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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  August 30, 2019 11:00am-1:01pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live, it's11am and these are the main stories this morning. a scottish judge rejects a temporary halt to borisjohnson's plan to suspend the uk parliament, but says a full hearing should be held early next week. thejudge has declined to grant interim orders, that is like an emergency order. but he hasn't made any ruling on the merits of our argument that prorogation should be stopped. he wants to hear further and full arguments on tuesday morning, here at the court of session. former prime minister sirjohn major says he's joining campaigner gina miller's legal bid to stop the suspension. the increased risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy lasts more than a decade after treatment stops, a major report says. prominent pro—democracy campaigners arrested in hong kong have been released, before police ban
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a planned weekend protest. australian authorities say the outlook for the great barrier reef looks ‘very poor‘, with climate change having a major impact on coral and marine life. good morning, welcome to bbc newsroom live. a judge sitting in scotland's highest civil court has rejected a request for an injunction, preventing the suspension of parliament, but says it's in the public interest for a full hearing, as soon as possible. a group of 75 parliamentarians were seeking an interim interdict — similar to an injunction — at the court of session ahead of a full hearing. lord doherty said he believed the full hearing should be moved forward to next tuesday or wednesday.
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lorna gordon is in edinburgh for us. explain the significance of this? explain the significance of thi57m effect, it means we are in a holding pattern at the moment. the judge declined to grant that emergency injunction. he said he wants to hear the full argument. in the end they settled on a date, that full hearing which was originally scheduled for next friday, because of course the moves to bring this case to court have been in the offing for some time. the petitioners started this court action back injuly. anticipating, they said, that the government would seek to prorogue parliament. original discussions we re parliament. original discussions were that it was set for friday, the discussions were that it would get moved forward to tuesday or wednesday. at the end of the
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hearing, decision was made that it would in fact take place next tuesday. thejudge, said it was in the interest of justice tuesday. thejudge, said it was in the interest ofjustice and the public interest that it proceeds sooner public interest that it proceeds sooner rather than later. he said in declining the interim interdict he was not satisfied that there was a cogent need for one and that he would not decide whether the petitioners have a case until the full arguments are set out. so we now know that this is a holding pattern for now, but the full hearing will be next tuesday and the speediness of the process thus far would suggest that he would make a decision very, very quickly thereafter. what reaction has there been, to putting it in a holding pattern? we had the lead petitioner came outside court, she is one of
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more than 70 parliamentarians and peers who have joined this action at the court of session. she talked of the court of session. she talked of the timetable, she talked also of the timetable, she talked also of the expenses. i think we get bit of her now. the judge has declined to grant interim orders, that is like an emergency order. but he hasn't made any ruling on the merits of our argument that prorogation should be stopped. he wants to hear further and full arguments on tuesday morning, here at the court of session, before making a decision. and so i see that as a victory for us. he has said there is no urgency over the weekend because, of course, the order that came from balmoral on wednesday says that parliament cannot be prorogued before the 9th of september, which is a week on monday. he is going to hear the full arguments, as to whether or not that prorogation should proceed, on tuesday of next week, and he has found the expenses of this hearing to be expenses on the cause, which means that the ultimate victor
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will get the expenses of it. interestingly, she also pointed out that she has given the caught a sworn affidavit talking about how she believes there is not enough time for parliament to properly scrutinise what is going on ahead of exit the —— court. we had the lawyer for the petitioners in court invite the prime minister to hand in a sworn affidavit as well which was acknowledged by the government lawyer, although not necessarily accepted. of course it is not up to the petitioners whether or not the prime minister submits a sworn affidavit, what we don't know at this point is whether, if you chooses not to, whether they might request that thejudge chooses not to, whether they might request that the judge compels him to. of course, that will ultimately be in thejudge's to. of course, that will ultimately be in the judge's gift, to. of course, that will ultimately be in thejudge's gift, his decision whether a not he does it. but yesterday in court, it was said that
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this case was unprecedented and i certainly think what happened here in that short 20 minute or so hearing just a short while ago, you really do get the feeling that we are really do get the feeling that we a re really really do get the feeling that we are really in uncharted territory when it comes to the courts. thank you very much. sirjohn major has said he's joined the campaigner, gina miller, who is mounting a legal challenge of her own against the government's decision to prorogue parliament. the former prime minister said he wasjoining the challenge to avoid duplication of efforts in the court. gina miller has tweeted to say that the challenge will be heard on thursday of next week. a similar legal challenge is also getting underway in northern ireland. the government says it is intensifying negotiations with the eu to try to find a new brexit agreement, as the uk prepares to leave in two months' time, with or without a deal.
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government negotiators will meet their counterparts in brussels twice a week, in september, in an effort to break the deadlock ahead of a crucial summit in october. it follows a backlash against the prime minister's decision to suspend parliament next month. more protests are being planned across the country this weekend. meanwhile, cross—party efforts to block a no—deal brexit are also intensifying, before parliament resumes on tuesday. let's get more on all of this, with our political correspondent ian watson, who's in westminster for us. onjohn on john major joining with onjohn majorjoining with gina mellor‘s legal challenge, it is quite something when you have a former conservative prime minister pitted against the current one? —— gina miller. they made it clear some weeks ago that if there was a suspension of parliament, he would ta ke suspension of parliament, he would take this matter to the courts. as there is already a court challenge under way by the businesswomen gina
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miller, he has decided tojoin that action. the details are less surprisingly the fact that the former conservative prime minister is effectively taking the current conservative prime minister to court, challenging the way he is handling the brexit process and effectively accusing him of undermining parliamentary sovereignty. we have also had a very prominent conservatives planning to join may speak to try to prevent a no—deal brexit no matter what the court say. so they are trying to rest control on tuesday with an emergency debate and then take further action during the course of the week to try to legislate for no deal. amongst them, a former conservative cabinet minister who said today that nothing that these rebels were doing would stop boris johnson from pursuing a deal but if you didn't get it, then that is very little that borisjohnson can do if they are successful, to prevent an extension to the brexit deadline. i hope that parliament
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will take a series of actions in a proper orderly way, that by the end of the week mean that borisjohnson knows, that as prime minister, he has the backing of many, many of us to get a deal, but that if he doesn't get a deal he will have to seek an extension. there's an irony here, i should just mention, which is if he does get a deal, as a matter—of—fact, he will need an extension any way, because it's impossible to take from the late october stage a deal which is sort of written down but not solemnised and implemented in just a very few days. should we be cautious about the fact that the meetings between eu and uk officials will be stepped up to twice a week? the german foreign minister is saying in helsinki where foreign ministers are meeting that we cannot imagine not reopening our
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agreement, we imagine it will happen on the 31st of october. the british government has needed clear that if there is no agreement on the irish border, and audio brexit will happen. there seems to be a bit of the chink in the armour —— a no—deal brexit. borisjohnson has been demanding, these meetings are being stepped up for two reasons. domestic consumption, we talked about conservative rebels. if it looks as though boris johnson is conservative rebels. if it looks as though borisjohnson is pursuing a deal, some of them who have doubts about no deal may notjoin oliver letwi n about no deal may notjoin oliver letwin in voting against the government next week. they merely prepared to give borisjohnson more time. the second thing to say about these meetings being stepped up is this. again, whether a german foreign foreign minister or
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otherwise, they are not reopening negotiations as such. the onus is on britain to come forward with new proposals which they will then examine. they want to see if there is going to be workable alternatives which nonetheless stay within their para meters which nonetheless stay within their parameters of avoiding a hardboard with ireland to the controversial backstop. they will be making clear that they will not sit around the table and try and solve this problem together. they are going to say that it is the uk who wanted to leave, britain wanted to leave the european union and it is therefore down to the british government to come to us with any solutions that they think are workable and for us to consider. given that is the case i think the view here at westminster is lots of people put different numbers on it, borisjohnson said i million to one at one point and then 50—50 but certainly the view is that money is still on a no—deal brexit unless the opposition and some conservative
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rebels are successful in wresting control of the legislative programme and demanding an extension to brexit and demanding an extension to brexit and even then of course it is not guaranteed that borisjohnson would either go along with it or that he wouldn't, himself, call a either go along with it or that he wouldn't, himself, calla general election to avoid it. thank you very much. the risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy is more than double what women are curretly being told. mht replaces oestragen and progesterone — two hormones that decrease in women during the menopause — to alleviate some of the symptoms. now, researchers at the university of oxford say the risks last up to ten years after therapy ends, and means one in every fifty women on the combined hormone treatment will develop breast cancer. there are other types of hormone replacement therapy and each of those showed an increased risk too. let's speak now to professor sir richard peto, professor of medical statistics and epidemiology at the university
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of oxford who has been doing this research for twenty years. thank you for taking the time to talk to us today. there is something quite confusing here for women who are on hrt, isn't there? on the one hand, we are being told according to this research about a new risk, on the other and, some people who specialise in dealing with the menopause say that there is nothing new in this research. so give us your take on all of it. the statement there is nothing new was put out by the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists and it is not true. what is true is that this confirms that the risk while you are taking hormone replacement therapy is roughly as estimated before. and that some risks persist actually for more than ten years. for at least up to 15 years and so when you add the risk during and the risk after, that roughly doubles the total risks that there are. how does
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one describe moderate sized risks? one in 50 women, if they did five yea rs of one in 50 women, if they did five years of standard hormone replacing therapy, would get breast cancer as a result of it. is that something which one should put as a stare slowly? you don't want an unduly concerned scare story but you don't wa nt concerned scare story but you don't want undue reassurance and i don't know how to describe one in 50 risk andi know how to describe one in 50 risk and i think the problem is that game ecologists don't either. bc the women with menopausal symptoms, they don't see the women with breast cancer later on as a general rule. —— gynaecologists. these cancers are real, it is not the biggest factor in the world, the biggest is smoking. but more than 80% of women don't smoke and for those who don't smoke in this country, this is among them moderate risks that are there and real. given what he said, it is really important to put this in context. what is the risk of being
