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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 4, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin — live from westminster. our headlines today: the ayes have it, the ayes have it, unlock! a dramatic late night defeat for the prime minister — as mps try to block a no—deal brexit. in just a few hours, borisjohnson lost his working majority, his first commons vote, and control of parliament. he reacted angrily and said he'll push for a general election as early as today. i believe i will get a deal. and we
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will leave anyway. the 21 conservatives who rebelled, including some of the most recognisable former cabinet members, have been expelled from the party. in other news, after battering the bahamas, and killing at least seven people, hurricane dorian is heading for the florida coast. promise for public services but who is paying? as the chancellor prepares to turn on the spending taps, critics accuse him of gambling the economy to win an election. i'm at old trafford ahead of the crucial fourth ashes test. can jofra archer deliver for england against australia? we'll hear from the fast bowler. showers will be at old trafford this afternoon as they will be for most of the country. the wind will pick up of the country. the wind will pick up and it will turn cooler as well. all the details, right here on request. —— breakfast.
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it's wednesday the fourth of september. our top story. it's the morning after the night before. in just one day, borisjohnson lost his working majority, his first commons vote as prime minister and control of brexit. mps voted by 328 to 301 to take over the parliamentary agenda. mrjohnson has said he will now push for a snap general election. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake. it was boris johnson's first test of his authority as prime minister in parliament and it ended in a decisive defeat. some on his own sidejoined opposition parties in voting to take control of the house of commons to attempt to block a no—deal brexit. order. the ayes to the right, 328, the noes to the left, 301. labour and others want to force the prime minister to ask for an extension if he can't get a new deal. mrjohnson says he'd never do that, so if they succeed, his only option
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would be to hold a general election. i don't want an election, the public don't want an election, i don't believe the right honourable gentleman wants an election. but if the house votes for this bill tomorrow, the public we will have to choose who goes to brussels on october 17 to sort this out and take this country forward. two—thirds of mps would need to back his call for an election, but labour say they'll only do that once the legislation blocking no—deal becomes law. he wants to table a motion for a general election. fine. get the bill through first! after three hours of debate in the commons, those conservatives who voted against the government knew they would be thrown out of their party. mps are in charge here, for now. the government must consider its next move as the battle for control of the brexit
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process grinds on. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. there is so much to sort out and so many questions to get through this morning. let's have a look now at how the process could play out. today, mps will take control of commons business to debate and vote on a bill which would delay brexit until the end of january. afterwards, borisjohnson will table a motion calling for a general election. he needs two thirds of mps on board to trigger an early election. tomorrow, the anti no deal bill will move to the house of lords, if it succeeds in the commons. parliament is not due to sit on friday, but mps could decide it should, to help rush the bill through. and if it passes, the bill could be given royal assent by the queen and become law on monday the 9th of september. let's speak now to our political correspondent, iain watson. good morning to you. my main concern is to keep my guest dry. i am
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appreciative that you are here. for we talk about what happens next, let's discuss last night. some people say that this is unprecedented and we have run out of superlatives. how would you describe this? it is unprecedented and i have run out of superlatives. it is amazing. a bigger defeat than most people would have anticipated. there isa people would have anticipated. there is a buffer now for the votes tonight. they may have been on a knife edge and people might have been wondering but it now looks almost certain that there will be a delay to brexit. that in itself is amazing. also amazing that the first vote held by a new prime minister has gone down to defeat, even more surprising that many people in the cabinet —— were in the conservative cabinet until recently. they are now no longer conservative mps because their whip has been removed. ‘s
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civil war in government and in no has a majority to govern. we know that they will vote on the no deal till later tonight. how about a vote on whether or not they will be a general election? will that happened today? yes. there will be a voter later today, after this bill to extend brexit has passed. sometime after 7pm this evening. but the opposition are saying they will not support the call for a general election until the no deal legislation has asked. that could happen on monday and that may mean, because boris johnson happen on monday and that may mean, because borisjohnson will suspend parliament, they are running out of roads to get an early election. at some point, an election will come. he has no majority and it will happen. it may not happen on the timescale that borisjohnson wants. it is fascinating and important for eve ryo ne it is fascinating and important for everyone watching. will try to get to the bottom of what mps will decide today. i know you will be with us throughout the programme so there will be many more questions
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for you. throughout the morning we will speak to a number of politicians across the brexit divide including the energy minister, kwasi kwarteng, labour's keir starmer and former conservative mp phillip lee, who has defected to the liberal democrats. i will also try and take you through how events may play out. we will keep it i think to 24—hour today because things are moving so weakly. we will also be looking at how the newspapers are reporting the events of last night. first, let's return to steph in the studio. also today, another important day. the chancellor, sajid javid, will announce an additional two billion pounds of brexit funding for whitehall when he sets out next year's public spending plans later. sean's keeping an eye on this for us this morning. now normally when you and i are talking about a spending review it is massive. and given the back drop
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of everything going on, it is unusual that it is so far down the news agenda. there are many reasons why that is the case because of what is happening in westminster but it is happening in westminster but it is also controversial what they are doing with the spending plans. normally we would have a big set piece alongside a lot of predictions and forecasts about how the british economy would be going and we would have a three—year spending plan so the department would know where the chancellor is allocating his money for the next three years. and if you have that length of time you can plan. but what the government is doing, today we will only hear their plans and promises for the next year. and of course these are uncertain times so there are so many? s dashmac question marks. but when you look at where the money is being spent there is criticism. the institute for government, the think
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tank that is influential but politically neutral, that advises researchers on government, where it some department most need the money and where it is likely the government will put the money and it does not think that priorities are in the right place. hospitals and police clearly help address some of the performance pressure such address some of the performance pressure such as address some of the performance pressure such as declining teacher recruitment rates, the backlog in hospitals or increasing the amount of time it takes to charge an offe nce. of time it takes to charge an offence. but really it is adult social care and business that have seen social care and business that have seen the largest decline in performance. 's government said it is committed to ending austerity and we believe these services should be first in line. there is criticism as ever about where the money has been allocated but also criticism about the government using this unusual one—year short—term spending as a tool for potential election that may be on the way where they can put
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forward where they want to be spending money and focusing on vote winning policies rather than the departments that need the money most. we will go through some of the numbers later in the programme. thank you very much. hurricane dorian is moving away from the bahamas, but it's left widespread devastation and flooding. seven people have been killed and the country's prime minister says that figure is expected to rise. the storm has reduced in strength but is still battering the region with heavy rain and high winds. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the wrath of dorian, the scale of the destruction in the bahamas is unprecedented. this is now a humanitarian crisis. vast areas are underwater, they including grand bahama international airport and the town of marsh harbour on abaco island. lingering over the bahamas, the stationary storm prolonged the nightmare for the island's residents. many took desperate measures to escape the rising waters.
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some were trapped on roofs for hours. the national hurricane centre says the storm is creeping dangerously close to florida's east coast. the state, once predicted to take a direct hit, may escape the worst, but georgia and the carolinas are also in dorian's path. so our message for today is this: this is a very serious storm and a western shift that is towards land ofjust a few miles could bring enormous damage to our state. so we want everyone to heed the warnings, listen to the official instructions that are given. and we want to prepare for the worst, but of course we want to pray for the best. water rescue teams are on standby and the army has been drafted into deal with the looming threat. dorian's destructive journey is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news. more than a ton of heroin has
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been found in a shipping container at the port of felixstowe in suffolk. the drugs, which have a street value of around £120 million, were found hidden in towels which had originated in pakistan. the national crime agency said it's the biggest ever seizure of heroin in the uk. the fire brigades' union says more staff are needed to cope with a big rise in wildfires. recent figures show that last year, they reached the highest level since 2011. the union says there's been a 19% drop in the number of firefighters in the uk over the past decade, and even though there was a small rise in staff last year, it's not enough. the ministry of defence has been accused of failing to train enough pilots. the government spending watchdog says over the past six years, the figure has been well below target, leading to an average shortfall of 125 pilots each year. it says a new training system used by the mod has led to long delays
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and cancelled courses. love island and jeremy kyle participants will appear before a government committee today, as part of its inquiry into reality tv. itv axed thejeremy kyle show in may following the death of one of its guests. 0ur entertainment correspondent, lizo mzimba, has more. the committee's decision to launch the enquiry into reality tv comes after the death of a guest following filming for thejeremy kyle show. steve dyment was found dead after reportedly taking and failing a lie detector on the programme. police believe he took his own life. an inquest to officially establish the full circumstances of his death is still ongoing. the committee of mps will hear from two people who have previously appeared on the show, robert gregory and dwayne davidson.
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both have said publicly in the past that the after care given to them was not robust and has had a serious negative impact on their lives. the mps are also examining issues including the support and duty of care programmes like love island. three former contestants on the reality show will give evidence on areas that include mental health support and after—care, the role of producers in influencing participant's behaviour, as well as the representation of race, gender and body image. two previous love island contestants have taken their own lives in the past 18 months. in both cases, the coroner did not make any direct links of the deaths and the treatment of the programme. stay awake. senior itv figures have already appeared before the select committee and defend the duty of care and treatment of individuals appearing on the two shows.
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here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. we were talking there about hurricane dorian. it has a devastating impact on the bahamas. what is happening with it now?m has been a horrendous storm in the bahamas. the real problem is it has been stationary across grand bahama in particular. the storm has weakened in wind strength but the wind is only part of the story. a lot of the damage comes from the storm surge and rainfall and as storm surge and rainfall and as storm moved to the east of the coast we expect we could see some problems in these highly populated areas. it could yet make another landfall across parts of north or south carolina as we go through thursday or friday so the story is not done yet. the winds may be easing but they have a lot more to come over this storm of the next few days. we
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will of course keep you updated. back to our shores and a change of seasonsis back to our shores and a change of seasons is definitely on the cards as far as the feel of the weather is concerned. i'll start for many, temperatures around 10— 15 degrees at the moment. through the day as the winds pick up it will turn substantially cooler. it is all because of this area of low pressure scented to the north of scotland, moving its way eastwards. in doing so it will start to drag the winds down from the north or north—west. to get through the first part of the
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morning rush hour, lots of rain around. the heaviest rain towards the south—east corner of england and east anglia. showers in northern england and packing back into scotla nd england and packing back into scotland and northern ireland as we go through the morning's rush hour. they will become more widespread through the day, spreading into parts of northern england and north wales. further south, we will lose the morning rain and things will turn drier and brighter for a the morning rain and things will turn drier and brighterfor a good pa rt turn drier and brighterfor a good part of the day with some sunshine around. the winds will be picking up across the country into the afternoon. a0 or 50 mph gusts into the afternoon but strengthening further in the evening, touching 60 mph for one or two, with widespread sales in the north. temperatures hitting 20 degrees around the early pa rt hitting 20 degrees around the early part of the afternoon. by the end of the afternoon, school pick—up and the afternoon, school pick—up and the journey the afternoon, school pick—up and thejourney home, only the afternoon, school pick—up and the journey home, only the teams for the journey home, only the teams for the most part. good luck for those of you heading to the ashes for the fourth test and after some showers towards the start of play, some showers into the afternoon so some interruptions likely. the showers will be there across some eastern areas. most places becoming drier and clearer. northerly winds across the country will bring a colder night tonight and we saw last night. as we go into tomorrow morning's rush hour, will need a slightly biggerjacket. temperatures rush hour, will need a slightly bigger jacket. temperatures into single figures but a fair amount of sunshine around to begin with. the sunshine around to begin with. the sunshine turning hazy into the afternoon, showers pushing into scotland, parts of north—west england and wales. 0ne scotland, parts of north—west england and wales. one or two dotted around elsewhere. 0verall tomorrow a drier day than today, a little bit more brightness around but staying on the cool side. temperatures around 15— 19 degrees. through into
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friday, a ridge of high pressure but more weather fronts set to push him. bringing outbreaks of rain across the northern half of the country. the friday itself, lots of rain across england and wales. something brighterfor across england and wales. something brighter for scotland, northern ireland on friday, but showers pushing in. anotherfairly cool day with temperatures in the teams for the vast majority. that cooler theme will continue into the weekend, but this weekend the good news is that most this weekend the good news is that m ost pla ces this weekend the good news is that most places will be dry. that is good news for those taking part in the great north run. but now to westminster and louise. thank you, i can tell you it is a question of when and not if the water comes down. it looks a little bit brighter right now. let's take a look at today's papers, and one story dominates the front pages, as you would expect. the front page of the telegraph has a picture of the prime minister standing at the despatch box in the house of commons, and the headline is johnson demands election. parliament surrenders to the eu is how the daily express interprets last night's vote.
