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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 26, 2019 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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that is the theme as we east anglia. that is the theme as we end the week. outbreaks of rain, blustery showers, it will turn breezy too and feel cool and fresh. this is bbc news. the headlines at 11pm: the prime minister says he's marginally more optimistic about striking a brexit deal after meeting g7 leaders in france, saying it the job of everyone in parliament to deliver on time. think people have enough i think people have just about had enough of this conversation, and i think they're yearning for when brexit comes off the front pages but that can only happen when we come out of the eu on october the 31st. leaders at the summit pledge $22 million to help tackle the devastating fires in the amazon rainforest. the $22 million promised by the g7
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nations to help tackle the fires here in brazil is welcomed by environmental campaigners in this country, but most would say it doesn't go anywhere near far enough. an oklahoma judge rules that drugmakerjohnson &johnson must pay $572 million for its part in fuelling the state's opioid addiction crisis. the largest earthquake thought to be caused by a fracking site in the uk has been felt in lancashire. and record—breaking weather — the hottest late august bank holiday sees temperatures hit 33 degrees celsius. and at 11:30pm we'll be taking a look at the papers with our reviewers. kevin schofield and daisy mcandrew will be with us. stay with us for that. good evening. the prime minister says he's marginally more optimistic
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of reaching a brexit deal with the eu at the end of the g7 summit, but he says he told the leaders meeting in biarritz not to listen to british politicians who claim they can stop brexit, saying britain will leave on october 31st even if no agreement is reached, and that colossal preparations have been made for a no—deal scenario. also at the summit, leaders agreed measures to try to help with the fires in the amazon. we'll hear more about that in a moment. but first, our political correspondent vicki young reports on the mood around brexit in biarritz. it's not easy keeping world leaders in line. order, order. boris! order! there are deep divisions over international trade, security and the environment. borisjohnson has used his first summit to reinforce a familiar message on brexit — the uk is leaving with or without a deal at the end of october.
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after conversations with leaders here, is a new agreement likely? yellow if he wants to leave without a deal, there could be rain obstacles. opposition party leaders will meet in westminster tomorrow. you've been telling eu leaders not to listen to those mps who say they're going to block a no—deal brexit, how far or you willing to go to stop parliament doing that?” to stop parliament doing that?|j think to stop parliament doing that?” think this is really a matterfor parliamentarians to get right ourselves, and i think people have just about had enough of this conversation and they're yearning for when brexit comes off the front pages but that can only happen when we come out of the eu on october the sist, we come out of the eu on october the 31st, and that is what i really call
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on all my fellow mps to deliver. and asked several times whether he'd even be willing to suspend parliament, he refused to rule it out. mrjohnson prefers to talk about opportunities beyond the eu stop a congratulations. there was a friendly chat with the australian prime minister despite cricket rivalry. they're hopeful of a trade deal within a year. but the big moment for the prime minister this weekend was his meeting with the american president and a tentative first chat about boosting trade between their two countries. president donald trump, boris johnson is very keen on a trade deal with the usa, you sound keen on it as well, some critics believe you're going to do over the uk. no, no, aj la going to do over the uk. no, no, ajla uk. | going to do over the uk. no, no, ajla uk. i own great property in the uk, ilove ajla uk. i own great property in the uk, i love the uk. i think he's going to drew greatjob as a prime minister. it takes a lot of. there's so minister. it takes a lot of. there's so many great elements to... his
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time is right. downing street things boris johnson's first summit has been a success , johnson's first summit has been a success, he has wooed donald trump and there's been friendly words with eu leaders and their not expecting an imminent breakthrough on brexit but they do feel boris johnson has brought a new energy to the whole negotiations. at this beachside summit there's been goodwill and positive noises about future deals. turning that into reality will be a much tougher test for the prime minister. vicki young, bbc news, biarritz. our europe correspondent katya adler brought us the latest from biarritz. eu leaders have heard the prime minister loud and clear but the kind of responses i'm hearing is if they we re of responses i'm hearing is if they were to get rid of the backstop, as the prime minister has asked the eu, for them what this would mean would be turning their back on member state ireland, risking the northern ireland peace process and risk exposing their single market but why
