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tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 25, 2019 9:30am-10:01am BST

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hello, this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines... president trump and borisjohnson meet for a working breakfast at the g7 summit — with thepromise of "a very big with the promise of "a very big
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trade deal" after brexit. we are going to do a fantastic deal once we clear up we are going to do a fantastic deal once we clear up some we are going to do a fantastic deal once we clear up some of the obstacles once we clear up some of the o bsta cles in once we clear up some of the obstacles in our path. as far as the uk and united states are concerned, we re uk and united states are concerned, were working on a very big trade deal and i think it is going to work out very well. the prime minister will discuss brexit later with the eu council president. the uk's biggest airports will install 3—d baggage scanners to make security checks quicker. 40,000 brazillian troops begin a major operation to fight fires in the amazon. we report — from a rainforest in crisis. before the papers — sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn watson. good morning. a glimmer of hope at the ashes? yes! yesterday we were saying how it
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looked all but over for england, and there's no doubt australia are still the favourites at headingley, but there's hope, after they dug in. they still trail australia by over 200 runs. andy swiss can bring us the story from yesterday. just a few hours earlier, it would have been unthinkable. england's captain cheered from the field with his team's ashes hopes still alive. earlier, australia's batsmen seemed to have ended them as they extended their lead. marnus labuschagne exhibiting his skill and his courage. struck on the helmet byjofra archer, he was cleared to continue and made 80. by the time archer wrapped up the innings, england's hopes seemed over. the target, 359. huge, but it soon seemed even huger. rory burns quickly went, before jason roy was
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bamboozled by a beauty. at 15—2, england were staring at humiliation, but finally some resistance. the twojoes, denly and root, combining to impressive effect. a flicker of hope, perhaps, as they both reached their half centuries, headingly was starting to believe. joe denly finally went, gloving one behind, but crucially, joe root continues. while he is at the crease anything is possible. well, england have shown some welcome fight, it still might not be enough to rescue them all the ashes. but the fans‘ hopes are still hanging on. so if england are to pull off an unlikely victory today, they'll have to put together their highest successful fourth innings run chase in tests. the best stands at 332 — that was made at melbourne way back in 1928.
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joe denley thinks it can happen. joe denley thinks it can happenm was never about getting a draw losing the test match, it is all about winning and that belief has to be there. and to be in a position we are in now, there's a lot of excitement in the dressing room. not getting too far ahead of ourselves! now take a look at this brilliant goal from liverpool's mo salah as they beat arsenal 3—1... a brilliant turn, before bursting in behind the arsenal defence. he added a second from the penalty spot, to make it three wins from three and extend their run of consecutive league wins to 12, equalling their record from 1990. a year in which they won their last league title. i didn't see a bad player tonight, or one who played under his level. it was really good, and there was one tackle that was incredible. completely clean, winning the ball and passing it pretty much with your bum on the floor, still passing the ball,
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that was incredible. so, yes, sensational. bit of a sickener for manchester united, having missed a penalty at 1—0 down they finally equalised with a minute to play against palace, only for patrick van aanholt to win it deep in injury time marcus rashford took it and was subjected to racist abuse online after, the fourth incident in two weeks. twitter have said they'll meet manchester united to outline what they're doing to tackle it. it's unheard of and we need to stop it, it needs to stop. because, no, iamjust lost for words, if it keeps going. we keep having all these campaigns, no to racism, and they still keep hiding behind fake identities so it's just crazy that we are talking about this in 2019.
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chelsea have their first win of the season and tammy abraham to thank for it, he got the winner, scoring twice in a 3—2 win over norwich. chelsea fielding their youngest line up in the premier league since 1994. in the scottish premiership, celtic and rangers play today, ysterday there were wins for motherwell and livingston while the games at kilmarnock and hibernian ended in draws. bolton wanderers have been set a deadline of 5pm on tuesday to complete the club's sale or else face expulsion from the english football league. the club have been in administration since may and are the subject of a takeover bid. tonight the efl says it's "concerned" by ongoing delays. fellow league one side bury were earlier given the same deadline to complete the sale of their club. talk about an upset, st helens who were the overriding favourties heading into yesterday's challenge cup, were beaten by warrington. they came out on top 18—1; in what was a really hot day, at wembley. after two tries daryl clark made sure of the win. saints will be frustrated with some refereeing decsions that went against them, two tries were
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controversially disallowed. but a great moment for the players and the fans, after they were on the end of an upset losing last year's final to catalans dragons. the only time i'm lost for words. the whole squad this week, there's been a buzz around it, there's been a bit of talk about some players not playing. the plan was outstanding. this bunch of boys, they're special. i can't believe it. meanwhile, at twickenham england thrashed ireland in the world cup warm up match, but head coach eddiejones doesnt think his side are ready to win the tournamnet just yet. that's despite their largest ever victory against ireland — 57—15 it finished. manu tuilagi crossing here for one of their eight tries. england's final warm—up match is against italy at st james' park next month before the tournament begins in 27 days time injapan.
