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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  August 27, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at five... opposition parties opposed to a no—deal brexit agree a way forward. at a meeting called byjeremy corbyn, mps from opposition parties agreed to try to pass legislation in parliament to stop the uk leaving the eu without a deal. i will put forward a proposal which will make sure that parliament is able to debate a legislative way of preventing the government crashing us out with no deal and that was an agreement reached with all the opposition parties this morning. the government accuses mr corbyn of creating "chaos, "delay and uncertainty". we'll have the latest in the next hour. the other main stories on bbc news at 5... the deadline to save both bolton wanderers and bury football
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clubs has just closed — with the firm aiming to buy bury pulling out in the last hour. police investigating alleged abuse at a hospital in county antrim say cctv footage has revealed 1500 crimes committed on one ward. documents discovered by the bbc suggest the government, and h52, knew the high speed railway was over budget — and behind schedule — years ago. would you feed your pets insects to help fight climate change? vets thinks it could be the way forward. and we speak to the author of the pulitzer—winning novel ‘the underground railroad', colson whitehead, about his latest work — that's in half an hour. good evening.
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opposition mps have agreed to try to block a no—deal brexit by introducing legislation in parliament. a meeting of those opposed to no deal was called by labour leaderjeremy corbyn. ajoint statement issued afterwards did not detail how or when legislative attempts would be made. and it said using a vote of no confidence to bring down the government remained an option. mr corbyn has now written to more than 100 conservative and independent mps asking them to support attempts to block a no—deal brexit. the government has accused mr corbyn of creating "chaos, "delay and uncertainty". 0ur political correspondent iain watson has this report. labour believes boris johnson's brexit policy, well, takes the biscuit. todayjeremy corbyn‘s team invited opposition parties to discuss stopping a no—deal brexit. the thorny issue was precisely how to do it.
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some opposition politicians were not keen onjeremy corbyn‘s idea of passing a no—confidence motion in borisjohnson and installing himself as a caretaker prime minister and calling an election. so, he says he will pursue other options including trying to get parliament to block no deal. the mechanism is we legislate to prevent the prime minister taking us out without a deal but also to prevent the prime minister from dissolving parliament and in a sense proroguing is the proper word for it, in order to crash out without any parliamentary scrutiny. this is about parliament asserting itself on behalf of the people of this country. while the no—confidence motion hasn't been ruled out at some stage, this opposition mp says the priority is for parliament to take control. the legislative way forward is the most secure way to extend article 50 and get rid of the 31st october deadline towards which the prime minister is careering with ever greater recklessness.
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passing a law asking for brexit to be delayed beyond october 31 would turn up the heat on borisjohnson but wouldn't in itself stop brexit, opposition mps would then have to agree what to do next. downing street is accusing opposition politicians of sabotaging the prime minister's approach to brexit negotiations but how likely is it that parliament would block no deal? jeremy corbyn and his collea g u es deal? jeremy corbyn and his colleagues would need the help of at least a handful of conservative rebels, so today he has written to 116 conservative and independent mps who had expressed opposition to no deal in the past. he says he is open to dialogue about how best to prevent no deal in the future. boris johnson met european leaders in france this weekend but even if he is sent back to the continent by mps to ask for a brexit extension he could refuse to do it and call an election. if polling day was after
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brexit day, october 31, election. if polling day was after brexit day, october31, remainer mps would be foiled. we need to make sure we do not crash out of the eu by accident during such a campaign and it is fairfor mps to say by accident during such a campaign and it is fair for mps to say people need the chance to choose and an election should only happen under the circumstances where it is before exit date on the 31st of october or it comes after it comes with an extension of article 50 because otherwise it would be hugely anti—democratic. otherwise it would be hugely anti-democratic. this sound is designed to strike fear into boris johnson. at a brexit party rally, nigel farage made it clear that if there is an election, anything short of no deal would be seen as a sell—out. of no deal would be seen as a sell-out. if mrjohnson you insist on the withdrawal agreement, we will fight you in every single seat up and down the length and breadth of the uk. even before mps returned to parliament next week, brexit battle
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lines are being drawn. our political correspondent tony bonsignore is at westminster. first of all, the numbers, because for this to work, there has to be a handful of tory rebels who are prepared to vote against the government. at least a handful of tory rebels and that is what this letter was about today. specifically to those 116 tory mps who had voted against the government in the last meaningful vote but it will be a very difficult decision for them. they will be worried about whether this might mean the government eventually falling and maybe jeremy corbyn himself getting into downing street and they will have to make thatjudgment. what street and they will have to make that judgment. what is street and they will have to make thatjudgment. what is more dangerous, jeremy corbyn or a no—deal brexit? theyjust need a few to make that switch potentially but it will be very tough for them and forjeremy corbyn even to get that. do we know anything about the
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tactics of the opposition parties? what sort of legislation do they want? we don't. there's a lot of discussion going on at the moment between opposition parties about what their tactics might be and we are hearing this may start very quickly next week, tuesday is when mps return, tuesday or wednesday, the first moves will be made, an attempt to take control of the parliamentary agenda, and maybe even attempt to curtail or even cancel the conference recess because mps are supposed to be off in september when all this is happening. lots of discussions going on and they may try to keep this a bit close to their chest and they don't want to give the game away to their opponents in the commons. many thanks. thanks for joining opponents in the commons. many thanks. thanks forjoining us. we will be discussing what was agreed today with one of the opposition mps who was at that meeting — the snp‘s westminster leader, ian blackford — later in the programme.
