Skip to main content

tv   The Papers  BBC News  August 30, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am BST

11:30 pm
, draw draw on ,draw on rather is changing. we will draw on rather than the south—westerly, north—westerly. this is polar maritime hour, it is cold air, fresh airand it is maritime hour, it is cold air, fresh air and it is sunshine and showers. for the first day of meteorological autumn, the first of september, it will feel more like autumn, lots of showers for the northern half of the uk, some heavy and hungry, a few showers getting into south wales in southern england, where temperatures may sneak up to 20 degrees but for most of us we are seeing at 15—16, it gets colder overnight because those showers put out into the north sea as this ridge of high pressure builds in temporarily, it eases the winds down, drop the temperatures sunday night into monday morning. it could be 5— seven in towns and cities, a bit chillier in the countryside. we start on a colder note on mundy, many places dry with some sunshine, instead of the north—westerly ‘s will pick up a south—westerly of the day goes on, that means more cloud coming in from the atlantic and some rain for northern ireland and scotland,
11:31 pm
especially western scotland. we may find those temperatures a degree also higher on mundy. still no great shakes. again these west— south—westerly winds on tuesday, again it will be quite risk, we will find something in cloud and showers and longer spells of rainfall western parts of the uk, it looks largely drive through the midlands towards the south—east of england where temperatures are into the low 20s at best. some weather fronts on the scene, coming in from the atla ntic the scene, coming in from the atlantic on tuesday again, that second weather front is likely to bring some rain towards england and wales, which could be quite heavy for a while, but whether front moves through, the rain band moves through and then we're into north—westerly winds, cooler air, fresh air, sunshine and showers, some heavy and hungry ones in north wales, further south, missing most of those and temperature is on wednesday very similarto temperature is on wednesday very similar to those we are expecting on sunday. we need to look further afield before we look further ahead, and this is hurricane dorian, it is
11:32 pm
still tracking towards florida, it will be a major hurricane but it is slowing down, and because it is slowing down, and because it is slowing down, and because it is slowing down it will have less impact on our weather further ahead. there is more confidence in the 0utlook. we also have this deep area of low pressure moving into north—eastern parts of canada, that downstrea m north—eastern parts of canada, that downstream will intensify this area of high pressure and build it, but it is sitting to the south—west of the uk, so we will draw in showers, long spells of rain, around the top of that area of high pressure, keep it unsettled and keep more of a non— north—westerly wind even into the start of next weekend. there is some warm air heading towards iceland, we eventually may tap into that but it is still on the cool side.
11:33 pm
hello. this is bbc news with martine croxall. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment with michael booker and polly mackenzie. first, the headlines. the prime minister pledges billions of pounds over the next three years to england's schools, following warnings from school leaders of a funding crisis. borisjohnson warns mps that they're damaging the uk's chances of getting a deal with the eu by trying to block a no—deal brexit. new research suggests the increased risk of breast cancer from hrt lasts more than a decade after treatment stops. police in hong kong conduct a wave of arrests and deny permission for a mass rally tomorrow. hello and welcome to our look ahead
11:34 pm
to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are deputy editor of the daily express, michael booker and chief executive of demos think tank, polly mackenzie. welcome to you both. let's have a look at tomorrow's front pages. the financial times leads on what it says was an angry confrontation between the chancellor and the prime minister after one of sajid javid's closest aides was marched out of downing street. the times has the same top story, a rift between number 10 and number 11 over the sacking of javid's media advisor. the daily mail says borisjohnson has had a boost in the polls since his decision to suspend parliament. the daily telegraph reports the eu might be ready to grant another extension of the brexit deadline to avoid no deal. the express leads on the prime minister's fury at remainer rebels — he accuses them of playing into the hands of the eu. the guardian reports of alarm among eu citizens in the uk hoping to gain settled status before brexit. the star has the story
11:35 pm
of an islamic state fighter who they say was paid £10,000 in housing benefit in the uk. and the mirror has the news that from next year same—sex couples will be allowed to strut their stuff on strictly come dancing. we shall begin with brexit. the eu ready to scrap the deadline for brexit, but we haven't asked for it? so this is based on something on a rumour. that the union is considering withdrawing this october 31 deadline. the way he said it, it sounds like there should be no deadline at all, we can just stay on until we sort out a deal, which is rather tempting, because we will in fa ct rather tempting, because we will in fact never be able to sort out a deal, we are so useless. but u nfortu nately, deal, we are so useless. but unfortunately, it's basically not true? i think the uk would have to
