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tv   BBC News  BBC News  August 31, 2019 4:00pm-4:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 4.00 — thousands take to the streets across the uk to condemn borisjohnson‘s decision to suspend parliament. demonstrators say he's by—passing democracy. i never thought at my age, 61 years of age, i would have to be here in whitehall protesting against the shutdown of parliament. there's been renewed violence in hong kong, with pro—democracy protesters defying a ban on rallying. more than 50 migrants have been detained as they tried to cross the english channel to reach kent. several boats have been intercepted. the charity samaritans is being criticised for entering into a year—long partnership with a gambling company. same sex couples could be allowed to compete on strictly come dancing from next year.
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and in half an hour, the victoria derbyshire programme looks at controversy over new relationship education in schools good afternoon, and welcome to bbc news. crowds of demonstrators have gathered in locations across the uk to protest against the prime minister's decision to suspend parliament. organisers hope tens of thousands of people will take to the streets in dozens of towns and cities. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, was among those addressing the crowd outside the gates of downing street. from there, our correspondent simonjones reports. yes, the protests are continuing this afternoon. we're just outside downing street,
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where still people are at the gates. they have been chanting they want boris out, they've been chanting, "stop the coup". earlier, people took to the stage. we heard from politicians, we heard from members of trade unions, and people, just general members of the public, who wanted to have their say, too. the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, says that dictators have been defeated before by this country, and there will be no change of this time. and this scene has been repeated in many other towns and cities across the country. they say they want to stop the coup. protesters outside downing street claim borisjohnson is trying to shut down democracy by suspending parliament ahead of brexit. people here insist they want their voices heard. stop brexit! i never thought at my age, 61 years of age, i would have to be here in whitehall protesting against the shutdown of parliament. to look after their own interests in a way like this is deeply undemocratic, and it needs to be fought against.
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more than 30 protests are being planned across the uk. 0rganisers say they expect tens of thousands of people. they are warning of mass civil disobedience and disruption in the coming weeks. the left—wing group momentum is calling for people to occupy bridges and block roads. campaigners here say they can't rely on parliamentary process, or even the law courts, to try and overturn the suspension of parliament. they say they want people out in numbers to show the strength of feeling. crowd chants: shame on you! critics of the process believe it's people here who are trying to thwart democracy by stopping brexit. i've come along here as somebody who voted remain, but i have now been convinced by the arguments and also the fact that we really ought to get behind decisions made democratically. downing street has insisted there will be ample time for debate ahead of britain leaving the eu. well, the protesters now seem to be heading from here at downing street towards parliament. people still determined
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to make their voices heard. in terms of other protests, there have been a small number of counter protests, people who want brexit brought about immediately. the police have been very quick to move in to make sure the two sides are being kept apart. and so far today, everything has been peaceful, the atmosphere, people have been angry here, but it has all been very good—natu red. now, the organisers say this is only the start. they insist that there are going to be protests throughout next week. they are calling on people to gather at 5.30 every evening next week in places like london and other towns and cities across the country, so the pressure continues. i think there is an acceptance among the organisers that, for many people here, it is a bit like preaching to the converted. they are all singing from the same hymn sheet. but they feel their message needs to get out amongst the wider public far more than it is at the moment, if it is going to make a real difference. as for the government, they insist there will be ample time down there to debate the whole brexit issue in parliament, and some are saying
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that the people here are actually the ones trying to thwart democracy by overriding the outcome of the brexit referendum. tens of thousands of pro—democracy demonstrators have taken to the streets in hong kong in defiance of a police ban. petrol bombs were thrown at officers, who responded to the protesters by firing tear gas and water cannons. the event was called to mark five years since beijing ruled out fully democratic elections in the territory. 0ur correspondent stephen mcdonnell is in hong kong. iam in iamina i am in a shopping area of hong kong where the riot police are just getting ready to leave. as has been the case over recent weeks, after spending hours battling with demonstrators, they are then faced these crowds gathering, hurling abuse at them, and it does show that some of the level of feeling there
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is in terms of the role of the police in this crisis. but for them, they are pretty frustrated because they are pretty frustrated because they feel like they meet in the sandwich. the government has not come up with a solution, and they are the ones at the front line with the protesters. the ministers are not out here. and that you can possibly here in the background the during as police get into their vans to drive away. but it also shows what a difficult problem this is now, because police warned protesters not to come out today and risk arrest, and yet another tens of thousands, they still did. they not only risk arrest, people also risk being injured, projectiles firing all over the place. we saw a barricade built outside police headquarters and set on fire. tonight, the main government office