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would they do that, they ask. no they are insisting that boris johnson can replace the backstop if you find a realistic workable alternative. he's received an invitation from eu leaders this summit, just like in paris and berlin, that those doors are open if he can find a workable alternative. in the meantime we are no further on the contentious backstop issue months ago when theresa may was prime minister. earlier i spoke to our political correspondent nick eardley. he said concrete progress with the eu has yet to be made. i think borisjohnson will be fairly encouraged by some of the conversations he's had, but under no illusions that this is far from easy to solve. downing street before borisjohnson made his first trip to paris were playing down the prospect of any imminent breakthrough because they knewjust how
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much had to be done. borisjohnson will be happy that the conversation, conversations he has had seem to have gone fairly well, everybody has got on, europe has said to the prime minister, come up with something, tell us what it is that you think could replace the backstop. but at the same time, nothing fundamental has changed. the fundamental problem still there, which is the uk will not sign to anything that had the backstop and europe will not countenance anything that doesn't have it. so in terms of genuine concrete progress, i am not sure things have moved that much further forward. perhaps a door has been ever so slightly left ajar, rather than slammed shut completely. and we have been concentrating on europe this week, but very shortly, the prime minister will be back in london and facing political opposition at home. it's fascinating — westminster doesn't go back for another ten days, mps are still on their summer holidays, but a group will return to westminster tomorrow to plot how to try and stop mrjohnson leaving the eu without a deal at the end of october
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if that is the situation we are in. jeremy corbyn, the labour leader, will have a meeting in his office with all the other opposition leaders apart from the dup, talking about strategy. we have heard over the last couple of weeks they don't completely agree, we have differences about how to do that. i think that is starting to change. i think increasingly, the different sites realise that the best way they can stop no—deal is not by bringing down the government and making mr corbyn prime minister but by passing a law that would force the prime minister to ask for an extension at the end of october, again, if that is the situation the uk is in. it is far from clear if that will work, you heard borisjohnson refusing to rule out the prospect of sending mps home, packing the place up to stop them blocking no—deal. there is a huge parliamentary battle about to happen and borisjohnson knows at the moment the numbers are against him. really interesting,
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thank you so much. our political correspondent nick ea rdley our political correspondent nick eardley there. g7 leaders did manage to agree measures to help tackle the devastating fires in the amazon rainforest. more than £18 million was promised in emergency funding forfirefighting equipment and military assistance. earlier borisjohnson pledged £10 million to help with re—forestation. our correspondent will grant is in brazil and sent us this reaction to the pledge. the $22 million promised by the g7 nations to help tackle the fires here in brazil is welcomed by environmental campaigners in this country, but most would say it doesn't go anywhere near far enough, in terms of the scale of the problem. there are still somewhere around 75,000 fires raging across brazil, and if that's to be dealt with properly, there will have to be a well—coordinated and funded operation. there has been a joint operation launched here in rondonia
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by the brazilian government, the government ofjair bolsonaro — and that involves the military, the firefighters, and the environment ministry. but protesters say it's woefully undermanned and it's late and slow. and as you can see around me, the situation continues to be terrible, in terms of the devastation it's caused. this is just outside the city, the state capital in rondonia of porto velho, and the ground has just been scorched around me. this is scores of hectares that have been destroyed, as the fire rages through. of course, jair bolsonaro himself has not welcomed the money. he continues to be in confrontation with g7 leaders, saying, "why do they want to help the amazon? why have they got their eyes on the amazon? what do they want out of it?", he said. "no—one helps anyone, except a poor person, unless they want something in return." and that alone, i think, shows the degree to which the two