11:36 pm
ask for an extension. that we have a vote of no—confidence or a kind of law to ask for a new extension, this idea that the deadline is going to just unilaterally move, it's not. can you hear that noise? the noise that russells is shaking in its boots? —— brussels? they'vejust realised that we might need to keep drugs flowing across the channel, evenif drugs flowing across the channel, even if we have a no deal? this is brussels shaking over there, and this is what brexit is a saying, panic from brussels and they don't wa nt panic from brussels and they don't want a no deal. no. a lot of countries out of the 2071 prepared for a no deal. i don't think that we all borisjohnson once for a no deal. i don't think that we all boris johnson once a no deal for a no deal. i don't think that we all borisjohnson once a no deal —— all borisjohnson once a no deal —— a lot of countries out of the 27 are
11:37 pm
not prepared for a no deal. so it is a slight compromising sort of air coming out of the eu as well. i don't know. ijust get the impression that this storyjust set us impression that this storyjust set us up for next week, where we have the big scrap in the commons. and legal challenges. there is talk of forcing this law through to extend article 50. i think this is a good, positive story for telegraph readers before the possible blowback stop the independent doesn't believe borisjohnson is the independent doesn't believe boris johnson is absolutely, the independent doesn't believe borisjohnson is absolutely, really committed to... why would they? let me finish. that he is not really committed because he doesn't even wa nt committed because he doesn't even want a technical extension, one of the elastic things which means you've got it if you need it and you can get rid of it if you don't. a technical extension would mean if there was a deal in the offing, close to october 31, you could
11:38 pm
extend it until the deal got through and ratified in parliament. if you haven't got that, you live with no deal, according to what we're being told. it doesn't feel like news. that was jeremy hunt's position throughout the leadership election, that he would say oh, well, surely if it was just a matter of days or a matter of weeks, wouldn't you just say yes in order to get a deal through? boris johnson sort say yes in order to get a deal through? borisjohnson sort of dug his heels in and said no, absolutely not, it's do or die. he's basically set his political strategy as i'm the person who would literally do break any rule, hang the constitution, none of it matters, just to do it. and of course he would prefer to get a deal, but if that halloween deadline is incredibly important to him. it's his entire political career. he is pledged —— it was his pledge, he told the eag he would do it. they've
11:39 pm
all said they would leave the tory party on november one, in duncan smith has said it, if you let them down, the tory party falls apart. if he is still prime minister somehow if we haven't left the eu by november one, then his lie to everyone again and they can get him for that. more brexit on the newspaper. daily express, brexit rebels playing into the eu's hands, making it more likely. can you explain that? they are less likely to compromise if we show weakness on this. that was the position in the theresa may government. she was always coming back, getting humiliated by the eu and shuffling off again. with this we are saying i'io off again. with this we are saying no deal, it has been ramped up, we are getting ready to leave, we are
11:40 pm
getting our advertising campaigns under way, will have a few bumps on road, but without that we have nothing to threaten the eu with. if you keep saying that, they aren't willing to compromise and then we willing to compromise and then we will live in october 31 of ever happens. yeah, it's a sort of complex architecture of blame shifting, really, he's trying to create this story which is me on the side of the people versus the establishment stop it's a bit funny when the prime minister is accusing other people of being the establishment, but i've long since stopped expecting brexit to make sense. laughter. i think it misreads the european union. there is an act article by alex barker —— excellent article by alex barker —— excellent article by alex barker —— excellent article by alex barker in the ft, only just realising that article by alex barker in the ft, onlyjust realising that when you leave a free trade area, you have checks and barriers that borders and
11:41 pm
that might cause problems. ijust don't think at any point eurosceptics have don't think at any point eu rosce ptics have really don't think at any point eurosceptics have really understood what the european union stands for. whether you like it or night... we've been part of it for so long. whether you like it or not, it's a rules —based system which is to protect its own interests and they cannot allow us to be better off outside and inside, because if that is true, then everyone else would automatically leave. that is what nigel thoreau is quite candidly says. he thinks brexit not only should but will need to the collapse of the european union, and that's a great thing, according to him. they are frightened of that, the eu will defend its corporate interest, and eurosceptics hate the european union and say it's a protectionist block. yes! it is the protectionist block so yes! it is the protectionist block so you have to be inside it otherwise they correct protectionist barriers against you —— raise