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and scotland bounced back too after their recent defeat to france, they won the return match at murrayfield. a chris harris try in the second half sealing the win dina asher smith can begin making plans for the world athletics championships next month. she booked her place in the british team after winning the 100 metres at the uk athletics championship yesterday — with the event doubling up as trials for the world championship in doha. asher smith won in 10.96 seconds — a new championship record. the men's100 metres was much closer and there was a surprise winner. 0jie edoborun edging out adam gemili and zharnel hughes — all three finishing in a time of 10.18 — the result decided on a photo—finish. all three should make the british team. reigning champion marc marquez will start in pole position for today's moto gp british grand prix. but home favourite cal crutchlow has work to do. he will start from ninth after crashing during qualifying yesterday.
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thankfully, he wasn't injured. no such problems for marquez as he held off valentino rossi to claim pole for today's race at silverstone. play had to be suspended at golf‘s tour championship in atlanta after a number of people were injured by lightning strikes near a fan zone. six fans were treated, all were 0k after they were hit by debris, from the strike. only two groups had completed the third round prior to the weather delay — with justin thomas at the top of the leaderboard. that's all the sport for now. we'll have plenty more throughout the rest of the morning but next up on bbc news, it's the papers.
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hello and welcome to our sunday morning paper review. with me are sian griffiths, the education editor of the sunday times and james rampton, features writer of the independent. let's ta ke both of you are always working weekends, do you ever get time to relax? but i do like to do on a sunday morning as i take the morning of, taken to the sunday papers after lunch. it's a lunchtime treat. with me, my efforts scroll every day of the week but i like to surround myself. if you are a journalist, it's also pleasure and professional enjoyment as well is just relaxing. you are constantly being fed ideas about what you might like. that gives me an idea next week. you never switch off. that's just the person you are. by the very nature
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of journalist. but let's person you are. by the very nature ofjournalist. but let's look at person you are. by the very nature of journalist. but let's look at the front pages. the g7 summit in biarritz is dominating the front pages. in the mail, no deal — no thirty billion pounds. borisjohnson will tell eu leaders at the summit britain doesn't have to pay the so—called ‘divorce bill', if there's no trade deal with europe. the sunday times says his threat puts britain on an ‘election footing', with his tough stance intended to win over brexit party supporters. meanwhile the telegraph says mrjohnson has told donald trump that any trade deal with the us must be in the interests of british business. but he's admitted that striking a post—brexit trade deal with the us will not be ‘plain sailing', according to the independent. in the observer, legal guidance for the prime minister — in a leaked email, borisjohnson asks the attorney if he can shut parliament for five—weeks, to avoid mps forcing a brexit extension
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right, let's begin, if we may come up right, let's begin, if we may come up with the sunday times. boris threatening the eu and raising election stakes. james, the drumbeat of electioneering seems to be beating ever louder as the weeks go on. the siren call of nigel farage, i think that is what this is about, the worry amongst old—fashioned tories that the brexit party is 14%, still a significant threat to a tory majority and that would, in my eyes, explained borisjohnson 's majority and that would, in my eyes, explained borisjohnson '5 very tough line on this. he says no we won't pay 30 billion that we would owe to the eu if we did do a deal. to me, it's my granny saying you honour your debts, to me it's absolutely outrageous, we owe them 39 million, those are contracts we signed years ago, we should honour them but this will play well with them but this will play well with
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the brexiteer element of the electorate who are going to say yes, we want a tough guy, someone who is going to stand up to europe. my taxi driver this morning said it's great, johnson is really hacking off all the people that he should be and i thought, it's up at the prime minister is supposed to do? in the eyes of the brexit people, that's what he supposed to do, hack of europe and that that is the same he is achieving it very well. the contrast with what went before, the style so different, even if the substance, the problems he faces are much the same as those theresa may face. absolutely, the style incredibly aggressive, gung ho stop i suspect the brexiteer don't want to pay your of anything at all, not even 7 billion! but it is as if you say, pointing to the possibility of a general election before christmas the sunday times suggesting that downing street has warned of an election in october the 17th ..e date for the diary. be out of the country. also the day eu leaders
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meet to discuss whether to decide giving britain and new deal. the opinion polls in the papers today, this new golf poll for the sunday times puts the tories on 33%, 12 points clear of the labour party which is their largest lead since 2017 with yougov. you can be considered temptation is theresa may did in 2017, opinion poll leads can evaporate quite quickly. did in 2017, opinion poll leads can evaporate quite quicklym did in 2017, opinion poll leads can evaporate quite quickly. if it teaches us anything it's that polls are not so reliable. a febrile atmosphere running through westminster and political journalist, orjournalist fuelling it and saying yes, this is definitely election drumbeats are being bashed at the moment but i would sound a real note of caution, when it comes to come up and people see the fights of the eyes of a ballot box, that will be a much narrower lead and i would foresee a hung parliament if it did go to a general election. i suppose that's the risk. let's look at the