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sides are at odds over this issue. will grant reporting there. president donald trump says he is open to meeting iran's president hassan rouhani under the right circumstances. it comes after iran's foreign minister made a brief and unannounced visit to the g7 summit in france on sunday. relations between iran and the us have deteriorated since washington withdrew from a 2015 deal to limit iran's nuclear activities last year. mr trump said he had good feelings about the prospect of a new nuclear deal with iran. our diplomatic correspondent james landale is also in biarritz and says a meeting could lead to de—escalation in tensions between iran and the us. ever since the united states pulled out of the deal curbing iran's nuclear programme last year, tensions have been rising in the gulf. the americans imposed sanctions and the iranians have been enriching more uranium fuel and targeting shipping in the area. this
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meeting revealed today at the summit, the idea us president donald trump might meet president rouhani in coming weeks came as a complete surprise and it's significant because it's the first time in many, many months of quite a deep and divisive stand—off that we've had a signal that possibly both sides might be willing in principle to step back from the brink stop in the idea president macron is talking about is perhaps getting the americans to soften their embargo, getting the iranians to go back in full compliance with the deal. where a long way from all of that yet. these meetings might not yet happened but they could and if they could it would be the first sign that both sides are not happy with the current status quo and potentially it could lead to a future deal, may be at the very least some kind of deescalation. so a small note of hope in what's been a small note of hope in what's been a pretty bleak story in recent months. the bbc‘s james landale there. ajudge in oklahoma has ordered
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the american healthca re giantjohnson &johnson to pay $572 million for its role in the state's opioid addicition crisis. thejudge said prosecutors had demonstrated that johnson & johnson contributed to a public nuisance in its deceptive promotion of highly addictive prescription painkillers, and that their actions compromised the health and safety of thousands. johnson and johnson are appealing the verdict. those actions compromised the health and safety of thousands of oklahomans. specifically, defendants caused an opioid crisis that is evidenced by increased rates of addiction, overdose deaths, and neonatal abstinence syndrome in oklahomans. our north america correspondent peter bowesjoins me now from la. peter, just how significant is this verdict? this is a very significant verdict. the state of oklahoma accusing
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johnson &johnson the state of oklahoma accusing johnson & johnson of the state of oklahoma accusing johnson &johnson of having a major role in the opioid crisis, which has been a huge health crisis in the united states going back several decades now. in fact it's been estimated some 130 americans have died every day over the last couple of decades as a result of an addiction to these drugs. the state or local homer accusing the company of promoting these drugs to doctors and patients while overplaying the benefits and underplaying the possible benefits of these drugs, in fa ct possible benefits of these drugs, in fact describing the company as a drug kingpin at one stage and the judge clearly agreed with that, saying the company was at least partly responsible for this epidemic in the united states. peter, this is just in the united states. peter, this isjust one of in the united states. peter, this is just one of several cases that may be brought to court? there are thousands of cases around the country pending some a0 states.
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lawyers have those looking at similar legislation or similar lawsuits around pharmaceutical companies and the significance is in the state of oklahoma they have been found liable as a public nuisance. that's controversial in terms of pursuing that legal argument. certainlyjohnson & johnson disagreeing strongly with that characterisation. what it does now is give lawyers in other states a legal framework on which to base their lawsuits and their charges againstjohnson & johnson and possibly other pharmaceutical companies as well, and those lawsuits are likely to play out over the next few months. our correspondent peter bowes there in
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los angeles. the headlines on bbc news: the prime minister says he's marginally more optimistic about striking a brexit deal after meeting g7 leaders in france, saying it the job of everyone in parliament to deliver on time. leaders at the summit pledge $22 million to help tackle the devastating fires in the amazon rainforest. a judge rules that drugmakerjohnson &johnson must pay $572 million for its part in fuelling america's opioid painkiller addiction crisis. the company plans to appeal. the mother of four children killed in a petrol—bomb attack on their home in greater manchester has died more than a year and a half on from the fire. the blaze happened in december of 2017 in walkden, and it killed demi, brandon, lacie and lia pearson. in april, ms pearson came out of the coma she had been in since the fire and was told of her children's deaths. zak bolland and david worrall were both given four life sentences for the children's murder in may last year.