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was also targeted by hardline activists throwing petrol bombs over the barricade there. water canon was used with a dialect to try and catch activists later on. —— with a dye in. the government is saying it will not give in to the protesters' demands. earlier this week, the government was questioned on the use of hong kong's emergency regulations. we have also seen this continual build—up of troops in the garrisons in hong kong. is there a fear, then, that the pla will start to ta ke fear, then, that the pla will start to take a part, and what do we mean bya to take a part, and what do we mean by a regulations ordinance? yes, the a nswer to by a regulations ordinance? yes, the answer to that as there is a fear. those classes today at the main government offices, that was right next to the people's liberation army headquarters. i imagine people start throwing petrol bombs into there, once the army gets involved, it is
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another story indeed. and it really represents the end of hong kong as we know it. to try and stave off that involvement from the mainland, from beijing, the government in hong kong has threatened much tougher measures. this would allow for example to cut off the intranet effort needed to come at a certain point. 0r, effort needed to come at a certain point. or, for example, the hong kong government to bring about a cu rfew kong government to bring about a curfew here. now, these are drastic measures. but they would be used if it meant the difference between the hong kong government handling this and troops coming across the border from the mainland, or the people's armed police, to take control of this crisis. that was stephen mcdonnell there. laurie wen is a pro—democracy protestor. she was out protesting at the admiralty where police used water cannon on protestors.
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many people were out despite the ban on gathering today. she explained why. people came out today because we do not want to live in fear. that is no way to live. it is getting harder and harderto way to live. it is getting harder and harder to not live in fear in hong kong when the chinese communist party, through their puppet government in hong kong, has stepped up government in hong kong, has stepped up in their repression of the pro—democracy movement. it is getting harder and harder because, when prominent figures in the movement are rounded up, arrested, and charged with things like writing, which they were not doing, and they are facing ten years in prison, when prominent figures in the movement are attacked by hired thugs while they are eating lunch in a restaurant. —— charged with things like rioting. it is getting harder and harder, but people in hong kong in the millions are coming out
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because it is worth fighting for. people want to live freely, and it is very moving to see how many people are still willing to come out when the costs of participating in of the movement are getting higher and higher. the chancellor, sajid javid, has insisted his relationship with the prime minister is "fantastic" , and "as strong as ever," despite reports he had an angry row with borisjohnson over the sacking of one of his special advisers. mrjavid is said to have heard about the sacking of sonia khan only after it had happened. the chancellor spoke to radio 4's today programme. well, i am not going to discuss personnel issues, it wouldn't be appropriate. i think my views are well understood. the relationship is fantastic with the prime minister. this is a prime minister that, first before he was prime minister, someone i have always got on with incredibly well, and it has been a real privilege
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for me to work with him so closely on delivering on these people's priorities, and that relationship is as strong as ever, and what it does mean, by having that strong link, is that we can focus on all these things that matter to so many people. what about your relationship with dominic cummings? i am not going to talk about personal relationships, especially when... you asked me about the prime minister, it is perfectly correct to do that, the prime minister is my boss and we work together, along with other cabinet colleagues to deliver, so i am not here to talk about particular individuals that are advisers in downing street. that was the chancellor sajid javid speaking earlier today. i've been getting more details on this row from our political correspondentjohn 0wen. it is a row that goes right to the top of borisjohnson‘s government. it asks questions about the crucial relationship between number ten
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and number eleven, the prime minister and the chancellor of the exchequer. the background here is that sonia khan, who was a special adviser to sajid javid was escorted out of number ten on thursday night, in really quite dramatic fashion, after being questioned by dominic cummings, who is borisjohnson‘s de facto chief of staff. he seems to believe she was distributing confidential government information. it turns out that was not in fact the case, but he clearly lost confidence in her, and so she was summarily sacked. what we have discovered more recently is that sajid javid, in a conversation with the prime minister, voiced anger about the situation, because it has been reported that he was unaware that the sacking was about to take place, and this is the second person he has lost from his team just this month. so, clearly quite upset about it. 0n the question of whether this represents a deeper rift, we have no comment, really, from number ten, and as you heard on the radio this morning, sajid javid really not acknowledging that there has been any kind of rift at all.