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it calls it another shameful day in our so—called democracy. the mirror says boris loses control. the paper claims the prime minister's brexit plans blew up in his face last night as tory mps helped defeat the government. and the sun headline says over to you, britain. it describes borisjohnson as livid, and says he is demanding the british people decide their brexit fate with a fresh general election. we will talk about that throughout the programme this morning. 0n social media, there has been a lot of discussion about jacob rees—mogg's relaxed demeanour through part of yesterday's commons proceedings. the mp was told to sit up by 0pposition mps, while caroline lucas called his body language contemptuous as he appeared to recline on the front bench. you can see the video in full
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on the bbc news website. what we really want to do is take you through what will happen in the next 2a hours. also what we don't know, and really trying to get to the bottom of what every single party wa nts the bottom of what every single party wants in the votes as well. there is so much to unpick. we will try and do that on bbc breakfast and keep you up—to—date with everything else as well. good luck keeping drier, as well. well, it is the million—dollar question — is there going to be a general election, and how would boris johnson do? in the constituency of st ives, in cornwall, the conservatives have a majority over the lib dems ofjust 312. we have sentjohn maguire down there to find out how people are feeling. morning, john.
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won't it looks glorious there this morning. isn't it beautiful, steph? proper postcard stuff in st ives this morning just as the sun is coming up, and life is waking up. louise has been talking about the morning after the night before, and of course daily life goes on. we have seen delivery trucks delivering food to the restaurant and cafe ‘s this morning, and fishermen setting off for the day. we were talking to one earlier who was saying it is blustery. you might struggle to find mackerel. that gives you an idea of this part of the uk, formed very much by the weather. the climate so important here. the major industries are tourism, farming, fishing, but they are also affected by a different type of storm. by westminster politics and by european politics. so people are very closely watching what is happening, or
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sometimes not happening, with this brexit saga. and harbour feels every inch 288 miles away from westminster, and of course it is even further from brussels. yet for a generation, that is where the decisions have been made about how much these fishermen can catch and land —— newlyn harbour. the problem is all this waiting. we just want to get out on 31 october. they want to leave the european union, back control of the fishing grounds. theyjust need to go ahead so that we can start with a rejuvenation programme for our coastal communities, you know, they are desperate for it. they are crying out for it. we need to leave in order to do that, and we need to leave with a clean break. this constituency, st ives, voted 5a% — a6% in favour of leave. but where
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there is consensus here is that eve ryo ne there is consensus here is that everyone you talk to once an end to all the uncertainty, and to move on. penzance is a town with ambitious plans to make the most of its resources . plans to make the most of its resources. we've got thermal energy below the ground which is going to heat a portion of the pool so that people can swim in heated water all year round. and for businesses here, the never—ending brexit saga is damaging and frustrating. people just want an end to it. we have all got fed up with the whys and wherefores, now, and we have all lost track of why it was started in the first place, and people just wa nt to the first place, and people just want to get an end, be it one way or the other. i know a lot of people are quite passionate about the way they feel, be it brexit or remain, but i think we just need the certainty. we just need stability, at the end of the day. this is a conservative seat with a majority of just 312 votes over the liberal democrats, who would see st ives as a key target. a general election, more uncertainty, may well affect
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the strength of the pound, which for the strength of the pound, which for the vital tourism sector here isn't necessarily a bad thing. the pound may be low today and people thinking ican may be low today and people thinking i can buy fewer coffees while on holiday, i must have a vacation in britain instead, or we have people on the continent or in america seeing the pound reducing in value, therefore thinking my stay in britain now is going to be much better value. these days, hunting fish seems an easier task than hunting for a solution to the brexit crisis. any definitive outcome is once again on ice. it is certainty, you know, that is the word that i heard so many times yesterday. people said theyjust wa nt yesterday. people said theyjust want some certainty. things have been going on for three years, maybe even longer, but in this part of the world, where fishing has been so important, it has been a debate for
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a generation, that the common fisheries policy has been in place. certainty is what people are after, but one thing is for certain. if you wa nt to but one thing is for certain. if you want to see people's eyes rolled these days, talk about a general election. someone i bumped into yesterday was telling me a story about the fact that they were on one of the main roads going into cornwall and someone had written on the side of a slurry tank, this is full of politicians' promises. it is suppose gives you an idea of people's mindset, but they are i think increasingly desperate, is that too strong? but increasingly willing and wanting some sort of solution to what has been going on for the last months, the last weeks, the last years. so from a blustery night, back to you and a damp westminster. you are absolutely right, and i can't promise any certainty by the end of this programme, but we will try and get at least clarity on what at least some of the mps are planning to do
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over the next 2a hours, at this point. and just looking at a few of the numbers, and these are numbers to remember this morning, 21 conservative rebels voted against the government effectively last night. and we know that they have been expelled from the party, and some of them very well names who have been in politics for decades. 15 october, we said yesterday, that possible election. and we don't know whether or not that is going to happen, it was going to be the 1ath but that date has moved to possibly the 15th of october. and another number to look out for going into tonight's vote, boris johnson, number to look out for going into tonight's vote, borisjohnson, if he wa nts to tonight's vote, borisjohnson, if he wants to get an election, given the rules of parliament as they stand at the moment, needs a30 mps to vote foran the moment, needs a30 mps to vote for an election, and without that it doesn't go ahead at the moment. but it is all to play for, as we say. but it is all to play for. later in the programme, the atmosphere is mps
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we re the programme, the atmosphere is mps were going to vote. there can be a lot of excitement, in some ways, before there is a big crucial vote ina before there is a big crucial vote in a house of parliament, and we understand it was a really sombre mood yesterday as well. we will talk about that with mps of all different sides, and there are so many different sides. 0ne sides, and there are so many different sides. one thing we can be certain of, the sun is coming up and we will have everything else as normal in the programme, the sport, the weather as well. it is time, as you will always know, for the news, travel and whether wherever you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. two london mps have been suspended from the conservative party after voting against the government last night. justine greening and stephen hammond rebelled against the web in the first stage of an attempt to pass a law designed to prevent an ideal brexit. 21 conservative mps
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rebelled in total. the mayor of london says he hopes some of the cuts of the last few years will be reversed — as the chancellor announces his spending plans this afternoon. sajid javid, will confirm the government's budget for the next financial year for the health department, education, the police and social care. i think what the government has to do is reverse the cuts that have been made to our police over the last nine years. we have lost more than 3500 offices, more than 3500 community officers and thousands... to sell off police stations. they have to reverse those cuts and give us have to reverse those cuts and give us extra funding because our population has grown. another case of a potentially fatal streptococcus infection has been confirmed in mid—essex. tests took place last week, and now that it is confirmed, that brings the total number in the area to 37. there have been 13 deaths from the infection. an exhibition on christian dior has broken attendance records at the v&a. tracing the history of the fashion house from 19a7 to the present day, the exhibit attracted nearly 600,000 people
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in seven months. the previous record holder was the alexander mcqueen exhibition. let's take a look at the travel situation now. firstly, on the tubes, it is bad news if you use the northern line. the entire line is suspended at the moment because of a signalling systems failure. there are also severe delays on the metropolitan line between harrow—on—the—hill and aldgate, and the victoria line has minor delays. and there's a lane closed on the ma out of london from the chiswick roundabout to junction 2 because of an overturned car. there are long delays from the aa in chiswick. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start, but are rather soggy one. we have had a bit of rain overnight. it is gradually clearing away eastwards, so yes, damp stars, but it will become drier and brighter as we head through the morning. some of the rain at first quite heavy, but it does clear away quite quickly. behind it, some showers around, but
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plenty of sunshine through the middle part of the day. a bit more cloud bubbling up this afternoon, again the risk of an isolated shower and temperatures getting up to 21 celsius. still a bit of a breeze as well, and that stays with us overnight tonight. some patchy cloud again. the risk of one or two light showers, but largely dry overnight. but a bit cooler. the rain today a cold front, and as it clears, the air isa cold front, and as it clears, the air is a bit fresher. so overnight, temperatures for some down in single figures. so a chillier start as we head into thursday morning. but plenty of sunshine around tomorrow. bridges, though, hovering around the high teens, 18, may be 19 celsius. some rain later on friday, then a more or less settled weekend, but temperatures stay similar i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it's back to louise in westminster and steph in the studio. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with louise minchin
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and steph mcgovern. we're live from westminster this morning, in a crucial week for the future of brexit. coming up on the programme: we'll be talking to energy minister kwasi kwarteng to find out what he makes of the prime minister's intensions for an early general election. philip lee defected to the liberal democrats last night to leave borisjohnson without a working majority. i'll speak to former conservative mp just after eight. and jeremy corbyn says he welcomes the prospect of an election, but how prepared is labour? i'll be joined by the party's keir starmer at eight thirty. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. it's the morning after the night before. in just one day, borisjohnson lost his working majority, his first commons vote as prime minister and control of parliament. mps voted by 328 to 301 to take over the parliamentary agenda.
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mrjohnson has said he will now push for a snap general election. let's speak to our political correspondent, iain watson. hejoins me in the drizzle here. firstly, before we talk about what next, let's discuss last night. was a sombre mood in parliament as they went for this vote. it was sombre because many conservatives felt they did not want to be pushed into this position. they were talking about a whole range of recent camden ministers such as philip hammond and ken clarke, the grandson of wind still -- ken clarke, the grandson of wind still —— winston churchill, a whole range of people voting against their own government but knowing that they we re own government but knowing that they were concise —— cutting their own throats. they cannot stand as conservative candidates again because the whip has been withdrawn.