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the strongest ever earthquake at a uk fracking site was recorded this morning in lancashire. with a magnitude of 2.9, it's the latest in a series of tremors at the site, and prompted many local people tojoin protestors there — as fiona trott reports. concerned, angry and gaining support. campaigners here have spent yea rs support. campaigners here have spent years trying to put a stop to frackung, but today they are joined bya frackung, but today they are joined by a new group of residents, who today, this morning felt a tremor in their own homes. the whole house rock. i was frightened. i thought oh my gosh, this must be a real earthquake or explosion or something. i have never had the same feeling, my house, family, pets and trouble, and it's not ok! it's all right for them in westminster, but what about us? the residence? what
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about our health, security, peace of mind? today there have been up to a00 protesters, this is the third and strongest tremor since wednesday. i am sorry that there is — hasn't —— has been angland and eggs lady does make that there has been concern and anxiety created by this. the tremor is not something that could could possibly or even merely because harm to people or damage to property. racking was suspended here after the first on wednesday. today's was almost six times as strong as the agreed limit. the operating companies as minor tremors are due to be expected during frackung. here's why. the
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first step is to do a straight down, then the drill moves horizontally. pressure is then pumped into release gas. the gases then brought to the surface, but it has been linked to earth tremors. today, the debate around frackung has intensified. and while the government has given it the green light, local conservative mp is now calling for it to be stopped. fiona trott, bbc news, lancashire. earlier i spoke to professor peter styles. he's an environmental geophysics expert from keele university who's advised the government on fracking. he told me that fracking is still an experimental process. fracking stopped several days ago, four days ago, fracking stopped several days ago, fourdays ago, ok? fracking stopped several days ago, four days ago, ok? these are caused from fluid pressure where the fracking took place. we need to understand it is more than the fracking itself, it's how it
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influences the strata a roundabout. we haven't had many fracks, and i spent the previous 70 minutes discussing this, about where the threshold is. but we need to understand this. i have recommended we should have tried to do this offshore first. are you suggesting toa offshore first. are you suggesting to a certain extent, what is happening is experimental on the mainland? happening is experimental on the mainland ? well, happening is experimental on the mainland? well, i've been monitoring seismic activity for a0 years, i monitored fracking in 1978 with bp. but the technology is complicated.
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we've had many more tectonic episodes which have affected these rocks and to some extent, the folds which have been rejuvenated have been found there. that is what we're doing, we are actually stimulating features which are probably several hundred million years old by actually influencing them either by the frack itself or the later injection of fluid. professor, if you could answer just injection of fluid. professor, if you could answerjust briefly, there are many people who are unconvinced by fracking and period. what would you say to them, given the events near blackpool? technically it is possible to do this. it has been done for other processes, problem is doing for geothermal energy, but we doing for geothermal energy, but we do need to have a system which allows us to meet controlled fracking without causing an event of this magnitude. it's partly to do with the plans the deal with this. professor peter stiles there.
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the disgraced hollywood film producer harvey weinstein has appeared in court in new york to deny a new criminal charge. a judge said weinstein‘s trial for rape and sexual assault, which was due to begin next month, would now be delayed untiljanuary. police have charged a 1a—year—old boy in connection with a fire at a secondary school in fife. 80 firefighters worked overnight to tackle the blaze at woodmill high school in dunfermline. the school has been forced to close just four days into the term. our correspondent james shaw reports. this was a substantial fire, which nearly 80 firefighters and 15 fire engines were needed to tackle it. the fire appears to have started in a part of the school for children with extra special needs. kieran elliott is one of the people in the
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league's department. his mother took him down to see the fire last night. we had to take him with us because he just we had to take him with us because hejust didn't we had to take him with us because he just didn't understand what had happened. kelly's younger son, joss, only just started at woodmill happened. kelly's younger son, joss, onlyjust started at woodmill high last week. were devastated as to where to go. my children have only gone to school for one year, joss has just started. gone to school for one year, joss hasjust started. i was there with the remark full days, started to know my way around, it has been a blur. there has been substantial damage to this building. it looks like a third of the main block has been completely burnt out. the question now is a good us what happens to the 1a00 pupils who should be getting their education here? there are number of options explored for the short term, which includes e—learning and making sure that people are able to access the learning. a 14-year-old boy arrested and charged in connection with the