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and i think, as we understand it, this is not indicative of a much deeper split between sajid javid and borisjohnson, that has been stomped on quite hard, but there is always that spectre, people look closely at that relationship between the chancellor and the pm just because it has been so fractious in the past. more migrants have arrived on the kent coast today, the latest in a wave reaching the uk from france. more than 200 have crossed the channel in the last ten days. yesterday, the home secretary, priti patel, said urgent action was needed to stem the flow. 0ur correspondent leigh milner is here with more. what's been happening? what we are being told is that 50 migrants were actually spotting in kent this morning by coastguards, trying to cross the english channel. what we do not know is where they have come from, but we have been told by officials that they have been detained, and also in fact, several other boats have actually been intercepted. as you can imagine, search and rescue
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operations will be taking place in that area, so if you are living in kent today, just expect some activity there. and as you mentioned before, the home secretary priti patel said urgent action had to be taken to tackle the migrant crisis, particularly migrants using small boats trying to cross the channel, because as we can see, it is extremely dangerous, extremely choppy waters there. and to be fair, following that announcement, british and french ministers have agreed to work together to try and tackle this problem. and speaking to french officials, they say they have seen a rise, particularly over the past couple of months, possibly because of the warm and hot weather. and we have got some figures, since january, more than 1000 migrants have been rescued by either british 01’ have been rescued by either british or french coastguards, more than double the number in comparison to the whole of last year. are migrants now using boats more than lorries when trying to cross the channel?
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it is important to remember that we are seeing a rise in the number of migrants using small boats, but in comparison, looking at the figures, it seems as though lorries are still the favoured option. a year ago, migrants illegally crossing the channel was quite a rare occurrence. now we are seeing hundreds trying to make that journey. now we are seeing hundreds trying to make thatjourney. why? well, it is easier and cheaper. 0k, we will leave it there for now, but thank you very much, leigh milner. you are watching bbc news. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has condemned the violence overnight in glasgow. trouble erupted when a planned march in support of a united ireland was met by a counter protest within the govan area of the city. riot police and mounted officers dealt with the disturbance. two men aged 33 and 36 have been charged with the murder of a youth whose body was found at barry docks in south wales. the victim has been named as harry baker,
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who was 17 and from cardiff. police are appealing for witnesses who may have seen a disturbance in barry between midnight and 1.00 in the morning on wednesday. the us national hurricane centre says a powerful storm threatening the bahamas and florida has gathered strength, and is now expected to be the strongest weather system to hit the us coast in decades. hurricane dorian now has winds of more than 215 km per hour. this is how the bbc weather centre expects the hurricane to develop over the next few days. it's now marked as a category four storm, one that is considered to be extremely dangerous. we can cross to cocoa beach in florida and speak to hilary lane. what is the latest with hurricane
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dorian? a lot of people here are breathing a sigh of relief. much of florida and coco beach was in dorian‘s direct path yesterday, but overnight of those models shifted, and it showed stern going out to see, and also likely heading carolina and georgia as of now. many people in florida were in lines for hours getting gas, hunkering down, getting supplies, but everyone now breathing a sigh of relief. that is a good chance that this storm will miss florida at this time. but still, very uncertain storm, and can make many changes before it is expected to make landfall on tuesday. in terms of preparation at being made? —— still being made? absolutely, especially when people thought this storm would directly hit florida. there were hundreds of ca rs hit florida. there were hundreds of cars waiting outside gas stations, people waiting for hours, many gas stations ran out of gas throughout florida. if you went into any grocery store in florida, the
