trump tower in the middle of greenland. it's bizarre. you just think. .. it's ha rd to it's bizarre. you just think. .. it's hard to believe it's a real story, isn't it? it's brilliant, it's brilliant. it's 6:10am. brazil's president jair bol5onaro has been blamed for a record number of wildfires acro55 the amazon rainforest. conservationists say the leader's policies have encouraged the clearing of land by farmers and loggers, leading to the outbreak of more than 70,000 fires — that's an increase of more than 80% on the same period last year. the president said the fires were simply seasonal.
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now, long—awaited bond new5 now, long—awaited bond news for you. the long—awaited title of daniel craig's fifth and final bond film has finally been revealed. ‘no time to die' will be the 25th official movie in the bond franchise. ‘fleabag' and ‘killing eve' creator phoebe waller—bridge is one of the writers. ralph fiennes and ben whishaw will return as mand 0 respectively. fiennes, we call him these days. it will also star 05car—winning actor rami malek as "a mysterious villain". that had been rumoured for quite a while. fans will have to wait another eight months until ‘no time to die' comes to uk cinemas in april. i'll book them now. massively delayed. doing different things in different countries, they couldn't film things together. so, april next year. daniel craig back for another one? do you think you will come
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back? no, not really. i've got bond posters and everything. even now? your favourite? i thought timothy dalton did a very good job stop very controversial. mine is controversial as well. pierce brosnan. yeah, he's brilliant! funny. but bond isn't funny, his hard. he should be. look, we've all got our own. roger moore's eyebrow, well, just the eyebrow. you could have a career based on his eyebrows. george lazenby, also controversial. i'm a big fan. anyway, sorry. we got distracted by bond. we have drama of a different
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kind. marcus rashford and harry maguire have said over the last few hours that social media companies are simply going to have to do more to deal with racist abuse of players online. pogba recieved racist insults after missing a penalty in united's 1—1 draw with wovles on monday night. his teamates showed supported for him yesterday — england's marcus rashford tweeted "enough now, this needs to stop" — calling on twitter to do more. the company say they have suspended accounts involved. australia's coachjustin langer says he's confident his players can step up after their star batsman steve smith was ruled out of the third test against england, which begins in headingley tomorrow after failing to recover from concussion. england, scotland, wales, and ireland all failed to reach the men's semifinals at the eurohockey championships in antwerp. england needed to beat spain in their final pool game, but could only draw 2—2. and britain's shauna coxsey won
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a second bronze medal at the world climbing championships in japan. watch this! it came in the combined event which is going to be the discipline contested at next year's 0lympics. i know i said this yesterday, but that sport is really one of those mesmerising sports where you can't ta ke mesmerising sports where you can't take your eyes. it's lovely watching the speed claiming, they're like little spiders, but then you watch the bouldering and it'sjust little spiders, but then you watch the bouldering and it's just insane. you think how on earth...? the bouldering and it's just insane. you think how on earth. . . ? did you ever see the movie free solo? you have to watch that. it's real life. is it like james bond? i can't believe it's all real. let's take a look at today's papers. the guardian reports the eu has rejected borisjohnson‘s calls to tear up the irish backstop and says the response appears
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to close the door on the restart of meaningful brexit deal negotiations. the picture is ofjed foster who appeared in court yesterday charged with the murder of pc andrew harper. he denies the charge. the mail reports that borisjohnson‘s partner, carrie symonds has been barred from visiting the united states. the paper says ms symonds's visa application was rejected after she made a visit to east africa last year, where she met the self—declared somaliland president to discuss women's issues and pollution. the daily mirror front page carries a warning about the impact of a trade deal with us president donald trump on the nhs. the paper cites experts who claim a trade agreement with the us after a no—deal brexit could be fatal for the health service and could push it towards bankruptcy by forcing the uk to pay hugely inflated prices for drugs and operations.
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peaky blinders is about to start. are you a fan? it is one of the best programmes. i've never seen an episode. finally, the times reports that british technology start—ups are enjoying an unprecedented investment boom, receiving a record £5.5 billion in funding this year, which is 50% more than the same period last year. this is catherine keating, the daughter of the former australian prime minister is being named as one of the women in a video which shows prince andrew at the home of the paedophilejeffrey epstein. prince andrew at the home of the paedophile jeffrey epstein. what have you got for us, steph? let me start with bagging. we are moving towards your plastic bags so more people are paying for bags and supermarkets. morrisons has announced they're going to hike the price of the plastic bags now to 30p each which is going to annoy some
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supermarket shoppers but obviously this is in a bid to try and cut back on plastic. that's the story there. i thought the 5p before didn't necessarily go to the supermarkets. i don't know, can i get back to you? that will definitely annoy shoppers, if they are taking it. i'm speed reading. just to other things. one is asos, obviously a darling of the retail world. —— asos. they put out a profit warning and have asked for a profit warning and have asked for a3% a profit warning and have asked for a 3% discount on all stock from suppliers that it receives after september one because basically they are trying to help themselves because they got a bit of a problem at the moment with money. morrisons
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is going to put the profits invested into plastic reduction initiatives. it's all right, you don't need to apologise. do you laugh when someone pumps? absolutely. there is now a mathematical formula to work out the funniest fights. sorry, i've taken of yourtime. funniest fights. sorry, i've taken of your time. —— fight. funniest fights. sorry, i've taken of yourtime. —— fight. —— flatulence. the number of kids present at the time, how long it lasts, the gender factor and from all of that, they worked out that women's flatulence is funnier and also men's last longer. there is a whole analysis that has been done.
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the guff of legend. it's quite serious. i want to show a picture of steve smith yesterday, confirming he won't be able to play in the third test because of his concussion. he doesn't look great. he does not look well. that is the thing that everybody commented on. he willjust be really annoyed. it makes you question whether coming back on the field was the right thing to do. he passed all the tests. a tricky one. we are focusing on things farming this week and carol is on a farm in coa lvi lle, this week and carol is on a farm in coalville, as is graham satchel. thank you for bringing us that, your job is done for the day. good
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morning, everybody. isn't it stunning? look at that sunrise behind me. best time of the day. we are on stanley's fireman leicestershire, 720 acres, 50 acres of it is wild matter and joe the farmer has been telling us you see lots of different wildlife, birds, red kites, buzzards, foxes and small dear. —— meadows. it's a lovely start of the day. chilly and breezy and for many of us, it's a chilly start. in barrow mall, the temperature is harbouring between three and four degrees. x mac bal moral. the forecast for today is one thatis moral. the forecast for today is one that is going to become increasingly windy. especially across the north—western parts of the uk and some of us will see some rain.
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building to the south. as that approaches from the west, what you will find is, the weatherfronts will find is, the weatherfronts will come in bringing rain. look at the squeeze on the isobars. the wind will pick up. lustre in the south, windy in the north. some of us up to a bright and sunny start of the cloud will build in from the west and we will see showers ahead of the rain coming to northern ireland in western scotland. this afternoon we could catch a shower in the midlands but they are going to be fairly hit and miss most of us will miss them. 50, 55 miles and miss most of us will miss them. 50,55 miles per hour in the north—west as you can see from the black circles, indicating the gusts of wind and temperature—wise, not particularly special if you are stuck in the rain. the midteens, into the low 205. the highest temperatures in the south—eastern corner and east anglia. as we go through the evening and overnight,
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the weather front sinks south, at times across north—west england, north—west wales and as it continues through the midlands, it will weaken and fragment. by the end of the night, a new weatherfront and fragment. by the end of the night, a new weather front will be coming across northern ireland. some clear spells and in the north—west, still windy. we start tomorrow with a weak front across the midlands, heading down towards the south—east which will break up. but in northern ireland, the rain pushes into scotla nd ireland, the rain pushes into scotland veritable lingo, still windy and parts of scotland could have 25—35 millimetres of rain from that front which eventually clears northwards on friday living most of us northwards on friday living most of us with a dry day. sunshine, early cloud waking up and it will warm up. temperatures getting up to about 26 degrees on the south on friday. if you're wondering about the weekend, many of us, it will be dry with
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sunshine, mist and fog to clear but it's getting warmer. widely into the 205. in the south—east, we could hit 28 or 29. 205. in the south—east, we could hit 28 or29. graham 205. in the south—east, we could hit 28 or 29. graham is 205. in the south—east, we could hit 28 or29. graham isjust 205. in the south—east, we could hit 28 or 29. graham isjust down 205. in the south—east, we could hit 28 or 29. graham is just down the road. that sounds pretty good. but it's not the kind of whether all farmers like? no, it's not. it's beautiful where you are but we are at the business end of the farm. this is a mixed farm, with longhorn cattle but also wheat. we're about gm crops. the new prime minister in his very first speech on the streets of downing street said it was time to liberate the bioscience set and start growing gm crops. it's a debate it's been going on for 20 yea rs. we debate it's been going on for 20 years. we about to see the commercial growing of gm crops in this country? i've been finding out.
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let's start now. liberate the uk's extraordinary bio sector from anti— genetic modification rules and develop the blight resistant crops that will feed the world. as the new prime minister changed the debate on gm? at the john prime minister changed the debate on gm? at thejohn ennis centre in norwich they are at the forefront of the science. this the new gm potato resista nt to the science. this the new gm potato resistant to blight. by modifying these potatoes to carry these resista nce these potatoes to carry these resistance genes, there wouldn't be the necessity to purchase and spray agrochemicals. the gm debate has been stuck for decades. advocates say crops are safe to eat as conventional foods, they can increase yield and because you need fewer pesticides, they are better for the environment but critics say cross pollination can produce so—called super weeds and contaminate conventional crops, but there is too much corporate controls of the seeds, the means of can production and in the tabloid press they are called frankenstein or
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frankenfoods. take the purple tomato. modified with genes from the snapdragon, it has the same antioxidant benefits as a blueberry. this tomato has been developed to improve human health but the problem a lot of people have with gm crops like this is one of perception, that they feel unnatural. we've been fiddling around with our food for the last 9000 years and that's the basis of crop reading. i don't like to engage on whether it's natural or not natural, that's not really the question. it is, how can you help those outcomes the benefit of humanity? do you think you're trying to do something that is good? yes, asa to do something that is good? yes, as a scientist, you want to do something that you think is good for humanity. young echo has developed modified wheat with higher levels of iron. it could reduce the risk of immediate —— anaemia in the develop the world. x mac developing world. but how many crops like these are
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grown in the eu where it's precautionary. banned in scotland, wales and northern ireland but with the brexit cheerleader in downing street, will the debate change? let's ask wendy harwood who is a gm scientist and liz 0'neill. why do we need gm crops? there is no doubt we're going to be facing problems going forward to provide food for the population. we got climate change, another big issue and we need all the tools we can allow hands—on and gm is one of those. gm will be the only way we can tackle some of these problems. we might have a serious disease problem and gm is the only way to get those crops resistance. do we need gm as borisjohnson crops resistance. do we need gm as boris johnson writes? no, we need a responsible, fair and sustainable food system and that means working with nature rather than trying to dominate it. if we need to feed
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everyone in the world, we need to share what we've got more fairly. it's interesting having a cheerleader in downing street is not like the debate.. is there a genuine possibility of change? it's difficult to say. there are many uncertainties at the moment. i think there is a feeling that may be here in the uk, we could benefit in terms of making our research a bit easier and pushing things forward. i think we may have to wait a little bit longer. and you said? what i'd like to see is retaining robust regulation. we need those safeguards. we will be talking about this later in the programme but now it's time for the news, travel, and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. police have arrested a man who allegedly threatened to blow up a block of flats in east london. the building in barking was evacuated, and police
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negotiators talked to the man who'd barricaded himself inside a flat. he was taken to hospital as a precaution after being arrested early this morning. a london council placing vulnerable families in converted shipping containers says the housing crisis has left them with no choice but to use temporary accomodation. according to a report by the children's commissioner a growing number of children in the capital are growing up in "cramped and unsafe" conditions by living inside "heavily modified" containers. ealing council said modular homes offer "a far better, much more private standard of accomodation than traditional hostels or bed and breakfasts". after years of producing bumper crops using pesticides, fertilisers and machinery there are increasing concerns for our soil. some experts put the number of food producing harvests we could have in future as low as 30. 0ne hertfordshire farmer is among those who are turning their backs
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on traditional farming techniques like ploughing and believes it's making a difference. we're just all these fantastic creatures who live in the soil to do the work for us and not only making this lovely seedbed in creating the soil that helps these plants grow but they are feeding these plants with nitrogen and phosphorus, which they are liberating from the bedrock in wonderful ways we couldn't even imagine. let's take a look at the travel situation now. you 0n the tubes there's good service. 0n the roads in poplar the a13 has one lane closed coming in to town at burdett road for gas works. in elmers end, croydon road is closed eastbound from elmers end road to clock house road for gas works. now the weather with lucy martin.