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but many were sombre because not only were they voting against the government, for some of them it was the first time in 1a years and they effectively knew they were spelling the ends of their political career at the same time. that is why i think it felt sombre. so boris johnson has effectively lost that vote. what happens today? they need to vote on a bill to stop no deal? they lost by a bigger margin than people imagined so it is almost certain that this bill which he does not want past, will go through the house of commons this evening and effectively that will ask him to delay brexit. he does not want to do that so tonight he will come to the house of commons and ask for a snap election. the opposition is likely to say no, we want this legislation past first. another option for boris johnson is simply to not ask for royal assent for a bill. that means
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that even if mps vote for it, unless it has been agreed to formally by the queen and detector and all the rest of it, it would not go ahead. he spoke about the potential consequences of taking that route. there has been talk, loose talk over the last few days, about the government possibly, if it did not like the result, not presenting it to the queen for royal assent. if that were the case that would be a very serious meltdown in the relationship between government and parliament and at the moment it really is quite bruised. quite bruised is an apt correction and meltdown as well. this is just extraordinary times. when will we know if there will be an election?” think extraordinary is becoming ordinary. if the bill passes, boris johnson lets it pass, at that stage the opposition mps may agree to an election but that would not be until monday. labour sources are telling
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me they will not give borisjohnson and election this week because they suspect he may set an election date after brexit day. they want an absolute guarantee it will happen before we leave the eu. whatever option they have is to try and amend a fixed term parliament act, a lower threshold for an election. because if you can get too 50—50 that is another chance for him. thank you for being here to explain it. you will be with us through the power —— programme and we will surely have questions for you. throughout the morning we'll be speaking to a number of politician across the brexit divide including energy minister, kwasi kwarteng, labour's keir starmer and former conservative mp phillip lee, who has defected to the liberal democrats. he chose to do that yesterday is borisjohnson he chose to do that yesterday is boris johnson stood up he chose to do that yesterday is borisjohnson stood up in the commons yesterday. so many things to get to the bottom of and i will be backin get to the bottom of and i will be
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back ina get to the bottom of and i will be back in a few minutes with a look at how the papers are reporting events. but first it's back to the studio where steph has the rest of the morning's news. the chancellor, sajid javid, will announce an additional two billion pounds of brexit funding for whitehall when he sets out next year's public spending plans later. mrjavid will also confirm plans to increase spending on schools, hospitals, and the police — public services which caused problems for the conservatives at the last general election. the additional money for hospitals schools and the police could clearly help address some of the big performance pressures, be it declining teacher recruitment rates, the growing backlog in hospitals or an increasing amount of time it ta kes to an increasing amount of time it takes to charge an offence and the police did but really, adult social ca re police did but really, adult social care and prisons have seen the largest decline in performance. this government is committed to ending austerity and these services should
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be first in line. hurricane dorian is moving away from the bahamas, but its left widespread devastation and flooding. seven people have been killed and the country's prime minister says that figure is expected to rise. the storm has reduced in strength but is still battering the region with heavy rain and high winds. more than a ton of heroin has been found in a shipping container at the port of felixstowe in suffolk. the drugs, which have a street value of around £120 million were found hidden in towels which had originated in pakistan. the national crime agency said it's the biggest ever seizure of heroin in the uk. the fire brigades' union says more staff are needed to cope with a big rise in wildfires. recent figures show that last year, they reached the highest level since 2011. the union says there's been a 19% drop in the number of firefighters in the uk over the past decade, and even though there was a small rise in staff last year, it's not enough.
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the ministry of defence has been accused of failing to train enough pilots. 0ver accused of failing to train enough pilots. over the last six years the figure has well been below target leading to an average shortfall of over a hundred pilots every year. they say a new training cistern used lead to long delays in council courses. the duke of sussex has defended his use of private jets, saying he occasionally needs to use them to ensure his family's safety. speaking at the launch of an eco—tourism project in amsterdam, prince harry said what's important is "what we do to balance out" negative effects. the duke and his wife have faced criticism after newspapers claimed they flew privately four times in 11 days this summer. that brings you up—to—date with all of the news this morning. we will return to louise in westminster
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shortly to find out and carry on explaining the shenanigans of the last 2a—hour is to of course it is also an important day for the cricket and john is at old trafford for us this morning. morning, john. a bit ofa a bit of a shame, it is raining here this morning, a little disappointment. but it is fair to say that when player gets under way things will not be dampened too much because as we know, the stages beautifully set an unbelievable performance from england against australia in the third test. the heroics of an stokes that has spoken so much about the way he masterminded that innings and got england over the line as they chase down a record score. it was brilliant. as a result it has given england momentum now coming into this match. but that story of what ben stokes did will mean nothing if england cannot push on now and wrap up england cannot push on now and wrap up this ashes series. ben stokes has spoken a lot about that as far as we
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know, english bowlers have been brilliant as well and that is down to the performance ofjofra archer who has been brilliant. taking his world cup performances into this ashes series. he has 13 wickets so farand he is ashes series. he has 13 wickets so far and he is confident of getting more. and you just wonder how much faster can he bowl? the speed is already in excess of 90 mile an hour. it was asked if he could surpass 100 and he said that maybe he could. selleck caught up with him this week and he has been telling her how important it is for him to switch off and relax away from cricket given the intensity of this series. i usually keep things simple. i am not one to overthink or else it complicates stuff. i am just trying to get whoever is batting at the time out. how important will the support before you the next few
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days? and leads, the crowd was amazing. they were there from day one today five. i don't think they we re one today five. i don't think they were quite for ten minutes throughout the game. so the crowd will have an impact. clearly you now believe that this is poised, that this can happen. notjust me. i need them all to believe and they do. the victory last week happen for a reason because that could easily have been a loss. we need to go out there and make it happen now. everyone is talking about you and steve smith. how do you feel about getting at him now?” steve smith. how do you feel about getting at him now? ijust want to getting at him now? ijust want to get him out. he can bat and if you get him out. he can bat and if you get him out early that is all i am here for? get him out as soon as possible. he said he is keen to face
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you. ok. we will see. how do you manage to stay so relaxed and laid—back. manage to stay so relaxed and laid-back. it is in my blood but there is no need to panic. at the end of the day cricket is just a game. and when it goes well there is no other sport that can compare. not even football? not in the mornings, anyway. how important is it for you to be able to leave cricket behind and go and relax and do normal stuff like take the dog for a walk?m and go and relax and do normal stuff like take the dog for a walk? it is important. especially mentally. cricket is amazing when you are here but some days if you are not having a good game or not having a good few games, sometimes getting away to reaffirm yourself as the best thing you can do. let me show you a picture of my dog. what is the
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breed? guess. it is easy. account of who. we had a barbecue the other day and there were more dogs and kids. 0ne baby, and nine dogs. my dog is 13 weeks. his name is luke. what do you do when you travel?” 13 weeks. his name is luke. what do you do when you travel? i onlyjust got him so i am only now getting into it. but the ashes will be over soon. amazing, isn't it? i can't believe
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jofra. for the speedy bowls and, he is incredibly chill and a fascinating insight there. let me point out the temporary stand pulled up, 8000 fans will be packing it into that later. that stand will be rocking when england take the field later on. i'm joined now by england bowler and ashes winner, kate cross and by callum flynn, all—rounder for the england physical disability team. kate, what will it be like for the english players? it is always an occasion. that will be the party stand with a lot of fancy dress but generally as we saw in lancashire with the vitality, they had incredible crowds here. cricket at the moment is so good and hopefully it will be a good occasion if the weather stays good. in that first for cricket will only grow. it has been an amazing summer with the world cup and ben stokes heroics. a great time for the sport.” world cup and ben stokes heroics. a great time for the sport. i wonder how many kids are in the back garden saying i will be ben stokes and ub
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jofra archer. that is exciting for the game. it is notjust boys being inspired now, many girls are picking up inspired now, many girls are picking up cricket bats and they are investing 20 million into the women's game and hopefully that will help the game grow in all respects. where i live, i have never seen kids playing cricket in the park but i have this summer. turning out a calendar, you have had a big summer now and you have made it through to the final. -- turning to callum. like kate was saying about children getting involved. i like kate was saying about children getting involved. lam like kate was saying about children getting involved. i am a coach at my local club and the number of kids coming around wanting to be the next stokes or archer is incredible. it feels that the summer of 2005 with the impact it is having. we talk about the headingley test and the 2005 ashes series. we have seen ben stokes doing it this summer. it has added to what has been a great story
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throughout the years. definitely. we took a lot of inspiration in the community camp from the world cup when so we wanted to take that momentum and bring it home. fingers crossed. unfortunately we didn't but hopefully we will get to do it. you came so close, having lost to india. i think they have the momentum now, they have made australia change the team, so they have the momentum now. the likes of ben stokes and larger can bring it home in the next five days at old trafford. —— archer.” can't believe you didn't bring a brolly, knowing the mancunian weather as you do. as i was saying,
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i don't think it will dampen things down too much. we hope that play will get under way as scheduled at 11a.m.. we will get under way as scheduled at 11 a.m.. we won't want to see and upset as england produced with the dismal batting performance in the last go. there has been a real shock at the us open overnight. roger federer has been knocked out by grigor dimitrov in the quarter finals. five—time champion federer had won all seven of their previous meetings, but dimitrov fought back from 2—1 down for a memorable victory in new york. no novak djokovic as well, so things might have opened up for rafael nadal. johanna konta is out after losing to elina svitolina. konta was the first british woman to reach the quarter—finals of the tournament sincejo durie
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back in 1983, but she lost in straight sets to the ukrainian fifth seed. svitolina is the highest seed left in the draw and will now play six—time champion serena williams in the last four. i actually felt like i was doing a lot of good things out there, a lot of the right things. but, like you observed, i mean, shejust made me play that extra ball, and i mean... yes, i mean, it's frustrating. you know, i would have loved to have come through that income a challenge like her. but i guess it willjust have to be next time. disappointment for her, but still a great run for konta. we will be here all morning, speaking to mark wood who performed brilliantly during the world cup. he
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knows ben stokes very well, he will give an inside track into the mind of ben stokes, who this summer has been producing some extraordinary things. and i assume you will be getting yourself right amongst the party stand. he has gone there already, hasn't he? it is not a party withoutjohn. see you later. more from john later in the programme. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. we saw some rain withjohn at old trafford and with louise at westminster. some sunshine in derbyshire and all of us will see some sunshine through the day stop but the big story today is how the weather will change to some thing much more turbulent. the winds will pick up and by the end of the afternoon it will feel substantially cooler. this area of low pressure is moving to the north of scotland. 0ut
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there this morning, a band of heavy rain in east anglia and the south—east pushing through over the next few hours, certainly the first half of the morning rush hour. those other showers in old trafford and the north midlands. more showers packing into northern ireland to us through the rest of the rush hour, some of those could come with the odd rumble of thunder. prolonged across parts of scotland, moving through northern ireland, back into northern england and the north midlands through the day. after that early rain in east anglia and the south—east it will stay dry through the afternoon with lots of sunshine around. but the breeze will be picking up and windy day across the board. gales in the northern half of the country possible. mph winds increasing into the evening and while temperatures may peak around lunchtime, 21 degrees in the south—east corner, these temperatures by the end of the day around 13—17. a cooler day to come at old trafford if you are heading off there but after some early showers, some dry weather to the start of the match. showers will be back later on so some interruptions expected. we will continue showers
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overnight into the northern and eastern half of the country. one or two in the west. drier by the end of the night with clear skies but it will be a colder night than the last few. temperatures widely down into single figures as we start thursday morning. tomorrow morning you may be digging outa morning. tomorrow morning you may be digging out a slightly warmer jacket. early morning cloud in the south—east will clear but already some showers in the west and sunshine turning hazy through the morning. the hazy sunshine for the rest of us into the afternoon, especially across northern and western areas where we will continue to see some showers in northern england, scotland and maybe the north midlands. many will stay dry through the day and temperatures tomorrow staying on the cool side, 15-19 tomorrow staying on the cool side, 15— 19 degrees. as you go through thursday night the rain returns more widely across scotland and northern ireland, and for friday it will be across england and wales. heaviest and most persistent for northern areas, eastern areas staying largely dry. staying on the blustery side through the second half of the week. sunshine and showers for scotland
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and northern ireland that it will be cool and northern ireland that it will be cool. temperatures staying in the mid teens for the vast majority. into the weekend, we stick with temperatures around those levels. but the good news is most parts this weekend will be dry, and it won't be too warm, either, especially for those taking part in the great north run. near—perfect conditions, i think. we're talking a lot about brexit today, but we'll get a sense of the other priorities of boris johnson's government later, when the chancellor announces the results of a spending assessment for next year. sean is here to tell us more about this. let me give you some of the numbers on all of this. the government has already promised to hire 20,000 extra police officers. this could cost just over £1 billion.