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shelves for water were completely empty. people were buying cases and cases. the governor of florida told eve ryo ne cases. the governor of florida told everyone that they should stop out enough food, water and medicine for about a week, but again, people are breathing a sigh of relief, things are starting to loosen up your as hurricane dorian takes a different track. but very uncertain at this time, it could still hit north florida, georgia and north carolina are still being very close attention to the storm. 0k, hilary laine of cbs news, thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news — thousands take to the streets across the uk to condemn a borisjohnson‘s decision to suspend parliament. there has been renewed violence in hong kong, with pro—democracy protesters defying a ban on rallying. more than 50 migrants have been entertained as they tried to cross the channel to reach kent. several boats have been intercepted. —— more than 50 migrants have been
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detained. in sport, manchester united were held to a 1—1 a draw by southampton in the lunchtime kick—off. danieljames put manchester united in front, but southampton equalised. the belgian grand prix takes place tomorrow. a world cup warm up match is under way in cardiff. ireland's jacob stockdale has scored two tries. they lead wales 22—10, approaching full time. i will be back with a full update around 5.30, see you then. a military court in the united states has set a trial date for khalid sheikh mohammad, who is accused of playing a lead role in planning the 9/11 attacks on the united states. he'll be tried in guantanamo bay from january 2021. he's already been held for more than 15 years. 0ur north american correspondent, peter bowes, has more. this trial has been a very
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long time in coming. khalid sheikh mohammad was detained by the americans in pakistan in 2003, three years later moved to the detention centre in guantanamo bay, and initially charged along with his alleged accomplices, under the administration of george w bush, and the initial plan was to have the trial in guantanamo bay. then president 0bama came up with a plan to move it to a civilian court in new york city. and that really caused an outcry from members of the public and that plan was eventually dropped. so it looks like it will go ahead. it is still a long time before that trial date and it has been a long time in coming for the families of those people who died, that momentous day, that tragic day in american history when those four passenger planes were hijacked, 19 hijackers, two crashing into the world trade center, the twin towers in new york city, one into the pentagon in washington, and the fourth crashed
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into a field in pennsylvania. so if the trial sticks to this schedule, it will be just eight months short of the 20th anniversary of 9/11. nearly 2 million people in assam in india are facing the possibility of becoming stateless, after narendra modi's govenment published a register of citizens. it's a list of people who can prove they came to the north—eastern state before neighbouring bangladesh declared independence from pakistan in 1971. the final version of the list leaves off 1.9 million people, many of them muslims. india's governing bjp party has been accused of bias towards its hindu population, a charge it denies. a 15—year—old boy is in a critical condition in hospital after he was stabbed in tottenham in north london. police think he may have been
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attacked by someone riding a bicycle on willan road on friday morning. three people have been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder. the charity samaritans is being criticised for entering into a year—long partnership with a gambling company. staff at paddy power betfair chose samaritans as their charity of the year, and are supporting it through fundraising, corporate donations, and volunteering. critics say samaritans shouldn't work with the gambling industry. dan whitworth, from radio 4's money box programme, has more. if you are sat in the pub, you can tell a guy who is an alcoholic. let's be honest, you can tell if a guy is on drugs. the man sat in the corner on his phone is gambling his life away and nobody knows because it is such a hidden thing. critics, including relatives of people with gambling problems who took their own lives, say samaritans is risking its well—earned reputation by working with paddy power betfair, adding it should stop taking
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the compa ny‘s money. the mp, carolyn harris, who chairs the all—party parliamentary group on gambling—related harm, says she is shocked by the deal. she calls it distasteful and appalling. others on social media, as well as the charity gambling with lives have voiced similar opinions. both samaritans and paddy power betfair have defended the partnership, though. samaritans says it will work with the company to... paddy power betfair, meanwhile, says that charity's expertise will help it develop existing safeguards for vulnerable customers. there are more than 400,000 problem gamblers in britain, according to the gambling commission, defined as people whose gambling compromises, disrupts or damages family, personal or recreational pursuits, with a further two million people at risk. things even now can just hit you.