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on hrt in terms of a woman's potential for getting breast cancer compared to other factors that may lead to breast cancer, perhaps you could put that into context?“ lead to breast cancer, perhaps you could put that into context? if you look at lean versus obese, obese women have a greater chance of developing breast cancer which would be roughly culpable, you would be talking about an increase of one third if you are obese as against lee. here is the same thing. us into changing the risk of getting breast cancer in your 50s and 60s from 6% to 8% which is a 2% increased. which is one in 50 women so in comparison, with obesity as a cause of breast cancer, it is comparable. and i was very happy that the statement from the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists and others have said it is not, people, because it is. and if you see alcohol can increase your risk of breast cancer, yes, but for five years of hormone
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therapy treatment you get a risk thatis therapy treatment you get a risk that is about the same size as drinking half a bottle of wine a day for several decades. i don't want to, i don't know how to do this. i don't want to exaggerate, but i don't want to exaggerate, but i don't want to under state. he wouldn't want someone who has breast cancer who has been on hormone therapy saying why didn't you tell me. but i don't see that one should have a huge panic. the biggest thing in this country is smoking. let me interrupt you if i may. with various parts of the medical establishment contradicting one another, what message would you have for women who are on hrt right now who are worried, concerned, who are trying to decide how worried they should be, should they chat to their gp? that she would be sensible because menopausal symptoms can be horrible and menopausal treatment can relieve
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it. if one in 50 were to do it for five years, one in 50 would end up with breast cancer in five years. i ama with breast cancer in five years. i am a man and won't have menopausal symptoms. i have had cancer and it is not fun but it is gone now. we really appreciate you coming along to talk to us today and giving us yourfrank to talk to us today and giving us your frank views on this latest study. the headlines on bbc news. a scottish judge rejects a temporary halt to borisjohnson's plan to suspend the uk parliament — but says a full hearing should be held early next week. former prime minister sirjohn major says he's joining campaigner gina miller's legal bid to stop the suspension gina miller's legal bid to stop the suspension. the increased risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy lasts more than a decade after treatment stops,
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and in sport, formula i has returned after its summer break but it has been a tough morning in belgium for lewis hamilton who has struggled with power issues but he has just managed to set his first time in first practice. uefa name their player of the year, a reward for a remarkable season for country and club. and dan evans faces roger federer at the us open later after an impressive win over his opponent. i will be back after half past. police in hong kong have warned that anyone who takes part in illegal demonstrations on saturday is likely to face arrest. the authorities have banned a planned protest and arrested a number of pro—democracy activists. there have been more than three months of protests,
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some of which have resulted in violent clashes. two prominent activists, joshua wong and agnes chow, have appeared in court. they were arrested earlier on friday on suspicion of inciting others to participate in an unauthorised gathering and of taking part in an unauthorised assembly. joshua wong and agnes chow where arrested, the authorities have banned a planned protest, however many of the protesters are saying that they will still be taking to the streets. i am not sure if we can hear anything from joshua one right now. let us try? i am told it is not in english at the moment but we will bring you more details of that as soon as we can. there have been more than three months of protest which you may know. some of which have resulted in violent clashes between these pro—democracy activists and these pro—democracy activists and the police in hong kong. our correspondent martin
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yip is in hong kong. when we spoke earlier today we heard the news thatjoshua wong and agnes to had been brought to court. they have been released. what is going on? they are now released on bail for 10,000 hong kong dollars. the equivalent of just over for 10,000 hong kong dollars. the equivalent ofjust over 1200 us dollars or £1000. and also a p pa re ntly dollars or £1000. and also apparently there is currently an order being put on agnes at the moment. they are facing charges for inciting others to participate in an unauthorised assembly. knowingly taking part in an unauthorised assembly, and any extra charge for joshua one is organising an unauthorised assembly. —— joshua wong. we also learned from this hearing that a third person could
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well be arrested. once he returns to hong kong from overseas. the chairman of joshua hong kong from overseas. the chairman ofjoshua and agnes's political group. he has been charged on the same case for inciting others to participate in an unauthorised assembly. these charges are not related to what could have happened tomorrow. these are related to a sort of ambushing of the police headquarters back on the 21st of june. thousands of protesters have been gathering outside of that building all the way into late night, having a bit of clashes with the police as well. that is what they have been charged. back on the police news conference, just today, those officers were somehow trying to avoid answering whether these
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charges are anything to do with the current people coming out tomorrow, but they do give some strong lines. and the just of it is that it is basically now that protesters have dans, don't ever try to pretend that you are not protesting while you are and go to, the police might still arrest people for participating in a illegal assembly. as for tomorrow, what is expected in terms of the level of protest? certainly many protesters are saying that they will go ahead with demonstrations despite what the police and the authorities are saying. and that is making the situation more fluid i'm afraid. because we just don't know how to gauge what relaxing happened tomorrow, because for several human rights front, the main organiser what is now the band marks, ——
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banned march. now they are giving up tomorrow's match as they say, they will try to apply for a future march on the same theme which is to oppose the august 31 decree from the chinese parliament back in 2014 which, in their point of view, outlawed universal suffrage for hong kong's elections, now the so—called legitimate or presumed to be peaceful protest is gone and we leave a gap for those who have been clashing with police, the hardcore ones, who have all been claiming themselves to be unorganised by anyone, they don't follow anyone as their leaders. wejust anyone, they don't follow anyone as their leaders. we just don't know if they will plan something and return to the street. thank you very much.
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more now on our top story — where lord doherty has rejected an injunction to prevent the suspension of parliament, after a group pf cross—party representatives asked for a judicial review. former conservative prime minister, john major, hasjoined gina miller — one of the mps who issued a legal challenge to the prorogation. our correspondent clive coleman is here. where shall we begin? shall we start with scotland ? what where shall we begin? shall we start with scotland? what has happened in scotla nd with scotland? what has happened in scotland today is that the 75th plus programming parliamentarians were seeking an emergency injunction —— pro remain. they have lost that but there is a full hearing on tuesday.
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it is possible that they could win that. if they win that, i think that is constitutionally really significant and fascinating. we are and uncharted waters because if they get a ruling on tuesday, when there is the substantive hearing, then we could be any position where we have a ruling that the advice given by borisjohnson to the queen, prompting her decision to prorogue parliament, suspend parliament, that that decision was unlawful. now, if we have that ruling then of course the government can appeal it. but, pending any appeal of it, it remains intact. so you are in a position where the monarch has exceeded to that request, made that order in council, based on advice that is unlawful. now that would put the queen in a very difficult position. so that is kind of where we are in scotland. so hugely significant?
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scotla nd scotland. so hugely significant? scotland is not over at all, we have to wait until tuesday. lorna called ita to wait until tuesday. lorna called it a holding pattern. let's move on to sirjohn major, the former conservative prime ministerjoining gina miller in her case which is due to be heard next thursday. and she told us yesterday that one of the grounds is that issue of whether the advice given by borisjohnson to the queen was unlawful. and also the intention of proroguing is the other ground that they are taking their case on? exactly. of course prorogue in parliament is something that happens. in the government position is that this is just another exercise of the lawful exercise of proroguing parliament. but gina miller is looking as you see at the intention. if the intention behind it really is to frustrate the healthy workings of our parliamentary democracy, to deny mps sufficient time to debate the various best options, if they can
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argue persuasively that before a judge, then again, that could result ina ruling judge, then again, that could result in a ruling that the advice given to the queen was unlawful. and today, gina miller has received the most heavyweight support she could have hoped for. the former prime minister, john major, set himself that he would seek to judicially review any attempt to prorogue parliament. i am looking at his brief statement here saying i promise that if the payments approach parliament in order to prevent members from opposing his brexit plans, i would seek a judicial review of this action. he goes on to say that there already is a case in the court, so what he is seeking to do is to get the permission of the court to become an intervening party in gina miller's case, who is of course the businessmen who in 2016, 2017, one famous victory at the government he wa nted famous victory at the government he wanted to use the powers to trigger
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the article 50 powers by which the uk leads the eu. a lot of people said she would lose it but she won it. critically what sirjohn says is that i seek to assist the court from the perspective of having served as pie minister. so his views within the context of that a highly significant. —— prime minister.‘ brief word in northern ireland? caviar essentially seeking the same thing. an injunction to prevent the prorogation of parliament. it may be early next week before we get a ruling. the great barrier reef‘s outlook has deteriorated due to climate change, according to a report from the australian government. rising sea temperatures —
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caused by global warming — means the reefs status has been downgraded to its lowest level, potentially jeopardising its world heritage status. the report says action to save the reef has ‘never been more time critical‘. forecasters are expecting hurricane dorian to strengthen into an "extremely dangerous" storm, as it heads for the us mainland. it‘s expected to hit between florida and southern georgia, possibly late on sunday. the eye of the storm missed the main island of puerto rico, sparing it significant damage. in the light of the warnings, president trump has cancelled a planned trip to poland. we are ready. we have the best people in the world ready and they are going to help you. we are setting food and water —— shipping. it seems almost certain that it is hitting dead centre and that is not good. the winds seemed to be building ata good. the winds seemed to be building at a tremendous right. it looks like the wings are going to be unbelievably high. —— winds we are ready and hopefully we‘ll get ready but it looks to me that this time it
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is heading in one direction. all indications are that it is going to hit very hard and it is going to be very big. somebody said bigger or at least as big as andrew and if you remember andrew from many years ago, that was not good. so just... remember andrew from many years ago, that was not good. sojust... be aware and be safe. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. breezy but dry for the southern half, different story for the northern half. rain across northern ireland working its way into scotland. this will pop up as we go through the afternoon in northern ireland. a few showers for cumbria and north wales. it brightens up first gothenburg for the best of the fine, dry sunny weather you need to come further south and east. as we head into this evening, the rain will be relentless, heavy pulses of
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rain working its way through northern ireland and into western scotland. blustery conditions here. it starts to work its way into the far south—west of england and western fringes of the uk as we head towards storm. a fairly mild sort of saturday morning and it is working its way east, narrowing as it does so, by the time it reaches the first south and east later in the day there is very little on it. we will hang onto some of the warmth, pressure conditions following with heavy showers. hello this is bbc newsroom live with anita mcveigh.