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it says there will be more than £2.5 billion for schools, and more money for special needs education and colleges. hospitals are also being promised a boost, with nearly £2 billion for the nhs to upgrade facilities and equipment. and there have been suggestions that defence spending will go up. soa so a lot of money being talked about, but how much will this cost the government? we don't know until we hear the finalfigures, but the government? we don't know until we hear the final figures, but we have an idea. the list of numbers you have mentioned there, and the institute for fiscal studies, which is this economic research think—tank a lot of people turn to when we try to analyse the spending of the government, they have put a figure on it at about £9 billion the government will make in terms of spending commitments. it is our starting point, and we will get more detail over the course of the day. so the question is where will it come from? there are always a few ways the government can look to spend more money. 0ne ways the government can look to
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spend more money. one of those is borrowing and the key thing about borrowing, keeping an eye on what the government says about that today, is that the government has some rules it likes to stick by to give the impression it is on top of finances, and one of the key ones is that the government says it won't borrow more than 2% of everything we produce as a country each year. it likes to stay within that. the last time these official calculations we re time these official calculations were made, the office for budget responsibility, the government's forecaster, says that means there is about £15 billion left to borrow until you reach that limit of your own rules. what the institute for fiscal studies, the afs, reckoned todayis fiscal studies, the afs, reckoned today is that this spending will be 4 today is that this spending will be a billion £5 billion more than when those last promises were made —— £a billion or £5 billion —— ifs. those last promises were made —— £a billion or £5 billion -- ifs. on the face of it that looks like plenty to pay for these promises for school and the police and so on. but later this year, even with a smooth brexit outcome, we expect the government's
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fiscal watchdog, the office of budget responsibility, to downgrade its forecast for growth and that could cut down the money available to the chancellor. they may want to wait for those forecast before making big spending decisions. borrowing is one way. we heard there the economy, if the economy grows more he will have more to spend but the prospects are not as great as a lot of people would like them to be. he could raise taxes, that might be something we might hear a little bit about, but we haven't so far from the government, or they could be cuts elsewhere. they are the different ways of doing it. and the other thing about all of this is there is actually no guarantee this money is going to be spent like this, is there? no, because as we said earlier normally these spending reviews would be a lot bigger, and three years is what the government has to spend. this one is only for one year. that is controversial because it is short—term, but a lot of people think it is because of an election which might be coming. it is an opportunity for the government to tell us about great spending it
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might do. if there was an election, they may have different plans after that. so there is a lot of uncertainty around these spending plans as well, never mind uncertainty generally. which makes it very tricky for people working in all of these areas because they don't know what they will won't be getting. definitely, and it is those prisons, schools and hospitals who will be looking at this. there may bea will be looking at this. there may be a boost, but maybe not for as long as they would have liked it to be. we will see you a little bit later in the programme, and we will be going back alive to westminster shortly. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. two london mps have been expelled from the conservative party after they voted against the government last night. justine greening and stephen hammond are effectively barred from standing at the next general election. the mps for beaconsfield, watford and guildford also rebelled
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against the whip in an attempt to pass a law designed to prevent a no—deal brexit. another case of a potentially fatal streptococcus infection has been confirmed in essex. it brings the total number in the area to 37. those affected were older people and the majority were receiving treatment for wounds. there have been 13 deaths from the infection so far. this week, we're looking at whether arts subjects are being squeezed out of the school curriculum. in the last five years, the number of young people taking a—level music has fallen by 30%. and in tower hamlets, not a single student entered for a—level music in the academic year before last. but one school in the borough is bucking the trend. london is a centre, england is a centre, globally for music. the
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music industry is a growing industry. if we cut off at the grassroots in years to come, we won't be able to provide culturally the output that we already, globally. an exhibition on christian dior has broken attendance records at the v&a. tracing the history of the fashion house from 19a7 to the present day, the exhibit attracted nearly 600,000 people in seven months. the previous record holder was the alexander mcqueen exhibition. let's take a look at the travel situation now. firstly, on the tubes, it's bad news if you use the northern line. the entire line is suspended at the moment because of a signalling systems failure. there are also severe delays on the metropolitan line between harrow—on—the—hill and aldgate. there are long delays from the aa in chiswick towards the ma towards brentford after a car overturned. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start, but a rather soggy one. we've had a bit of rain overnight. it is gradually clearing away eastwards, so yes, a damp start, but it will become
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drier and brighter as we head through the morning. some of the rain at first quite heavy, but it does clear away quite quickly. behind it, some showers around, but plenty of sunshine through the middle part of the day. a bit more cloud bubbling up this afternoon. again — risk of an isolated shower and temperatures getting up to 21 celsius. still a bit of a breeze, as well, and that stays with us overnight tonight. some patchy cloud again, risk of one or two light showers, but largely dry overnight, but a bit cooler. the rain today a cold front, and as it clears, the air is a bit fresher. so overnight, temperatures for some down in single figures, so a chillier start as we head into thursday morning, but plenty of sunshine around tomorrow. temperatures, though, hovering around the high teens — 18, maybe 19 celsius. some rain later on on friday, then a more or less settled weekend, but temperatures stay similar. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin — live from westminster. our headlines today: the ayes have it, the ayes have it, unlock! a dramatic late night defeat for the prime minister as mps try to block a no—deal brexit. in just a few hours borisjohnson lost his majority, his first commons vote, and control of parliament.
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borisjohnson accused his opponents of handing control of brexit negotiations to the eu and said he would now seek a general election. it will mean that the eu themselves will be able to decide how long to keep this country in the eu. and since i refused to go along with that plan we will have to make a choice. the 21 conservatives who rebelled, including some of the most recognisable former cabinet members, have been expelled from the party. in other news, after battering the bahamas, and killing at least seven people, hurricane dorian is heading for the florida coast. promises for public services. but as the chancellor plans to increase spending, critics say the announcement is being used to help win an election. i'm at old trafford ahead of the crucial fourth ashes test. can jofra archer deliver for england against australia? we'll hear from the fast bowler.
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and showers will play a part today at old trafford and across the uk. it will feel cooler as we go through today and become a lot windier. i will have all the details here on brea kfast. it's wednesday the fourth of september. our top story. it's the morning after the night before. in just one day, borisjohnson lost his working majority, his first commons vote as prime minister and control of parliament. mps voted by 328 to 301 to take over the agenda. mrjohnson has said he will now push for a snap general election. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake. it was boris johnson's first test of his authority as prime minister in parliament and it ended in a decisive defeat. some on his own sidejoined
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opposition parties in voting to take control of the house of commons to attempt to block a no—deal brexit. order. the ayes to the right, 328, the noes to the left, 301. labour and others want to force the prime minister to ask for an extension if he can't get a new deal. mrjohnson says he'd never do that, so if they succeed, his only option would be to hold a general election. i don't want an election, the public don't want an election, i don't believe the right honourable gentleman wants an election. but if the house votes for this bill tomorrow, the public we will have to choose who goes to brussels on october 17 to sort this out and take this country forward. two—thirds of mps would need to back his call for an election, but labour say they'll only do that once the legislation blocking no—deal becomes law. he wants to table a motion for a general election. fine. get the bill through first!
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after three hours of debate in the commons, those conservatives who voted against the government knew they would be thrown out of their party. mps are in charge here, for now. the government must consider its next move as the battle for control of the brexit process grinds on. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. let's take a look now at how that process could play out. today, mps will take control of commons business to debate and vote on a bill which would delay brexit until the end of january. afterwards, borisjohnson will table a motion calling for a general election. he needs two thirds of mps on board to trigger an early election. tomorrow, the anti no deal bill will move to the house of lords, if it succeeds in the commons. parliament is not due
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to sit on friday, but mps could decide it should, to help rush the bill through. and if it passes, the bill could be given royal assent by the queen and become law on monday the 9th of september. let's speak now to our political correspondent, iain watson. let's look back to last night. last night we saw rebellions in people being expelled from the party, a big defeat from the government and we have run out of superlatives to describe what is happening. extraordinary has become the new normal at westminster. nonetheless it was extraordinary if you stand back and think of what has happened to 21 conservative mps effectively expeued to 21 conservative mps effectively expelled from their own party and unable to stand as conservative candidates. but look at who there. very recently they were in the cabinet. greg clark, ken clarke, philip hammond. the grandson of winston churchill. they have been expeued winston churchill. they have been expelled from the party but those who voted against theresa may ‘s
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withdraw bill, they are still in the cabinet. boris johnson himself withdraw bill, they are still in the cabinet. borisjohnson himself voted against the deal twice and remains prime minister. so in itself that is extraordinary. also extraordinary that this was the first boat the prime minister has held and with a bigger defeat than anticipated which means he looks set for another defeat tonight on people —— when people vote on extending the deadline. he said he will put down vote on whether or not there would bea vote on whether or not there would be a general election. if so, what will happen? it depends on mps voting for this extension which he says he will not tolerate. i think they will so a little after seven tonight he will bring forward a motion in the house must agree, for a general election. that needs to thirds of mps. a general election. that needs to thirds of mp5. the opposition will lock that. they will say unless there is a guarantee to rule out no deal onto the statute books, making
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it law, we will not agree to a general election. if he does do that however, at that stage of the opposition will say yes to an early election. i am trying to get clarity for me and for the people at home, because so much of this is about the sequence of events. he may lose the first vote on whether or not we will have an election, but then there is another one? i think he will lose tonight because the opposition will not give way. if he then allows them to pass their legislation then they may well agree to an election at that stage or what he could do, because at the moment he needs to thirds of mps to agree, he could try to amend or exchange the existing legislation to drop that threshold to just over 50% and that has a better chance. of calling a year —— general election. but a senior
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labour source says they want to make him wait. no agreement on an election this week but it could be on monday here in the house of commons that the opposition will say you can have an election just so long as we are convinced that a no deal deal, the extension to brexit, is now the law of the land.” deal deal, the extension to brexit, is now the law of the land. i feel exhausted listening to that. thank you for that clarity. throughout the morning we'll be speaking to a number of politician across the brexit divide including energy minister, kwasi kwarteng, labour's keir starmer and former conservative mp phillip lee, who has defected to the liberal democrats. he chose to do that when the prime minister was standing up in the commons yesterday. there is so much to talk about. i'll be back in a few minutes, but first it's back to the studio where steph has the rest of the morning's news. the chancellor, sajid javid, will announce an additional two billion pounds of brexit funding for whitehall when he sets out next
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year's public spending plans later. mrjavid will also confirm plans to increase spending on schools, hospitals, and the police — all of which are public services which caused problems for the conservatives at the last general election. additional money for hospitals and police clearly help address some of the performance pressure such as declining teacher recruitment rates, the backlog in hospitals or increasing the amount of time it takes to charge an offence. but really it is adult social care and prisons that have seen the largest decline in performance. this government has said it is committed to ending austerity and we believe these services should be first in line. hurricane dorian is moving away from the bahamas, but its left widespread devastation and flooding. seven people have been killed and the country's prime minister says that figure is expected to rise. the storm has reduced in strength
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but is still battering the region with heavy rain and high winds. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the wrath of dorian, the scale of the destruction in the bahamas is unprecedented. this is now a humanitarian crisis. vast areas are underwater, they including grand bahama international airport and the town of marsh harbour on abaco island. lingering over the bahamas, the stationary storm prolonged the nightmare for the island's residents. many took desperate measures to escape the rising waters. some were trapped on roofs for hours. the national hurricane centre says the storm is creeping dangerously close to florida's east coast. the state, once predicted to take a direct hit, may escape the worst, but georgia and the carolinas are also in dorian's path. so our message for today is this: this is a very serious storm and a western shift
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that is towards land ofjust a few miles could bring enormous damage to our state. so we want everyone to heed the warnings, listen to the official instructions that are given. and we want to prepare for the worst, but of course we want to pray for the best. water rescue teams are on standby and the army has been drafted into deal with the looming threat. dorian's destructive journey is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news. more than a ton of heroin has been found in a shipping container at the port of felixstowe in suffolk. the drugs, which have a street value of around £120 million were found hidden in towels which had originated in pakistan. the national crime agency said it's the biggest ever seizure of heroin in the uk.