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hello there. temperatures are on the way up as we hello there. temperatures are on the way up as we move hello there. temperatures are on the way up as we move through the next few days, getting into the high 205 that bank holiday weekend. it does come with a good deal of dry, fine weather, plenty of sunshine around as well. but certainly the case first thing this morning. as the day wears on, we will see some there we re wears on, we will see some there were the cloud bubbling up, sunshine could turn a little hazy later in the day. the temperatures at a sum of 22 celsius with a south—westerly breeze. 0vernight, nota of 22 celsius with a south—westerly breeze. 0vernight, not a great deal to see. plenty of their skies. 0vernight knows —— close, 9— 11 celsius and tomorrow a bit of a rinse and repeat of today. plenty of sunshine to come, perhaps a bit more on the way of cloud as we move into the afternoon but holding onto good spells of sunshine, temperatures starting to pick up, a maximum of around 24 celsius. we continue to see those temperatures rise as we move towards the end of the week. we could see only missed on friday but further sunshine and into the bank holiday weekend, temperatures get
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tempting to the high 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and dan. is it like james bond? i can't believe it's all real. hello this is breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. it's 6:30am. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: the rush to upgrade is leading to a mountain of old smart phones and laptops — we'll hear how we can all do our bit to stop it. it can be heartbreaking when a pet dies, but should bosses be forced to give animal owners time off work to grieve? we'll be speaking to a woman who thinks they should. and ‘how to train your baby like a dog' aired last night — despite thousands of people signing a petition against it. we'll be asking if clickers and treats are an acceptable way to make children behave better.
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i had ihada i had a notification from you this morning about clickers. we don't have any clickers. you're declaring? just in case. we'll explain about it a bit later on. it's now 6:32am. today's news: borisjohnson will repeat his demand for fundamental changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement when he meets the german chancellor angela merkel in berlin today. allies of mrs merkel have accused the prime minister of making a completely impossible request, and not being serious. in what could be a crucial week for brexit talks, mrjohnson will meet the french president emmanuel macron tomorrow, before travelling to the g7 summit in biarritz at the weekend. an extra £9 million is to be given to local councils to help them prepare for brexit,
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with a little more than half the money going to areas with major ports. ministers say the funding will help councils develop local brexit plans, and cover additional staffing costs. kent council will get more than £2.5 million due to the potential pressures around the port of dover. thousands of homeless children are growing up in converted shipping containers, office blocks and bed and breakfasts, according to a report by the children's commissioner for england. anne longfield says it's a "scandal" that many families are living in dangerous and cramped conditions, often for months at a time. councils say the housing crisis and budget cuts are forcing them to place people in temporary accommodation. cardinal george pell, the most senior catholic cleric to be found guilty of child sexual abuse, has lost an appeal in australia against his conviction. the 78—year—old was jailed for six years in march for abusing two boys in a cathedral in melbourne in the 19905. he maintains his innocence. the nhs is to fund a new treatment for 2,000 people in england with severe haemophilia. the new drug is said to dramatically cut their risk of "life—threatening" bleeds and reduce treatment times.
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emicizumab is also much easier to take than current treatments. it's given as an injection just under the skin, rather than into a vein. for years, it was widely believed that women experienced different symptoms to men while having a heart attack. but new research suggests that not to be the case. the british heart foundation says misconceptions about a woman's risk of having a heart attack, meant they received unequal care compared to men, often leading to misdiagnosis and even death. the nhs says it's working to improve services preventing cardiovascular disease following a review last autumn. i think this is a misperception both by the public and the medical profession. i think the biggest message must be to the public so that women are aware of this and realise that if they're having symptoms which classically would be a heart attack in a man, it affects
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them to and they should do something about it. a fundraising page set up for the family of pc andrew harper has raised nearly a £250,000. pc harper was killed while attending reports of a burglary in berkshire on thursday. a man accused of his murder, 20—year—old jed foster, will appear at reading crown court later. he denies any involvement in the officer's death. brazil's president jair bol5onaro has been blamed for a record number of wildfires across the amazon rainforest. conservationists say the leader's policies have encouraged the clearing of land by farmers and loggers, leading to the outbreak of more than 70,000 fires — that's an increase of more than 80% on the same period last year. the president said the fires were simply seasonal. president trump has cancelled an official state visit to denmark after the nation's prime minister confirmed greenland was not for sale. did you just need to clarify that greenland is not for sale, just in case you thought it was?
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announcing the cancellation, mr trump tweeted: "denmark is a very special country with incredible people, but based on prime minister mette frederiksen‘s comments, that she would have no interest in discussing the purchase of greenland, i will be postponing our meeting scheduled in two weeks for another time." denmark's prime minister described the suggestion greenland would be for sale as absurd, and said she hoped the president was not being serious. do you think that was really the whole point of the meeting, on his part? there were probably other things. yeah. and naga was excited about the news about the new james and naga was excited about the news about the newjames bond. and, if you like the matrix, matrix four is coming out, with yana reeves and
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kerri—anne mice. —— gianna reeves —— the original actors of neo and trinity. manchester united players have showed support for paul pogba have he received racist insults on social media after missing a penalty in united's1—1 draw with wolves on monday night. i wonder if the football clubs are going to have more influence?” think the players have all the influence, its think the players have all the influence, it's interesting now, the players are being told potentially by some people to boycott social media completely and not go on it until the social media companies do something about it. like you said, the really interesting thing about this is how all the players, manchester united players have shown support for pogba. england's marcus rashford
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tweeted "enough now, this needs to stop", calling on twitter to do more. saying manchester united is a family and podga is huge part of that. united's new signing harry maguire says social media need to look at how accounts are verified to prevent the trolls. twitter say they've since suspended several accounts involved. this is where player power could potentially do something positive. speaking yesterday, the manager of the england women's team and former united player, phil neville, has called for a boycott of social media by professional footballers. it's getting to the point now where i think we need to make a real strong message and i say, i say to every single footballer out there, and every club and to the pfa, is why don't we make a big fan, come all social media now and see if that makes a big enough impact —— big stand. neville was speaking after naming his squad for a couple of friendlies.
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mannion gets her first senior call up alongside chelsea's bethany england. world cup star ellen white in not in the squad due to injury. england play belgium at the end of the month and norway next month. the coach is rumoured to have a photo of the english— us defeat for the women's leg. , league. bury have been forced to suspend a sixth match as owner steve dale turned down an offer to buy the club yesterday, which would have secured its future. the league one side faces being kicked out of the football league. dale believes he can secure a better deal before friday's deadline. australia's coachjustin langer says he's confident his players can step
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up after their star batsman steve smith was ruled out of the third test against england which begins in headingley tomorrow. smith has failed to recover from concussion after being hit in the neck in the drawn second test. marnus labuschagne replaced smith at lords and is favourite to do so again. we've got to make sure that all the other guys, our senior players and younger players all step up and build what are almost on fillable shoes, because he is the best player in the world, but we thought the whole time about squad mentality, being ready and when things come up, like they was doing this game, we have guys were ready to step up. so, i'm confident they'll do that. england, scotland, wales and ireland all failed to reach the men's semifinals at the eurohockey championships. britain's shauna coxsey won a second bronze medal at the world climbing championships in japan. it came in the combined event which is going to be the discipline contested at next year's 0lympics. coxsey lead after the first two rounds, speed and bouldering, her speciality, but she slipped own to third place after the final event. i really had no idea what to expect
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coming out here, especially in the combined format. i've been training a lot, battling some little niggles and injuries, and yeah, just to be here and part of this event is incredible. then to stand on the podium on top of that, i'm ecstatic. absolutely delighted. finally, this is kind of a sports story. mike bushell? now, you will know by now that mike has confirmed he will be among the next set of strictly come dancing contestants. take a look at this — he's already in training. he tweeted these images yesterday saying: "after a brilliant first day jigging around with the strictly pros, we weren't hurting enough, so while others went for ice baths." front row in the middle there. of course he is. they went to the gym! there is mike lifting a little barbell. his more intimate than anyone i've ever seen do it, ever. can you imagine the sequence and the spray tan? —— sequins.
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can you imagine the sequence and the spray tan? -- sequins. mark never does anything halfway —— mike. he's brilliant. determination. the buyers is obvious. —— bias. it's 6:42am. let's return to one of our top stories. borisjohnson begins his first visit to germany later, a trip which will be watched particularly closely by people living in the north port city of hamburg. that's because its estimated a no—deal brexit could do more financial damage per head of population in hamburg than any other part of germany. 0ur correspondent jenny hill is there. jenny, glorious sunshine, you see the boards behind you. tell us why this relationship is so important?
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—— of the ports. in hamburg, britain really matters. last year, trade between hamburg and britain added up to something like 6.5 billion euros. it's really big business for hamburg. ithink it's really big business for hamburg. i think it's really worth pointing out that three years ago, people here in hamburg, and in fact across germany, were shocked and saddened when britain decided it was going to pull out of the european union. now, three years later, they're watching by and large with a mixture of horror and disbelief as britain's new prime minister says he wa nts to britain's new prime minister says he wants to tear up that withdrawal agreement that took a long time to negotiate and try and get a different dealfor negotiate and try and get a different deal for britain. i negotiate and try and get a different dealfor britain. i don't get anyone in this country is under any illusions that very much is going to come from borisjohnson‘s meeting with angela merkel today, certainly his demands to remove the so—called irish backstop from the withdrawal agreement are likely to be very family rebuffed. —— family.
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i can't emphasise this enough, here in hamburg, across this country, people are watching and saying you know, the stakes could not be higher. germany has no appetite for a no—deal brexit. it's what the new british prime minister's threatening to dish up if he doesn't get what he wa nts. to dish up if he doesn't get what he wants. and in hamburg, where much of the fish comes from british waters, that's a concern. translation: we aren't panicking, but we expect prices to rise. we will have to pass costs onto the consumer. so, should the eu renegotiate the terms of britain's departure? transition backi don't ink you should give any more. europe has given up a lot already, and i think we've reached the limit. —— translation:. is estimated hamburg would suffer more financial damage per head of population design any other part of the country. 0ther
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regions worry for their car plans, their drug companies. in hamburg, its aeroplanes. as they set of course were worried about what brexit will bring, where the third biggest aviation site after seattle and toulouse —— translation:, and toulouse —— translation: , hamburg produces and toulouse —— translation:, hamburg produces our buses, whose wings come from wales —— airbuses. buses, whose wings come from wales -- airbuses. europe is queen of compromise encountered plenty of hot airas she compromise encountered plenty of hot air as she toured geothermal sides in iceland yesterday. angela merkel has her redlines, and the irish backstop is one of them. in hamburg, they come and ego. germany has never altered its brexit course. you really get a sense ofjust how close germany and britain have been. they've traded through this board for centuries. germany wants to keep
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britain close, but it values europe and the single market for. and those hoping that this country's soft spot for the british can translate into more brexit concessions may be disappointed. and even as it seeks to prevent it, this city, this country, is stealing itself for a painful farewell. —— steeling. we know prime minister is expected to turn up in berlin and ask chancellor merkel if there is a chance that the irish backstop may be with moved —— removed from the withdrawal. angela merkel is very keen to maintain a good working and trading relationship with britain, regardless of what happens. but he is likely to be refused. it's worth just looking at why angela merkel would be so anti— that kind of move.