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the headlines: a scottish judge rejects a temporary halt to borisjohnson‘s plan to suspend the uk parliament, but says a full hearing should be held early next week. he hasn‘t made any ruling on the merits of our argument that prorogation should be stopped. he wa nts to prorogation should be stopped. he wants to hear further and full arguments on tuesday morning here at the court of session. former prime minister sirjohn major says he‘s joining campaigner gina miller‘s legal bid to stop the suspension. the increased risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy lasts more than a decade after treatment stops, a major report says. two pro—democracy activists in hong kong have been released from prison after being charged with organising an illegal protest. coming up, expats in spain concerned for their future after brexit
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sport now and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. formula one is back after its summer break — and it‘s ferrari‘s sebastian vettel who has set the quickest time in first practice for sunday‘s belgium grand prix. it‘s been a tough morning though for lewis hamilton. power issues and tyre problems have affected his session, although he was able to set the sixth quickest time in p1. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer says a loan move to roma would do defender chris smalling the world of good. smalling is in italy to finalise a deal with the serie a club — they‘ve reportedly agreed a year—long loan, with roma paying a fee of 2.7—million pounds. i couldn‘t promise chris regular football. of course, he is on the plane over now and i think you will enjoy the experience of there. it‘s a big club, good league. there are
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not many english players who have had the chance to play in italy and i‘m sure he will come back stronger and better for it. )england defender lucy bronze has been giving us her reaction to being named uefa‘s women‘s player of the year. she said she was ecstatic and humbled to receive the honour, which came after an outstanding season for her country and club, lyon. she‘s the first english player to win the award, but she was on international duty last night and couldn‘t collect it in person. she spoke to us via skype this morning and told us her mum had ideas about taking her place in monaco. i texted her and told her about it and she said, i will go there and i will pick the award up for you i will pick the award up for you i will sit next door to ronaldo so i can chat to round i said, mum, i‘ve already got the award. she said, i'll already got the award. she said, i‘ll go anyway. i am not that great
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ofa i‘ll go anyway. i am not that great of a talker in front of strangers, so it is probably better that i was on the field. liverpool‘s virgil van dijk beat lionel messi and cristiano ronaldo to the men‘s award, after winning the champions league with his club last season. well, lucy bronze may be more comfortable on the pitch but she couldn‘t help england to victory against belgium last night. they let a two—goal lead slip, in what was their first match since the world cup. england only saved by this penalty from nikita parris as it finished 3—3 in leuwen and phil neville wasnt happy. were going to challenge the players more than we have ever done and we arejust going to more than we have ever done and we are just going to keep saying to them that their performances need to be better. i think there are probably two or three out there today that know they have a lot to do to probably continue playing for england. unlike hosts england, wales‘s women have to qualify
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for euro 2021 and they made the perfect start last night. they beat the faroe islands 6—0 — and how about this for a goal from reading striker tash harding — a really clever finish as she got a hat trick. wales go on to face northern ireland on tuesday. great britain‘s dina asher—smith ran her fastest 200—metres of the season last night at the diamond league meeting in zurich. however, it wasn‘t enough to beat shaunae miller—uibo of the bahamas, who stormed to victory with the fastest time for four years. miller—uibo will be focussing on the 400—metres at next month‘s world championships in doha, leaving asher—smith as favourite over 200 metres. the two britons still in the us open both play again today. johanna konta takes on zhang shuai, after a stunning performance against the unseeded russian margarita gasparyan — she took less than an hour and dropped just one game. da n eva ns will play roger federer — the third grand slam meeting between the pair. the last time they faced each other, federer said it was like playing himself in a mirror. evans beat luca pouille in four sets to make it through to the third round.
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that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for you in the next hour. concerns about healthcare and dwindling pensions is leading some british ex—pats living in spain to consider whether to stay in the country after brexit. a group representing brits abroad has told the bbc ex—pats feel "alone and forgotten" by the uk government. breakfast‘s tim muffett on the costa del sol for us this morning. tell us more about what they have been saying to you. good morning to you. ona been saying to you. good morning to you. on a day like this it is not ha rd to you. on a day like this it is not hard to see why so many british citizens choose to live in spain. more than 300,000 are registered as living here, more than 70,000 pensioners. it is their access to health if there is a new deal brexit thatis health if there is a new deal brexit that is causing a lot of concern amongst many. a lot of them have
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been telling us how worried they are because they don‘t know for sure what will happen if the new deal brexit that is causing a lot of concern amongst many. a lot of them have been telling us how worried they are because they don‘t know for sure what will happen if the no—deal brexit occurs. under the spanish sun, dave is sweating on events in brussels and westminster. good to meet you. hi, good to meet you too. how do you feel you been treated by the british government? drea dfully. i think if i‘d treated a dog the same way, i‘d have been in court. what they‘ve told us has been half truths, lies, misdirections. it seems to change week by week. dave moved to almeria in andalusia in 2004. he has parkinson‘s disease and has had two heart attacks. like other british pensioners, he has been able to access health care in another eu country but the chance of a no—deal brexit has changed things. this is a cardiac drug. that drug is for parkinson‘s... if it‘s a no—deal brexit, you do not know for sure whether you can access these medicines. i can‘t get them without prescription, any of them. the cost of medicines alone
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is around 700 euros a month. i can‘t afford it. something would have to give. i‘m wondering, you know, is it worth going on? if i lose my health care, wouldn‘t it be easier to just die? even if there is a no—deal brexit, both the british and spanish governments have said they want to carry on offering a reciprocal health care agreement to pensioners from both countries, but nothing yet has been formalised and it is that uncertainty which many are finding so unsettling. my battle with cancer has been hampered by actually having a fight with brexit, as well. lisa moved to spain three years ago and is undergoing treatment for breast cancer. expats have been advised to register for spanish residency. lisa says her application has been rejected on a technicality even though she has been here for three years. if i don‘t have residency, i don‘t have my health care rights.
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do you fear if there is a no—deal exit, your treatment could effectively stop? yes, of course it could! i mean, suddenly countries can decide they don‘t like each other too much. it‘s unlikely but so was prorogation and this is why the panic and the anxiety is rising. others are confident things will be sorted. neil runs a support group for expats. there is no question in my mind that britain and spain would want an agreement. before spain evenjoined the eu 30—35 years ago, there were lots of different agreements between britain and spain over health care, pension rights, workers‘ rights, but no government is going to let people not be covered, it‘s just not going to happen. people here expect to feel the heat but as brexit gets nearer, the questions keep coming.
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the government has today announced a £3 million package of funding for eu citizens —— for uk citizens across the eu to help them apply for their residency. you own the spa, what have the british people been telling you about the concerns about what may or may not happen? the point has been dropping at the drastic rates. the major concerns are at the point carries on dropping it might get to the point that people can‘t afford to come out. once britain has left completely, are the airlines going to skyrocket the prices? are we going to start using our customers because i would save 95% of our clientele is british. if our customers can‘t afford to come out here because the point is not so much, then we could suffer greatly. we have been looking at the plight of pensioners, is there a fear
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that‘s without a deal being done between spain and the uk to clarify the health care situation, that many families are going to be put in a very difficult situation? it‘s enough being done to reassure them? the problem with that situation is the only thing that will reassure them is the time once everything has happened, and that might be too late. a lot of people at the moment are moving back, just for the reassurance that if the ship is sinking they want to be on the island, you know? a lot of people don‘t know what to do. only time will tell, unfortunately. the british embassy in madrid has set up a series of workshops to go along to register their residency. is that enough? is there enough information? it is not that there are no places to do it, we have a waiter, for example, when he was getting his residency it took him four months to
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get it because every time you go you are missing this document, that documents. you can get your residency without a work contract but you can go on contract without a residency. that is the dilemma for so many people. this extra funding has been announced today by the government. the british embassy has set upa government. the british embassy has set up a series of workshops to give people advice, especially pensioners and disabled people. despite all of that, there is a lot of uncertainty. the risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy is more than double what women are curretly being told, a major internatinal study has found. mht replaces oestragen and progesterone, two hormones that decrease in women during the menopause, to alleviate some of the symptoms. researchers at the university of oxford say the risks last up to ten years after therapy ends and means one in every 50 women on the combined hormone treatment will develop breast cancer. there are other types of hormone replacement therapy
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and each of those showed an increased risk too. our health and science correspondent james gallagher reports. some of the numbers being discussed can sound quite intimidating, so it‘s time to bring out the bbc‘s head of statistics, robert cuffe, to show us exactly which numbers you need to know. robert, we have heard some contradictory opinions from the medical establishment here on the bbc news channel this morning. it is time to look carefully at the statistics. the front pages saying that the risk is doubled, robbed by a third, orare that the risk is doubled, robbed by a third, or are million cases of breast cancer are up to these hormones. what do you make of these figures? the controversy is around is this data brand—new or do we kind of know about it? i don‘t think people are contesting the numbers. it is good to talk about how we get to that one in 50 figure. let‘s take a look at the data. what it chooses
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that if you are a 50—year—old woman who starts the that average weights and your expected chance of getting breast cancer over the next 20 yea rs, breast cancer over the next 20 years, for breast cancer over the next 20 yea rs, for every breast cancer over the next 20 years, for every thousand women, not taking any replacement therapy, 63 women will gets breast cancer. oestrogen only, that would go from 63 up to 68 per 1,000 people. if you ta ke 63 up to 68 per 1,000 people. if you take the most common, which is oestrogen plus daily progestogen, that goes up to 83, so a case of 20 cases extra per thousand. the professor you were speaking to earlier said it is difficult for people to put that into context, but people to put that into context, but people should discuss that their gp. he did say he didn‘t want to unduly scare people, but not unduly come them either. so, this is difficult.