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the fire brigades' union says more staff are needed to cope with a big rise in wildfires. recent figures show that last year, they reached the highest level since 2011. the union says there's been a 19% drop in the number of firefighters in the uk over the past decade, and even though there was a small rise in staff last year, it's not enough. the duke of sussex has defended his use of private jets, saying he occasionally needs to use them to ensure his family's safety. speaking at the launch of an eco—tourism project in amsterdam, prince harry said what's important is "what we do to balance out" negative effects. the duke and his wife have faced criticism after newspapers claimed they flew privately four times in 11 days this summer. it is now 12 minutes past seven. we will be going tojohn who is covering the ashes. matt has the
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weather and there are a lot of sport events this weekend and we will head back to louise in westminster. have you managed to not get dripped on yet? there has been torrential rain. honestly it is touch and go because if you look here itjust pours down every now and then. so far i am at one hour and 13 minutes without going down my back is that thank you for your concern. this morning we will be talking to politicians and trying to get some clear a nswers politicians and trying to get some clear answers but first, let's look at the papers. and one story dominates the front page of the telegraph has a picture of the prime minister standing at the dispatch box in the house of commons, and the headline
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is "johnson demands election". "parliament surrenders to the eu" is how the daily express interprets last night's vote. it calls it "another shameful day in our so—called democracy". the mirror says "boris loses control". the paper claims the prime minister's brexit plans "blew up in his face last night as tory mps helped defeat the government". and the sun headline says "over to you britain". it describes borisjohnson as "livid" and says he's demanding the british people decide their brexit fate with a fresh general election. on social media, there's been a lot of discussion about jacob rees—mogg's relaxed demeanour through part of yesterday's commons proceedings. the mp was told to sit up by opposition mps, while caroline lucas called his body language ‘contemptuous', as he appeared to recline on the front bench. you can see the video in full on the bbc news website. if you have questions you want answered, that is a good place to go and find some answers. after such a tense night, things could get even more dramatic today. a group of labour mps are expected
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to put forward a motion to get an amended version of theresa may's withdrawal agreement back on the table. they say it's all about compromise. welljoining me now is the leader of the scottish national party, ian blackford. before i talk about what you want going forward, should we talk about last night? what was the atmosphere like in the house of commons? firstly, all parties gave a very clear signal to the parliament that we need to stop no deal, that we can get to that safe landing place, at least for now. when borisjohnson spoke as prime minister there was a lack of dignity and i think a lack of respect to the house. what we saw from conservative mps, the shouting, the jeering, the from conservative mps, the shouting, thejeering, the heckling, it really wasn't a good sign. there was a
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pretty u npleasa nt wasn't a good sign. there was a pretty unpleasant atmosphere, i have to say, in the house of commons after the vote. and i think the public watching on would have been quite appalled with what they were seeing. we all have a responsibility to show respect in that kind of dignified manner. this is a key moment in our political history, and what we will end up doing. let's look forward to today. various things are going to happen, for example that deal to take no deal off the table will be voted on stop what are the numbers? well, you saw la st what are the numbers? well, you saw last night we had a majority of 27 to have that debate today. i believe that we will have a decent majority tonight in the house of commons, which is really important. mps across parties are saying no deal brexit is something that quite frankly frightens the living daylights out of us. looking forward a bit, we understand the prime minister will vote regarding an election. will you vote for an
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election? we want to make sure the bill going through parliament gets royal assent. i want an election, so we will seek to put down amendments today that will protect the right of parliament to legislate, and yes, we should have an election.” parliament to legislate, and yes, we should have an election. i know it is nuanced, this. today you will vote against an election. and is not what i am saying. we will seek to amend the motion. i want to make sure we can protect the interests of our citizens, but we want an election. we are supportive of having a general election as soon as possible. what we need to try and do is make sure that the bill gets royal assent. that removes the risk of us crashing out of the european union at the end of october. if we can do that, then of course we want an election. we need to make sure that people have the right to have their say. parliament has expressed a very clear view that we want no deal. it is right that the public have their say on this as well. ok,
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soiam have their say on this as well. ok, so i amjust have their say on this as well. ok, so i am just trying to be clear here. you might have to wait until the royal assent happens. when is that likely? that should happen within days. we're not talking about a long delay. i would appeal to collea g u es a long delay. i would appeal to colleagues that we now to bring this government down. i want to do that as soon as possible but we need to get protection to make sure we don't crash out of the european union. there will be a number of opportunities for this. let's say for argument‘s sake that labour don't come down behind us and we don't come down behind us and we don't get that election. we end up ina don't get that election. we end up in a situation where the bill does get royal assent and parliament will be shut down by borisjohnson, he will pro road parliament, he will come back and we will have a queen speech. —— prorogue parliament. come back and we will have a queen speech. -- prorogue parliament. what do you say to people, they will be some people watching, who may not agree with your view because we know there are so many views, and say what is the point in my delay? you have already had years, they have
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already been years, to try and get this sorted. the government has failed to find a way to get through the brexit impasse, but the real issue for us, the government have told us there is a risk to the supply of food and medicine and the risk of civil unrest, and what will happen on the island of ireland. we have a responsibility to be honest, to say to people there are fundamental challenges, we have a responsibility to say to government you cannot and should not be doing this. and you will have been asked this. and you will have been asked this many times before. what do you say to members of the government who say to members of the government who say you are tying their hands, they cannot negotiate if you take no deal off the table? it is the height of irresponsibility for a government to threaten its own citizens. what will happen to the threat to supply chains and two jobs? looking at the end of the day, as a scottish mp,
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scotla nd end of the day, as a scottish mp, scotland voted overwhelmingly to remain. i have a responsibility to give voice to that and to make clear to government that we will not allow scotla nd to government that we will not allow scotland to be dragged out of the european union against our will. thank you very much, i will let you get out of the rain, actually. it has been raining here all morning. just to let you know, before we go on, we will be speaking to a representative for the government here on bbc breakfast shortly. look at that lovely view from our camera, and various different sides of this debate. what is really clear here, there are so many divisions. not just one party against another party but within parties themselves. if you look at the calibre of those conservative mps who have been expeued conservative mps who have been expelled from the party, it seems as our political correspondent was saying earlier extraordinary times. let's find out what will happen with the weather. i would like it to brighten up. things will turn a little bit drier through the next half hour or so in the london area. it isn't raining everywhere. some lovely sunrise shots from leicestershi re lovely sunrise shots from leicestershire early on. while we will all see a bit of sunshine,
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there will be some downpours around and the big story will be later on as things turn windier. and a much more autumnal feel. this as things turn windier. and a much more autumnalfeel. this is pushing its way eastwards, and we will start to bring the air around from the north. temperatures will drop and the winds pick up. here is the band of rain in london, affecting southern and south—eastern counties. in east anglia it will clear through by the end of the morning. showers in north—west england, the north—west midlands, and pushing into northern parts of northern ireland in western scotland. they will become more extensive through the rush hour into the afternoon. showers returning to northern england and north wales as well as the north midlands later. to the south and east, after the morning rain, the rest of the day should be dry. the winds will pick up. these other wind gusts expected through the afternoon. stronger surround western scotland and northern ireland, but to go into the evening hour, we could see 50 or 60 mph
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gusts more widely. that means temperatures will drop by this stage. 21 celsius in the south—east, by this time apm down to 17 celsius and a cool day out for those heading to old trafford. showers will ease for the start of play but more showers returning for lunchtime onwards. as we go through the night, showers featuring across northern and eastern areas in particular. one or two on the west, many becoming dry and largely clear for a time overnight. it will not allow those temperatures to drop. tonight a colder night than the night gone. maybe not necessarily a waterproof jacket, because most will start the day dry and sunny. cloud in the south—east will clear. some showers into northern ireland and western scotla nd into northern ireland and western scotland and they will start to edge across other parts of scotland and northern england. nowhere near as many as today. a drier day by and large, most places staying dry throughout that it will still feel chilly throughout. temperatures remaining in the teens throughout. into thursday night, ran for
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scotla nd into thursday night, ran for scotland and northern ireland, windy conditions to take us into friday. the rain slowed its way southwards as we go through friday. england and wales can expect rain at times. plenty of cloud at times, a bright start to the and south—east. we will finish the day cloudy and damp. further north, a mixture of sunshine and showers on friday, but remaining blustery and cool and it will remain cool into this weekend, with much more in the way of sunshine. should bea more in the way of sunshine. should be a drier weekend for the vast majority, and while it will be a little on the cooler side, that may be perfect conditions for those taking part in the great north run. that is typical, the year i am not doing it it is decent weather. you are obviously jinxed, doing it it is decent weather. you are obviouslyjinxed, steph. thanks for pointing that out! see you later, love. welcome back to westminster, where in a dramatic night of twists
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and turns, boris johnson's first parliamentary vote as prime minister ended in a crushing defeat and the loss of 21 of his conservative mps. well, it is the million—dollar question — is there going to be a general election, and how would boris johnson do? in the constituency of st ives, in cornwall, the conservatives have a majority over the lib dems ofjust 312. we have sentjohn maguire down there to find out how people are feeling. morning, john. newlyn harbour feels every inch of 288 miles away from westminster, and of course, it is even further from brussels. yet, for a generation, that is where the decisions have been made about how much these fishermen can catch and land. the problem is all this waiting. and, you know, wejust want to get out on 31 october. they want to leave the european union, and to coin a phrase, take back control of the fishing grounds. theyjust need to go ahead so that we can start
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with a rejuvenation programme for our coastal communities. you know, they're desperate for it. they're crying out for it. and we need to leave in order to do that, and we need to leave with a clean break. this constituency, st ives, voted 5a—a6% in favour of leave. but where there is consensus here is that everyone you talk to wants an end to all the uncertainty, and to move on. penzance is a town with ambitious plans to make the most of its resources. we've got thermal energy below the ground which is going to heat a portion of the pool, so that people can swim in heated water all year round. and, for businesses here, the never—ending brexit saga is damaging and frustrating. people just want an end to it. i think we've all got fed up with the whys and wherefores now, and we've all lost track of why we started this in the first place, and people just want to get an end, be it one way or the other. i know a lot of people are quite
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passionate about the way they feel, be it brexit or remain, but i think we just need the certainty. we just need stability, at the end of the day. this is a conservative seat with a majority ofjust 312 votes over the liberal democrats, who would see st ives as a key target. a general election, more uncertainty, may well affect the strength of the pound, which for the vital tourism sector here isn't necessarily a bad thing. the pound may be low today, and people are thinking, oh, crumbs, i can buy fewer coffees while on holiday. i must have a staycation in britain instead. or we have people on the continent or in america seeing the pound reducing in value, therefore thinking, my stay in britain now is going to be much better value. these days, hunting fish seems an easier task than hunting for a solution to the brexit crisis. any definitive outcome