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she doesn't like walls, she doesn't wa nt to she doesn't like walls, she doesn't want to see a hard border. but she is very keen to protect the integrity of the single market and she along with the other eu leaders see a concern about the integrity of that single market and if the arrangements on the island of ireland unsatisfactory free and it's worth pointing out that angela merkel is not going to diverged from the eu's standard line. as far as angela merkel, the eu 27 and a lot of politicians and disney's people here in germany are that withdrawal agreement was painfully and carefully negotiated, they are not going to reopen it now. well, we will see if dorisjohnson can use his powers of persuasion to even try a little bit. you won't hear on monday? we had cow cam. cows
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are sitting up, lying down on occasion but now, we have bee cam. this is inside a beehive. some intense bee action taking place and i'm delighted to say, we can get the weather now from the bbc breakfast queen bee, carol kirkwood. thank you very much. good morning. look at my view this morning. from stanley's farm in leicestershire. it is beautiful. we've seen the most stunning sunrise and the forecast for today is one that is going to become increasingly windy and some of us will see some rain. some of that rain will be happy. for some of us, we will stay dry. if we take a look at the poster child, you can see what's happening. low pressure coming from the north—west. it's going to introduce some rain and strengthening wins. first thing this
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morning, a lot of dry weather around. it's a chilly start and a breezy one and as the weather front approaches from the west, rain initially into northern ireland. pushing across much of scotland. getting into north—west england later on. there is a chance, but it is going to be hit and miss. most of us is going to be hit and miss. most of us will stay dry. the more likely you are to hang onto the sunshine. it's going to be windy for the north—west, gusting to up to 55 miles per hour, breezy and blustery across much of the uk. temperatures in the high teens to the low 205. through this evening and overnight, the weather front continues to sink south. it will bring heavy rain for a time. unless it sinks through the midlands. 0n either side of it, clear skies, a few showers but by the end of the night, a new front.
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that rain tomorrow is going to spread northwards. we could see as much as 25—35 millimetres of rain in some places. as we come further south, we are looking at writers skies, fewer showers and still quite blustery. by the time we get to friday, the weather front will be ensconced across northern scotland, leaving most of the uk with the dry day, sunny day and we will lose the cloud. temperatures widely once again in the high teens, up to about 26 somewhere in the south—east. if you are wondering about the weekend, fairly settled at the moment. dry, sunny and warm, temperatures into the 205 but in the south—east, some places could hit 28 or 29. that was a very high—pitched excitement.”
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places could hit 28 or 29. that was a very high-pitched excitement. i am excited. i know lots of people don't like the heat. we had a fair amount of rain. what will you do if it gets to 30? i will go supersonic. where she is this morning looks gorgeous, in coalville. and not too far away from carol is graham satchell. also, live on facebook is bee cam. the average pay of britain's top bosses has taken a tumble. steph's been looking at the numbers. what's going on, steph? these are our top one has to —— top 100 companies listed on the stock market. analysis of how their pay has changed over the last year and what we know is, pay on average has fallen. it's interesting when you look at the figures on this because the median average pay packet, you know, you will remember, different
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types of averages. the median is where you line up pay packets in orderfrom top to where you line up pay packets in order from top to bottom and take the middle one. if you look at that middle one, it's about £3.4 billion. there still owning lots of money. that's when you include all the different bits of their pay packet. the remuneration. that is down by 13% compared to the previous year. it's gone down a bit but you won't be shocked to hear that that is still 117 times more than what the average full—time worker gets, which is just average full—time worker gets, which isjust under £30,000 average full—time worker gets, which is just under £30,000 a year. there is just under £30,000 a year. there is still that massive disparity in the people have put this research together say the gap is still too big. the uk is a highly unequal country, the superrich take a much bigger share of income is compared
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to other economies. that's prompted an understandable debate about fair pgy- an understandable debate about fair pay. this suggests the boards are paying lip service to that debate however you are still a talking about extraordinary sums of money and you couldn't really say this represents a big shift in corporate culture. it's come down a bit but is it seen as excessive? it depends who you ask because the businesses say they pay this kind of money because they pay this kind of money because they have to get top talent and that is the market rate globally. the unions obviously would be less impressed by this, and not necessarily agree with that. there is also the shareholders to consider, so when you have shares in the company, there is being a bit more unrest in terms of their views on what the bosses of their companies have been paid and actually 50 of them have already promised to cut their executive pensions because of concerns around this. we heard theresa may when she
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was prime minister, talking about excessive bass pay. we're not sure whether boris johnson excessive bass pay. we're not sure whether borisjohnson is going do anything about it but there is still that wave of there is too much money. have they looked at the difference between mail and female bosses? there is still that massive gender gap in terms of how many women are running ftse100 companies. there are only six out of the 100. it's gone down by one because we had the former chief executive of lloyd's of london leave. there is only six of them in the pay on average that women get compared to the men is less. not dramatically less but it is less than the guys. there is that great start that we like to give. there is more chance of getting a boss called steve a nd more chance of getting a boss called steve and of getting a female boss in the ftse100. or steve and of getting a female boss in the ftse100. 0r dave as well.
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dave and steve are their names. more than six. there we are. what do you do with your old phones?” than six. there we are. what do you do with your old phones? i do have a draw. because you never know, the data on them, you should recycle them. i'm a bit security conscious. you can clear them down. do we really? you can clear them down. do we really ? ta ke you can clear them down. do we really? take them into a shop. i am a bit big brother. we will talk about that a bit later. i've only ever had one laptop. i'm still on my first laptop. no way. how long have you had it? three years. that is not very long. a late adopter. i didn't get a laptop until two or three yea rs get a laptop until two or three years ago. did you have a computer before that? i wound it up. a commodore vic 20. we have seen bee
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cam, let's have a look. what is going on? is there honeycomb in there as well? right at the back. there is one be desperate to make its name on telly. just getting out of the way a little bit. it's quite hypnotic. we're not going to you with that. it's an important time in the morning. time to find out what is happening wherever you are in there maybe be news as well. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. police have arrested a man who allegedly threatened to blow up a block of flats in east london early this morning.
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the building in barking was evacuated, and police negotiators talked to the man who'd barricaded himself inside a flat. he was taken to hospital as a precaution after being arrested. a london council placing vulnerable families in converted shipping containers says the housing crisis has left them with no choice but to use temporary accomodation. according to a report by the children's commissioner a growing number of children in the capital are growing up in "cramped and unsafe" conditions by living inside "heavily modified" containers. ealing council said modular homes offer "a far better, much more private standard of accomodation than traditional hostels or bed and breakfasts". you after years of producing crops using pesticides, fertilisers and machinery there are growing concerns for our soil. some experts put the number of food producing harvests we could have in the future as low as 30. 0ne hertfordshire farmer is among those who are turning their backs on traditionalfarming techniques like ploughing. he believes it's making a difference.
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we're just harnessing all these fantastic creatures who live on the soil to do the work for us and not only are they making this lovely seedbed and creating the soil that helps these plants grow but they're feeding these plants with nitrogen and phosphorus, which they're liberating from the bedrock in wonderful ways that we couldn't even imagine. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tubes there's good service. in elmers end croydon road is closed eastbound from elmers end road to clock house road for gas works. now the weather with lucy martin. hello there. temperatures are on the way up
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as we move through the next few days, getting into the high 205 for that bank holiday weekend. it does come with a good deal of dry, fine weather, plenty of sunshine around as well. that's certainly the case first thing this morning. as the day wears on, we will see some fair weather cloud bubbling up, sunshine could turn a little hazy later in the day. the temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees celsius with a south—westerly breeze. 0vernight, not a great deal to see on the map here. plenty of their skies. 0vernight lows of around 9— 11 celsius and tomorrow a bit of a rinse and repeat of today. there'll be lenty of sunshine to come, perhaps a bit more in the way of cloud as we move into the afternoon but holding onto some good spells of sunshine, the temperatures though starting to pick up, a maximum of around 24 celsius. and we continue to see those temperatures rise as we move towards the end of the week. we could see some early mist on friday but further sunshine and into the bank holiday weekend, temperatures getting into the high 205. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today: borisjohnson prepares to meet german leader angela merkel as he tries to persuade the eu to agree a deal without the controversial irish backstop. more than 200,000 children in england are believed to be
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homeless, with some being housed in converted shipping containers. pet bereavement leave — thousands of workers sign a petition calling on employers to give them time off to recover from the death of a pet. enough is enough. manchester united players urge social media companies to react after paul pogba receives racist abuse. good morning, once again from the sta nley‘s good morning, once again from the stanley's farm in leicestershire. today we are looking at gm crops after the prime minister, boris johnson, comes out in favour. and i'm just along the road from gram in leicestershire, a beautiful started the day. across the board is a chilly start. some sunshine but in the north expect some rain and stronger winds in the south, blustery with a chance of a few showers. i'll have more in 15 minutes.