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this is not one of these coffee causes cancer stories. this is an enormous study. they have looked at 100,000 women with breast cancer. the data is consistent to what we know about the effects of oestrogen and progesterone on breast cancer risks. that is why you had some of that discussion earlier about did we already know about this? the evidence is already pointing in that direction. what we do about it in terms of how guidelines work? the major drug regulators are already saying take these therapies for a shorter time as you can get away with. manage the symptoms of the menopause and then get off them. clinical guidelines are a bit more generous. the thing for individuals to do is not to panic when you see
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these numbers, but go and talk to yourgp these numbers, but go and talk to your gp because the risks and benefits will change based on the symptoms you are experiencing. also on the drug to your own, also your family history, smoking, alcohol consumption. with a medical professional you need to merge all these things together. robert, that‘s been very useful. thank you. in a moment we‘ll have all the business news, but first, the headlines on bbc news: a scottish judge rejects a temporary halt to borisjohnson‘s plan to suspend the uk parliament — but says a full hearing should be held early next week former prime minister sirjohn major says he‘s joining campaigner gina miller‘s legal bid to stop the suspension the increased risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy lasts more than a decade after treatment stops, a major report says
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in the business news: uk house prices were unchanged in august compared with the previous month. this is according to latest figures from the nationwide building society. annual house price growth remained subdued at 0.6%. the average home is valued atjust over £216,000.the strongest growth came from properties close to transport hubs in major cities. shares in shoe zone have plunged by more than 30%. the high street chain announced that its boss had resigned with no notice. it also warned that its profits would be lower than expected. the firm has 550 uk stores and employs 4,000 people. it blamed "tough" trading conditions since may for the profit warning. strikes have resumed on south western railway. it‘s part of a long—running dispute over train guards.
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swr is cancelling 800 trains a day until the end of monday — about half its services — following the walk—out by rmt union members. the union accused the firm of "rowing back on their public pledges" about the future of guards. the operator said it was "committed to finding a solution" to the dispute. how confident we feel about our own finances and the wider economy affects how much we spend. the more we spend — the better for the economy. the less we spend — the less we see businesses take on new staff and expand. it seems consumer confidence has fallen. gfk‘s long—running survey suggests a sudden drop in expectations for personal finances and the general economy over the next 12 months. joe staton joins us now. i think we are unsettled about
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everything we hear in the news. we are concerned about our personal financial situation, so the size of our future wallet in the next 12 months. if we are unsettled, then we retract and retrench. the economy will slow down. for me, that is the number to look up and there is a red flag there. any connection to the brexit? i'm sure there is. i'm sure it‘s connected to a lot of issues overall. people are concerned about having enough money to live right and paid the bills. work we do looking at concerns, having enough cash to meet your monthly expenses is number one. brexit is the number three concern. the key thing in the uk, people are struggling to make ends meet. we are not saving any money. this is worrying against the backdrop of other good news. we have high employment, strong wage growth, low inflation, low interest rates.
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normally one would expect the personal financial situation over the next 12 months to look a little rosier than it does at the moment. how does this read and compare with, say, the financial crisis in 2008? well, we saw some very big drops them. the overall index at the moment is —14, sojust south them. the overall index at the moment is —14, so just south of positive. july 2008 we saw a drop to -39. the positive. july 2008 we saw a drop to —39. the last time it was really positive was in the mid—19 70s, so i‘m a positive person, i don‘t like to see the numbers drop. when they do decrease, for me, the alarm bells ring. how quickly does this sort of fall and the consumer confidence index translates so that businesses and the economy start feeling it? whether it is a lagging indicator or
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a leading indicator. does a point to where things are going? for me, the trajectory has been downwards. i‘m looking for positive news in the next three — six months that would encourage the index to come. i can‘t see anything at the moment. for businesses out there, this is a concern. if we stop spending the economy will suffer. that is my concern, that we are worried about her personal finances, an area where we have control. we don‘t have control over the worldwide economy, but we do over that. we are flagging up but we do over that. we are flagging up issues to do with future spam, future planning. for me, that is of note. true, thank you very much. let‘s have a look at some other busines news.
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tsp projects, a subsidiary of british steel that works with the likes of network rail and siemens, has been sold to a french engineering firm in a move that is expected to save over 400 jobs. the official receiver‘s office said the sale would have no impact on the proposed sale of the rest of british steel to ataer holdings. moneysupermarket found that adult offspring living at home now stay for an average ofjust over 10 months — and cost their parents £1,640 as the householders shouldered the water, heating and electricity bills, as well as paying for takeaway meals, toiletries and food. about a quarter of young adults in the uk aged 20—34 live at home, a figure which, according to the office for national statistics, has been growing steadily for 15 years. the environmental impact of the fast—and—cheap fashion culture is coming under increasing focus, with 11 million garments ending up in landfill in the uk each week.
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thanks in response to this, oxfam is launching "second—hand in response to this, oxfam is launching "second—hand september", a campaign to encourage people not to buy any new clothes during the month. oxfam‘s research found that found that 50% of adults did not know that fast fashion had an impact on the climate, and a third the ftse 100 rose, lifted by gains in miners as nickel hit an all—time high. sentiment was supported by signs of a resumption of us—china trade talks. aim—listed shoe zone tanks after warning on results. its shares plunged 30.7% to an all—time low after warning annual results would be below expectations. that‘s all the business news. a mother, who won a major court case
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on bereavement benefits, says it‘s "shameful" the government hasn‘t acted on the ruling a year on. siobhan mclaughlin, from county antrim, wasn‘t married to her late partner and so wasn‘t able to claim an allowance for widowed parents. in 2018, siobhan won a challenge against that decision in the supreme court. our ireland correspondent chris page reports. four children lost their father whenjohn adams died in 2014. he lived with their mother, siobhan maclachlan, for more than two decades. a year ago, she won a challenge against the decision for a widow‘s allowance from the supreme court. how can they not? it really, really years shameful that they haven‘t, really is. at the end of the day, these children were talking about. you know? they have lost a parent. siobhan maclachlan says she did it
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not mainly for herself but for the children of all parents who found themselves in the same situation. according to bereavement charities, that‘s about 2,000 families a year. some of them have contacted siobhan‘s solicitor. what we‘re saying to those families is you should apply for this benefit but we are at the stage where they are now than having to consider ending their own challenges and you do wonder how many grieving families is going to take? the department for work and pensions as it‘s actively considering options following the ruling. it says it‘s widened and the support for bereaved families in addition for cohabiting couples through the wider welfare system. this time last year, they hoped their battle with the state last year was over but their campaign is still on. chris page, bbc news, belfast. a fire has engulfed about 40 lorry trailers at a household appliance factory in peterborough. the black smoke could be seen from miles around the hotpoint site
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in shrewsbury avenue and witnesses reported hearing explosions at around 7pm. a spokesman for hotpoint‘s owner whirlpool, said the trailers which had caught fire contained spare parts, and no—one had been injured. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. good morning. well, a real stark contrast in fortunes across the uk today. for the southern half, it is mainly breezy but dry. the further north you are, heavy rain, blustery winds. that is set to stay for the next day. it will continue into the start of the weekend. that is thanks toa start of the weekend. that is thanks to a weather front that is draped across northern ireland and is working its way into western scotland. some heavy bursts in the highland at the moment and that will become more persistent across northern ireland as the day goes on. a few showers for cumbria and north wales, but it should brighten up for the far north of scotland. for the
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best conditions, you need to come south and east. that is where you will see the highest of the temperatures. that way and will be relentless as we head into this evening with heavy pulses working its way through northern ireland and up its way through northern ireland and up into scotland, accompanied by blustery winds. that rim will be relentless as we head into this evening with heavy pulses working its way through northern ireland and up its way through northern ireland and up into scotland, accompanied by blustery winds. the rainbow arc around as we head towards dawn. further south and east, it is largely fine overnight with a few clear spells. for most places, i‘ll start to saturday. through such a big, here is the cold front that is on the move, working its way south and eastwards. before it does so it will have some big rainfall amounts, particularly for northern ireland and south—west scotland. that is why there is this yellow warning. the rim will clear northern ireland fairly sharpish tomorrow morning, then this band of rain will fragment and narrow as it continues to track down to the south and east. behind
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it, pressure conditions start to edge their way. we will keep someone in the south and the east, but there will be a few showers in the mix and they will be happy and potentially thundery in the far north of the uk. from saturday into sunday, this cold front will squeeze that want out of the way. that opens up the floodgates for something fresher, feeding ina floodgates for something fresher, feeding in a north—westerly feat. through sunday, for many it will be a fine day with good spells of sunshine around. it will feel noticeably cooler. while there will be plenty of dry intervals, we will also see a few showers. some of them could be heavy and thundery and they will work their way further east which is the day goes on. temperatures across the board will be done where they have been. of course, it is the first day of meteorological autumn.
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you‘re watching bbc newsroom live, it‘s midday and these are the main stories this morning. a scottish judge rejects a temporary halt to borisjohnson‘s plan to suspend the uk parliament — a full hearing will be held early next week. he hasn‘t made any ruling on the merits of our argument that prorogation should be stopped. he wants to hear further and full arguments on tuesday morning, here at the court of session. former prime minister sirjohn major says he‘s joining campaigner gina miller‘s legal bid to stop the suspension. the increased risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy lasts more than a decade after treatment stops, a major report says. florida is braced for hurricane dorian, which is strengthening into an "extremely dangerous" storm as it approaches the mainland.