11:42 pm
protectionist barriers against you. i'm sure there are millions of people watching this tonight, but no, there is, millions of people who have been waiting for three years i'iow. have been waiting for three years now. it's a shame the brexit is didn't vote for a perfectly reasonable brexit. people are losing faith. we had a perfectly - i didn't like it, but it was a reasonable compromise that was put to parliament three times. we would have left if it weren't for the brexiteer saying they wanted something better or different. i mean — it — the kind of complex irony alljust defies me. i'm just saying, we invite you in here, don't come and insult us. casting aspersions. right. ft confronts johnson. i've onlyjust come back from holiday. johnson confronts
11:43 pm
after aid is kicked out of downing street —— aide. after aid is kicked out of downing street -- aide. downing street seems to be controlling the messages. they got the spending review coming up, they keep announcing things about schools in the budget and how much they are spending and they don't really know about it. this is the latest insult that she was summoned to see dominic cummings, the deputy prime minister at the moment, sorry, the chief adviser to the prime minister, and the aid was gotten rid of. he looked at her phone, and she was marched out of downing street, accused of collaboration and trying to stop brexit within the tory party. she hasn't even been accused of leaking anything, just being friendly with someone else who they think it leaked somebody. it's truly extraordinary. but i think as we are
11:44 pm
just hearing, if this systematic treatment of sajid javid, you put someone as treatment of sajid javid, you put someone as chancellor, think how powerful gordon brown was. as it mentions, tony blair would have to beg to see details of the budget, and they are treating studied david like a patsy. —— sajid javid. what we don't know is how they will respond to that. you can do it right, run the treasury incredibly strictly. you can stop talking to other departments and during the george osborne, david cameron administration, number ten social advisors weren't allowed to talk to anyone without one of osborne's social advisors being in the room. set those rules. the whole kind of way dominic cummings works is the only respects brutal power and if the chancellor wants do not be a patsy, he needs to start exerting it. every department - again,
11:45 pm
patsy, he needs to start exerting it. every department — again, this is about 60 days. he's the chancellor, he should be able to make decisions about the economy. the guardian. alarm as eu citizens are denied settled status. the guardian has done a lot of coverage of people applying for settled status. the home office was running adverts which had to be amended because it suggested all unit with a passport, when actually for about one fifth of people they need to provide more evidence. and it is interesting to see that even really quite ardent long—term leave supporters, peter —— people like dan hammond, conservative mep, the spectator has started to criticise the government, saying the leave
11:46 pm
campaign, is that it would be easy for eu citizens. if we end up with another window scandal in our hands ido another window scandal in our hands i do think the tide of popular opinion, even among leave supporters would turn. the claims of hypocrisy among people who were part of vote leave... he said there should be a syste m leave... he said there should be a system whereby everybody gets to state, the administrative complexity of stripping millions of people of their rights and assuming you can just tidy it up with some paperwork, this is the home office that lost... crosstalk. they think there has been an increase of 30% to 42% in the last few months, they are saying it could be just an accident when people have been putting in their studies online, and most of the 40% are correct but a theoretical lead to this timebomb. it is a bit of wishful thinking from the guardian... there are a lot of people who still... there are a lot
11:47 pm
of people very, very worried. and the home office does not have a good track record of doing good bureaucracy work. here is a story that has to do with brexit. " fa rewell to that has to do with brexit. "farewell to billings" that has to do with brexit. " fa rewell to billings" —— that has to do with brexit. "farewell to billings" —— feelings. scientists find a way to regrow tooth enamel. —— fillings. scientists find a way to regrow tooth enamel. -- fillings. get some sweet manufacturers shares in, keep brushing and flossing until then. chinese scientists have found that mixing calcium and phosphate with a chemical that has a very long name, in an alcohol solution, it causes animal to go with the same structure as teeth. these things will regrow natural enamel in 48 hours. that is very quick. tooth enamel is the ha rd est very quick. tooth enamel is the hardest issue in the human body that cannot repair itself. when you have a chip you have to have some work done, otherwise you will be waiting
11:48 pm