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is once again on ice. in louise, we arejoined bya government minister. it was a dramatic native twists and turns. boris johnson's parliamentary vote endedin boris johnson's parliamentary vote ended in a crushing defeat in the loss of 21 of his conservative mps. in a moment we'll speak to one of his ministers, kwasi kwarteng. but first, here's what some of his former colleagues, the so—called rebels, have been saying. iam i am sorry, we will have that a little bit later. the energy minister joins little bit later. the energy ministerjoins us now. thank you very much forjoining us. before we talk about what happens next, this was a big defeat for the government, bigger than expected. what do you think about that, and tell us about what the atmosphere was like there last night. i think it was quite a
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tense atmosphere, and it is never easy losing votes like we did last night. but i think the prime minister was very clear that we have to deliver brexit one way or the other, and last night he also made it clear that, if we are forced to have a general election, if a general election is the only way we can geta general election is the only way we can get a resolution to this, he was prepared to go down that route. it is not something he wanted, he said earlier in the week that wasn't something he wanted, and we are also very conscious that people out in the country don't necessarily want a general election. but i think the lady in one of your clips earlier was quite right. i think there is a real feeling that people want this thing done, one way or the other, and the prime minister has made his position very clear on that. who is forcing him to have a general election? because that is his choice. well, it isn't really, because as the lady in the clip said, we have been going around the houses for three years on this. the referendum happened more than three
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yea rs referendum happened more than three years ago, and the house of commons has shown itself completely incapable of actually delivering brexit. it may well be that the general election and a new house of commons is the only way to get some final resolution to this. so today we know that that bill which will effectively stop no deal will go to the house of commons and most likely get through. is it today that the prime minister is going to ask mps to vote on whether or not it will be a general election? we he said last night that if the bill goes through he will be seeking a general election and it was interesting to me that the leader of the opposition who has called for an election at practically every pmqs for the last four years, is now apparently running scared of that prospect. jeremy corbyn after the 2017 general election said there should be a fresh election, and this is perhaps where we will end up. i think the house of commons has shown itself incapable of resolving brexit,
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incapable of resolving brexit, incapable of resolving brexit, incapable of delivering on a very simple mandate from the referendum. it may well be that a general election is the best way forward to put this thing to bed? and what they we re put this thing to bed? and what they were voting for is to take no deal of the table. can we talk about the rebels, the so—called rebels, and the attitude towards them? they have been expelled from the party. many ministers have voted against the government before. why take that tone? so the government was quite right, in my view, to say that yesterday was effectively a confidence vote. you were essentially saying that the government no longer has control of the business in the house of commons, and you are handing them over to the opposition. and the government was very clear that people who voted against the government in that vote would have the whip withdrawn from them. and i think that was the right policy. many of the people who rebelled against the government are good people. they —— i served in
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government with them. but they were told quite clearly that this was the consequence of their actions and the government delivered on that. i think we have got to be completely certain and clear and sure about that. and what you say to people who say that looking at it now, you see one mp before things were on yesterday crossing the house of commons to become a liberal democrat, those rebels, as well. this looks like a party deeply divided. i don't think it is divided. i don't think it is divided. if you look at them, there are 312 conservative mps, and 21 of them rebelled. that is 6%. so 9a% of conservative mps voted with the government. so i don't think there isa government. so i don't think there is a deep division there. many of the 21 had been in government, they had pursued the policy that no deal was better than a bad deal, as the previous prime minister said. and now they are seeking to undermine the current prime minister by taking no deal off the table, just as when
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we are reaching a conclusion for the negotiations the prime minister is trying to get a deal, he is being undermined by the house of commons andi undermined by the house of commons and i think conservative mps who undermine him should have the whip withdrawn. and they have had the whip withdrawn. thank you very much for your time this morning. we will be speaking as well on this programme to labour's keir starmer to find out how the labour party might vote tonight if there is that vote on whether or not there will be a general election. so much of this is, as! a general election. so much of this is, as i understand it now, about timing, about sequencing, as well. it is very important the order in which things happen, so we will try and keep you up—to—date in what that means and how things will go. many things to talk about, including the weather. you will want to know the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london. two london mps have been expelled from the conservative party after they voted against the government last night. justine greening and stephen hammond are effectively barred from standing at the next general election. the mps for beaconsfield, watford and guildford also rebelled against the whip in an attempt to pass a law designed to prevent a no—deal brexit. figures reveal that new hiv diagnoses are falling faster in london than elsewhere in the uk. the figures from public health england show there were just over 1,500 new diagnoses in the capital last year — a 12% decline. but experts are warning more needs to be done to protect against the infection. the mayor of london says he hopes some of the cuts of the last few years will be reversed — as the chancellor announces his spending plans this afternoon. areas including health, education and the police will be included in the government's budget
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for the next financial year. i think what the government has to do is reverse the cuts they made to our police over the last nine years. we've lost more than 3,500 officers, more than 3,500 community officers, and thousands of police staff, they've had to sell off police stations. they have to reverse those cuts and give us extra funding, because our population has grown. an exhibition on christian dior has broken attendance records at the v&a. tracing the history of the fashion house from 19a7 to the present day, the exhibit attracted nearly 600,000 people in seven months. the previous record holder was the alexander mcqueen exhibition. let's take a look at the travel situation now. firstly on the tubes — it's bad news if you use the northern line. the entire line is suspended at the moment because of a signalling systems failure. there are also severe delays on the metropolitan line and minor delays on the overground and the bakerloo line. on the roads, in lewisham, one lane is closed for gas mains
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work on the a20 lee high road westbound near the junction with belmont hill. time to get a check on the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start, but a rather soggy one. we've had a bit of rain overnight. it is gradually clearing away eastwards, so yes, a damp start, but it will become drier and brighter as we head through the morning. some of the rain at first quite heavy, but it does clear away quite quickly. behind it, some showers around, but plenty of sunshine through the middle part of the day. a bit more cloud bubbling up this afternoon. again — risk of an isolated shower and temperatures getting up to 21 celsius. still a bit of a breeze, as well, and that stays with us overnight tonight. some patchy cloud again, risk of one or two light showers, but largely dry overnight, but a bit cooler. the rain today a cold front, and as it clears, the air is a bit fresher. so overnight, temperatures for some down in single figures. so a chillier start as we head into thursday morning, but plenty of sunshine around tomorrow. temperatures, though, hovering around the high teens —
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18, maybe 19 celsius. some rain later on on friday, then a more or less settled weekend, but temperatures staying similar. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. now though it's back to louise in westminster and steph in the studio. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin and steph mcgovern. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. after such a tense night, things could get even more dramatic today. a group of labour mps are expected to put forward a motion to get an amended version of theresa may's withdrawal agreement back on the table. they say it's all about compromise. welljoining me now is stephen kinnock, one of the 17 mps behind the plan, and leader of the scottish national party in westminster, ian blackford. welcome both. i will start with you and we can talk about the events of last night. it had no deal of the table will go
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backin it had no deal of the table will go back in today. how will you vote? i will vote for that but i want to see an extension that does notjust kick the can down the road so we have a new date and we will be in the same place on january four. to new date and we will be in the same place onjanuary four. to give that extension purpose we want the withdrawal agreement built to be brought to parliament. it is full of compromise and concessions to labour and we think it is the only way we can have a plan for leaving the eu with a deal which is, of course, the least risky and most achievable way of preventing a nodal catastrophe. and that was negotiated with theresa may, over a period of few weeks? all the meaningful votes collapsed and so theresa may finally did what labour had asked her to do and reached out for cross party talks. they went on for six weeks and they we re they went on for six weeks and they were serious talks that produced a lot of good compromises and concessions to my lung labour then said they would not support them.
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what we are saying now is to bring that builder parliament. parliament has never had a chance to do —— vote on that will. why will that one make the difference? only 70 mps in parliament have a problem with the backstop. so let's tell boris johnson that if he is serious about leaving with a deal, it is difficult to make the eu doge, most members of parliament are happy with the backstop, let's put it to parliament and get it over the line and if you wa nt and get it over the line and if you want a general election afterwards, 0k. want a general election afterwards, ok. but let's take the air out of the brexit balloon first. brexit -- borisjohnson could not be more clear about leaving on october 31. where does your bill fit into that? we will still need a net stanchion. the amendment is based on the x
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assumption there would be an extension to january 31. but just changing the date from october 30 12 january 31 kicks the can down the road. give the extension the purpose, the purpose of which is to pass a withdraw bill. kicking the can down the roads, doesn't that put you at odds with the labour colleagues? my hope is that they will come on board with the amendment today because they will understand that what the country wa nts understand that what the country wants is clarity and certainty. there is no majority in the country for leaving the eu without a deal. people want a compromise, meaning we respect and honour the result of the referendum be keeping a good relation with the eu. that is what the withdrawal agreement bill would do. what support do you have for this? we have talked so many numbers today. what numbers are you talking about? it has been last—minute. we had to wait for the bill. over the
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course of the day, overnight certainly, colleagues have contacted me saying they want to support and put their name to the bill and vote for it if we can. sorry, the amendments, if it can be selected by the speaker. let's also talk. we understand the node deal bill will go through to stop no deal and that will go through today. and then borisjohnson said he will then ask mps to vote on whether or not we will have a general election. how will have a general election. how will you vote? i don't think we should have one but your party has been calling for one for two years. that it cannot be a general election thatis that it cannot be a general election that is just a trojan horse for smuggling us out of the eu without a deal. a general election should be that once we secure the certainty of not crashing out on october 31 then bring it on. but firstly, let's get legislation through so we do not
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have a prime minister who is clearly ready to abuse the norms and conventions of democracy. so today you will vote against a general election. do you say to people who say why? i will say that we do not trust boris johnson say why? i will say that we do not trust borisjohnson because he could bring forward a general election date prior to october 31 and then change it through royal proclamation. he has shown he is ready to play all sorts of shenanigans with our norms and conventions of democracy. so we cannot allow that to happen. let's get the legislation through and of course if he wants a general election. but i think it would be better if we can agree we have an extension, that that extension has one purpose only, that is to secure a deal with the eu. let's take the airout of a deal with the eu. let's take the air out of the brexit balloon so we can get our politics back to where it should be, jobs, the nhs and schools. i'm sure many people at home might think that perhaps we should talk about other things so
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let's try to do that. we will hear it many other points of view throughout the programme because there are so many. also, what else will be talk about? the weather. on brex, philip lee and keir starmer will be here as well. first, steph has the rest of the news. get yourself a nice hot drink, i hope someone is taking care of you there. the chancellor, sajid javid, will announce an additional two billion pounds of brexit funding for whitehall when he sets out next year's public spending plans later. mrjavid will also confirm plans to increase spending on schools, hospitals, and the police — all of which are public services which caused problems for the conservatives at the last general election.