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australian authorities say the outlook for the great barrier reef looks ‘very poor‘, with climate change threatening coral and marine life. good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i‘m anita mcveigh. a judge sitting in scotland‘s highest civil court has rejected a request for an injunction, preventing the suspension of parliament, but says it‘s in the public interest for a full hearing as soon as possible. a group of 75 parliamentarians were seeking an interim interdict — similar to an injunction — at the court of session ahead of a full hearing. lord doherty said he believed the case should be heard as soon as possible and it‘s been brought forward to tuesday. the snp mpjoanna cherry, who was behind the challenge, spoke after the hearing this morning.
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thejudge has declined to grant interim orders, that is like an emergency order. but he hasn‘t made any ruling on the merits of our argument that the prorogation should be stopped. he wants to hear further and full arguments on tuesday morning, here at the court of session, before making a decision. and so i see that as a victory for us. he has said there is no urgency over the weekend because, of course, the order that came from balmoral on wednesday says that parliament cannot be prorogued before the 9th of september, which is a week on monday. he is going to hear the full arguments, as to whether or not that prorogation should proceed, on tuesday of next week, and he has found the expenses of this hearing to be expenses on the cause, which means that the ultimate victor will get the expenses of it. interestingly, aidan o‘neill qc, who is instructed by myself and my fellow petitioners, pointed out to the court that the court ordered that affidavit should be launched at an earlier stage. those are sworn statements
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about evidence relevant to the case. and i‘ve lodged an affidavit, well, my solicitors have launched an affidavit from me, setting out my views, sworn testimony about the circumstances surrounding this prorogation. the petitioners senior counsel has suggested that the prime minister should likewise launch a sworn affidavit, setting out his reasons for the prorogation, and make himself available for cross—examination before the court if necessary. which, of course, is a very interesting suggestion, particularly in the light of the comments that were caught off—camera from the defence minister in the british government yesterday. indicating that the real reason for the prorogation was, as i, and others, have always argued, to frustrate the democratic ability of parliament to stop a no—deal, when we all know that there is a majority of mps against no—deal. so i see this as a vindication of decision to take this action. proceedings in northern ireland are already under way, i understand that similar
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proceedings are going to be put in flow in england next week, albeit the english case may not be able to get into court until the 9th of september. sirjohn major has said he‘s joined the campaigner, gina miller, who is mounting a legal challenge of her own against the government‘s decision to prorogue parliament. the former prime minister said he was joining the challenge to avoid duplication of efforts in the court. gina miller has tweeted to say that the challenge will be heard on thursday next week. a similar legal challenge is also getting under way in northern ireland. earlier, i spoke to our political correspondent iain watson, and i asked him to explain how we got to this point, where we have a former conservative prime minister, pitted against the current one. john major made it clear some weeks ago that if there was a suspension of parliament, he would take this matter to the courts.
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as there is already a court challenge under way by the businesswomen gina miller, he has decided tojoin that action. as you say, the details are less surprisingly the fact that the surprising than the fact that the former conservative prime minister is effectively taking the current conservative prime minister to court, challenging the way he is handling the brexit process and effectively accusing him of undermining parliamentary sovereignty. in addition to that, we have also had very prominent conservatives planning to prevent a no—deal to brexit no matter what the court say. to so they are trying to rest control on tuesday with an emergency debate and then take further action during the course of the week to try to legislate for no deal. amongst them, oliver letwin, a former conservative cabinet minister who said today that nothing that these rebels were doing would stop boris
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johnson from pursuing a deal but if he didn‘t get a deal, then that is very little that borisjohnson can do if they are successful, to prevent an extension to the brexit deadline. i hope that parliament will take a series of actions in a proper orderly way, that by the end of the week mean that borisjohnson knows, that as prime minister, he has the backing of many, many of us to get a deal, but that if he doesn't get a deal he will have to seek an extension. there's an irony here, i should just mention, which is if he does get a deal, as a matter—of—fact he will need an extension any way, because it's impossible to take from the late october stage a deal which is sort of written down but not solemnised and implemented in just a very few days. should we be cautious about reading too much into the fact that the meetings should we be cautious about reading too much into the fact that the meetings between should we be cautious about reading too much into the fact that the meetings between british should we be cautious about reading too much into the fact that the meetings between british officials and their eu counterparts are going to be stepped up to twice a week? i
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am looking at something the german foreign minister is being quoted as saying in helsinki where foreign ministers are meeting. he says we cannot imagine reopening the agreement. we assume brexit will happen on october 31. we will do everything to avoid and no—deal brexit but the british government has made clear that if there is no agreement on the irish border, no—deal brexit will happen. agreement on the irish border, no-deal brexit will happen. there seems to be a bit of a chink in the armour. a tiny one when boris johnson met emmanuel macron and did absolutely rule out reopening negotiations. however these meetings are being stepped up for two reasons. one, in terms of domestic consumption. we talked about conservative rebels. if it looks as if borisjohnson conservative rebels. if it looks as if boris johnson is conservative rebels. if it looks as if borisjohnson is pursuing a deal, some with doubts about no deal may notjoin sir oliver letwin and others in voting against a government next week. next week they might be prepared to give boris johnson a bit more time. the second
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thing to say about these meetings being stepped up to twice weekly in brussels as this. again, whether it isa brussels as this. again, whether it is a german foreign minister or others from the eu, they are making very clear that this isn‘t reopening negotiations as such. the onus is on britain to come forward with new proposals which they will then examine. they want to see if there is going to be workable alternatives which, nonetheless, stay within their parameters of avoiding a hard border in ireland. to the controversial backstop. but what they have been making clear is that they have been making clear is that they will not sit on the table and try and solve this problem together. they are going to say, look, it is the uk who wanted to leave, but in voted to leave the european union, it is therefore down to the british government to come to us with any solutions that they think are workable. and for us to consider, given that is the case, then i think the view here at westminster is lots of people put different numbers on it, borisjohnson said 1 million to one, against no deal at one point.
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then he said 50—50. but certainly i think the view here is that the money is still on a no—deal brexit u nless money is still on a no—deal brexit unless the opposition and some conservative rebels are successful in wresting control of the legislative programme and demanding an extension to brexit and even then it is not guaranteed that boris johnson would either go along with it or that he wouldn‘t, himself, call a general election to avoid it. foreign ministers from across the eu are meeting in the finnish capital in the finnish capital helsinki. the eu has been calling on the uk for some time to come forward with concrete proposals. what they make up concrete proposals. what they make up the latest development? they say they have not had concrete proposals and they are desperate to hear detailfrom the and they are desperate to hear detail from the uk site about anything the uk wants to change in the west all agreement. because, as
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the west all agreement. because, as the dutch foreign minister said, only with detail can they see how any of the issues that agreement is there to deal with might be resolved. we did hearfrom there to deal with might be resolved. we did hear from the british foreign secretary dominic raab as he was arriving and we asked him about that decision. by the government to suspend parliament for several weeks. and i put it to him, is this about trying to evade parliamentary scrutiny? well actually, we've had one of the longest parliamentary sittings in, i think it's almost 400 years. we've been talking about nothing but brexit, we're going to get a chance to scrutinise all aspects of brexit between now and the end of october. only about two or three days at the end of october. one second — no, not quite right. there's going to be time before the october council and after it, and i think it's only something... before the october council will be the queen‘s speech. can i answer your question? i think it's only something like four days less than we would otherwise have had. but also be able to present to the british public all
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the other things we want to do on policing, the nhs and education. that's really important. but you say four days left, foreign secretary. there‘s been no agreement yet about a recess even, so four days less is not correct to say that. that would be the number of days broadly that will be lost. so i think the idea that this is some kind of constitutional outrage is nonsense it‘s actually lawful. outrage is nonsense it's actually lawful. it's perfectly proper, there's precedent for it, but actually, fundamentally for the people watching this, they want to see we're leaving the eu, but also talking about all the other things they expect us to be addressing, that is what this government will be doing. the eu ministers now say that the negotiating team in brussels are sitting waiting happy to reopen those negotiations if the uk has asked make sweet. waiting for things to be tabled by the uk site as the irish foreign minister told us on the way in, he said that the eu side wa nts a the way in, he said that the eu side wants a deal, wants to avoid no deal, but it is redline remain
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intact and the difficulty is they have not had proposals from the uk. this is what he told us. at the moment nothing credible has come from the british government in the context of an alternative to the backstop, and you know, if that changes, great, we'll look at it in dublin, but more importantly, it can be the basis of a discussion in brussels, but it has to be credible. it can't simply be this notion that look, we must have the backstop removed and we will solve this problem in the future negotiation, without any credible way of doing that. that's not going to fly and i think it's important we are honest about that. and for those of us who have watched these negotiations for a couple of yea rs or these negotiations for a couple of years or more, this is a yearly reminiscent of what happened with theresa may when the british government was talking about dynamic of negotiations happening in brussels and the eu site seeing they
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hadn‘t been credible proposals put and they needed alternatives from the uk side if things were going to move forward. very clearly from the eu today, that view that you were hearing earlier of the german foreign minister that they don‘t envisage opening that withdrawal agreement or making substantial changes to it, if the uk wants out, the sea uk has come up with ideas. —— they say. the risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy is more than double what women are curretly being told, a major internatinal study has found. mht replaces oestragen and progesterone — two hormones that decrease in women during the menopause, to alleviate some of the symptoms. now, researchers at the university of oxford say the risks last up to ten years after therapy ends, and means one in every 50 women on the combined hormone treatment will develop breast cancer. there are other types of hormone replacement therapy and each of those showed an increased risk too. our health and science
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correspondent, james gallagher reports. louise rivers started having symptoms of menopause three years ago. she said she lost her brain and was struggling to work. herjoints ached, she was not sleeping well and she began to get migraines. louise says starting hormone therapy last year was a difficult decision, but the right one. i definitely feel as if my concentration levels are back where they were a few years ago. i feel a lot more confident working. i still have a few bad days here and then, still get migraines, but overall i feel much better taking it than i did before, when i was not taking it. it has long been known that menopausal hormone therapy increases the risk of breast cancer. the latest study shows that the increased risk lasts more than a decade since stopping the drug
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and the dangers are twice as high as previously thought. it means for every 50 50—year—olds taking daily oestrogen and progesterone pills forfive years, one would develop cancer caused by hormone therapy before they turn 70. we don't want to give them false reassurance about the risks with it. what we hope is that women would use this information to make a much more informed decision about whether or not they want to start taking or perhaps continue taking hrt. louise says she found the latest findings concerning, but that she would not panic. taking hormones has improved her quality of life and she plans to chat to her consultant at their next appointment. police in hong kong have warned that anyone who takes part in illegal demonstrations on saturday is likely to face arrest. the authorities have banned a planned protest and arrested a number of pro—democracy activists. there have been more than three months of protests, some of which have resulted in violent clashes. two prominent activists,