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the deadline has passed for bolton wanderers and bury to prove they have enough money to continue or face expulsion from the football league. the company trying to buy lie said it was not able to go ahead with its takeover of the ligue one clu b with its takeover of the ligue one club —— trying to buy bury said it was not able to go ahead with its ta keover of was not able to go ahead with its takeover of the ligue one club and the club is now likely to be expeued the club is now likely to be expelled by the afl. david, this is the news bury supporters were dreading. indeed, the nightmare scenario for bury and many of their supporters are gathering here, many who were helping to clean up the place ahead of the proposed match against doncaster on saturday after the first six matches of their season the first six matches of their season cancelled so far as they were trying to get themselves out of this mess. the owner steve dale who took
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over the club for just mess. the owner steve dale who took over the club forjust £1 mess. the owner steve dale who took over the club forjust e1 in december 2018 from the previous owner, stuart day, trying to salvage a package and it seemed it was there and he announced on friday he had sold the club to a company. it was a company who have since conducted due diligence but it has proved beyond them. they released a statement that said as part of their due diligence they set themselves a list of criteria regarding the cva, the ground and the overall financial state of the club, that had to be met in orderfor us state of the club, that had to be met in order for us to state of the club, that had to be met in orderfor us to be state of the club, that had to be met in order for us to be satisfied that we have enough knowledge to proceed with the takeover. the complexities involved in each of these matters escalated and continues to do so, and it is therefore with regret, we will be unable to proceed with the takeover of bury fc, and this decision has not been taken lightly and we fully understand the importance of the
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clu b to understand the importance of the club to the community and it is with this in mind that we have informed the afl of our decision at the earliest possible opportunity, they said —— earliest possible opportunity, they said -- efl. earliest possible opportunity, they said —— efl. this company also said despite the tight turnaround they had, that time was not the issue, and it was more the financial problems that very few bury are in and that had festered over a long period of time. bury stand to be the first ever third tier team to go out of business. an incredibly sad day in the last team was maidstone in 1992. -- in the last team was maidstone in 1992. —— and the last team. unless the efl can come up with a solution and an alternative buyer is there, but the afl have said they will now not cancel any more matches of bury and with that in mind it would appear that the end is nigh for them and there is devastation here at gigg lane. david, thanks forjoining
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us. and let's speak now to katie gornall at bolton's ground. what is the situation? the news about bury has filtered through to the supporters here, to the bolton supporters who face an anxious wait here, as they wait for news, dreading what might come out. we have not had any update yet and we might not have an update for some time because the efl board meeting is going to take place at five o'clock and then they have to decide if that deal that was all set to go through before the weekend between the current owner karen anderson —— ken anderson and a group of footballers, but the deal collapsed on saturday and the administrator gave an updated statement this morning saying talks were continuing. the fact talks were continuing. the fact talks were continuing shows some positivity, this has given some supporters hope but unless we get news that those
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talks have been able to be resurrected, it looks like it could all be overfor resurrected, it looks like it could all be over for bolton and we know that if they have not been able to convince the efl by that 5pm deadline that a takeover has been resurrected or has the chance of completion, then the efl have said they are not prepared to cancel any more games and they will give bolton a15 more games and they will give bolton a 15 day notice of withdrawal from the football league. essentially that would mean they have 1a days to provide proof of funds although that deadline could be immaterial because the administrator has already indicated that unless a deal is concluded today, they will start the process of closing down the club tomorrow and 150 jobs he could be at risk, a club with a great history, one of the founding members of the football league, which has won the fa cup four football league, which has won the fa cupfourtimes, football league, which has won the fa cup four times, and it could really be on the brink. 0k. for the
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time being, thanks forjoining us. let's talk now to james frith, labour mp for bury north. thanks forjoining us. very bad news for the town this afternoon, what is your reaction? i'm gutted. a sucker punch to the town and the quality of life in our town and to bury football clubs 130 odd years history and the wider community will be dismayed, angry, crestfallen, frankly. essentially a deal made impossible because of a refusal to deal by those interested in holding a financial charge over the club thatis a financial charge over the club that is of more interest to them than the future or the success of the club. do you think that is a
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biggerfactor than the the club. do you think that is a bigger factor than the previous management of the club? ownership, yes, that is slightly different, but the ownership, we are in a situation, the toxicity started with the immediate past owner stuart day and was exploited under the current owner steve dale. i'm also on the record as recognising some of the work that steve dale did to get the cva done so that the club could be a prospect for success in the future, but with a situation now, where no deals and mortgages are on the grounds and they were more value to be kept than doing a deal, and this afternoon i've been involved with the compa ny‘s attempts afternoon i've been involved with the company's attempts to negotiate with those people who are just