20 years for it to come. this is fantastic but it will take about 20 yea rs fantastic but it will take about 20 years until you grow back a tooth, but you know... i haven't lost any yet, ijust have to be careful, don't play ice hockey or anything. that will not help you regrow a whole tooth. the worrying thing is that when they start saying they are mixing these chemicals together, in 40 yea rs mixing these chemicals together, in 40 years you may have a tooth but you may also have another two hats. there is also questions over whether the chinese will let us exercise —— access their research. we know their attitude towards intellectual property. let's look at the ft again. iphone owners hacked off as google exposes spyware attack on rival apple. can you unpick this event? iphone apparently have a whole range of different
11:49 pm
vulnerabilities, a dozen in fact including being able to capture text messages, photos and device locations. the real fun of this story is that it was their big rival google who discovered this, and very generously publicly told them, by the way, apple, i am so sorry, we have discovered a few vulnerabilities. just a few weeks before the next big tech launch as well. apple rabbis made a big deal about they the ones who take privacy seriously. all going to buy them -- apple have always made a big deal. we now expect to buy whatever... hopefully there were —— apparently there were three google researchers found the problem, so i hope they have got a good rise out of it. maybe apple would take them on.|j
11:50 pm
don't want, i would like to get rid of my phone. it is a way for people to keep asking you things.|j of my phone. it is a way for people to keep asking you things. i dropped mine ina to keep asking you things. i dropped mine in a well when i was on holiday, so i had a digital detox. i am addicted to twitter again now that i am back. brexit is addictive, isn't it. it is a good job, doing thejob we do, isn't it. it is a good job, doing the job we do, isn't it. let's finish with the daily mirror. which is claiming a showbiz exclusive. strictly‘s yes to same—sex couples to reflect modern britain. it has been mooted for a past few years, in israel and australia, and now they are saying yes, from 2020, they are floating it, and i think the reaction will be positive because people aren't idiots. the average
11:51 pm
bbc viewer, i think they will be fine with it. i think the magic of strictly is flamboyant costumes, and that mixture of completely incompetent dancers and wonderful amazing talented ones, claudia and tess who i don't think we'll be dancing together, though they are obviously here presented as if they are the same—sex couple. there is a tiny traditionalist boat inside me that says "no, ballroom dancing is this thing with a man and a woman", but you know, it isjust a tv this thing with a man and a woman", but you know, it is just a tv show, andi but you know, it is just a tv show, and i think if anyone doesn't... there are competitions for same—sex couples, and it is beautiful to watch. they do it inside, inside one of the other papers they say they might do it by having a drag act. i don't mind but saying that is the same as having a same—sex... men should be allowed to dance together without having to dress up as a
11:52 pm
woman. or a woman dressed up as a man. you don't need to be dressed as a man, you can wearanything. man. you don't need to be dressed as a man, you can wear anything. equal opportunity drag, that is what i am saying. why notjust have two men in —— women dancing. saying. why notjust have two men in -- women dancing. two men in drag, dancing together, that would confuse people. strictly come dancing is an exclusive —— inclusive show, it is a bbc spokesperson, and we are proud to have same—sex couples amongst group numbers in previous eras. we are open to have same—sex couples in future should the opportunity arrives. it might, you would never know. you would have to find celebrities who would want to do it. i would very happy to dance with a
11:53 pm
woman. very happy. that's it for the papers tonight. thank you michael and polly. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers and if you miss the programme any evening you can catch up on bbc iplayer. goodnight. good evening, i'm gavin ra mjaun, here's your latest sports news. a big blow for england in the ashes — james anderson has been ruled out of the rest of the series. he had been playing for lancashire's second x! in a bid to prove his fitness, but he felt a pain in his calf yesterday. following that, medical teams have ruled him out for the final two tests. earlier this week, there had been some positive noises from anderson. he said he felt like he was getting somewhere and seemed hopeful of playing in the fourth test next week.
11:54 pm
he'll be replaced by somerset seamer craig 0verton. with the ashes series tied at 1—1, the momentum is with england after that sensational win at headingley last week. this is as bad as it gets for athlete, because the one thing you wa nt to athlete, because the one thing you want to do is play out your home ground, bowling from your own end, andjimmy ground, bowling from your own end, and jimmy anderson will be feeling his pain, i know he will be gutted, and it might actually give him more still to come back for another little ste nt, still to come back for another little stent, just to remind himself, but he has achieved so much in his career that this one is going to be frustrating, but we all know what a bowler he is. romelu lukaku has hit back at criticism from gary neville by saying the pundit should "never say i am unprofessional". the belgium striker was also called "overweight" by the former manchester united defender on twitter. lukaku left the old trafford club this summer to join serie a side inter milan for £74 million on a five—year deal.