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joshua wong and agnes chow, have appeared in court and been released on bail after being arrested on suspicion of organising an illegal protest. earlier i spoke to our reporter in hong kong, martin yip, about these latest arrests. they are now released on bail for 10,000 hong kong dollars. that is the equivalent ofjust over 1200 us dollars or £1000. and also apparently there is currently an order being put on them at the moment. they are facing charges like i told you earlier for inciting others to participate in an unauthorised assembly. knowingly taking part in an unauthorised assembly, and an extra charge forjoshua wong is organising an unauthorised assembly. we also learned from this hearing that a third person could well be arrested. once he returns to hong
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kong from overseas. ivan lam, who is the chairman of joshua and agnes‘s political group, demosisto. he has been charged on the same case for inciting others to participate in an unauthorised assembly. these charges are not related to what could have happened tomorrow. these are related to a sort of ambushing of the police headquarters back on the 21st ofjune. thousands of protesters have been gathering outside of that building all the way into late night, having a bit of clashes with the police as well. that is what they are being charged. back on the police news conference, just today, those officers were somehow trying to avoid answering whether these charges are anything to do with the current people
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coming out tomorrow, but they do give some strong lines. and the gist of it is that it is basically now that protest is banned, don‘t ever try to pretend that you are not protesting while you are, and go to the facility, the police might still arrest people for participating ina illegal assembly. the headlines on bbc news. a scottish judge rejects a temporary halt to borisjohnson‘s plan to suspend the uk parliament — but says a full hearing should be held early next week. former prime minister sirjohn major says he‘s joining campaigner gina miller‘s legal bid to stop the suspension. the increased risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy lasts more than a decade after treatment stops, a major report says
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sport now, here‘s jane. formula one is back after its summer break — and it‘s ferrari‘s sebastian vettel who was quickest in first practice for sunday‘s belgium grand prix. it‘s been a tough morning though for lewis hamilton. power issues and tyre problems have affected his session — although he was able to set the 6th fastest time in p1. manchester united manager ole gunnar solskjaer says a loan move to roma would do defender chris smalling the world of good. smalling is in italy to finalise a deal with the serie a club, they‘ve reportedly agreed a year—long loan, with roma paying a fee of 2.7—million pounds. i could not promise chris regular football. he is on the plane over now and i think you will enjoy the experience over. it is a big club, a good league. there are not many angus players who have had the
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chance to play in italy. —— english players. and i am sure he will come back stronger and better for it. england defender lucy bronze has been giving us her reaction to being named uefa‘s women‘s player of the year. she said she was ecstatic and humbled to receive the honour, which came after an outstanding season for her country and club, lyon. she‘s the first english player to win the award, but she was on international duty last night and couldn‘t collect it in person. she spoke to us via skype this morning and told us her mum had ideas about taking her place in monaco. i texted her and told her about it and she said, i will go there and i will pick the award up for you, i will sit next door to ronaldo so i can chat to ronaldo, i said, mum, i‘ve already got the award. she said, i‘ll go anyway. i am not that great of a talker in front of strangers,
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so it is probably better that i was on the field. great britain‘s dina asher—smith ran her fastest 200—metres of the season last night at the diamond league meeting in zurich. however, it wasn‘t enough to beat shaunae miller—uibo of the bahamas, who stormed to victory with the fastest time for four years. miller—uibo will be focussing on the 400—metres at next month‘s world championships in doha, leaving asher—smith as favourite over 200 metres. and the draw for the group stage of the europa league is under way, five british clubs involved, and you can follow it on the bbc sport website that's bbc. c0. uk/sport, that‘s all the sport for now.
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with talk of an early general election increasing after the government‘s decision to suspend parliament from the second week of september. politicians will watching the polls with interest. the latest yougov poll puts the conservatives on 34 per cent with a sizeable lead over the labour party on 22 per cent. joining me now from glasgow is sirjohn curtice, polling expert and professor of politics at strathclyde university. does the latest full suggest that those in favour of brexit, whether or not it is no deal or any other form of brexit, are actually managing to coalesce around one party rather than the remain, anti no deal voters who are perhaps spreading themselves out amongst a number of parties? it is certainly true across all of the poles that the leave vote is gradually proving to be more concentrated than that of the remain vote. although it has to be said there are some variations in the polls about how far this is going and certainly you got has it higher than other polls because they are suggesting that... across the piece, at the moment, it looks as
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though the average of the polls that something like 50% orjust short of 50% of those people who say they voted leave in 26 and currently say they vote for the conservatives win is only around a quarter who say they voted for the brexit party, but it is still as many as a quarter people who said they would vote for the wretched party. are the conservatives managing to hold voters back? that is exactly what is been going on. if you are back to the position at the time of the european elections, the conservatives sunk to 25% in westminster voting intentions. we have held themselves back up to an average of 33 in the polls, just slightly below what you got are saying. whereas the labour party also fell to 25% at the end of may but are still at 25% in the polls, with liberal democrat hanging onto therefore. it is a crucial movement.
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brexit party supporters saying i would vote for the conservatives and the question therefore lies before us whether this process will further or whether the squeeze on the brexit party bought at least for so long as we are in the face of the brexit process that we are currently in is not going to go any further. but to give you some idea of what this means, if you make that pretty important assumption that the geography of conservative labour, liberal democrat support or snp support is more or less as it was in 2017, bearing in mind that liberal democrats are much stronger than they were in 2017, the snp probably making games north of the border, the concern is probably leaved eight points over labour to have a 50% chance of getting overall majority. —— the conservatives. that is the point we‘re at. so at the moment, forjohnson and l general election looks like a relatively risky prospect. rather than necessity.
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looks like a relatively risky prospect. ratherthan necessity. but he has told us he does not want to hold an election the site of the 3ist hold an election the site of the 31st of october. i want to hold one after the fish first october, after he has delivered brexit at his calculation would be —— 31st of october. his calculation would be that at that point more of the brexit party voters would switch to the conservatives and that would open up the kind of lead that might give the conservatives a secure position inside house of commons but that means boris johnson position inside house of commons but that means borisjohnson has to solve that little of how to get brexit through the current house of commons rather than using a general election in order to make the task easier. so many variables of course. what does all of this mean for the pro—remain partys in terms of —— parties in terms of alliances in an election? it certainly raises a question as to whether or not those on the remain side want to do
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something about the fact that their forces are divided. because if the conservatives were to win an election by squeezing the brexit party vote, that won‘t necessarily mean that the election were in favour of using oh leaving the european union. it suggests they are still split 50—50. there are various things that could happen. one is that maybe voters do a bit of resorting for themselves and that for example labour voters living in constituencies where the liberal democrats are strong would move to liberal democrats and indeed some of men have done this in the past. there was a bit of that in 2017. more crucially whether those voters who are currently voting liberal democrat when they are in a labour tory marginal would slip back to the labour party. maybe that will happen, maybe not. otherwise the parties themselves have to do something about it. the difficulty there is that apart from the traditionalfact there is that apart from the traditional fact that possible i don‘t think anyone is go to do with
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the snp in scotland, secondly, the labour party historically has been very, very reluctant to get into any kind of pact. the problem is that if there were to be a patch formed, at there were to be a patch formed, at the moment, the problem might be the liberal democrats might get some thing out of it and indeed the welsh party as well, but the labour party with public get more out of it and so the conundrum for the liberal democrats is if we help the labour party to match maybe they do better than we were expecting. perhaps the forming app packs we are enabling jeremy corbyn to get into ten downing st. —— pact. so tensions are forming which may not be easy to resolve. thank you very much. forecasters are expecting hurricane dorian to strengthen into an "extremely dangerous" storm as it heads for the us mainland. it‘s expected to hit between florida and southern georgia, possibly late on sunday. the eye of the storm missed the main island of puerto rico, sparing it significant damage. in the light of the warnings,
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president trump has cancelled a planned trip to poland. our weather presenter ben rich is here. where are we with dorian now? dorian is already a major hurricane. we have been watching it strengthen it is moving to the eastern side of puerto rico and has been drifting north—west. we can take a look at some graphics to give unido of where dorian is at the moment. —— an idea. we will get them. basically we have watched it move to the eastern side of porto rico. moving north—west at the moment but we expect it to move —— puerto rico. forecasters have been watching closely to get an idea of the track. there is uncertainty about its track but it looks most likely to move across the northern end of the bahamas and then
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eventually towards somewhere along the florida coast. there is a lot to play for exactly where. it looks likely to get there as we get into monday, maybe tuesday because the son is going to slow down as it approaches florida. —— storm. it will bring multiple hazards. hugely strong winds, likely to see sustained winds close to 140 miles further. the gusts even stronger could be around 165 male flowers on that coastal strip of florida. on top of that, —— miles per hour. a lot of the florida coastline very low lying indeed so that is a real concern. as the storm slows down and it may set off the coast for quite some days, here are the graphics. this is where we are at the moment but this is the track. where it is going to go. as it moves into the florida coastline. let us see
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because we talked about the slowing down idea, you can see his living relatively quickly through the first few days of this forecast sequence. that is ticking away in the corner, we go into sunday, monday, tuesday, it really slows down. if it slows down, sits in place for a couple of days, for example, could easily dump up days, for example, could easily dump up to 375 millimetres of rain. i have mentioned the storm, the strong winds, huge rainfall, people in florida are right to be very concerned about this storm. and further north into the southern part of georgia as well. the question is where does it hit. there is quite a wide—ranging of solutions from our different computer models of it we it will be so everyone in that part of the united states need to be on guard. i am right in saying that we‘re getting toward the most active pa rt we‘re getting toward the most active part of the hurricane season?m we‘re getting toward the most active part of the hurricane season? it has been a slow start to the season year, we have had five name storms
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in the atlantic base and a couple of which have been very minor in the grand scheme of things. this obviously is a very major storm which is developing and we would expect the most active part of the hurricane season two, during august and september sea temperatures are at their highest ——. those high sea temperatures, chiefly the drive. it is bath water, you can see the steam coming off the bar. it is giving the energy to the storm which is allowing it to grow which is why we are expecting such a major hurricane. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. c temperatures here in the uk no near 29 degrees. we have the best of the weather today across
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south—eastern parts of the uk weather is warm, hazy sunshine. temperatures into the mid 20s. the rain will mainly affect northern ireland and the south—west of scotland. the rain will be heavy over the hills. the rain will head towards england and wales, but generally fine and dry overnight. temperatures 12—14d. sunshine and showers will follow. the rain lingers longer in scotland. the bands of rain will sweep down to the rest of the uk but the afternoon. this is where we have the rest of the remaining one. sunshine and heavy showers to start the new month. it will feel a bit more like autumn. temperatures beginning to rise up a little bit on monday as it begins to cloud over. hello this is bbc newsroom live
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with anita mcveigh. the headlines: a scottish judge rejects a temporary halt to borisjohnson‘s plan to suspend the uk parliament — a full hearing will be held early next week. he hasn‘t made any ruling on the merits of our argument that prorogation should be stopped. he wants to hear further and full arguments on tuesday morning here at the court of session. former prime minister sirjohn major says he‘s joining campaigner gina miller‘s legal bid to stop the suspension the increased risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy lasts more than a decade after treatment stops, a major report says. florida braces for hurricane dorian, which is strengthening into an "extremely dangerous" storm as it approaches the mainland. australian authorities say the outlook for the great barrier reef looks "very poor", with climate change threatening coral and marine life.