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hurricane dorian is moving away from the bahamas, but its left widespread devastation and flooding. seven people have been killed and the country's prime minister says that figure is expected to rise. the storm has reduced in strength but is still battering the region with heavy rain and high winds. more than a ton of heroin has been found in a shipping container at the port of felixstowe in suffolk. the drugs, which have a street value of around £120 million were found hidden in towels which had originated in pakistan. the national crime agency said it's the biggest ever seizure of heroin in the uk. the fire brigades' union says more staff are needed to cope with a big rise in wildfires. recent figures show that last year, they reached the highest level since 2011. the union says there's been a 19% drop in the number of firefighters in the uk over the past decade, and even though there was a small rise in staff last year, it's not enough. time to get the sport now withjohn, who's at old trafford, where the fourth ashes test gets underway later. morning john.
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sorry, it has been raining and later we will get the weather details from matt but first, let's go tojohn who is at old trafford. it looks like it is at old trafford. it looks like it is brightening up there. it was miserable when we got here this morning but as you can see the clouds are clearing and there is a little blue sky so it shapes a beautifully. the momentum really is with england at the moment after the surprise victim at —— victory at headingley. one each now and the series, two test left to play. england cannot afford to slip up. we spoke so much about the heroics of ben stokes but let's not forget performance of jofra ben stokes but let's not forget performance ofjofra archer. 13 wickets already and bowling in excess of 90 mile an hour. he feels
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he can bowl faster still. he caught up he can bowl faster still. he caught up with sally this week and it has been interesting to hear from up with sally this week and it has been interesting to hearfrom him about how important it is to switch off. i usually keep things simple. i am not one to overthink or else it complicates stuff. i am just trying to get whoever is batting at the time out. how important will the support be for you over the next few days? at leeds, the crowd was amazing. they were there from day one to day five. i don't think they were quiet for ten minutes throughout the game. so the crowd will have an impact. clearly you now believe that this is poised, that this can happen. notjust me. i need them all to believe and they do. the victory last week happened for a reason because that could easily have been a loss. we need to go out there
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and make it happen now. everyone is talking about you and steve smith. how do you feel about getting at him now? ijust want to get him out. he can bat and if you get him out early that is all i am here for. get him out as soon as possible. he said he is keen to face you. 0k. we will see. how do you manage to stay so relaxed and laid—back? it is in my blood but there is no need to panic. at the end of the day cricket is just a game. and when it goes well there is no other sport that can compare. not even football? not in the mornings, anyway.
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how important is it for you to be able to leave cricket behind and go and relax and do normal stuff like take the dog for a walk? it is important. especially mentally. cricket is amazing when you are here but some days if you are not having a good game or not having a good few games, sometimes getting away to reaffirm yourself as the best thing you can do. let me show you a picture of my dog. what is the breed? guess. it is easy. a cockapoo. no. cavapoo. we had a barbecue the other day and there were more dogs and kids. one baby, and nine dogs. my dog is 13 weeks. his name is luke. what do you do when you travel? i onlyjust got him so i am only now getting into it.
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but the ashes will be over soon. i'm joined now by ceo of lancashire county cricket club, daniel gibney, and england bowler and world cup winner mark wood. mark, you must be pleased that the rain has gone and people get to see jofra do his business. yes, 156 yea rs of jofra do his business. yes, 156 years of test cricket here, we are really looking forward to it. years of test cricket here, we are really looking forward to itm sort of dropped off the rotor a little bit, you have had to make a few changes here. a lot of history, but we have had a ten year redevelopment programme and we are
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delighted to be here, ready for england to come and win. and the temporary stand, a.k.a. the party stand, that is going to be rocking, isn't it? yes, the biggest temporary stand in europe. it will be a fantastic atmosphere. plenty of watermelons floating around, i think. i heard it is the biggest temporary structure in europe at the moment, quite a claim. we talk about jofra's ability to bowl fast. he is such a small guy, everyone thinks of fast bowlers as being told to generate the power, but not in jofra's case. no, he is a little bit taller than me, though. he keeps it simple when he bowls, and frustratingly, it looks really easy for him. he is a laid—back character, he takes everything in his stride, and i am sure he will be up his stride, and i am sure he will be upfor it his stride, and i am sure he will be up for it today. playing in the world cup, you clock 95 mph, jofra has clocked 96 mph. he was asked
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about whether or not he could surpassed 100 mph. only once has that been done in the history of cricket. do you think that is something he could do?” cricket. do you think that is something he could do? i think he probably could. he is someone that a lwa ys probably could. he is someone that always looks like a. of course he is trying, but it looks like he could get even more out of himself because his action is so sort of easy. and that gradual momentum he has at the crease, i am sure if he wants to mmp crease, i am sure if he wants to ramp it up, say when steve smith comes out today, he could hopefully get the 100 mph mark. and he will be wearing that bit of extra neck support following that blow he suffered off the bowling ofjofra archer. you know ben stokes very well, you came through the durham academy together. he seems like a normal bloke doing extraordinary things this summer. he isjust a normal lad. he is a really inspirational character in the dressing room. he is not a captain but is a leader in the dressing room and drags everyone along with him. he is the best trainer we have in
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the squad and he puts that into practice in the field. i am so happy for him that it has all come together. i love the story about him having a couple of chocolate bars and a cheeky nando's before the test. it will be a fantastic match, as we know. i think as far as england are concerned, they will hope they do not have to rely on the heroics ofjust one or two people. they will hope it will be more of a tea m they will hope it will be more of a team effort this time around. if that last test is anything to go by, you won't want to take your eyes off these ones. and once again your cameraman has gone off and focused on that party stand. it is cracking us on that party stand. it is cracking us up in the studio. yes, over 8000 will be in that party stand a little bit later on. it is a huge
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structure, as i was saying. the biggest temporary structure in europe at the moment, but it is the party stand. that will be rocking a little bit later on. people dressed in fancy dress, it will be a great atmosphere. i think more than a few beers will be drunk today, i imagine. and why not? if you can't enjoy yourself in an ashes series like this one, then when can you? so when you say rocking, itjust makes me think that is a lad who dances. thank you very much, see you later. it looks like it is brightening up wherejohn is. it looks like it is brightening up where john is. let's it looks like it is brightening up wherejohn is. let's find out what is going on across the rest of the country, and as well hurricane dorian in florida. matt has all the details. good morning, sticking with the uk this time, we have seen some downpours at old trafford and westminster, but lovely scenes to start the day in cumbria. while we will all see sunshine at times, showers will never be too far away
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for some of you. and what will be the big story today which you will notice more than anything else, by the time you go into the evening rush hour it will be windy and cold. this area of low pressure which has been with us tonight brings around the winds to the north and north—west, dropping the temperatures quite widely. lots of rain across the south—east corner, still tipping it down for some. that will clear through in the next hour or two. a few showers further north, but they are fairly well scattered. showers now getting going in western scotla nd showers now getting going in western scotland and northern ireland, becoming fairly widespread into the afternoon. slow moving in central and southern scotland and showers returning across northern england, north wales in the north midlands. still a bit of sunshine here and there but it will be windy this afternoon as we head towards the end of the day. from northern england northwards, widespread gales developing and by the evening parts of western scotland and northern ireland could see gusts in excess of 60 mph. that will drop the temperature across the country, probably peaking around midday for some of you but by the end of the
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afternoon, 13 to around 90 degrees. if you are heading off to old trafford, maybe in the party stand, it will be a chilly day. a windy afternoon and those showers will return. there will be some interruptions later. finishing up with some more persistent rain on the far north of scotland and into tonight, showers around northern and eastern areas. most places becoming dry and with some clear skies around, that northerly wind, a chilly night than last night. as we head into tomorrow morning's rush hour, graba head into tomorrow morning's rush hour, grab a warm jacket. temperatures down in single figures. warmer rather than waterproof for many of you because most will start the day dry and many stay dry throughout. sunny spells to begin with, cloud increasing from the west through the day, bringing a few showers here and there. scotland, parts of northern england and north wales especially, most will be dry with some sunny spells. but it will stay a little bit on the cooler side as we go through the next few days and into the weekend.” as we go through the next few days and into the weekend. i don't mind it being cool, it is the rain that
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does my head in. thank you, see you ina bit. we're talking a lot about brexit today, but we will get a sense of the other priorities of boris johnson's government later, when the chancellor announces the results of a spending assessment for next year. sean is here to tell us more about this. but first, let's go through what we know so far. the government has already promised to hire 20,000 extra police officers. this could cost just over £1 billion. it says there will be more than £2.5 billion for schools and more money for special needs education and colleges. hospitals are also being promised a boost, with nearly £2 billion for the nhs to upgrade facilities and equipment. and there have been suggestions that defence spending will go up. so sean, how much is this
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going to cost the government? it seems like spend, spend, spend. we don't know exactly until we hear from sajid javid all the details. the institute for fiscal studies, and economic research think—tank, widely respected, who we often turn to and people look at when we are looking at government numbers, they reckon if you touched all of these promises up it comes to about £9 billion of extra spending. so where is that money coming from? there are a few things you can do. you can borrow the money and the government has some rules itself and how much it wants to borrow each year, to give the impression it is in control of our finances. that rule is 2% of everything we make as a country each year. some calculations made earlier in the yearsaid year. some calculations made earlier in the year said there was £15 billion we could borrow until we went past that threshold of the government's own rules. the spending we are talking about here is more, about a billion pounds or £5 billion
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more, than when those calculations we re more, than when those calculations were previously made. clearly something has to give, either borrowing more. will we see taxes going up? we need the economy to grow but a lot of people are thinking it will not grow as quickly as it has done before. so various things might happen. we might not get all of that. i know we will be talking about this a little bit later on, lots of criticism as well about whether this is just pre—election spending which might never happen. thank you very much. time to get the news, travel and weather wherever you are this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm alice salfield. two london mps have been expelled from the conservative party after they voted against the government last night. justine greening and stephen hammond are effectively barred from standing at the next general election. the mps for beaconsfield, watford and guildford also rebelled against the whip in an attempt to pass a law designed to prevent a no—deal brexit.
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figures reveal that new hiv diagnoses are falling faster in london than elsewhere in the uk. the figures from public health england show there were just over 1,500 new diagnoses in the capital last year, a 12% decline, but experts are warning more needs to be done to protect against the infection. the mayor of london says he hopes some of the cuts of the last few years will be reversed as the chancellor announces his spending plans this afternoon. areas including health, education and the police will be included in the government's budget for the next financial year. i think what the government has to do is reverse the cuts they made to our police over the last nine years. we've lost more than 3,500 officers, more than 3,500 community officers, and thousands of police staff, they've had to sell off police stations. they have to reverse those cuts and give us extra funding, because our population has grown.