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flatly refusing to negotiate. and they are asking for more than double of what was to be paid on debts that incuran of what was to be paid on debts that incur an interest rate that is, well, it would make a high street loa n well, it would make a high street loan shark blush. what is the impact this is going to have on what looks inevitable, that the club will close ? inevitable, that the club will close? well, look, keep the faith, at the shakers, that is what we say at the shakers, that is what we say at bury, and keep the faith is important, we will be back. the town has been here before and if it is a phoenix club scenario, we will rise again, but the situation and the scenario is one which was wholly avoidable. everyone involved in this
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situation is culpable, the owners, the state of football governance, and of course the indebted state of the club, loans were taken out by people who fancy themselves as regional roman abramovichs, borrowing and spending too much, and the fans of the town are the ones left to pick up the pieces of what isa left to pick up the pieces of what is a really ugly period and a really ugly fate that now awaits us. we have got to leave it there but thanks forjoining us. have got to leave it there but thanks for joining us. james have got to leave it there but thanks forjoining us. james frith, the mp for bury north. the headlines on bbc news... opposition parties say they have agreed to try to block a no—deal brexit by passing legislation in parliament. the meeting was called by labour leaderjeremy corbyn. a police investigation is under way after cctv footage reveals 1500 crimes on one ward of a northern ireland hospital over the last two years.
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the deadline to save both bolton wanderers and bury football clubs has closed — with the firm aiming to buy bury pulling out in the last hour. and in sport... the british number one kyle edmund is due to play his first round match at the us open shortly. he faces the spaniard pablo andujar of spain. johanna konta and dan evans .are already through after a year out, robert snodgrass has returned to the scotland squad for the euro 2020 qualifiers with russia and belgium — but there is no place for leigh griffiths. but wales will be without aaron ramsey
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for their qualifiers against azerbaijan and belarus next month, he has a hamstring problem. police in county antrim — who are investigating allegations of abuse at a hospital for people with learning disabilities and mental health needs — have said cctv footage has revealed 1500 crimes on one ward. the incidents happened over a period of six months at muckamore abbey hospital. our ireland correspondent chris page is in antrim. shocking details, what has been discovered? the scandal here at muckamore abbey hospital became public almost two years ago when the relatives of some vulnerable patients made allegations of mistreatment and there has been a police investigation. the figures the police have spoken about show how extensive it is, and officers have been looking at more than 300,000 hours of cctv footage from inside the hospital and they have said that footage shows 1500 crimes on one particular ward, the psychiatric intensive care unit over a period of six months between 2017
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and 2018, and the police officer leading the investigationjill duffy has said the images show repeated patterns of mental and physical abuse, and harrowing images, she said, and she made the point that because of the conditions these patients had it was unlikely they would have been able to come forward themselves and tell someone what had happened. the cctv footage is particularly crucial in this investigation. they are now coming to the end of the long process of viewing the cctv and after that detectives expect to call people in for interviews. there have been no prosecutions yet. 20 members of staff, mainly nurses can have been suspended over the last two years, and police say they expect the number to rise. ok, chris, thanks for joining number to rise. ok, chris, thanks forjoining us. documents seen by the bbc show the government knew the hs2 rail project was over budget three years ago.
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the documents were written in 2016 — before mps had signed—off the first phase of the project. it raises questions over whether parliament was given the whole picture. our transport correspondent tom burridge has this exclusive report. until very recently, we were told by ministers and bosses at hs2 that the programme to build the new high—speed railway was on budget and on time. there is only one budget for hs2, and it is £55.7 billion. but bbc news has obtained documents which show that at least three years ago, the government knew that wasn't the case. the evidence we've got hold of suggests you, the taxpayer who's funding it, didn't have the full picture. this letter was sent in may 2016 to the then chancellor george osborne. in it, the transport secretary at the time patrick mcloughlin admits that the first stretch of the railway linking birmingham to london was already over budget by nearly £1 billion. he also proposes opening the railway
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a year late to try and save money. a former hs2 director told me the £1 billion overspend was a conservative estimate, and internally teams knew it was a lot higher. another former hs2 director, doug thornton, says he often told government the budget wasn't realistic. i was briefing personally the director at the department of transport, the head of property at the department of transport and the department of transport‘s project representative team, so, at that level, the department knew. and all of these warnings crucially before the first phase of hs2 had been signed off by parliament. as protesters occupy fields and footpaths next to a construction site, people will ask whether mps were misled. for all the opposition, hs2 does have strong support, but the evidence we've seen not only raises questions about whether this programme is value for money but about transparency and trust.