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telegraph, that takes us into more detail some of the things boris johnson was talking about ahead of his breakfast with donald trump this morning. boris tells trump it's time to help british firms. yes. this is quite an amusing story. we thought boris was going to go and fawn all over donald trump and you know, want a trade deal but no, he's come out fighting and he's told donald trump to tearup fighting and he's told donald trump to tear up the red tape and get rid of all these bureaucratic obstacles which are stopping britain, he says, selling goods to the united states and being boris he has some hilarious examples so apparently pork pies, we can sell them in thailand but we can get them into the united states. according to boris cauliflowers can enter the us via specific ports and uk bell peppers cannot get in at all! shock, horror! the one that perplexes me is shower trays. i don't even know what that is, that's not allowed ..ij think that is, that's not allowed ..i think it's the thing you stand on
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when you have your shower. but apparently ours do not meet their standards? it's fine for them to send us chlorinated chicken but we cannot send them substandard territories. that's the interesting point, we will have to trade off in any trade deal, but will be accept that we don't accept now in order to get our shower trays into the united states ? get our shower trays into the united states? i think we will have to acce pt states? i think we will have to accept a lot of chlorinated chicken cell compromises, the eu is very strict particularly on food safety in my view, very correctly. but the big elephant in the room is whether us congress will even pass a trade deal. chuck schumer and nancy pelosi have said this week they will not pass it if wave crashed out with the democratic leaders respectively in the senate and the house. they said they will not pass a deal because no deal would threaten the good friday agreement which the us isa good friday agreement which the us is a signatory and that is crucial, many people in the united states identify as irish—american and they are absolutely wedded to the good friday agreement. if they accuse in
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my view, rightly, borisjohnson of jeopardising that, then there will be no deal with the united states at all, whatever bluster and hyperbole trump and johnson are putting up this week, it won't happen if there isa no this week, it won't happen if there is a no deal because the us congress would stop it. let's move on to the observer. this is another take on brexit, different aspect to it. one we have heard about before. but now, a suggestion although downing street has said there is absolutely no truth in this story, they have come out quite hard on it. which is the suggestion that the prime minister has sought legal advice from the attorney general, you do ask your own lawyer, whether he has the power to shut parliament for five weeks so that it cannot block a no deal brexit? yes. this is a really interesting story and boris johnson asking geoffrey cox whether parliament can be shut down for five weeks would appear to be a plan to stop mps dry to block any deal brexit. and of course people like
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sir keir starmer are saying that would be outrageous, undemocratic, andi would be outrageous, undemocratic, and i know that boris ‘s team have come out and denied the story today but there does seem to be an e—mail from senior government advisers to an advisory number ten written within the last ten days and seen by the observer newspaper which dates quite categorically that the prime minister has requested guidance on the legality of such a move which is a thing called prorogation. and we are all suddenly experts on this which hasn't been used since charles the first are something but we know all about it! let's hope they don't ta ke all about it! let's hope they don't take that particular approach to the challenge! perhaps understandably they remain mps are up in arms about this, dominic grieve who has been very vocal for remain saying it's the house from a national crisis, and it's absolutely wrong. i absolutely agree, brexiteers are banging on about democracy, we must respect democracy but what could be more respecting democracy than letting parliament had the final say
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oi'i letting parliament had the final say on 110 letting parliament had the final say on no deal? the high court and supreme court had mandated parliament to do that, to ignore that, a bit like an old—fashioned dictator, to force it through without consulting parliament is outrageous. except, winning the argument be parliament has already said this is the date on which we are leaving comments on legislation so are leaving comments on legislation so in are leaving comments on legislation soina are leaving comments on legislation so in a sense, it's not for parliament whether or not there is a racing today, that is for government. it is but i do think the final site must still go to parliament, it's a classic thing and boris wants to go to the people, people versus parliament, it's a classic clash between the executive and the parliament. and the executive are saying, yes, we are going to force it through whatever, parliament says we have to have a say as well, we are the voice of the people, we have to have our say and lam with people, we have to have our say and i am with the parliamentarians on that. it feels like everybody is exploring all kinds of options at the moment and there's this huge melting pot of things that could happen and i think everybody is a bit baffled, actually, as to what the game plan is or is there a game