11:55 pm
don't try to question my professionalism, i live for this game, i don't drink, i don't smoke i am at home all the time, i try to do everything that, you know, to improve my game, but lastly was a bad year and that can happen in football, but you have to move on. i'm not going to sit here and try and attack him in the public eye, we are both grown men and we don't need, i don't need to react in a negative way, he is a pundit, he gets paid to say certain kind of stuff, i am gets paid to say certain kind of stuff, iam paid gets paid to say certain kind of stuff, i am paid to play football. and ijust stuff, i am paid to play football. and i just want to do stuff, i am paid to play football. and ijust want to do my best. ten—man fulham held cardiff city to a 1—1 draw in tonight's game in the championship. it was cardiff who took the lead in the first half, josh murphy with an angled finish beyond the reach of marcus bettinelli. but fulham were level within minutes, alexandar mitrovic tapping in an ivan cavaliero cross. that's his fifth goal of the campaign. fulham were reduced to 10 men in the second half after harry artur received a second yellow card for simulation. that's how it finished, with fulham moving up to 4th while cardiffjump to tenth.
11:56 pm
british number one johanna konta was in devastating form to beat china's zhang shuai and reach the us open fourth round. the 29—year—old won 6—2, 6—3 in 71 minutes to reach the last 16 for the third grand slam in a row. konta will face czech third seed karolina pliskova for a place in the quarterfinals. british number two dan evans was outclassed as roger federer showed his best form to ease into the us open fourth round. federer played with his trademark fluency in a 6—2, 6—2, 6—1victory on arthur ashe stadium. after that match, dan evans expressed his disappointment at being scheduled as the first match on arthur ashe on friday, having played a gruelling four—setter against lucas pouille less than 24 hours earlier. he was asked if he thought federer had intentionally asked for the early start time.
11:57 pm
if that is the case, there is... it is tough on me, isn't it. but wouldn't be the first time the higher round players —— higher ranked players has had bull. —— had bull, so to speak. these guys, the tournament obviously want roger, they would rather roger be going through that match than me, so it is understandable. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport. friday was another very warm day across southern and eastern parts of the country, temperatures reaching around the mid 20s, a different story further north, and the low pressure, a lot wetter for scotland and northern ireland. low pressure still dominating the story as we start the weekend, this active weather front moving eastwards but slowly dying out through the course of the day. but by the time we
11:58 pm
reached saturday morning after all the rainfall across the north—west through friday and friday night, we could be looking at up to 50 millimetres of rain in parts of northern ireland, 80, maybe even 100 millimetres over the higher ground of south—west scotland. this will lead to some issues, standing water on the road and some minorflooding. however conditions improve through saturday afternoon, weather front moving south—east and tending to fizzle out. behind those guys bright with a few showers but cold air will be settling in. you can see 20—23 in the south—east, that is the last of the south—east, that is the last of the warm weather as that weather front the warm weather as that weather fro nt m oves the warm weather as that weather front moves through saturday evening, during saturday night it is a much colder, fresher night for all of us. clear skies, fabrics for scotla nd of us. clear skies, fabrics for scotland and northern ireland, that will feed on some blustery showers. temperatures dipping down into figures even in towns and cities. so into sandy, the first of september, the first day of metre article autumn, it will certainly feel like
11:59 pm
it as we open the floodgates to a polar maritime north—westerly, so it will be a chilly start to sunday, a bright one though, plenty of sunshine though, showers will push into parts of north—west england, western wales, a few through the cheshire gap into the midlands. sundy will tend to stay largely dry, what you will notice is the afternoon temperatures. 11—15 further north, 16—20 south—east, that will feel cooler than it has of late. as we head into money we start to see a ridge of high pressure build in from the south—west, are these weather fronts could bring more cloud, outbreaks of rain, the pa rt more cloud, outbreaks of rain, the part of northern ireland, everly into northern and western scotland. rainfor into northern and western scotland. rain for the northern and western isles as well, further south and east you are thanks to the high pressure it should be generally dry, lighter winds, some sunny spells around and it will feel a touch warmer on monday, top temperatures in the south—east around 22—23.
12:00 am
this is bbc news. i'm duncan golestani. our top stories: days after turning down money offered by the g7, brazil accepts foreign help to deal with the fires in the amazon. we report from inside the rainforest. even the rainforest. when the fires have been put out, even when the fires have been put out, this is what remains. the dense ra i nfo rest out, this is what remains. the dense rainforest that once stood here is no more, and this has happened in more than 80,000 places across the arm is on this year alone. —— across the arm is on —— amazon. hong kong police arrest protesters and pro—democracy lawmakers. the crackdown continues with a demonstration planned later on saturday now banned. hackers briefly take over the account of twitter‘s chief executive posting a string
12:01 am
of offensive remarks

15 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on