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it's wednesday, august 21st. our top story: borisjohnson will repeat his demand for fundamental changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement, when he meets the german chancellor, angela merkel, in berlin later today. allies of mrs merkel have accused the prime minister of making a completely impossible request, and not being serious. in a moment we'll get the view from germany, from our correspondent jenny hill in hamburg. but first, our political correspondent, iain watson in westminster. iain, what is borisjohnson hoping to achieve from these talks? it's all about the powers of persuasion and where the boris johnson can get anything theresa may couldn't get. that's exactly right. i think what borisjohnson is going to do is accentuate the positive, if you like. there's going to be a mini press co nfe re nce you like. there's going to be a mini press conference in berlin, and i think you'll be talking about security, international issues, but fundamentally, this gaping hole, this big virtually unreachable gap
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on brexit. he wants the controversial northern irish backstop, this insurance policy to avoid a hard border in ireland to be taken out of the withdrawal agreement in order to do a deal before october the 31st. so far, the other side aren't moving. but additionally, he is got quite a few choice words to put angela merkel. his message to her is going to be theirs, don't listen to the dissidents in his own ranks, those conservative mp5, don't listen to these people who say they can block no deal when parliament resumes in september, he will say that is not going to happen. don't hedge your bets. if you are going to make compromises to get a deal, start making those compromises now. boiler alert, neither, —— spoileralert, neither, no—one is expecting a breakthrough today. not much of a
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spoiler indeed. let's go to hamburg now and our correspondentjenny hill. jenny, how are the prime minister's demands likely to be received there? not very much further, i would have thought. no—one is under any illusions that today's meeting is going to result in any kind of big breakthrough. the main point of course, this demand that the irish backstop be removed from the withdrawal agreement hasn't gone down well in belen. angela merkel has plenty of redlines when it comes to brexit and that backstop is really one of them —— in berlin. she did indicate yesterday that she is willing to talk if a solution can be found. she said there is still time to try and find some sort of solution, but there is a wariness about the corridors of power in berlin, a sense that the withdrawal agreement, which was negotiated, is as good as britain is going to go. whether mrjohnson can persuade them otherwise still remains to be seen,
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of course. but when it comes to issues like the irish backstop, berlin is very, very unlikely to budge, i think. berlin is very, very unlikely to budge, ithink. and berlin is very, very unlikely to budge, i think. and for all sorts of reasons, mainly, the benefits from the eu's single market, they are very keen to make sure that remains europe. secondly, of course, and this is what i'm really pointing out, people in berlin are watching mrjohnson very closely. they are watching the british parliament very closely. they want to know he is still going to be in all those months down the road and they also wa nt months down the road and they also want know that his threats of a no deal really can be trusted, that he is not simply trying to call the eu's life. jenny, good to talk to you about that in hamburg and a bit later on. real close links with the uk in terms of trade. the lens of pounds. it's an interesting place to assess how those talks may be going in the next few days. jenny does
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have a piece a bit later in the programme. an extra £9 million is to be given to local councils to help them prepare for brexit, with a little more than half the money going to areas with major ports. ministers say the funding will help councils develop local brexit plans, and cover additional staffing costs. kent council will get more than £2.5 million pounds due to the potential pressures around the port of dover. thousands of homeless children are growing up in converted shipping containers, office blocks and bed and breakfasts, according to a report by the children's commissioner for england. i can't ican't imagine i can't imagine shipping containers. councils say the scale of the housing crisis and budget cuts are forcing them to place increasing numbers of families in temporary accommodation. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. would you like to live here? this office block in essex was converted into flats to house homeless families. developers don't need planning
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permission after the government relaxed the rules to boost the housing supply, and tens of thousands of similar properties have been created in recent years across england. today's report highlights that some of the flats are tiny, however, whole families are living in an area little bigger than a parking space. the children's commissioner calculates that there are more than 210,000 homeless children in england. 124,000 are in temporary accommodation — office blocks, bed—and—brea kfasts, even repurposed shipping containers while a further 90,000 are sofa surfing. children become very anxious, withdrawn. they feel ashamed that they're homeless, they feel ashamed of where they are living. i mean, if you are living in an old shipping container, or a converted office block, it's not particularly nice to invite your friends around after school. all of that has a really severe emotional impact and teachers tell us that children's education is suffering.
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councils say the housing crisis and budget cuts are forcing them to place increasing numbers of families in temporary accommodation, and they are calling on ministers to ensure that all homes are built to a high standard. michael buchanan, bbc news. cardinal george pell, the most senior catholic cleric to be found guilty of child sexual abuse, has lost an appeal in australia against his conviction. the 78—year—old was jailed for six years in march for abusing two boys in a cathedral in melbourne in the 19905. 0ur correspondent phil mercer was at the victoria court of appeal when the judgement was handed down, and joins us now. he continues to maintain his innocence? it's good to talk to you. it's hard to overestimate how much interest there has been in australia around this case. yes, and around the world, given that 0nce this case. yes, and around the world, given that once upon a time george pell was one of the most powerful catholic figures anywhere. he was in the pope's in a circle, he was the vatican's treasurer.
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certainly, the most powerful catholic cleric here in australia. he is now in disgrace, behind bars. we were there when he heard his appeal had been rejected. he didn't seem to us to be showing any sort of emotion. he was looking pretty grey and gaunt according to people who have known him for some time. really, this case came down to the reliability of the witness, one of those choirboys that george pell abused at saint patrick's cathedral here in melbourne in the late 19905. and the appeal court said that that complainant was trustworthy, was a truthful witness, he wasn't a liar, he wasn't a fantasist, and as a result, george pell is back behind bars. he may try to take his case to the high court, but for now he's backin the high court, but for now he's back in prison and facing more years behind bars stop phil, you very much for that. the nhs is to fund a new treatment for 2,000 people in england
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with severe haemophilia. the new drug is said to dramatically cut their risk of "life—threatening" bleeds and reduce treatment times. emicizumab is also much easier to take than current treatments. it's given as an injection just under the skin, rather than into a vein. for years, it was widely believed that women experienced different symptoms to men while having a heart attack. but new research suggests that not to be the case. the british heart foundation says misconceptions about a woman's risk of having a heart attack, meant they received unequal care compared to men, often leading to misdiagnosis and even death. the nhs says it's working to improve services preventing cardiovascular disease following a review last autumn. i think this is a misperception both by the public and the medical profession. i think the biggest message must be to the public, so that women are aware of this, and realise that if they're having symptoms which classically would be a heart attack in a man, it would almost certainly be a heart attack in them too and they should
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do something about it. a fundraising page set up for the family of pc andrew harper has raised nearly £250,000. pc harper was killed while attending reports of a burglary in berkshire on thursday. a man accused of his murder, 20—year—old jed foster, will appear at reading crown court later. he denies any involvement in the officer's death. president trump has cancelled an official state visit to denmark after the nation's prime minister confirmed greenland was not for sale. announcing the cancellation, mr trump tweeted: "denmark is a very special country with incredible people, but based on prime minister mette frederiksen's comments, that she would have no interest in discussing the purchase of greenland, i will be postponing our meeting scheduled in two weeks for another time...." denmark does currently own greenland.
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denmark's prime minister described the suggestion greenland would be for sale as absurd, and said she hoped the president was not being serious. it's a story that you wouldn't be sure you are going to read. shall we bring you some film news? there's another one, trinity and neo back together. it will be the fourth magix movie, the original 120 years ago. it's taken more than one point £3 billion since it premiered at the box office does make 1.3 billion. and carrie—anne moss will be back there with keanu. i would love to watch a marathon on with the matrix
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one, two, three and four. i wonder what will happen, though? didn't neo fix the matrix? he killed it. it's now 7:13am. let's return to our top stories. borisjohnson says he'll enter brexit talks with eu leaders "with a lot of oomf" after his latest demand for changes to the withdrawal agreement was rejected by brussels. later he'll travel to berlin, where he'll make his case to german chancellor angela merkel, in his first oversees trip as prime minister. so, how far will "oomf" go in helping to secure a brexit deal? let's speak now to economist and political commentator, vicky pryce. thank you for talking to us, vicky pryce, this morning. 0omf, is that
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what is needed, what is going to be effective? i think boris johnson is hoping that is what is needed. they may talk about tweaking the withdrawal agreement, and hoping that the backstop is not going to be necessary , that the backstop is not going to be necessary, but i don't think he will get very far. he's hoping the germans will think differently because the uk's economy is important to them, we are something like the third export company for germany. so, there are a lot of things at stake, things that german businesses and manufacturing, exports have been engaged in in the chains. but i don't think angela
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merkel would be interested in a new agreement now. that is it, isn't it? borisjohnson had agreement now. that is it, isn't it? boris johnson had of agreement now. that is it, isn't it? borisjohnson had of the eu summit on the weekend —— g7 summit on the weekend, seeing emmanuel macron in france, they are the ones who have the influence, it appears, but it also appears their loyalty to the eu is overwriting any of the uk's demands? absolutely. they also have to bear in mind what the other countries were think. there was also the concern that they might be too lenient to the uk because we seem to hold some cards, now we don't hold any cards, really. so the chances of them wanting to show to the other country that it is easy to leave and you can keep all the privileges you had as members of the single market, but isn't going to be something they wa nt to but isn't going to be something they want to play with. the other countries will actually start thinking look at what is going on in italy, for example, there are some countries that are not happy with how the eu is working right now. if
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they give into britain in any way, then that will weaken the position of, if you like, brussels and the bigger countries to in relation to the weaker ones in the eu are present. so you say there are some countries unhappy with the system so to speak, at the moment. are they potentially ones that borisjohnson could target if he's not going make any headway with angela merkel or emmanuel macron? arguing with the european commission in particular. there is much chance of them exercising any real power within the eu, given their weaker position economically. i don't think there is very much chance coming. it is going to be germany. we made it
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very clear that we have our correspondence tojenny very clear that we have our correspondence to jenny hamburg looking at the ports. regardless of what happens, we are still influential, the uk is an influential, the uk is an influential trading partner and that relationship does need to be cherished. surely there must be some ground that will be given, at least in that sense. i think the germans probably still think we're not going to leave without a deal. there is lot to be negotiated, in terms of the trade agreement we can have in the trade agreement we can have in the future which will continue to use the current way of moving goods. being as frictionless as we possibly can. of course, there is pressure being put between businesses across both countries to ensure that there are influencing government. they will tell you directly that yes, the
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uk matters, yes, the supply transmitter. yes, it would be bad for the economy in germany but overall, all the other principles of free movement are paramount for them. they are not going to budge.” think there are 71 days now before 0ctober think there are 71 days now before october 31. 0f think there are 71 days now before october 31. of course we have this meeting this week. how do you see this panning out, this process. 0r will it be who blinks first? the most important thing will be who blinks here. it would be a political issue to be resolved in westminster. that is going to the be the main area of development here. i don't think we can wait for the europeans to really change for anything. it's how borisjohnson to really change for anything. it's how boris johnson manages to really change for anything. it's how borisjohnson manages to keep his party behind him. i think that
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is where the game will be played in the next few weeks. vicki price, it's been very interesting. thanks for watching us this morning. i know that viewers do get annoyed sometimes. if we get place names incorrect. when we pronounce coa lvi lle, incorrect. when we pronounce coalville, there are various ways. we do ask, we've asked someone who's been with carol this morning but i had a tweet from pip who's lived in the county of leicestershire for 40 yea rs the county of leicestershire for 40 years and says, the l is silent. look a bit abilities this morning. it's stunning. the view can see is over the reservoir behind me. it's gorgeous. this is a very natural
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area. very pretty. chilly start of the day. the forecast for many of us isa the day. the forecast for many of us is a windy one. we've got some rain coming in from the west. you can see why. we got high pressure building on the south and low pressure in the atlantic. the low pressure is coming towards us. the strongest winds today for the north—west of the uk where we are looking at costs of 50, 55 miles per hour, possibly a bit more with exposure. a lot of dry weather and bright weather, sunshine and its breezy and also cool. the rain will come in across northern ireland initially but sweeping across western scotland, moving across western scotland, moving across and getting into north—west england. it's a blustery day. most
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of us staying dry. temperatures from the midteens to the low 205. our weather front producing the rain sinks south. as it continues into the midlands. the rain in it will be lighter. ahead of it, some clear spells. by the end of the night, we will be seeing a new weather front bringing rain across northern ireland. if we pick that one up tomorrow, we could see between 20 and 30 millimetres of rain. meanwhile, a weak weather front heading south will be producing much more than a band of cloud. that will break up and we will see some sunshine. tomorrow's top temperature, 26 in the south—east. as we head on into friday, we lose that rain from northern scotland,
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most of us having a dry day with some sunshine, fewer showers and again, temperatures into the mid—205. for the weekend incidentally, all of us will have temperatures into the 205 but in the south—east, we could see highs of 28 or 29 degrees. a lot warmer than it is this morning, isn't it? a bit snippy this morning, farmers looking for a period of dry weather. we are on the stanley farm in leicestershi re on the stanley farm in leicestershire on the business end. as pa rt of leicestershire on the business end. as part of the bbc‘s focus. we're looking gm crops. borisjohnson stood on the street in downing street. it's time to liberate the bioscience set in time to grow gm crops. are we really going to see that in this country? we have been taking a look.