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plan at all? and what is prorogation. all these new words. they are all suddenly this could all vanish into the mist, couldn't it? if angela merkel, her head during the week to allow there to be something of substance, though there is room for manoeuvre and they might come up with a slightly different, reworked brexit agreement? in which case borisjohnson 's massive game of chicken with the eu will have paid off. i will be really surprised if it's not being spun is much more positive than it is because angela merkel and emmanuel macron seem so solid on that in the past but if they are seeing the horror of not being able to sell german cars without a massive tariff and french wine in this country, that is concentrating the mind and they are saying the only way to do this is tweak the backstop and therefore, get the agreement with parliament. we will talk more on this on dateline which is broadcast on the bbc news channel at 11:30am this morning so if you're interested on
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what might be happening behind the scenes we will talk to expert journalists covering in washington and germany, you can see that. prince andrew ‘s statement yesterday has not entirely impress the papers this morning, this is about his relationship with a man who of course was a convicted paedophile? no, that's right. the mail on sunday is still very attached to the story, they put it on the front page, that picture, that very well known picture, that very well known picture by now of the duke of york looking out from a mansion owned by jeffrey epstein in new york, they have a 2—page spread inside which saysis have a 2—page spread inside which says is the duke of york spent almost a week are jeffrey says is the duke of york spent almost a week arejeffrey epstein ‘s new york home. and that was in 2010 which was two years after multimillionaire businessman was convicted of having sex with a child. so, his statement yesterday, i think, probably raises more questions than it answers and that is what this spread in the mail a
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six exploring today, the sunday times also has a story which i think is pretty damning. they have a story ina very is pretty damning. they have a story in a very nice picture to go with it, that is saying, the duke of york flew on epstein ‘s, the lolita express , flew on epstein ‘s, the lolita express, his private plane, with eight miss russia who was subsequently jailed for eight miss russia who was subsequentlyjailed for her failure to attend a drug treatment programme. it's all very that allegation hasn't been put to the duke as far as i'm concerned and he didn't deal with it in his statement, we should probably say that but the point is the story has not gone away, the statement james doesn't appear to be killing it? there is a very old saying in journalism if you are in a hole stop digging and it seems that the duke 's digging and it seems that the duke '5 statement has only led to more digging and more of a whole. and there's lots of comments here, peter kirsten from the association of child abuse lawyer saying prince andrew to offer himself to interview
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by the authorities in america rather than put out a worded statements. ingrid seward who is a royal expert says if it was a politician he would have to resign immediately, of course he can resign because he is in the royal family and allegedly the queen has my favourite son so she wouldn't accept his resignation anyway! but i think there are many, many questions as to answer, you're right, he carried on seeing jeffrey epstein after he was a convicted paedophile, which part of that did prince andrew not realise was a bad idea? you know? it's not only standing by your friends? idea? you know? it's not only standing by yourfriends? i idea? you know? it's not only standing by your friends? i think when you're in the royal family there are things that are more important than that and the perception is deeply damaging for prince andrew and indeed for the whole royal family because he did not distance himself from a convicted paedophile. it's not going to go by, another story here saying the duke of york will be summoned to prosecutors to help them, they've opened an investigation in france, this is going to go on and on, i
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suspect this will be in the papers for many weeks to come. let's move on to your story on the front of the sunday times today. thank you! how kinda sad. we had a long debate about that, really good. yes, this, 0xbridge penalises private peoples, it's august, we had the a—level and gcse results, education in the news and what is emerging is that 0xford and what is emerging is that 0xford and cambridge this year not for the first time, very much this year, to be determined to take large numbers of state school students, perhaps more state school pupils and they have in the past and we know that both universities have been severely criticised including by david cameron and theresa may when they we re cameron and theresa may when they were prime minister. gordon brown as well. yes, criticised for not being representative, not taking enough state school pupils, they take roughly 40% privately educated pupils and roughly 60% of state educated pupils but of course, it's