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and for the first time, this former hs2 manager is speaking out. andrew bruce's job was to work out how much all of the land and property needed to build the first phase of the railway would cost. in the previous estimate, some properties had ridiculous values. so, you've got a school and the land around it for £782.45. yes. he improved the data and discovered that aspect of the project would need an extra £2 billion. but he says hs2 sacked him just half an hour before he was due to present that uncomfortable truth to the department for transport. i think parliament was misled. i think we're now having to spend far more public taxpayers' money on hsz than parliament thought was going to be required. hsz knew that months if not years before giving those figures to parliament, and yet they went ahead and gave figures they knew
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to be vastly underestimated. hs2 ltd said it did not recognise andrew bruce's claims. it strongly rejects the idea that a more accurate costing for land and property needed to build the railway was covered up. the national audit office investigated these allegations last year and cleared hs2 of any wrongdoing. hs2 said it also faced extensive scrutiny from parliamentary committees. the department for transport said like in any major complex programme, delivery plans evolve over time. but with the team appointed by the government to review the scheme set to begin their work tomorrow, it's hard to say how high speed 2 will evolve in the coming weeks. more now on our top story — that opposition mps say they have agreed to try to block a no—deal brexit by passing legislation in parliament. a meeting between those opposed to no deal was called by labour leaderjeremy corbyn. ajoint statement issued afterwards did not detail how or when legislative
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attempts would be made. ian blackford was at that meeting — he's the snp‘s westminster leader. thanks forjoining us. can you give a bit more detail about how you are hoping to proceed ? a bit more detail about how you are hoping to proceed? as much as i can. we are in a real battle here because borisjohnson we are in a real battle here because boris johnson and his we are in a real battle here because borisjohnson and his government wa nt to borisjohnson and his government want to make sure that we are leaving the eu and i know deal basis and what we are seeking to do, working with mps across the house, is to stop that, so the position is we go back to parliament and we are leaving the eu on a doe deal basis is the default position so we have to stop that. —— no deal. we need to lay down a standing order 2a mechanism to take control of the audit papers and normally the government controls the agenda. we need to seize control of the agenda and bring forward legislation and a bill that will strike out no deal
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being the default option, so that is the process that will start next week. time is short because we know there a very real proposition that there a very real proposition that the prime minister will seek to shut down parliament from the 9th of september to the 14th of october, so we need to act in advance of that, because quite simply it is quite extraordinary and inexcusable that the prime minister thinks it is right that he can shut down parliament, that is anti—democratic, akin toa parliament, that is anti—democratic, akin to a coup. he knows there is a majority against no deal in parliament and i'm asking parliamentarians of all parties to come together to express very clearly that we are not going to allow in the first instance the prime minister to take us out of a no deal basis and for the prime minister to threaten to shut down parliament. ultimately it is quite simple, it is a numbers game, you
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need enough conservative mps to come onside with you, how confident are you? there has been a lot of talking going on over the last few weeks and if you go back to the parliament just before we rose for the summer recess there was a vote to stop borisjohnson prorogue recess there was a vote to stop boris johnson prorogue parliament which had the majority of 41 and i'm confident that colleagues who are conservative mps will come with us because they recognise that a no—deal brexit is going to be extremely damaging to the economy and it will cost jobs extremely damaging to the economy and it will costjobs and affect our communities. there is a resolve across parties that we need to work together. what happened today was quite extraordinary, a range of parties that agreed to leave their differences at the door, where we recognise that we have to work together because quite simply what we are facing is a crisis, we do have to work together and that means with conservative members of parliament as well. to stop the damaging effects of a no—deal brexit. there were no conservative mps at your meeting today, though.
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not at the meeting but myself and others have been talking with conservative mps and i'm content a number will be coming with us next week and i'm confident we have that majority and we need to make sure we get to work next week so we can protect the interests of our constituencies. the government's own economic analysis published last year shows that a no—deal brexit could damage the economy up to four times the impact of the financial crisis ten years ago, this simply is a price which is not worth paying and we have a responsibility, all of us, to stand up and be counted and we have to put our constituents first and be honest with the people regardless of how they voted come on what the impact of a no—deal brexit would be. the fact the government has said there is a potential risk to the supply of fresh food, the supply of medicines, it is quite extraordinary that the government is prepared to engage in an action that in effect is threatening the livelihoods and the well—being of oui’ livelihoods and the well—being of our constituents, and we are not going to have it. ian blackford, thanks forjoining us.