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let's start now to liberate the uk's extraordinary bioscience sector from anti—genetic modification rules and let's develop the blight—resista nt crops that will feed the world. has the new prime minister changed the debate on gm? at thejohn innes centre in norwich, they're at the forefront of the science. this, a new gm potato resistant to blight. by modifying these potatoes to carry these resistant genes, there wouldn't be the necessity to purchase and spray agrochemicals. the gm debate has been stuck for decades. advocates say the crops are safe to eat as conventional foods, that they can increase yield and because you need fewer pesticides, they are better for the environment. but critics say cross—pollination can produce so—called super weeds and contaminate conventional crops, that there's too much corporate controls of the seeds, the means of production and in the tabloid press they are called frankenstein, or frankenfoods. take the purple tomato. modified with genes from a snapdragon,
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it has the same antioxidant benefits as a blueberry. this tomato has been developed to improve human health but the problem a lot of people have with gm crops like this is one of perception, that they feel unnatural. we've been fiddling around with our food for the last 9,000 years and that's the basis of crop breeding. i don't like to engage on whether it's natural or not natural, that's not really the question. it is, how can you help those outcomes for the benefit of humanity? do you think you're trying to do something that is good? yes, i mean, you know, as a scientist, you want to do something that you think is good for humanity. janneke has developed modified wheat with higher levels of iron. it could reduce the risk of anaemia in the developing world. but hardly any gm or gene—edited crops have been grown in the eu, where regulations are highly precautionary.
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they're banned in scotland, wales and northern ireland. now with brexit and a gm cheerleader in downing street, will the debate change? will the debate change? let's ask two ladies here this morning. wendy harwood, a gm scientist and liz o'neill, harwood, a gm scientist and liz 0'neill, an activist against gm. i thought we had this debate and decided people don't like gm crops, they give them as unconstrained foods, across pollinate and cause problems with other crop and we don't need them. i don't think that's the case. there is a huge amount of gm crops already grown worldwide, grown by millions of farmers. all of them can't be wrong in thinking it's a bad technology otherwise they wouldn't be using it and in terms of safety, it doesn't really make sense to say no. you have to look at what you are using
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it for. like any technology, you could use it for something that is really beneficial. you could use it for something that is rather stupid. it's just a technology. there is no evidence in the 22 years we've been growing gm that there is a problem. liz, the other side is, it is safe and we have a growing population and climate change, and we can use clever technology in silence to make the food more productive, but of the environment, what is wrong with that? why don't we do it? all those farmers growing gm at the moment are growing herbicide tolerant crop so they are very heavily sprayed with particular weed killers, which is having all sorts of impact. that is one cop a lot of these are designed to use fewer pesticides. and they do. there are some crops designed to have lesson set sides but that's because they make and set aside in their own cells. they are still
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having impacts on nature that spraying would have. talking about feeding the world, we produce more than enough food. to feed a growing global population? we produce enough food to feed double the world population. people aren't hungry because there is not enough food, people are hungry because they are pooh people are hungry because they are poor. hunger is a political issue and producing more food isn't going to make it go away. that is barely the scratching the surface of a flavour of the debate. if we do live the —— leave the eu, we will be free asa the —— leave the eu, we will be free as a country to go our own way it borisjohnson remains as a country to go our own way it boris johnson remains prime minister. it will be interesting to see what happens. now it's time to get the news, travel, and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. police have arrested a man who allegedly threatened to blow up a block of flats in east london early this morning. the building in barking
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was evacuated, and police negotiators talked to the man who'd barricaded himself inside a flat. he was taken to hospital as a precaution after being arrested. a london council placing vulnerable families in converted shipping containers says the housing crisis has left them with no choice but to use temporary accomodation. according to a report by the children's commissioner a growing number of children in the capital are growing up in "cramped and unsafe" conditions by living inside "heavily modified" containers. ealing council said modular homes offer "a far better, much more private standard of accomodation than traditional hostels or bed and breakfasts". after years of producing crops using pesticides, fertilisers and machinery there are growing concerns for our soil. some experts say the use of traditional farming techniques could lead to soil becoming infertile. 0ne hertfordshire farmer is among those who are turning their backs
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on methods like ploughing. he believes it's making a difference. we're just harnessing all these fantastic creatures who live on the soil to do the work for us and not only are they making this lovely seedbed and creating the soil that helps these plants grow but they're feeding these plants with nitrogen and phosphorus, which they're liberating from the bedrock in wonderful ways that we couldn't even imagine. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's minor delays on the overground but a good service on other tubes. 0n the roads — in walthamstow there's queuing traffic on the a406 westbound from waterworks corner to the crooked billet interchange because of a broken—down van. in elmers end, croydon road is closed eastbound from elmers end road to clock house road for gas works.
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now the weather with lucy martin. hello there. temperatures are on the way up as we move through the next few days, getting into the high 205 for that bank holiday weekend. it does come with a good deal of dry, fine weather, plenty of sunshine around as well. that's certainly the case first thing this morning. as the day wears on, we will see some fair weather cloud bubbling up, sunshine could turn a little hazy later in the day. the temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees celsius with a south—westerly breeze. 0vernight, not a great deal to see on the map here. plenty of clear skies. 0vernight lows of around 9—11 degrees celsius and then tomorrow, a bit of a rinse and repeat of today, really. there'll be lenty of sunshine to come, perhaps a bit more in the way of cloud as we move into the afternoon but holding onto some good spells of sunshine, the temperatures, though, starting to pick up, a maximum of around 24 degrees celsius. and then we continue to see those temperatures rise as we move towards the end of the week. we could see some early mist on friday but then further sunshine
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and then into the bank holiday weekend, temperatures getting into the high 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to naga and dan. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. borisjohnson will repeat his demand for fundamental changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement, when he meets german chancellor angela merkel in berlin later today. allies of mrs merkel have accused the prime minister of making a completely impossible request, and not being serious. in what could be a crucial week for brexit talks, mrjohnson will meet the french president emmanuel macron tomorrow, before travelling to the g7 summit in biarritz at the weekend. thousands of homeless children are growing up in converted shipping containers, office blocks
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and bed and breakfasts, according to a report by the children's commissioner for england. anne longfield says it's a "scandal" that many families are living in dangerous and cramped conditions, often for months at a time. councils say the housing crisis and budget cuts are forcing them to place people in temporary accommodation. cardinal george pell, the most senior catholic cleric to be found guilty of child sexual abuse, has lost an appeal in australia against his conviction. the 78—year—old was jailed for six years in march for abusing two boys in a cathedral in melbourne in the 19905. he maintains his innocence. a fundraising page set up by the family of pc andrew harper has raised nearly £250,000. pc harper was killed while attending reports of a burglary in berkshire on thursday. a man accused of his murder, 20—year—old jed foster, will appear at reading crown court later. he denies any involvement
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in the officer's death. brazil's president, jair bol5onaro, has been blamed for a record number of wildfires across the amazon rainforest. conservationists say the leader's policies have encouraged the clearing of land by farmers and loggers, leading to the outbreak of more than 70,000 fires, that's an increase of more than 80% on the same period last year. the president said the fires were simply seasonal. president trump has cancelled an official state visit to denmark after the nation's prime minister confirmed greenland was not for sale. announcing the cancellation, mr trump tweeted: "denmark is a very special country with incredible people, but based on prime minister mette frederiksen's comments, that she would have no interest in discussing the purchase of greenland, i will be postponing our meeting scheduled in two weeks for another time." this was his vision, was it? he has tweeted saying he would not do that.
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denmark's prime minister described the suggestion greenland would be for sale as absurd, and said she hoped the president was not being serious. i don't know what to read into. the fa ct i don't know what to read into. the fact there was a meeting scheduled for two weeks and they cancelled it, or that he wanted to purchase greenland? there's diamonds in there. diamonds. really? it's 7:34am. carolyn gram have been out and about. there will be coming to us and about. there will be coming to us later. we need to talk about some really... this is just us later. we need to talk about some really... this isjust rotten, isn't it? it's right into the core of the badness of people when they think they can hurl racist abuse that people just they can hurl racist abuse that peoplejust doing their they can hurl racist abuse that people just doing theirjobs. it's not pleasant, is it? paul pogba missed a elsie from manchester united smoke for manchester united —— missed a penalty. and he received racist abuse from the manchester
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united fans. england's marcus rashford tweeted "enough now, this needs to stop" — calling on twitter to do more. saying "manchester united is a family and podga is huge part of that." united's new signing harry maguire says social media need to look at how accounts are verified to prevent the trolls. twitter say they've since suspended several accounts involved. speaking yesterday, the manager of the england women's team and former united player, phil neville, said it might be time for a boycott of social media by professional footballers. it's getting to the point now where i think we need to make a real strong message and i say, i say to every single footballer out there, and to every club and to the pfa, is why don't we make a big stand? come off social media. boycott all social media now and see if that makes a big enough impact. neville was speaking
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after naming his squad. that's coming up against belgium and norway. manchester city's defender eefa mannion gets herfirst senior call up alongside chelsea's bethany england. world cup star ellen white in not in the squad due to injury. england play belgium at the end of the month and norway next month. bury have been forced to suspend a sixth match as owner steve dale turned down an offer to buy the club yesterday, which would have secured its future. the league one side faces being kicked out of the football league. dale believes he can secure a better deal before friday's deadline. time is running out for them, though. australia's coach justin langer says he's confident his players can step up after star batsman steve smith was ruled out of the third test against england which begins at headingley tomorrow. smith has failed to recover from concussion after being hit in the neck in the drawn second test. marnus labuschagne replaced smith at lords and is favourite to do so again. we've got to make sure that all the other guys, our senior players and our younger
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players all step up and fill what are almost unfillable shoes, because he's the best player in the world, but we taught the whole time about squad mentality, being ready, and when things come up, like they always do in this game, we have guys who are ready to step up. so, i'm confident they'll do that. britain's shauna coxsey won a second bronze medal at the world climbing championships in japan. it came in the combined event which is going to be the discipline contested at next year's 0lympics. coxsey lead after the first two rounds, speed and bouldering, her speciality — but she slipped own to third place after the final event. look at the bouldering. that is really ha rd. look at the bouldering. that is really hard. i was a bit confused as to what it was, it looks like it's on an inverted angle? giant boards of stuff to climb over, that is the technical term. there she is. i really had no idea what to expect coming out here, especially in the combined format.
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i've been training a lot, battling some little niggles and injuries, and yeah, just to be here and part of this event is incredible. then to stand on the podium on top of that, i'm ecstatic. absolutely delighted. this might not be sport, but it is about our sport colleague mike. take a look at this. he is already in training, he tweeted these images yesterday saying: "after a brilliant first day jigging around with the strictly pros, we weren't hurting enough, so while others went for ice baths." i think that's a trick. the easy win, then day two is tougher. —— theyis win, then day two is tougher. —— they is you in. wait until you see what he tweets today. do you think it will change that quickly? you do
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need to work it in, and dancing shoes you've never danced in. so, yeah, it will happen. it always happens. michael will be fine. yeah, it will happen. it always happens. michaelwill be fine. mike will be brilliant, but it won't be easy —— mike will be fine. will be brilliant, but it won't be easy -- mike will be fine. it is coming up to 7:40am. for years, it was widely believed that women experienced different symptoms to men while having a heart attack. we've been talking about that, haven't we? yes, we regularly visited. —— visit it. but new research suggests that not to be the case. the british heart foundation says misconceptions about a woman's risk of having a heart attack, meant they received unequal care compared to men, often leading to misdiagnosis and even death. joining us now is professor nick mills from the university of edinburgh, and shernaz engineer, who had a heart attack, joins us in the studio. you are well now? i'm very well.