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let‘s return to our main story today. our chief political correspondent has just sent this clip from an interview with the prime minister, boris johnson. clip from an interview with the prime minister, borisjohnson. in the last couple of weeks there has been a great deal of movement from the eu side. they do think that the uk is serious, as indeed we are, about doing a deal. they also understand the parameters of what needs to be done. the current withdrawal agreement just doesn‘t work for the uk. it‘s been thrown out three times. it keeps us locked into eu law, makes it impossible for us to rein run a room trade policy. it means the uk could be passed around by brussels with no comeback,
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with no say. that camp work. we need to come out of that arrangement. they understand that. we are working together now on serious ways in which we can change the current agreement, get out of that mistake and doa agreement, get out of that mistake and do a deal. that is what we are working on now. when you became prime minister you talked about uniting the public, but now you are talking about forcing through a no—deal brexit, something that a democratically elected parliament does not agree with. we want to do a deal. that is why we are working so ha rd deal. that is why we are working so hard with her friends and partners. that is why we have been talking to angela merkel, emmanuel macron, jean—claude juncker. i have angela merkel, emmanuel macron, jean—claudejuncker. i have talked to lots of leaders around the eu.
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everybody can see the rough shape of what needs to be done. everybody has now got a fix in their heads about the kind of landing place we need to get to. it is going to take work, it will take a lot of energy for us to get there, to get rid of this withdrawal agreement as i described it. the best way to do that is if our friends it. the best way to do that is if ourfriends and it. the best way to do that is if our friends and partners over the channel don‘t think that brexit can be somehow blocked by parliament. as long as they think in the eu that parliament might try to block brexit or might even succeed in blocking brexit, the less likely they are to give us the deal we once. so the weird thing is that the more the
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parliamentarians try to block the new deal brexit the more likely it is that we will end up in that situation. the best thing now is for us to get on and make our points to our european friends with clarity and vigour, and that is what we are doing. let's get some analysis with that right now... sorry, we don‘t have iain watson just yet. i will recap for you what boris johnson have iain watson just yet. i will recap for you what borisjohnson was just saying. he said his opponents are harming his chances of getting a deal with the eu. he said it was weird that the more parliament tries to block a no—deal brexit, the more likely it was that that is what was going to happen. he said he was serious about doing a deal. he said the eu understands that. he says the uk can be in a position where it is
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bossed around by brussels with no say, to quote him. he said the two sides now are working on serious ways they can deliver a deal. the latest comments there from the prime minister coming into us just latest comments there from the prime minister coming into usjust in the last few minutes. we will get you some analysis of that very soon. a mother, who won a major court case on bereavement benefits, says it‘s "shameful" the government hasn‘t acted on the ruling a year on. siobhan mclaughlin, from county antrim, wasn‘t married to her late partner and so wasn‘t able to claim an allowance for widowed parents. in 2018, siobhan won a challenge against that decision in the supreme court. our ireland correspondent chris page reports. four children lost their father whenjohn adams died in 2014. he lived with their mother siobhan maclachlan for more than two decades. a year ago, she won a challenge against the decision for a widow‘s allowance from the supreme court.
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how can they not? it really, really years shameful that they haven‘t , really is. at the end of the day, these are children we‘re talking about. you know? they have lost a parent. siobhan maclachlan says she did it not mainly for herself but for the children of all parents who found themselves in the same situation. according to bereavement charities, that‘s about 2,000 families a year. some of them have contacted siobhan‘s solicitor. what we‘re saying to those families is you should apply for this benefit but when out the stage where they are now than having to consider ending their own challenges and you do wonder how many grieving families is going to take? the department for work and pensions as it‘s actively considering options following the ruling. it says it‘s widened the support for bereaved families in addition
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for cohabiting couples through the wider welfare system. this time last year they hope their battle with the state last year was over but their campaign is still on. chris page, bbc news, belfast. the risk of breast cancer from menopausal hormone therapy is more than double what women are curretly being told, a major internatinal study has found. mht replaces oestragen and progesterone — two hormones that decrease in women during the menopause — to alleviate some of the symptoms. now, researchers at the university of oxford say the risks last up to ten years after therapy ends, and means one in every fifty women on the combined hormone treatment will develop breast cancer. there are other types of hormone replacement therapy and each of those showed an increased risk too. earlier, i spoke to sir richard peto, professor of medical statistics and epidemiology at the university of oxford who has been doing this research for 20 years. i asked him about the criticism that this might scare women off the therapy.
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what is true is that this confirms that the risk while you are taking hormone replacement therapy is roughly as estimated before, and that some risks persist for more than ten years, for at least up to 15 years. you have the risks during the risk after, that roughly doubles the risk after, that roughly doubles the risk. how does one describe a moderate size risk? one m50 woman if they did five years of standard hormone replacement therapy would get breast cancer as a result of this. is that something which one should put us a scare story? you don‘t want an unduly extreme scare story and you don‘t want unduly to say there is no risk. i don‘t know how to put that risk. they see the women with menopausal symptoms, they don‘t see the breast cancer later on, asa
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don‘t see the breast cancer later on, as a rule. they are looking at one side. these countries are real. it is not the biggest risk factor in the world, the biggest one is smoking. more 40% of women don‘t smoke smoke, so this is among the moderate risks that are there and real. it is really important to put this in context, isn‘t it? what is the risk of being on a charity in terms of a woman because my potential for getting breast cancer, compared to other factors that may lead to breast cancer. perhaps you could put that into context for us? if you look at lean versus obese. obese women have a greater risk of developing breast cancer. this would be roughly comparable. it would be about a one third increase in the risk of getting breast cancer after menopause if you are obese. this will be the same thing. this would change the risk from 6% up to 8%, 2%
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increase. one in 50 women. in comparison to obesity is a cause of breast cancer, it is comparable. i was not very happy with the statement from the royal college of obstetricians and gynaecologists that it obstetricians and gynaecologists thatitis obstetricians and gynaecologists that it is not comparable, because it is. if you say alcohol can increase your risk of breast cancer, but for five years of hormone treatment he would get a risk about the same size as having been drinking half a bottle of wine a day for several decades. i don‘t know how to do this, i don‘t want to exaggerate, but i don‘t want to lessen that, either. you don‘t want somebody who has breast cancer sang, why didn‘t you tell me? at the same time, we shouldn‘t have the big panic. with various parts of the medical establishment contradicting one another, frankly, what message
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would you have four women who are on hrt right now who are worried, concerned, trying to decide how concerned, trying to decide how concerned or worried they should be. should they chat to their gp?|j think should they chat to their gp?” think that is sensible. menopausal symptoms can be horrible and hormone treatment can believe it. one in 50 of their work to do it for five yea rs of their work to do it for five years would end up with breast cancer as a result. how does one balance those two? i do not know. i ama balance those two? i do not know. i am a man, i would balance those two? i do not know. i am a man, iwould have balance those two? i do not know. i am a man, i would have menopausal systems. i had cancer, but it has gone now. the headlines on bbc news: borisjohnson says his opponents are damaging the uk‘s chances, of securing a new brexit agreement, with the eu. the pm made the comments after a scottish judge rejects a temporary halt to plans to suspend the uk parliament. former prime minister sirjohn major says he‘s joining campaigner
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gina miller‘s legal bid to stop the suspension. concerns about healthcare and dwindling pensions is leading some british ex—pats living in spain, to consider whether to stay in the country after brexit. a group representing brits abroad has told the bbc, ex—pats feel "alone and forgotten" by the uk government. tim muffett has been on the costa del sol for us this morning. on a day like this it is not hard to see why so many british citizens choose to live in spain. more than 300,000 are registered as living here, more than 70,000 pensioners. it is their access to health if there is a new deal brexit if there is a no—deal brexit that is causing a lot of concern amongst many. a lot of them have been telling us how worried they are
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because they don‘t know for sure what will happen if the no—deal brexit that is causing a lot of concern amongst many. under the spanish sun, dave is sweating on events in brussels and westminster. good to meet you. hi, good to meet you too. how do you feel you been treated by the british government? drea dfully. i think if i‘d treated a dog the same way, i‘d have been in court. what they‘ve told us has been half—truths, lies, misdirections. it seems to change week by week. dave moved to almeria in andalusia in 2004. he has parkinson‘s disease and has had two heart attacks. like other british pensioners, he has been able to access health care in another eu country but the chance of a no—deal brexit has changed things. this is a cardiac drug. that drug is for parkinson‘s... if it‘s a no—deal brexit, you do not know for sure whether you can access these medicines. i can‘t get them without prescription, any of them. the cost of medicines alone is around 700 euros a month. i can‘t afford it. something would have to give. i‘m wondering, you know, is it worth going on?