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brazil's president bolsonaro has told local media he may reverse his decision to reject an offer of $20 million worth of aid from the g7 to help fight fires in the amazon. reports say it's conditional on france's president macron "withdrawing insults", including calling him a "liar" and threatening the sovereignty of the amazon by speaking about the "international status" of the rainforest. with me now is nathalia passarinho from bbc brasil. a senior brazilian official has this afternoon called macron‘s posturing childish, but it looks as if one could easily say that of the brazilian leadership, too. absolutely, the row between the brazilian president and the french president has escalated into personal fences and it got personal a few days ago when president
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bolsonaro endorsed a sexist tweet that compared the looks of the two first ladies, brazilian and french —— personalfences. first ladies, brazilian and french —— personal fences. bolsonaro first ladies, brazilian and french —— personalfences. bolsonaro said, don't humiliate the guy, and of course the french president was quite offended and he reacted very harshly as well, saying that the comet is very sad, especially for brazilian women and that brazilian women must be ashamed of their president and he even said he hopes that in the near future brazil will have a president that is up to the task. the fee is this will obscure the real image which is the burning of the amazon forest —— the fear is this will obscure the real damage. there is plenty of contradiction amongst the members of brazil's government as to whether they should ta ke government as to whether they should take this $22 million, and now president bolsonaro says he will accept the money only if emmanuel
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macron will withdraw what he calls insults to himself and we'll stop suggesting that the amazon belongs to everybody. —— will stop. the money will be of help to brazil because sue has been through a serious economic crisis —— because brazil has been through a serious economic crisis and very recently they have been going through serious austerity measures. the brazilian defence minister said the money would only help start operations in the north of brazil. many thanks. changes to planning rules in england could see companies building taller phone masts. it's part of a wider government move to boost the roll—out of 5g networks and improve mobile coverage across britain, especially in the countryside. ministers have also launched a £30 million competition for rural communities to host new 5g technology schemes. the digital secretary, nicky morgan, explained the existing rules on the maximum size of the phone masts. at the moment, the maximum is 25
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metres in a non—protected area, 20 metres in a protected area like an area of outstanding natural beauty. as i say, we've got to find that balance. but if you end up having slightly taller masts, you could put more infrastructure on it which means that you could get rid of other masts that have been an eyesore. and making sure we can have more building—based masts nearer to roads, for example. it is about finding that balance. i know as a local member of parliament, i used to get a lot of people say they objected to masts. actually, i don't get that so much now because people do understand that need for connectivity. but we want to hear from people. that consultation will close in november. time for a look at the weather, here's stav da naos. good afternoon. it has been hot across the south—east at 33 celsius in greater london but this is the
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last of the hot days as it turns cooler and more unsettled through the week. these weather fronts mark the week. these weather fronts mark the change, this one bringing showers and thunderstorms to central and eastern parts of england and into the east of scotland this evening and overnight. and then more outbreaks of rain pushing in from the west. quite a muggy night to come across eastern areas. tomorrow we start off with quite a lot of cloud and feeling distinctly different across england and wales. cooler as well at around 10 degrees lower than what seen across the south—east of england. unsettled towards the end of the week with wet and windy weather especially to the north and west of the uk. this is bbc news.
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the headlines. opposition parties say they have agreed to try to block a no—deal brexit by passing legislation in parliament. the meeting was called by labour leaderjeremy corbyn. the deadline to save both bolton wanderers and bury football clubs has just closed — with the firm aiming to buy bury pulling out. police investigating alleged abuse at a hospital in county antrim say cctv footage has revealed 1500 crimes committed on one ward. documents discovered by the bbc suggest the government, and hs2, knew the high speed railway was over budget — and behind schedule — years ago. time for all the sports news now with olly foster. we start with
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those football stories now and bury and belton missing that five o'clock deadline to find buyers. the prospective owners of bury said they almost a series of values going back yea rs almost a series of values going back years and say that due diligence and the financial state of the club revealed complex issues that meant that they simply could not proceed with any purchase. that came just an hour before the deadline from the football league to conclude a deal, expulsion now seems inevitable. but the current owner steve dale again pleaded for more time. sadly up until now the fa have not worked with us but hopefully now they will give us a reprieve so we can geta they will give us a reprieve so we can get a deal over the line. it is not just us but can get a deal over the line. it is notjust us but bolton, two of the great clu bs notjust us but bolton, two of the great clubs in the north. being
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destroyed. i just do great clubs in the north. being destroyed. ijust do not understand why there isn't a mechanism for saving them that takes this way, this threat. because what we need to do is allow them time to recover and carry on in the league. let's go live noted gigg lane and simon is a bury fan. all very upsetting for the fa ns bury fan. all very upsetting for the fans or do you blame for this? there's one person to blame for this and that is mr steve dale. he had the opportunity... sorry, please go on. he had the opportunity to release due diligence a long time before the deadline and we could have found another buyer, we had plenty of office for the club. steve dale hung on as long as it could just to line his own pockets. we have seen through him. he asked for
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patience but the afl have extended the deadline and it seems that they have given steve dale every opportunity and apparently there are other office already on the table now that he is prepared to accept but do you feel that that is it for the club behind you?” but do you feel that that is it for the club behind you? i apologise, can you repeat that? i wasjust saying the football league seemingly have been very patient despite pleas for more time, this deadline keeps on being extended. do you think that is it now even though apparently there are more deals on the table, that a steve dale is prepared to accept? we are hearing about other offers filtering through. we were all here on friday night celebrating until midnight and we heard that there was a deal. steve dale texted friends of mine sent club sold but we do not believe a word coming out of his mouth right now. i cannot
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help but feel this is the end of our beloved football club. what would that mean for the community, we thought you and fans getting ready for what she thought would be the first game of the season. what would it mean if gigg lane ceases to exist? it is heartbreaking. we have beenin exist? it is heartbreaking. we have been in floods of tears since the news broke. every single one of us, really sombre mood. we have old guys and they have spent 17 years supporting this football team and for that to be taken away is heartbreaking. these people are going to need help, counselling and support and i hope steve dale will do something to support these people because right now his attitude is it is what it is he was quoted on local radio as saying it is what it is.