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it is just something stupid that will set it off. you will hear something or see something or remember something and before you know it, you are tearing up again. it never goes away. it does get slightly better but it doesn't go away. let's talk to gillian wilmot, chairman of the senet group, an independent body which promotes responsible gambling standards. shejoins me now via webcam. i should just say that senet group is created by four of britain's leading gambling companies, including paddy power. what do you make of the criticism that this partnership is receiving?” make of the criticism that this partnership is receiving? i think it is important to get enough funding to charities via front line services. the samaritans is an
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excellent charity with a great board of trustees. it has a volunteer led, and chairare of trustees. it has a volunteer led, and chair are volunteers. and to apply they will not retain their independence and their objectivity is both untrue and unfair. we need all people who are providing front line services to get the funding they need. so how will this partnership work? because i think to say unfair is unfair to people who have experienced gambling whether directly orfamily have experienced gambling whether directly or family members, there have experienced gambling whether directly orfamily members, there is that concern. it wrecks lives. the samaritans provides vital front line services, so the implication of the row about funding is run around the samaritans' row about funding is run around the samarita ns' independence. row about funding is run around the samaritans' independence. they have an independent board of trustees. that will ensure that they do the right thing, so that is a problem, if we say that nothing can be funded, and also that the industry
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is so inherently bad, and it is a legal industry, that it cannot be involved in anything to do with providing a solution to these problems, is a bad place to be. we need the industry involved in finding solutions. and they know their customers, they can provide greater ability for those customers to both control their own behaviour and for the companies to monitor that behaviour. julian, to make this clear, why would paddy power choose the samaritans to make so many companies out there, by the samaritans? many companies have an employee vote about who to support, andi employee vote about who to support, and i believe that is what paddy power did. that is not unusual. you get your employees to decide which is the most want to support. but this goes beyond the particular issue, this goes to the point that we have to trust charities and volunteer organisations to do the right thing, the samaritans has
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a lwa ys right thing, the samaritans has always done the right thing. and to say that the funding has to go via another route to get to them rather than straight from paddy power is missing the point. the point is that the money needs to go to the people providing vital services, we need to help people with gambling addiction, and we need to involve the companies in providing those solutions, which is why paddy power runs a project where we raise the standards across the whole industry, notjust the ten largest businesses, including the casino groups, that help fund senet group. and senet group is entirely separate from the industry. i have had nothing to do with the senet group historically, and the other things i chair are nothing to do with the gambling industry. —— i have had nothing to do with the gambling industry historically. this is about helping people and not getting tied up in issues of corporate governance. gillian, just very quickly, because we are about
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to run out of time, biased or not a direct relationship groups like yourself, rather than via paddy power? because you do have to ask yourself, what are paddy power hoping to get out of this? why are you not leaving that partnership? well, senet group works, it is not a customer facing well, senet group works, it is not a customerfacing organisation, well, senet group works, it is not a customer facing organisation, it well, senet group works, it is not a customerfacing organisation, it is purely working with all those gambling businesses. to improve standards across the industry, and working with regulators. and we do the when the fun stops stop advertising, which works as customer messaging. if employees want to support a particular charity, and the samarita ns' trustees support a particular charity, and the samaritans' trustees are happy to ta ke the samaritans' trustees are happy to take that money, then of the trustees have a duty to ensure they are independent, and they will be independent. 0k, thank you very much, we will leave it there, gillian. same sex couples could be allowed to compete on strictly come dancing from next year. in a statement, the bbc said it's "open" to having same—sex couples
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competing on the show in the future. it said that strictly come dancing is an inclusive show, and would consider including same sex pairings between celebrities and professional dancers in the future "should the opportunity arise." earlier i spoke to robin windsor, a former professional dancer on the show, who welcomes the move. strictly has always been pitched as afamily strictly has always been pitched as a family show, and in their own words a few years back, they said that as the reason they would not include same—sex couples. that as the reason they would not include same-sex couples. what did you make of that at the time?m include same-sex couples. what did you make of that at the time? it was very disheartening at the time, but of course families are now made up very differently than they were, and i think it is fantastic they are open it to have some more inclusivity on the show. what is your experience of same—sex dancing? the first time i saw it i find it strange, because growing up, you had never really seen that. generally it is between a man and a woman, or two women dancing together, because there are never enough boys going around, and of course, there are
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thousands of girls who dance with each other, and we'll think of same—sex partnerships, when we mention it for strictly, as two men, but it can of course be two women as well. how does strictly compare with other versions of the show around the world? in australia, it is called dancing with the stars. we had an incredible drag act dancing with a man, and it was so well received by the australian public, they were the nation's sweethearts, and they embraced it, they would all the way to the final. she did not a lwa ys the way to the final. she did not always dance as a drag queen, sometimes it was as e—mail as well, it was absolutely fantastic.|j sometimes it was as e—mail as well, it was absolutely fantastic. i was just going to say, does a drag act equates to a same—sex dance?” just going to say, does a drag act equates to a same-sex dance? i think we sort of forgot that courtney was actually a man, so it was nice to see what they did with their tango. it was amazing, you can see that online. because it was so well received, the group would be fantastic to do that here. and of course, you do not need to be gay to
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