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if i lose my health care, wouldn‘t it be easier to just die? even if there is a no—deal brexit, both the british and spanish governments have said they want to carry on offering a reciprocal health care agreement to pensioners from both countries, but nothing yet has been formalised and it is that uncertainty which many are finding so unsettling. my battle with cancer has been hampered by actually having a fight with brexit, as well. lisa moved to spain three years ago and is undergoing treatment for breast cancer. expats have been advised to register for spanish residency. lisa says her application has been rejected on a technicality even though she has been here for three years. if i don‘t have residency, i don‘t have my health care rights. do you fear if there is a no—deal exit, your treatment could effectively stop? yes, of course it could!
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i mean, suddenly countries can decide they don‘t like each other too much. it‘s unlikely, but so was prorogation and this is why the panic and the anxiety is rising. others are confident things will be sorted. neil runs a support group for expats. there is no question in my mind that britain and spain would want an agreement. before spain evenjoined the eu 30—35 years ago, there were lots of different agreements between britain and spain over health care, pension rights, workers‘ rights, but no government is going to let people not be covered, it‘s just not going to happen. people here expect to feel the heat but as brexit gets nearer, the questions keep coming. the government has today announced a £3 million package of funding forfor uk citizens across the eu to help them register their residency.
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you own the wigan bar, what have the british people been telling you about the concerns about what may or may not happen? recently, more than anything, because the pound has been dropping at drastic rates. the major concerns are if it carries on dropping it might get to the point that people can‘t afford to come out. once britain has left completely, are the airlines going to skyrocket the prices? are we going to start losing our customers because i would say 95% of our clientele is british. if our customers can‘t afford to come out here because the pound is not so much, then we could suffer greatly. we have been looking at the plight of pensioners, is there a fear that without a deal being done between spain and the uk to clarify the health care situation, that many families are going to be put ina very difficult situation?
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is enough being done to reassure them? the problem with that situation is the only thing that will reassure them is the time once everything has happened, and that might be too late. a lot of people at the moment are moving back, just for the reassurance that if the ship is sinking they want to be on the island, you know? a lot of people don‘t know what to do. only time will tell, unfortunately. the british embassy in madrid has set up a series of workshops to go along to register their residency. is that enough? is there enough information? it is not that there are no places to do it. we have a waiter, for example, when he was getting his residency, it took him four months to get it because every time you go it‘s "you are missing this document, that document."
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you can‘t get your residency without a work contract but you can‘t go on contract without a residency. that is the dilemma for so many people. thanks so much. this extra funding has been announced today by the government. the british embassy has set up a series of workshops to give people advice, especially pensioners and disabled people. despite all of that, there is a lot of uncertainty. doctors and nhs leaders are warning that a no—deal brexit is likely to cause delays in the supply of flu vaccines this year. the nhs offers the treatment for free — usually from the beginning of october to the end of november — to those most at risk of the illness, including over—65s and pregnant women. the department of health says it is "working closely with vaccine suppliers to ensure they have robust contingencies in place." whether it‘s the swings or the seesaw, a trip to the playground for many children is a highlight of the summer holidays. however, there are concerns that the number of play areas for children in england is falling. sam fenwick has this report
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this is strong this is to be a playground were children just to while away the hours, swinging as high as they could. it was good and it was here. what did you do on it? we used to play hide and seek. yeah, it was good. last summer, the playground was dismantled because the council couldn‘t afford to maintain it. do you miss it? yeah, i do. it is been there ever since i moved here and that was a long time ago. here we did have the climbing frame for the bigger kids, a basketball court. different ages that played. we just need to get something back for the kids and for the community and bigger for everyone. it is so sad to say it like this. an absolute waste. having
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parks ta ken down like this. an absolute waste. having parks taken down is not going to help, it will make things worse. in the past couple of years, the council here in barrow have had to kill six playground because they can‘t afford to keep them open. and that reduce the maintenance budget by nearly 30%. barrow might not be alone. the group representing companies which provide much of this play equipment says that by 2021 councils will be spent on £25 million less than they were three yea rs million less than they were three years ago. barrow council says finding the money to maintain playgrounds is really difficult. it cost us tens of thousands of pounds a year to cost us tens of thousands of pounds a yearto maintain cost us tens of thousands of pounds a year to maintain them all. it‘s not easy. it is the ongoing running costs, really. people don't tend to appreciate that. you have to check to make sure it is safe. the government said that in the past two yea rs government said that in the past two years they have spent £15 million bringing parks and green spaces that are fallen into disrepair back use.
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the president of colombia has condemned the announcement of a new offensive by a group of former farc rebel commanders who‘ve called on their supporters to take up arms again. president ivan duque has said the new group will be hunted down. donna larsen reports. nearly three years after a peace deal was struck, commanders of the demobilised rebel group say they are returning to war. the 2016 agreement had sought to end south america‘s longest guerrilla conflict. now, former farc commander ivan marquez claims that the colombian state has betrayed a deal which formally ended 52 years of war, that left some 260,000 people dead and forced 7 million from their homes, in a bitter conflict between left—wing rebels, government forces and state aligned paramilitaries. the fa rc rebel lambasted president ivan duque‘s government for not keeping its end of the deal, negotiated over four
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years of talks in cuba. but columbia‘s president has hit back, vowing to hunt down the rebel commanders, offering a reward for each one captured. he is also accused the rebels of instigating a criminal enterprise, with support from neighbouring venezuela and its president. translation: colombians must be clear that we are not facing a new guerrilla, but facing the criminal threats of a gang of narco—terrorists who have the shelter and support of the dictatorship of nicolas maduro. one former farc commander, rodrigo londono, known as timochenko, has distanced himself from him, insisting his party will honour the peace deal. translation: with all sincerity, we are ashamed. i apologise to the people of colombia, to the international community, to countries like cuba and norway that have worked so hard to support this process. but there is also optimism.
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we are the vast majority. we are the best in this process. despite this support, though, the sight of rebels in army fatigues may be the first and most significant sign that the hard earned peace agreement could be starting to unravel. in a moment, we‘ll say goodbye to viewers on bbc two and coming up shortly we‘ll have the news at one with clive myrie, but now it‘s time for a look at the weather with darren bett hello, they are. it is then quite windy for many of us through the day. the best of the weather will be in south—eastern parts of the uk. all this cloud is streaming in from the atlantic. thick clouds along the north—west. the rain will continue to affect northern ireland, pushing back into scotland turning wetter in the south—west later on in the day.
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ahead of it, much of england and wales will be dry. the sunshine will be hazy in the south—east. wetter weather is continuing through this evening and overnight across northern ireland, developing more widely again into scotland, england and wales it is likely to be dry. more cloud and western areas. temperatures 12—14d. we have a weather front on the scene. we saw it earlier on. this is where it will be heading into saturday. this area of low pressure will move northwards, allowing the weather front to take the rain into england and wales. before it does so, over the course of friday and into friday night, saturday morning, we could get a couple of inches of rain over northern ireland, may be more than that‘s over the high ground in scotland, particularly the galloway hills. the ring will clear away from northern ireland, sunshine and showers following. it will be wet for northern and north—eastern
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scotland. this meant i will push over england and wales, but it becomes lighter as we head to the south—east. elsewhere, after the rain, we will get more sunshine but it will be cooler and fresher. the wind will start to come in from the north—west. this is polar maritime air, so temperatures will drop overnight and into the second half of the weekend. it means there will bea of the weekend. it means there will be a mixture of sunshine and showers. on sunday, the first day of meteorological auction, it will feel like autumn. these showers will be heavy country, not so much in southern england and wales. the best temperatures in the showers 15 or 16 degrees. we lose the north—westerly wind on monday. it will be a cold start. try the months increasing. we will see some rain coming back into scotla nd will see some rain coming back into scotland and northern ireland. the creeping up a little bit on monday.
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borisjohnson says his opponents are damaging britain‘s chances of securing a new brexit agreement with the eu. he says the government will hold more frequent talks with the eu to try to get a deal, but warns mps not to scupper their chances. the more the parliamentarians try to block the no—deal brexit, the more likely it is we will end up in that situation. meanwhile, a judge rejects a temporary halt to borisjohnson‘s plan to suspend parliament, but mps behind the move remain hopeful. he hasn‘t made any ruling on our argument that prorogation should be stopped. he wants to hear further and full argument on tuesday morning here at the court of session. we‘ll have the very latest on today‘s brexit developments.

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