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but he is to blame for this and needs to put it right. many thanks for joining needs to put it right. many thanks forjoining us. a very difficult time. bolton wanderers have also missed the same 5pm deadline, — they too are on the brink of liquidation, and their future will also be decided by the efl in the coming hours. aaron ramsey has withdrawn from the wales squad for the euro 2020 qualifying match against azerbaijan next month. ramsey has not played a full match since injuring a hamstring playing for arsenal in april. he has made only one appearance off the bench since his transfer tojuventus, in a friendly. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website.
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his last novel — the pulitzer—winning underground railroad — was based on the testimonies of former slaves in 19th century georgia who escaped their plantation. colson whitehead's new book — ‘the nickel boys‘ — is also inspired by real events, following the discovery of unmarked graves at a prison reform school in florida. the arthur g dozier school had a long reputation of abuse, beatings and torture — but despite this, it remained an official part of the juvenile justice system until it was closed in 2011. a year later unmarked graves were discovered containing the remains of students and 51 bodies. this year a further 27 suspected graves have been found at the campus. and colson whitehead is here with me now. welcome to bbc news. what was it about this particular horror that made you want to write the book?|j made you want to write the book?”
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came across the story in 2014, a very rough summer in america. a black teenager michael brown had been killed by white policeman in ferguson in the story and we had weeks of protests and riots. then i heard about the arthur g dozier school which was a big story in the north of florida. it seemed to be pa rt north of florida. it seemed to be part of a cycle of people getting away with things of innocence being abused or killed and no one being held accountable. so in that very raw summer, if i'd come across the street six months before or after it may not have stuck with me but it seems if we had this reform school, one place but this kind of abuse going on than there could be many. what is partly so shocking about the story, it is of course historical and the school opened in 1900 but also it is absolutely recent. it was
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shutin also it is absolutely recent. it was shut in 2011 and three years after it opened they found kids as young as six shackled to the war in solitary confinement. over the decades they have been periodic investigations and calls for reform and then people would forget and it would start up again. the cycle continued until a few years ago. in the nickel boys you give voice to some of the black boys who were at the school, it was racially mixed, but you focused on the black boys. it was black and white, segregated, no contact between black and white stu d e nts no contact between black and white students and now there are men in their 50s, 60s and 70s, survivor groups but most of the people in the news accounts were caucasian and i thought what was the black part of the campus —like, what were their stories and so i set my novel in 1963 during the height of the civil rights movement. and jim crow. jim
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crow laws the segregation laws in place of the time? silly, absurd laws like bumptious contact, if a white person was walking towards you you would have to get out of the way or be jailed orfined. a whole host of doors meant to restrict black life. what you want people to take from the novel? i think any piece of art works when you see yourself in the characters and situations so it isa the characters and situations so it is a very particular story in the 19605 is a very particular story in the 1960s of florida but my main character i think speaks to the optimistic spike in all of us. he's 16 at the start of the novel and he has seen great advances in the civil rights movement, laws have been enacted, boycotts a re rights movement, laws have been enacted, boycotts are working and he sees himself as part of this generation that is changing the world. his counterpart is a kid who is an orphan and lives by his wits
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and does not think the world is changing. all you can do is get to the end of the date without getting beaten or having something bad happen to you. i think we all have that optimistic and pessimistic part of ourselves that we wrestle with. i started writing in the spring of 2017 a few months into the trap administration and i felt my optimism and pessimism at war with each other in dialogue and writing a book might be a way to work through that. how much to the events that you depict in this novel, which although it is a fiction, it is based on real fact, although it is a fiction, it is based on realfact, how much do they resonate with what is going on in america today? if you talk about race in 1850 or the 1960s or now it is the same thing, there is this continuum of oppression, some advancement and then some withdraw. i think we can see that in terms of what has been happening in the last
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couple of years. the book takes a snapshot of the juvenile incarceration system in 1963 and of course some of the systems are still in place and we have this huge rates of incarceration and for—profit business just there to make money basically from these inflated statistics. so when you talk about race in america, each about 1850 and 1963 and now. these are real moments for you? these 1963 and now. these are real moments for you ? these last 1963 and now. these are real moments for you? these last two books, i normally mix it up may be too heavy book and then a light book, so i done slavery and now institutional racism again and some of the dashed hopes of the civil rights movement. but i cannot always control what subjects will speak to me and in this case definitely the nickel boys