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excellent. let's first ask professor nick mills. we often have the sense that the advice seems to be changing. what has changed? so, for over 100 years, we've been taught that men and women have different symptoms when they present with a heart attack. 0ur symptoms when they present with a heart attack. our research challenges that. in fact, it demonstrates men and women are just as likely to present with classical symptoms and we need to start re—educating both the general public and our doctors and nurses. 0k, how does that happen? what does that look like? what should people be told to look out for in terms of signs and symptoms? it's really important that not everyone presents with classical chest discomfort or pressure going into the jaw or arm. people can present with different symptoms. but the really important
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m essa g es we symptoms. but the really important messages we should consider heart disease in men and women similarly, rather than labour women as having atypical presentations. 0ur concern is that might lead to under investigation, and under treatment in women. there is pretty good evidence about. shernaz engineer, you were sort of nodding along to that. what were your symptoms, did you think you are having a heart attack? not at all. it started on a monday and i had pain from my neck down. it carried on for a whole week. it got so bad, on the saturday week. it got so bad, on the saturday we went to a dinner party, and then i was feeling really nauseous. you had pain in your arm and things as well? it was tingling. i went to the physio on a tuesday, she said it was a trapped nerve and you slept badly. the whole week i kept taking aspirins and stuff and, you know, put stuff on my arms i wouldn't have so put stuff on my arms i wouldn't have so much pain. but itjust went on.
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by so much pain. but itjust went on. by saturday night it was really bad. i told my partner, i by saturday night it was really bad. itold my partner, i need by saturday night it was really bad. i told my partner, i need to go home, i i told my partner, i need to go home, lam really i told my partner, i need to go home, i am really feeling very sick. 0n the way he said do you want to go to the hospital? i said no, it's a trap. i would get a strong painkiller. by 2am, my pain started in my back on my front and it was so bad i could not sleep on the bed stop so, i had to get up and sort of sit up and sleep on the server, just dosing. by sam, it was really excruciating. i put on my clothes andl excruciating. i put on my clothes and i ran across. i live on one of the busiest streets in my neighbourhood, i went to the private hospital and i went and i said i have this pain in my arm and my chest and the guy said you're having a heart attack! i said me, don't be silly? i took a blood test and he
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said you're having a heart attack. there must‘ve been some damage? said you're having a heart attack. there must've been some damage? i've damaged my heart by 30%. because you we re damaged my heart by 30%. because you were told it was a trapped nerve?” carried on for a whole week. if someone had even said to me, you should go to the gp or go to the hospital and so this, i would have gone. it has damaged my heart. professor nick mills, when you hear shernaz‘s experience, what would be your advice to anyone experiencing this kind of pain? you always don't wa nt to this kind of pain? you always don't want to bother doctors with what might not well be a trapped nerve once you've been diagnosed. but these symptoms seem so far—reaching or so widespread it is difficult to pinpoint what a heart attack looks and feels like? i think the messages would rather see you to determine whether it is a heart attack or not,
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irrespective of how classical your symptoms are, and really important that women don't consider this to be something they don't experience. the earlier you can come to hospital, the better the treatment you are going to get. now, the national health service does a douglas job of treating heart attacks and survival for a heart attack is excellent, but you've got to come early. the earlier we see you, the better the treatment we can offer. sent -- shernaz, did you have different conceptions about heart attacks? even though i was having chest pains, i never thought even though i was having chest pains, i neverthought i even though i was having chest pains, i never thought i would have a heart attack. it's crazy. i've always made sure i didn't have breast cancer by checking, but, you know, you always worry about cancer. you never worry about heart attacks. this is why i am so glad the bhf is making us aware that you should be aware. if i'd been to the doctor in
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my 40s and they had taken my cholesterol, they would have found out i was prone to it. after my — a stent was put in, they took my cholesterol and it was skyhigh. you know, it was unbelievable. and the next day, this is hilarious, a woman came in with a checklist and said, oh, cani came in with a checklist and said, oh, can i ask you a few questions. have you ever smoked? i said never. have you ever smoked? i said never. have you ever had a drink? i said one or two a week. i'd do you go to kentucky? do you ever go to mcdonald's? i said never. she said, my dear, you are so unlucky. and, you know, it wasn't enormous, i'm overweight but, you know, it was... something i don't think would ever have happened to me. you had a lucky scare, i'm glad you're well now.
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thank you, i am. and professor, thank you for coming on. i'm sure there are people watching this this morning. i think every woman over 40 should check her cholesterol and blood pressure, at should check her cholesterol and blood pressure, et cetera. i'm glad the british heart foundation is making us aware of this. professor nick mills, thank you very much as well for taking us through those symptoms and explaining what's going on. thank you. a pleasure. just we are on social media this morning as well where you can also find on facebook, bee cam. here they are. milling around. creating lots of lovely honey. it's not rather mesmerising. from these bees to brea kfast mesmerising. from these bees to breakfast queen bee. it's time to
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talk to carol. good morning everybody. what have you. let's meet two of the farmers here. pat stanley and poppy. tell us a bit about this natural meadow. it is beautiful. this is a zero input natural grassland which means we don't put any fertilisers on it. it looked like this for hundreds of years and it actually is on the margins of the rest of the farm. we are quite happy for it to be like this. poppy is beautiful. what does she do? she is our head rodent control officer. earlier on, we were in a field that
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has just been harvested. what we are growing? we were growing wheat. it been a good season until we wanted to harvest. the crop looked really, really well. then when we wanted to get the combine in the field, a deluge started. it's a shame because it just sort of takes the deluge started. it's a shame because itjust sort of takes the edge of the quality of the crop. hopefully we'll be talking to your sonjoe later on. what have you, you can see the reservoir right behind me. making a right old bracket down there. we saw them flying back in formation. the forecast today, it's mixed. increasingly windy, bluster in the south. the reason for this
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is, we got high pressure in the south keeping things settled, low pressure in the north and that is the low pressure coming in. look at the low pressure coming in. look at the isobars. gusts of wind in the north—west, 50, 55 miles per hour with exposure even possibly a bit more. after a cool start and a largely dry start, we will see the cloud build on the west. the rain comes into northern ireland and also much of scotland. moving away from scotla nd much of scotland. moving away from scotland and northern ireland, may a dry day. possibly the southwest. sunny spells, blustery winds and highs up to 22 degrees. through the evening and overnight, the weather front producing the rain does get into northern england. heavy at times across the north—west. also into north wales. also heavy at times. as it sinks into the midlands, it will weaken. not much more than a band of cloud and spots
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of rain. also, new front coming in across northern ireland, introducing rain. tomorrow, that rain is going to push out of northern ireland. where it will remain for much of the day. we will start to see more totals like 25—35 millimetres of rain coming from this band. 0r england and wales, again, a drier day, fewer showers around. the weather front breaking up with sunshine developing. by friday, a lot of dry weather around when we lose the rain from the far north of scotland. sunny spells developing as well and temperatures getting up to about 26 degrees. as we head into the weekend, for some of us, it's a bank holiday. at the moment, it's looking settled, dry, warm and sunny with temperatures widely into the 205. in the south—eastern quarter, hires up to 28 or 29. she did it
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ain! hires up to 28 or 29. she did it again! the thing is, carol, we saw into your mind. we have too gruesome to sims. it's unusual for us to be on the couch together. you can't get cross. you can't get cross with carol on my behalf. i'm not cross, i'm just winding carol on my behalf. i'm not cross, i'mjust winding up carol on my behalf. i'm not cross, i'm just winding up stop to know what, is it my day off? i don't have a pet. you will soon have a baby, that will do. i've got three cats,
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you've got dogs. when i lost an animal, it's about how sympathetic this is will be. a lot of people without animals think, just get over the —— just get over it. without animals think, just get over the -- just get over it. i think most people would be pretty devastated. we got diane with us he was a specialist. let me give you the reason why we talking about the story. most people with a pet would be devastated. there's been a lot of debate about whether people should actually be allowed to have pet bereavement leave and it's come up again because a glass co—worker says she was refused time off when her terrier died so she started a petition. that petition is to get the rules changed. it's at nearly 19,000 signatures. diane james is a specialist in pet bereavement. are there any rules about pets at the moment? the rules state certain
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dependence, you can have leave. it's very loosely defined. there is nothing specifically for your pet. what do you say to people about how to deal with work? do you encourage them to talk to their employer? what we encourage them to do is be honest. most people ring inside something else rather than pet has died. the best thing, if you are honest, hopefully they will be compassionate and empathetic. that's what we want to encourage. we understand not heavily employer can give leave. if you can be compassionate, you can help them out and normalise. a lot of people don't understand. what do you think of the idea of employers giving leave?” also understand, some people can't, others it's the number. people then ta ke others it's the number. people then take the mix. i have hamsters, i
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have wished, where do you draw the line? we support any business that is compassionate to an employee. what advice would you give to employers? talk to them and be honest. explain how it affects your business. if you can get them a differentjob for the day, behind—the—scenes or somewhere they won't get emotional. 0f behind—the—scenes or somewhere they won't get emotional. of course, i a lwa ys won't get emotional. of course, i always say, if you can't talk to them, ring us. how is it getting? it's getting better. people realise the benefits of a pet, how attached people come. like me, it's a member of my family. you mentioned earlier, there could be some people out there who think, i could take the mickey and just south had a pet that's died. what is your kind of advice around that? they even do it with human relatives. its trust with each
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other. if you have an employee, you know how people feel about them. if you movejobs. know how people feel about them. if you move jobs. people know how people feel about them. if you movejobs. people can take know how people feel about them. if you move jobs. people can take the mickey. we say trust, compassion and listen to each other. great advice. lovely to see you. that's it from me for now. you'll remember, just a few weeks ago the small town of whaley bridge in derbyshire looked dangerously close to being completely flooded, when a nearby dam partially collapsed.now, of course, the town's residents are back in their homes, but work to drain more than one million tons of water, and re—home 30,000 fish, from the reservoir continues. 0ur reporter dave guest is there for us this morning. good morning. yes, we are at the reservoir, a shadow of its former self. it's had millions of gallons of water pumped out of it. it's now only two metres deep. they had to do that because the dam over he was in danger of giving way. it was flooding over the top, the book the
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town of whaley bridge was imperilled. they started a huge operation to empty the reservoir. that operation has finished another real work begins. more importantly understanding julie sharman from the canal and river trust is with me now. it's now getting the management situation finished. we have 11, 12 inch pumps which are keeping the water level at —12 or below. this only about two metres of water. those pumps are hanging off the pontoons and are available should any rain start to fall. that is going to be the concern of people. is there a danger it's going to start posing a problem? the system we got in here can deal with extreme rainfall events. we are very confident that what we have here is more than enough to deal with
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problems. swapping in for any potential problems with machine failure. we got this good system in place which will protect the residents of whaley bridge. longer term and briefly, how is that going to go? it will take up to three yea rs. we to go? it will take up to three years. we must understand why this happened and will get into the design and construction and investigation will inform and what they need to do, to improve dam safety because that's what it's all about. there are thousands of other dams around the country. there are 2000 in england alone. this is one of our larger ones. there are much bigger ones. most of them are of the same general design. there is a lot to learn. thanks very much indeed. that is it from the reservoir here. i will hand you now to your reason —— regions for the news, travel, and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. police have arrested a man who allegedly threatened to blow up a block of flats in east london early this morning. the building in barking was evacuated, and police negotiators talked to the man who'd barricaded himself inside a flat. he was taken to hospital as a precaution after being arrested. nearby residents in barking were forced to leave their homes after the man also threatened to burn down the building.fire a london council placing vulnerable families in converted shipping containers says the housing crisis has left them with no choice but to use temporary accomodation. according to a report by the children's commissioner a growing number of children in the capital are growing up in "cramped and unsafe" conditions by living inside "heavily modified" containers. ealing council said modular homes offer "a far better, much more private standard of accomodation than traditional hostels or bed and breakfasts". after years of producing crops using pesticides, fertilisers and machinery there are growing concerns for our soil.