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fire is expected to appear in court tomorrow. the impact on the education of the 1a00 pupils at woodmill high is hard tojudge at this point, but that could be the most important long—term concern after this devastating fire. james shaw, bbc news, dunfermline. this has been the hottest late august bank holiday on record — though it is not a holiday in scotland. temperatures rose to more than 33 degrees celsius in west london — beating the previous record of 28 degrees two years ago. richard lister has been braving the temperatures. it's europe's biggest street party, and this year the notting hill carnival was hotter than ever. over the past two days, more than a million people danced their way through temperatures in the 30s. officially, today's temperature record was broken rather more quietly here at seven in norfolk when the thermometer hit 28.6dc. ——
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tibenham. but temperatures climb to over 33 degrees in nearby places. beach—goers were undeterred by a possible contamination issue at this age which made 150 people seek medical attention yesterday after swimming in the sea. today, they couldn't get enough of it.” swimming in the sea. today, they couldn't get enough of it. i have never been here before.” couldn't get enough of it. i have never been here before. i didn't know this was here, in england. it's just a gorgeous day. because of yesterday's contamination scare, the official advice on this stretch of coast is deal don't go in the water. well, you can see how much notice people here are taking about, with no more problems reported, most people in princeton are concerned about staying cool. —— frinton. and these people in bradford, temperatures were breaking everywhere in the uk, but hot
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enough. and here in north yorkshire, what people had been hoping for, a prize—winning bank holiday monday. around the country, people made the most of one of the last public holidays before christmas, from sa ndcastles holidays before christmas, from sandcastles inside the lad to relaxing in regents park in london, where for a few sunbathers, it was even a bit too hard. it's a day which ended with sunburn for some and plenty of sand in the car to, but bank holidays don't get much better, or hotter, than this. richard lister, bbc news, friends and on c. —— frinton on sea. now it's time for the weather with stav da naos. what a scorcher it's been. a record—breaking live hot bank holiday. temperatures in the south—east reaching the low to mid 30s celsius. so a record—breaking speu 30s celsius. so a record—breaking spell over the last few days, but then, beyond the week, things are
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set to become much cooler and treasure. tap temperatures around 23 degrees across the south—east —— top temperatures. on tuesday, we've got a weather front pressing into parts of western scotland and northern ireland, introducing more breeze, cloud, outbreaks of rain and also a scattering of showers, may be thunderstorms. again, this eastern half of england, particularly the south—east which will have another scorching hot day. temperatures not quite as hot as hot as sunday and monday, generally around 30— 31 degrees, but coolerfurther monday, generally around 30— 31 degrees, but cooler further north and west. all the while this weather front will continue to push slowly across the country, so by wednesday we'll have some cooler, fresher conditions for parts of scotland and northern ireland. but the sunshine will make its appearance behind the screen than which will bring muttering to scotland, northern western england and into wales. lower temperatures here, still quite hot in the south, we could have some showers and thunderstorms break out
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of that rain band, temperatures 2a — 37 or 28 degrees in east anglia. as we reach the end of the week you will turn cooler —— it will turn cooler, because of the jet stream. now it's an invigorated jet and as we had on through the week, which was the weather systems across the atla ntic was the weather systems across the atlantic in towards our shores. it does look like fairly deep areas of low pressure will affect more northern and western parts of the country for your thursday and friday andindeed country for your thursday and friday and indeed into the weekend. so it's you will have the strongest winds and outbreaks of rain with high pressure in the southern parts of the continent, it looks like it will stay dry there. lots of showers, blustery times across scotland and northern ireland, attempt is here in the upper— mid—teens celsius. ——
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temperatures here. there could be quite a bit of rainfall to northern parts of ireland, particularly western scotland and north—west england, cumbria could see rainfall too. further sunny spells and low 20s later. that is a rain rain sings its way eastward. the start of the weekend could be the started useful rainfor weekend could be the started useful rain for anglia, but pretty quickly the sunshine returns. —— east anglia. it will be cooler as well, 13-17 anglia. it will be cooler as well, 13— 17 degrees and 20— 23 degrees across the south—east. we think this is the process set up as we head towards the weekend, lower pressure from the east and north of the uk, higher pressure going to building again from the south—west of the atlantic. it will for a time brings a much cooler, fresher air. you can see the blues across our shores before temperatures recover again into next week. that's the first pa rt into next week. that's the first part of the weekend, into next week it will feel quite cool for a time, which will be blustery times and breezy. then that i pressure becomes
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more settled —— high pressure.

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