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and underground railroad are in dialogue with each other. do you think that the stories and depictions of latin america are becoming more mainstream than they used to be? we have a generation that have grown up being tutored by the black studies movement, we have black artists and teachers in the 19705 black artists and teachers in the 1970s and 1980s teaching american history which also means black history which also means black history in a new way and those kids like me are grown up and making movies or writing books or we are teachers or librarians and we are moving i think, i think the conscience of a nation is moving a bit further but i think every generation hopefully improves upon the one before and i definitely have benefited from renewed interest in black history and american history in the 1970s and hopefully the kids today might come to my book and have
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their consciousness expands it a little. he spoke earlier about the optimist and the pessimist in you tussling, where are they now? well with my two characters, i think the more cynical one is perhaps winning out these days and if you look around america with the rise of hate crimes, anti—semitic hate crimes, incarceration clamps of refugee children on the southern border, things are a lot more explosive than three years ago. i am a parent so i have to hope that things are getting better for my have to hope that things are getting betterfor my children have to hope that things are getting better for my children and i have pa rents better for my children and i have parents and grandparents who grew up under incredible racial injustice and they had a hope that my generation would have it better. and they were certainly would be surprised that things like a black president had happened and they may not be so surprised that a white supremacist president. so i think my
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turner site is speaking a bit more loudly but to go on and see a more, a better day, you have to also see the pessimistic side. and how influence have you been by some of the other great artists that have emerged in the last few years, just recently of course the passing away of toni morrison. films for example by spike lee, how have these help to shape a black american culture and make it mainstream ? shape a black american culture and make it mainstream? it is great to bea make it mainstream? it is great to be a teenager in the late 1980s. beloved came out then. and having this great model was inspirational. and very moving. and also it was a great time for black film—making, we had spike lee, john singleton. and in 1988 to 1991 there was this great flowering and then it petered out. i
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don't want to be like the depressive quy don't want to be like the depressive guy but we had this moment of energy and now we have barryjenkins, people influenced by the early 1990s waiver film—making. can we people influenced by the early 1990s waiverfilm—making. can we keep it going and keep these young film—makers in business? we have these periods of boom and bust so hopefully what is going on now is not cresting and will continue to rise. very good to talk to you, thank you so much. the headlines on bbc news. opposition parties say they have agreed to try to block a no—deal brexit by passing legislation in parliament. the meeting was called by labour leaderjeremy corbyn. the deadline to save both bolton wanderers and bury football clubs has closed — with the firm aiming to buy bury
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pulling out of the deal. a police investigation is under way after cctv footage reveals 1500 crimes on one ward of a northern ireland hospital over the last two years. the pharmaceutical companyjohnson and johnson has been fined nearly half a billion pounds in the us — for its part in encouraging opioid use which has led to 400 thousand deaths. the ruling in the state of oklahoma is being seen as a test case for thousands more potential claimants. johnson and johnson has descibed the decision as flawed — and says it will appeal. from the united states, peter bowes reports. the scourge of prescription drug abuse. an opioid epidemic that has claimed almost 400,000 lives in the us over two decades. now a landmark ruling after the state of oklahoma accused johnson & johnson of fostering the opioid crisis, creating a public nuisance by aggressively marketing the drugs to doctors and patients
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as safe and effective while underplaying the dangers of addictive painkillers. johnson & johnson's misleading marketing and promotion of opioids created a nuisance, specifically the cause of opioid crisis that is evidenced by an increase rates of addiction, overdose deaths and neonatal abstinence syndrome. lawyers for the state hailed the ruling as a major victory, affirming the view thatjohnson & johnson are motivated by greed, maliciously and diabolically created the opioid epidemic. johnson &johnson was the kingpin behind the nation's ongoing opioid crisis. reggie, a member of the legal team that tookjohnson &johnson to court lost his own son to opioids. am i optimistic? no.
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i think they will appeal this thing and fight until it is over. but my boys are fighters, and we are too. johnson &johnson says it will appeal the ruling. the company insists it should not be held responsible for the opioid epidemic. we do not believe that the facts or the law supports the decision today. we have many strong grounds for appeal. and we intend to pursue those vigorously. with over 2000 similar opioid lawsuits currently pending across the us, this ruling could have far—reaching implications for drug makers and a country still struggling to contain the worst drug crisis in its history. peter bowes, bbc news.