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only 7% of pupils who are privately educated so that seems terribly unrepresentative so this is a story about the head teacher of one of our leading schools, and recalls, the head of king's college school wimbledon who says he's worried that 0xford wimbledon who says he's worried that oxford and cambridge are turning away brilliant, brilliantly privately educated teenagers in favour of state school pupils who have perhaps lower a—level results and perhaps are not as academic. i think this is the presents we are getting the private schools are really rattled about what is going on and they are feeling their grip on and they are feeling their grip on these top universities is beginning to be diminished. and what about the observer take on this, slightly different? easier exams art howdo slightly different? easier exams art how do they work that out? the private schools have jumped in with the new form of gcse which is perceived to be easier and the idea is that russell group universities are not making any difference between the forms of gcse. so the
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state schools which do the old form which is seen as harder and we've been hearing they've been toughened up. beingjudged by the same yardstick as private schools would surprise have found a way of perhaps subverting the system and finding an easier way to get into the good universities. partly fight you send your children to private school, i would say. but it's interesting it's been picked up by a journalist who has been very vocal about this, saying it's that state extraordinary school pupils are taking harder exams that their private school counterparts and they are being judged on the same criteria. i think it's a really good story because a way, somehow you think sometimes and look at the way the establishment is run, private school gives you advantages that are really unfair. let me do the old and finally the front page, if only, it's whatever, since the brexit equivalent, the skateboard? a skateboarding duck, but actually, a
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time ago. quick summary, we got about a minute. 67 days until brexit. if that makes you nervous you are absolutely not alone. the civil servant who is in charge of government information campaigns has banned the use of a countdown clock in downing street because he thinks it's too stressful the civil serva nts it's too stressful the civil servants who x are expected to deliver on this. and yes, it's a federalist fortunately deliver on this. and yes, it's a federalist ... fortunately james they don't give is the equivalent in here because i moved to too stressful. terrifying. thank you both so much. 0ur clock has run out. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online seven days a week. and if you've missed the programme it's available on the iplayer. my thanks to both my guests. let's get the weather. there's always time for whether, if it's like this. and it is a glorious
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weekend across the bulk of the uk, a little hotter for some of us today. here's a look at cornwall this morning, a bit of cloud out there and a bit more cloud towards parts of south—west england and wales compared with yesterday. any of us hot in the hazy sunshine today. let's look at the satellite picture, areas of cloud wafting towards us overnight, we keep some of that towards the channel islands, south—west england, western counties of wales, it may brush towards the coast of north—west england this afternoon, perhaps towards dumfries and galloway but elsewhere high cloud and hazy sunshine, more of that across scotland and northern ireland compared to yesterday, that's what you see higher temperatures, near 30 in hotspots in scotla nd temperatures, near 30 in hotspots in scotland and above 30 in england, 32 even 33 degrees and that could be a record for the late august bank holiday weekend. let's look at and i. holiday weekend. let's look at and i,a holiday weekend. let's look at and i, a barbecue evening, cloud expanding across the western side of the uk, lowering to give poor
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visibility in places, that means there will be for patches mainly towards the west as we start the day tomorrow, temperatures overnight into the mid—teens. 0n tomorrow, temperatures overnight into the mid—teens. on to the bank holiday, river apart from scotland, across the bulk of the uk another fine day, cloud improve visibility in the west slowly improving, some sunny spells albeit quite hazy across sunny spells albeit quite hazy a cross m ost sunny spells albeit quite hazy across most places. the chance of showers edging towards cornwall, pushing into the western isles later, coolly feeling date for many of us in scotland and northern ireland, not cold by any stretch of the imagination, temperatures are staying up in eastern england into the 30s in hotspots. the big picture as we go through the week, seeing this weather system moving through and that will bring some cooler and fresher atlantic air coming back. on tuesday we could well see showers and thunderstorms breaking out ahead of this system which are still waiting in the wings, giving some rain to the western isles and temperatures starting to come down a little bit but the heat is still there especially across eastern parts of england. bridge is
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continuing to slide away as go through the week ahead and with the chance of seeing some wetter weather for a change as well. that's your latest forecast. for every 30 minutes on the bbc news channel. this is bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines: president trump and borisjohnson meet for a working breakfast at the g7 summit, with the promise of "a very big trade deal" after brexit. we are going to do a fantastic deal, once we clear up some of the obstacles in our path. as far as the uk and the united states, we are working on a very big trade deal and i think it's going to work out very well. the prime minister will discuss brexit later with the eu council president. the uk's biggest airports will install 3d baggage scanners to make security checks quicker. 40,000 brazillian troops begin a major operation to fight fires in the amazon. we report from a rainforest in crisis. it is a huge task for the troops who are supposedly reaching this region. this is a global crisis because these are considered

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