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some experts say the use of traditional farming techniques could lead to soil becoming infertile. 0ne hertfordshire farmer is among those who are turning their backs on methods like ploughing and believes it's making a difference. we're just harnessing all these fantastic creatures who live on the soil to do the work for us and not only are they making this lovely seedbed and creating the soil that helps these plants grow but they're feeding these plants with nitrogen and phosphorus, which they're liberating from the bedrock in wonderful ways that we couldn't even imagine. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there are minor delays on the overground — a good service on the tubes. 0n the roads — in walthamstow there's queuing traffic on the a406 westbound from waterworks corner to the crooked billet interchange
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because of a broken down van. in elmers end, croydon road is closed eastbound from elmers end road to clock house road for gas works. now the weather with lucy martin. hello there. temperatures are on the way up as we move through the next few days, getting into the high 205 for that bank holiday weekend. it does come with a good deal of dry, fine weather, plenty of sunshine around as well. that's certainly the case first thing this morning. as the day wears on, we will see some fair weather cloud bubbling up, sunshine could turn a little hazy later in the day. the temperatures at a maximum of 22 degrees celsius with a south—westerly breeze. 0vernight, not a great deal to see on the map here. plenty of clear skies. 0vernight lows of around 9—11 degrees celsius and tomorrow, a bit of a rinse and repeat of today. there'll be lenty of sunshine to come, perhaps a bit more in the way of cloud as we move into the afternoon but holding onto some good spells of sunshine, the temperatures though starting to pick up, a maximum of around 24 degrees celsius. and we continue to see those temperatures rise as we move
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towards the end of the week. we could see some early mist on friday but further sunshine and into the bank holiday weekend, temperatures getting into the high 205. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and naga munchetty. just gone 8am on wednesday morning. 0ur headlines today: borisjohnson prepares to meet german leader angela merkel — as he tries to persuade the eu to agree a deal without the controversial irish backstop. more than 200,000 children in england are believed to be homeless — with some being housed in converted shipping containers. ryanair strikes. europe's biggest budget airline is in court today to stop pilots from walking out tomorrow, 500,000 passengers could be affected. enough is enough.
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manchester united players urge social media companies to react after paul pogba recieves racist abuse. good morning from the stanleys farm in leicestershire as we continue the bbc‘s focus on farming week. today we are looking at gm crops after the prime minister boris johnson we are looking at gm crops after the prime minister borisjohnson comes out in favour. good morning, toby, ted and i are just along the road from graham this morning in leicestershire. the sun is shining, it is a cool start for england and where is, just a chance ofa england and where is, just a chance of a shower, blustery. and for scotla nd of a shower, blustery. and for scotland and northern ireland, windy with some rain. we will be back with more in 15 minutes. good morning, 21st of august, it is our top story today. borisjohnson will repeat his demand
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for fundamental changes to the brexit withdrawal agreement, when he meets the german chancellor, angela merkel, in berlin later today. allies of mrs merkel have accused the prime minister of making a completely impossible request, and not being serious. 0ur political correspondent, iain watson in westminster. mrjohnson is going there to meet angela merkel amid accusations of not being serious. that's right. the accusation is that effectively he is putting forward to the eu and offer which they simply have to refuse. in other words, get rid of this controversial northern irish backstop, which they say is essential if britain wants to leave the eu with a deal. he has another message for angela merkel as well, it isa message for angela merkel as well, it is a message more about his collea g u es it is a message more about his colleagues in westminster, naga. he will say don't listen to the anti—no deal dissidents, don't assume they can block a no—deal brexit, don't assume that they can delay brexit beyond 0ctober assume that they can delay brexit beyond october 31, he is talking about some of his former colleagues, the former chancellor phillip hammond amongst others. he is
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saying, don't hedge your bets and don't wait until parliament resumes in september and see what it does. as prime minister i'm determined to leave in october the 31st so if you wa nt leave in october the 31st so if you want a deal then please compromise on the backstop. as far as angela merkel is concerned, she was happy to say, look, we will work desperately hard to avoid ever implementing this, it is an insurance policy against a hard border in northern ireland. but as for borisjohnson, border in northern ireland. but as for boris johnson, he border in northern ireland. but as for borisjohnson, he wants this deleted upfront, and that means there is an almost unbridgeable gap between them and might frankly boris johnson's own supporters do not expect a breakthrough today. interesting. i know borisjohnson had a long conversation with leo varadkar yesterday evening. a lot is being said in the commentary about the loyalties of eu leaders, they are to the eu and the relationship the uk has with those countries is important but not as important. that's right. angela merkel herself was stressing yesterday before the meeting with borisjohnson it was
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important to maintain that unity and that means even if she wanted to she is unlikely to ditch the northern irish backstop, the insurance policy against a hard border in ireland, which so upset so many of boris johnson's colleagues. but she is trying to sound to some extent, and will try to sound a bit more emollient, talking about practical positions down the line that will stop it being implement it. we will also see both sides talking about non—brexit issues today as well trying to show there is agreement on other international issues as well as security. iain watson, thank you for taking us through that. iain watson in westminster. let's go to hamburg now and our correspondentjenny hill. the prime minister will be meeting angela merkel in berlin later. as iain watson pointed out, the prime minister is trying to shift the uk position but the eu's position, and he will find that out over various meetings over the next few days, is pretty much as it was. yeah, and
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interest income over the last couple of years really, germany's position on brexit has not changed. angela merkel has her red lines. the irish backstop now is very much one of them. for several reasons, backstop now is very much one of them. forseveral reasons, bear backstop now is very much one of them. for several reasons, bear in mind she is a leader who grew up behind the iron curtain, she doesn't like borders and walls and doesn't wa nt to like borders and walls and doesn't want to see a hard border on the island of ireland and wants to protect what she would see as the integrity of the eu's single market which benefits germany. this country. so greatly. there is another consideration. behind—the—scenes in berlin people whisper and say we are also not entirely sure that just supposing the eu did give way on the irish backstop is that actually enough to get that withdrawal agreement through parliament? there are some concerns here about the parliamentary arithmetic in britain and what's happening in the british parliament. they are going to watch this very closely in hamburger and if there is the threat and no—deal brexit, it is estimated that the financial damage caused per head of population would be worse here in
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hamburg, the region of hamburg, than anywhere else in germany. they will keep a close eye on what happens today. i don't think anybody is under any illusions that a great deal is going to come out of today's meeting. jenny hill in hamburg, thank you. and iain watson was in westminster for us this morning. an extra £9 million is to be given to local councils to help them prepare for brexit — with a little more than half the money going to areas with major ports. ministers say the funding will help councils develop local brexit plans, and cover additional staffing costs. kent council will get more than £2.5 million due to the potential pressures around the port of dover. thousands of homeless children are growing up in converted shipping containers, office blocks and bed and breakfasts, according to a report by the children's commissioner for england. anne longfield says it's a "scandal" that many families are living in dangerous and cramped conditions, often for months at a time. councils say the housing crisis and budget cuts are forcing them to place people in temporary accommodation.
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children become very anxious, withdrawn, they feel ashamed that they are homeless. they feel ashamed of where they are living. if you are living in an old shipping container ora living in an old shipping container or a converted office block, it is not particularly nice to invite your friends around after school. so all of that has a really severe emotional impact. teachers tell us that children's education is suffering. we will talk to the author of that report in just a few minutes and get a few more details. elsewhere for you this morning. cardinal george pell, the most senior catholic cleric to be found guilty of child sexual abuse, has lost an appeal in australia against his conviction. the 78—year—old was jailed for six years in march for abusing two boys in a cathedral in melbourne in the 19905. 0ur correspondent phil mercer was at the victoria court of appeal when the judgement was handed down. good to see you. he still maintains he is not guilty?
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yes, and his legal team is indicating that they will try to convince australia's highest court, the high court, to hear a new challenge against the convictions. the high court isn't obliged to hear any new case so george pell is now backin any new case so george pell is now back in prison. his next legal move, if there is one, remains unknown. what we do know is that the judges here at the victorian court of appeal were split 2—1 in a decision to dismiss george pell‘s appeal. 0ne of thejudges said to dismiss george pell‘s appeal. 0ne of the judges said that the key witness in this case, one of the boys george pell abused in the 19905 at st patrick's cathedral here in melbourne was a very credible witness. the judge melbourne was a very credible witness. thejudge said melbourne was a very credible witness. the judge said the witness wasn't a liar, he wasn't a fantasist, wasn't a liar, he wasn't a fa ntasist, and that wasn't a liar, he wasn't a fantasist, and that was in large pa rt fantasist, and that was in large part the reason why george pell‘s appeal has been rejected and he is backin appeal has been rejected and he is back in prison facing come on the
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face of it, more than three years in prison before he is eligible for parole. 0k, phil mercer, thank you very much. a fundraising page set up for the family of pc andrew harper has raised nearly £250,000. pc harper was killed whilst attending reports of a burglary in berkshire on thursday. a man accused of his murder, 20—year—old jed foster, will appear at reading crown court later. he denies any involvement in the officer's death. president trump has cancelled an official state visit to denmark after the nation's prime minister confirmed greenland was not for sale. announcing the cancellation, mr trump tweeted: "denmark is a very special country with incredible people, but based on prime minister mette frederiksen's comments, that she would have no interest in discussing the purchase of greenland, i will be postponing our meeting scheduled in two weeks for another time." denmark's prime minister described the suggestion greenland
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would be for sale as absurd, and hoped the president was not being serious. greenland is a danish territory. beautiful it is. looks nice, doesn't it? it's 8:pm. those are some of the main stories around. it's 8:11pm. as you've just heard, it's been revealed that thousands of homeless children in england are growing up in converted shipping containers, office blocks and bed and breakfasts. it is quite unbelievable, isn't it? councils say the scale of the housing crisis and budget cuts are forcing them to place increasing numbers of families in temporary accommodation. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan reports. would you like to live here? this office block in essex was converted into flats to house homeless families. developers don't need planning permission after the government relaxed the rules to boost the housing supply, and tens of thousands of similar properties have been created in recent years across england.
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today's report highlights that some of the flats are tiny, however, whole families are living in an area little bigger than a parking space. the children's commissioner calculates that there are more than 210,000 homeless children in england. 124,000 are in temporary accommodation — office blocks, bed—and—brea kfasts, even repurposed shipping containers while a further 90,000 are sofa surfing. children become very anxious, withdrawn. they feel ashamed that they're homeless, they feel ashamed of where they are living. i mean, if you are living in an old shipping container, or a converted office block, it's not particularly nice to invite your friends around after school. all of that has a really severe emotional impact and teachers tell us that children's education is suffering. councils say the housing crisis and budget cuts are forcing them to place increasing numbers of families in temporary accommodation, and they are calling on ministers to ensure that all homes
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are built to a high standard. michael buchanan, bbc news. let's get more on this story now from the author of today's report simone vibert, from the children's commissioner's office. thank you forjoining us. and giving us thank you forjoining us. and giving usa thank you forjoining us. and giving us a bit more detail on this story. what prompted you to look into this? were you hearing stories of some of the examples of the conditions people were living in? yes, we were hearing about so many families that we re hearing about so many families that were struggling to make ends meet and been tipped into homelessness, perhaps because they couldn't afford their rising rent or they were awaiting the first universal credit payment. the stories were really shocking. they involved families living in spaces that are just simply too small, sometimes barely bigger than a car parking space. we also found that the government data in this area just really wasn't up to scratch. we know from the government dated that, yes, there is
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around 120,000 children in temporary accommodation but we didn't know there is a further 375,000 children who are at risk of becoming homeless. that is something that really needs to be understood if we are going to tackle the rising tide of homelessness. lots of people living right on the edge. you talk about living space the size of a car park space. can you give us an idea of some of the conditions you saw people living in? we heard of families being forced to move away miles and miles from the children's friends and from their schools. we heard about really poor quality accommodation. you said in your report about converted shipping containers. that was something that we went and saw for ourselves. we heard about condensation dripping down the walls. we heard from one mother that she couldn't sleep with her front mother that she couldn't sleep with herfront door to her mother that she couldn't sleep with her front door to her shipping container open because it was simply too hot and she had a baby alongside her. that just isn't too hot and she had a baby alongside her. thatjust isn't right in 21st—ce ntu ry her. thatjust isn't right in 21st—century england. her. thatjust isn't right in 21st-century england. i'm sure you have seen the government response.