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globally, pets consume about 20% of the world's meat and fish — and that has a considerable impact on the use of land, water, fossil fuels, phosphates and pesticides. now the british veterinary association thinks feeding pets insects could be the way forward — but will their owners agree? our environment analyst roger harrabin reports. would you feed your dog or cat on these? the larvae of soldier flies are high in protein and edible fats. the british vets association says they are ideal for your pet. i think there's a really exciting future for the use of insects in pet food. there's a fantastic opportunity here to look at insects as providing an alternative source of some of the nutrient ingredients that we use in our pet food diets. the ingredients are produced in this vast insect farm in southern holland. its uncomplaining workers
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are black soldierflies, chosen because they're not fussy what they eat, and the grubs that hatch from their eggs are highly nutritious. these little marks on the perspex are actually black soldier fly eggs. this is a little demonstration pod — the main breeding centre is way behind me. it's top secret, it's an industrial process, we're not allowed there, but i can say it is bigger than an olympic swimming pool and it's absolutely full of black soldier flies. the idea of farming flies for pet food is to reduce the impact of meat production on the earth and on the climate. everywhere, we're heating up the planet and we're eating everything, so we have to start giving something back. so we have to reduce our land use, but we also have to feed people nutritionally so we need alternatives and this is our prime focus, is to lower the footprint of this society. the larvae eat food waste. they use a fraction of the land and water of cows, and produce much
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lower greenhouse gas emissions. so we've got different coloured grubs here — why are they different colours? yeah, indeed. you can tell by the colour the age of the larvae, and the lighter ones are younger and the darker colour indicates that they're a bit older. they're about 20 days old now. ground—up larvae are fed to fish, pigs and chickens. dogs and cats are a growing market. but do pets actually like insect—based food ? it's breakfast. she definitely likes it. she's usually quite a fussy eater so i'm surprised. she's eaten it all so it must be good. she loves the fact of having to sit and to wait, and then actually going for it, and the fact that she ate it as quickly as she did shows she really likes it. this food is expensive, and it may stay that way until the insect industry expands. but for some dog owners, it'll be worth it. it appeals to me because i'm a vegan.
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i have to wrestle with the fact that i have to literally kill animals to feed big animals, to feed my dog. and big animals that are eating a lot of grain, that's causing all the problems so insect—based diet makes a lot of sense to me. in fact, most pet food is based on offal, such as heart and lungs, that people in the uk don't like but the vets say, if dogs eat insects instead, it'll free up that offal to be exported to people who do like it. roger harrabin, bbc news. two teenage sisters have rescued a man and a toddlerfrom drowning off the coast of aberdeenshire. aylee noble and her sister isla — aged 14 and 15 — swam out with a lilo after they heard cries for help while swimming near fraserburgh yesterday. the local coastguard says they ‘deserve medals‘ for their bravery. earlier, the sisters described pulling the pair to shore. i took the son first and put him out on the lilo. then as i pulled him up the dad came
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up so i made sure he was leaning on it and it took his weight and his head was out of the water. i then started swimming in but i could only use one hand because i was holding on with the other. so i was trying to get in but there was another man further up the beach who had noticed so he came in and he got on the other side of the lilo. when he was lying on the beach there was like foam coming out of his mouth and his fingers and his feet were blue. we put a towel and a top on to try and heat him up because he was shivering. through mumbled speech he was saying that he was too hot. when i tried to put on the towel he was like no, no. but we put it on and he slowly started to speak again. time for a look at the weather, here's stav da naos. another scorcher today across the south—east of england with a top temperature of 33 celsius in greater
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london. but all changed now as we move through the week atlantic weather systems bringing in cooler and breezy at times. these weather fronts with us at the moment indicate this change, the first bringing showers and thunderstorms to parts of the midlands and east of and moving north this evening across eastern scotland. some torrential downpours in places across the midlands at the moment. then the next weather front really brings in that fresher air and starts to make inroads overnight. so quite a muggy night to come with temperatures up to 16 or 17 degrees across eastern areas. we start wednesday on a pretty unsettled note with these weather fronts bringing outbreaks of rain and the cooler air behind this.
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so quite a bit of cloud across england and wales. outbreaks of rain quite heavy across the south west of england. some spanish cells around. —— some sunny spells around. and a good 10 degrees cooler than of late. through thursday and friday the pressure charge show weather systems heading our way. quite breezy and windy for scotland and northern ireland. outbreaks of rain and some of that heavy for the western side of that heavy for the western side of scotland. further south some blustery showers around but also plenty of sunny spells especially in the south east which could stay dry for most of the week. on friday more rain and a stronger wind for scotla nd rain and a stronger wind for scotland and northern ireland, some showers further south and more but persistent rain. temperatures in the
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mid teens across the north, 24 in the south—east. that is around the seasonal average but a little lower across northern areas. then a more vigorous area of low pressure moves in over the weekend and turning fairly cool on sunday into the start of next week, before it warms up a bit again through next week.
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attempting to block a no—deal brexit — opposition parties meet to draw up a plan for parliament. labour, the lib dems, and the snp sign a pledge to ensure the uk doesn't leave the eu without a deal. i will put forward a proposal which will make sure that parliament is able to debate a legislative way of preventing the government crushing us out with no deal. crashing us out with no deal. it comes a week before mps return to parliament after the summer break. also tonight: the future looks bleak for bury football club after hopes of a last—minute takeover appear to have fallen through. plans to build bigger phone masts across the english countryside to improve mobile coverage — without council permisison. as the fires in the amazon rainforest continue to blaze, indiginous groups tell us
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of their fears for the future. your dog's dinner?

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