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they say no child should ever be without a roof over their head, we are working to ensure all families have a safe place to stay. they mention they have invested £1.2 billion to tackle all types of homelessness including funding a tea m homelessness including funding a team of specialist advisers which has in two years helped local authorities reduce the number of families in the end be accommodation for more than six weeks by 28%. they say that money is helping to tackle this. do you think that money can make a difference and is it making a difference? it is a good start but this is a big problem that successive governments have failed to get to grips with and ultimately what it comes down to is a lack of affordable housing. that really needs to be addressed very quickly. and also further work needs to be done to improve the quality of temporary accommodation for families living in it now, and that must involve introducing new space standards so that certain temporary accommodation has to be a certain size. it involves also addressing the welfare system which just isn't
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working forfamilies the welfare system which just isn't working for families at the moment. simon, i have noticed that your earpiece has fallen out and you might want to push it back in and hopefully you can hear my next question. i will wait a moment while you put it in. you talked about some of the conditions that some children and families are living through. what impact can i have particularly ona what impact can i have particularly on a child's mental and physical health? it can have a severe impact. we heard cases of children being bullied for the fact they were living in these office blocks, shipped out miles and miles away from home, they became very isolated because their accommodation was far away from their friends and shops. in these office block conversions, sometimes these kids are called office block kids by their peers at school and that will impact children's mental health. and also all children need security, they need stability, and without that they just can't succeed need stability, and without that theyjust can't succeed in life. and we are not giving back to these children in temporary accommodation. simone vibert, thank you for giving
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us simone vibert, thank you for giving usa simone vibert, thank you for giving us a bit more extra detail. interesting to hear. interesting isn't the right word, it is terrible to hear some of the conditions some of those children are living in. shelter has said this, we heard about the response from the government putting money into tackle all types of homelessness. shelter so, no child should spend months or yea rs so, no child should spend months or years ina so, no child should spend months or years in a converted shipping container, office block or emergency bed and breakfast but they say a cocktail of punitive welfare policies, lack of social homes and widely expensive private homes mean it isa widely expensive private homes mean it is a complex situation. they say the devastated impact this has on a child's development and well—being cannot be overstated. if you know someone going through something like that or you yourself are going through something like that get in touch, we would love to find out how the process works, actually and how easy it is to move on and what help is offered. get in touch in the usual ways. we would love to hear from you and perhaps follow up on this. it is 8:17am. we are focusing
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on all things farming today, and this week in fact, and also taking a look at the issue of gm food and with brexit how that will affect us. carol is getting involved too. she is on carol is getting involved too. she isona carol is getting involved too. she is on a farm somewhere down there in gorgeous leicestershire. when carol gets to do these outside broadcasts, have you noticed she always makes sure the weather works for her. she takes a helicopter with her as well. it is not a helicopter! it is a drone. it is absolutely a drone and carol has her own wellington boots as well so don't worry about that. good morning, everyone, iam on so don't worry about that. good morning, everyone, i am on the sta nleys fa rm good morning, everyone, i am on the stanleys farm in leicestershire and you are quite right, it is beautiful. there are 720 acres of farmland here, 50 acres of which is wild meadow, as you can seejust behind me there. while the meadows actually attracts lots of insects, butterflies and even some muntjac and that one is totally unimproved.
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so what you see is what you get. where i am standing was actually harvested this week and a crop of wheat has been taken in. the weather today, a chilly start but we are going to see some sunshine initially but then it changes. the forecast for today is quite variable. we are looking at strengthening winds coming in from across the northern half of the country, particularly the north—west and some rain. as we can further south, under an area of high pressure, well, things are more settled with a risk of a shower or two. through the morning we will start to see cloud coming in from the west across western areas with a few showers and also have the rain coming on courtesy of that weather front, initially across northern ireland, then through the day across much of scotland, accompanied by stronger winds gusting 50—55 mph plus possibly with exposure in the north west. whereas, for the rest of england and wales we are looking at a blustery day as indicated by the black circles you can see, the wind
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gusts, and a chance of a shower in the midlands and south west but most of us will stay dry. the sunshine lasting the longest in the south—east where we will have the highest temperatures at 22 degrees. through this evening and overnight, the weather front six south bringing heavy rain across north—west england, north wales. behind it, some showers and clear spells, ahead of it, some clear spells. and the weather front weakens as it heads down. they will be a new weather front coming in across northern ireland over night and that will introduce some rain by the end of the night. tomorrow, it moves out of northern ireland and becomes ensconced across scotland way will have a further 25—30 millimetres of rain from it and it will be fairly windy in the northern half of the country. in the south, we are looking at one or two showers getting in, courtesy of that weather front which is weakening but the front which is weakening but the front breaks up through the course of the day and we will see some sunshine. by friday the weather front in scotland eventually clears away, taking its rain with it, then
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we are all in for a drier day and although we might start off cloudy in the morning, the cloud will break and the sunshine will come through and the sunshine will come through and ourtop and the sunshine will come through and our top temperature on friday is up and our top temperature on friday is up to 26. as for the weekend, at the moment it is looking misty and foggy in places first thing in the morning but that will lift and then dry, sunny and warm widely across the uk, looking at temperatures into the 205, locally in the south—east, 28 or 29. naga, i 205, locally in the south—east, 28 or29. naga, i know you 205, locally in the south—east, 28 or 29. naga, i know you love that, dan, i'm not so sure about you, though. oh, yeah? you know me far too well, carol. that is a very big bale of hay, you have, carol, did you get that especially? not at all, naga. i would have jumped up on it but it is too high. my jumped up on it but it is too high. my brother is always saying to me i have a short wheelbase. meaning i have a short wheelbase. meaning i have short legs. here we go.
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yeah! how very elegant. it was really classy, carol. thanks very much for that, carol. we have one more visit to carol before we leave her on breakfast, she will be back at 8:45am. it is a really big day as borisjohnson makes his first trip to germany later. a trip which will be watched particularly closely by people living in the north port city of hamburg. his first foreign trip as prime minister, isn't it? that's because its estimated a no—deal brexit could do more financial damage per head of population in hamburg than any other part of germany. 0ur correspondent jenny hill is there. you have been taking a careful look at this link between hamburg and the uk. billions of pounds of trade goes between the uk and the port that you are in today. absolutely. last year, imports and exports between this region of hamburg and britain amounted to some 6.5 billion
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euros. it is a huge amount of money, britain is really big business. i don't think anybody here expects that boris johnson don't think anybody here expects that borisjohnson is going to walk away from today's meeting with angela merkel with her blessing to reopen that withdrawal agreement and ta ke reopen that withdrawal agreement and take out the irish backstop. but they are going to be watching really closely because borisjohnson's threat of a no—deal brexit has sent a shiver down the spine of economists in this region and beyond. as i've been finding out politicians and business people in hamburg say that whilst in no deal must be avoided if possible, the eu, germany, shouldn't just pay must be avoided if possible, the eu, germany, shouldn'tjust pay any price for that. germany has no appetite for a no—deal brexit. it's what the new british prime minister's threatening to dish up if he doesn't get what he wants. and in hamburg, where much of the fish comes from british waters, that's a concern. translation: we aren't panicking, but we expect prices to rise.
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we will have to pass costs onto the consumer. so, should the eu renegotiate the terms of britain's departure? translation: i don't think you should give any more. europe has given up a lot already, and i think we've reached the limit. it's estimated hamburg would suffer more financial damage per head of population than any other part of the country. other regions worry for their car plants, their drug companies. in hamburg, it's aeroplanes. translation: of course, we're worried about what brexit will bring, we're the third biggest aviation site. hamburg produces airbuses, whose wings come from wales. europe's queen of compromise encountered plenty of hot air as she toured geothermal sides
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in iceland yesterday. berlin are still not sure whether borisjohnson is berlin are still not sure whether boris johnson is calling berlin are still not sure whether borisjohnson is calling europe's bluff. but angela merkel has her redlines, and the irish backstop is one of them. in hamburg, they come and they go. but germany has never altered its brexit course. you really get a sense ofjust how close germany and britain have been. they've traded through this port for centuries. germany wants to keep britain close, but it values europe and the single market more. and those hoping that this country's soft spot for the british can translate into more brexit concessions may be disappointed. and even as it seeks to prevent it, this city, this country, is steeling itself for a painful farewell. uppermost in angela merkel‘s mind
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today, i suspect, uppermost in angela merkel‘s mind today, isuspect, is uppermost in angela merkel‘s mind today, i suspect, is the priority for her, which is making sure that the eu maintains the united front on brexit, which she has managed to do over the last couple of years. i mention angela merkel‘s red lines in the report. the irish backstop is one of them and for a number of reasons. first of all, she is a leader who grew up behind the iron curtain, she doesn't like walls or borders and doesn't want to see a ha rd borders and doesn't want to see a hard border in ireland and is also concerned about the integrity of the eu single market. it is worth emphasising this, behind—the—scenes in berlin there is some scepticism about whether simply removing the irish backstop would actually enable that withdrawal agreement to be passed by the british parliament. so, a lot to play for today, but borisjohnson, it so, a lot to play for today, but boris johnson, it is so, a lot to play for today, but borisjohnson, it is widely expected, isn't likely to come away with very much. angela merkel has indicated that where a solution to be found that removes the need for the backstop, that's fine, people are ready to talk and listen but i
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must say in berlin and in germany the senses that is to come from britain and as yet britain hasn't managed to find any sensible alternative. jenny, good to talk to you. interesting assessment of what will be an important day for the prime minister today and tomorrow when he meets a macron and onto the g7 at the weekend. slightly busy. lots to talk about on the programme, we will tell you more but you need to find out what is happening where you are. we will see you ina happening where you are. we will see you in a couple of minutes. it is going to turn much warmer into the bank holiday weekend. today we have a north — south split. northern areas, an area of low pressure bringing an area of low pressure, high pressure in the south keeping
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things settle for most of england and wales. sunny spells, one or two showers developing ahead of the band of rain as it moves east. from northern ireland and the west of scotland, heavy rain this afternoon, gusty winds associated with that, temperature 17—19 in the north, 22 in the south—east. the area of rain will continue to march south—east tonight, breaking up and fragment in the early part of thursday morning, temperatures overnight staying for many of us in double figures, 12—14. thursday, this area of rain linked to the cold front will move further south and continue to fragment as it moves into high pressure. another weather system will slowly move into northern ireland and scotland. further rain expected here on thursday. western scotland, there could be a lot of rainfall accumulating by the end of the day.
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further south, a few showers in northern england, but elsewhere in england and wales, largely dry. hints of temperature starting to rise. they will continue to rise as high pressure from the near continent becomes more established across the uk, starting to block weather fronts in the far north and west, plenty of dry weather on friday and into the bank holiday weekend. some sunshine for many and temperatures rising so up to about 29 in the south—east of england. goodbye.
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always looks so spontaneous! this is business live from bbc news with ben bland and egon cossou. britain's top bosses have a big paycut but still earn more than 100 times the salary of average workers. live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, 21st august. the salaries of the ftse100 bosses are down by 13%, yet, on average, they still earn a massive $4.2 million a year. also in the programme...

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