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an exhibition on christian dior has broken attendance records at the v&a. tracing the history of the fashion house from 19a7 to the present day, the exhibit attracted nearly 600,000 people in seven months. the previous record holder was the alexander mcqueen exhibition. let's take a look at the travel situation now. firstly, on the tubes, it is bad news if you use the northern line. the entire line is suspended at the moment because of a signalling systems failure. there are also severe delays on the metropolitan line and minor delays on the overground and the bakerloo line. on the roads, in lewisham, one lane is closed for gas mains work on the a20 lee high road westbound near the junction with belmont hill. time to get a check on the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a mild start, but a rather soggy one. we've had a bit of rain overnight. it is gradually clearing away eastwards, so yes, a damp start, but it will become drier and brighter as we head through the morning. some of the rain at first quite heavy, but it does clear
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away quite quickly. behind it, some showers around, but plenty of sunshine through the middle part of the day. a bit more cloud bubbling up this afternoon. again — risk of an isolated shower and temperatures getting up to 21 celsius. still a bit of a breeze, as well, and that stays with us overnight tonight. some patchy cloud again, risk of one or two light showers, but largely dry overnight, but a bit cooler. the rain today a cold front, and as it clears, the air is a bit fresher. so overnight, temperatures for some down in single figures. so a chillier start as we head into thursday morning, but plenty of sunshine around tomorrow. temperatures, though, hovering around the high teens — 18, maybe 19 celsius. some rain later on on friday, then a more or less settled weekend, but temperatures staying similar. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with louise minchin, live from westminster. our headlines today... the ayes have it, the ayes have it, unlock! a dramatic late—night defeat for the prime minister as mps try to block a no—deal brexit. in just a few hours, borisjohnson lost his majority, his first commons vote, and control of parliament. borisjohnson accused his opponents of handing control of brexit negotiations to the eu and said he would now seek a general election. it will mean that the eu themselves will be able to decide how long to keep this country in the eu. and since i refuse to go along with that plan, the 21 conservatives who rebelled, including some of the most recognisable former cabinet members, have been expelled from the party. in other news, after battering the bahamas, and killing
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at least seven people, hurricane dorian is heading for the florida coast. promises for public services. but, as the chancellor plans to increase spending, critics say the announcement is being used to help win an election. i'm at old trafford ahead of the crucial fourth ashes test. can jofra archer deliver for england against australia? we'll hear from the fast bowler. and showers will feature at old trafford debate, as it will be another part of the country but it will turn windier and cooler with a real autumn feeling. i will have the details later on breakfast. it's wednesday the ath of september. our top story. it's the morning after the night before. a night of rebellion and defeat and expulsions. in just one day, borisjohnson
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lost his working majority, his first commons vote as prime minister and control of parliament. mps voted by 328 to 301 to take over the agenda. mrjohnson has said he will now push for a snap general election. here's our political correspondent, jonathan blake. it was boris johnson's first test of his authority as prime minister in parliament and it ended in a decisive defeat. some on his own sidejoined opposition parties in voting to take control of the house of commons to attempt to block a no—deal brexit. order. the ayes to the right, 328, the noes to the left, 301. labour and others want to force the prime minister to ask for an extension to brexit if he can't get a new deal. mrjohnson says he'd never do that, so, if they succeed, his only option would be to hold a general election. i don't want an election, the public don't want an election. i don't believe the right honourable
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gentleman wants an election. but if the house votes for this bill tomorrow, the public we will have to choose who goes to brussels on october 17th to sort this out and take this country forward. two thirds of mps would need to back his call for an election, but labour say they'll only do that once the legislation blocking no—deal becomes law. he wants to table a motion for a general election. fine. get the bill through first! after three hours of debate in the commons, those conservatives who voted against the government knew they would be thrown out of their party. mps are in charge here, for now. the government must consider its next move as the battle for control of the brexit process grinds on. jonathan blake, bbc news, westminster. let's take a look now at how that process could play out.
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i say could because there are so many unknowns. today, mps will take control of commons business to debate and vote on a bill which would delay brexit until the end of january. afterwards, borisjohnson will table a motion calling for a general election. he needs two thirds of mps on board to trigger an early election. tomorrow, the anti—no deal bill will move to the house of lords, if it succeeds in the commons. parliament is not due to sit on friday, but mps could decide it should, to help rush the bill through. and if it passes, the bill could be given royal assent by the queen and become law on monday the 9th of september. let's speak now to our political correspondent, iain watson. i have said before that we are running out of superlatives. there was a real drama last night and very important decisions made. what you make of how significant this was?m was hugely significant on a number of fronts. a new prime minister, if it is not unprecedented then
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extremely rare to lose their first vote in the house of commons and he lost by a big margin than expected which means he is likely to lose again tonight when mps discuss delaying brexit further and we see people who were until recently sitting in the conservative cabinet, phillip hammond, ken clarke, former business secretary greg clarke, david gauke, told that they have lost the conservative whip which means they cannot stand as conservatives at the next general election and that in itself its absolutely extraordinary. interestingly, keeping a straight face, the brexit minister told this programme a while ago that the conservatives were not divided!” don't think there was a deep division. many of the 21 have been in government and pursued the policy that no deal was better that a bad deal as the previous prime minister said, and now they are seeking to undermine the current prime minister by taking no deal off the table.
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when he says that they are not deeply divided, but the numbers are the numbers, whatever anybody says, lets look forward to today. the bill to ta ke lets look forward to today. the bill to take no deal off the table goes back. it will be voted on at around 7pm and it is likely to pass. as a response, borisjohnson 7pm and it is likely to pass. as a response, boris johnson is 7pm and it is likely to pass. as a response, borisjohnson is likely to come forward with his own bill and the fixed term parliament act, calling for a snap election. he says that the public should decide who goes to a major meeting of european leaders in mid—october and we should have a swift election but it is likely an impact almost certain that the opposition will say no night because he needs a two thirds majority which is difficult to get because they say they don't trust him to alter the date of the election until after we leave the eu. they will say no for now but make no mistake, an election is coming sooner rather than later. they say that if he allows the
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delay, the antique no deal bill to pass, they will consider an election at that stage but it looks like he's infor at that stage but it looks like he's in for another defeat tonight. extraordinary times and difficult to say at this point whether or not there will be an election at all. there will be but we don't know when. i think there will have to be because he has lost his working majority, he presides over a minority government but having a spending review as well, that would normally be a big deal but it's now a footnote. there will be a whole range of pre—election sweeteners, more money for the nhs, more police, he can't get these things through, never mind brexit, with a minority government. it isjust never mind brexit, with a minority government. it is just that the opposition will not do it and do it on his timescale. thank you very much for being with us and taking us through the detail. throughout the morning we'll be speaking to a number of politicians across the brexit divide including labour's keir starmer and, in a few minutes, former conservative mp phillip lee, who has defected to
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the liberal democrats. we will get his take on why he decided to do that at this point. and at the end of the programme we have a panel of mps and not on all different sides because there are so many, but on various sides of what is turning out to be an extraordinary discussion. i'll be back in a few minutes, but first it's back to the studio where steph has the rest of the morning's news. so much to cover and it looks like it is starting to brighten up as well which is good. it is lovely, the danger of me getting totally soaked is now a bit less! good news! we will see you again shortly. now the other news stories this morning. the chancellor, sajid javid, will announce an additional £2 billion of brexit funding for whitehall when he sets out next year's public spending plans later. mrjavid will also confirm plans to increase spending on schools, hospitals, and the police, all of which are public services which caused problems for the conservatives at the last general election.
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hurricane dorian is moving away from the bahamas, but its left widespread devastation and flooding. seven people have been killed and the country's prime minister says that figure is expected to rise. the storm has reduced in strength but is still battering the region with heavy rain and high winds. our north america correspondent peter bowes reports. the chancellor, sajid javid, will announce an additional the wrath of dorian, the scale of the destruction in the bahamas is unprecedented. this is now a humanitarian crisis. vast areas are underwater, including grand bahama international airport and the town of marsh harbour on abaco island. lingering over the bahamas, the stationary storm prolonged the nightmare for the island's residents. many took desperate measures to escape the rising waters. some were trapped on roofs for hours. the national hurricane centre says the storm is creeping dangerously close to florida's east coast. the state, once predicted
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to take a direct hit, may escape the worst, but georgia and the carolinas are also in dorian's path. so our message for today is this — this is a very serious storm and a western shift, that is towards land, ofjust a few miles could bring enormous damage to our state. so, we want everyone to heed the warnings, listen to the official instructions that are given. and we want to prepare for the worst, but of course we want to pray for the best. water rescue teams are on standby and the army has been drafted in to deal with the looming threat. dorian's destructive journey is far from over. peter bowes, bbc news. more than a tonne of heroin has been found in a shipping container at the port of felixstowe in suffolk. the drugs, which have a street value of around £120 million, were found hidden in towels which had originated in pakistan.
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the national crime agency said it's the biggest ever seizure of heroin in the uk. the fire brigades union says more staff are needed to cope with a big rise in wildfires. recent figures show that last year, they reached the highest level since 2011. the union says there's been a 19% drop in the number of firefighters in the uk over the past decade, and even though there was a small rise in staff last year, it's not enough. the duke of sussex has defended his use of private jets, saying he occasionally needs to use them to ensure his family's safety. speaking at the launch of an eco—tourism project in amsterdam, prince harry said what's important is "what we do to balance out" negative effects. the duke and his wife have faced criticism after newspapers claimed they flew privately four times in 11 days this summer. that brings you up—to—date with the headlines. it's 12 minutes past 8.
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time now to go back to louise in westminster with all of the latest brexit developments. phillip lee crossed the floor yesterday, switching his allegiance from the conservative party to the lib dems and we will talk to him in a moment but before that, we know that there were over 20 conservative rebels, as they are now to be known, who did not vote with the government and we have been hearing from a couple. i have been told by the chief whip, who is my friend and i like very much, but he has told me it will be his sad duty to write to me tomorrow to tell me i have had the whip removed tomorrow after 37 yea rs the whip removed tomorrow after 37 years as the whip removed tomorrow after 37 yea rs as a the whip removed tomorrow after 37 years as a conservative mp possible i voted against the government three times in 37 years and i've had that whip removed. do you recognise your party tonight? no, it's been taken over by a rather knock—about character who has this bizarre crash it through philosophy in charge. a cabinet which is the most right—wing cabinet which is the most right—wing cabinet of any conservative party,
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and they are not in control of events. that was nicholas soames and of course kenneth clarke. i am joined by phillip lee who we now know is a liberal democrat. good morning, you chose yesterday to cross the floor, how long have you been thinking about that?l cross the floor, how long have you been thinking about that? a few months, talking to close family and friends and saying that i don't think i could stay in the conservative party, it is not the party ijoined in 1992! think it was accelerated by the behaviour and culture that has come in with this newest administration. i came back at the end of august from holiday and said that this was not for me. i need to be able to serve my constituents in the best way that i judged and that was why i was elected as an mp and i thought i was best served byjoining the liberal democrats. we are seeing you physically crossing the floor, did you choreograph that? it's not strictly come dancing... it was a dramatic moment! you did it when the prime minister was there. it was a
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dramatic moment and i was waiting for what was called the barkham operate —— opposite the speaker's chair but i wanted to show respect to the new member of parliament for brecon and radnor and then i followed. i am sure you have seen this, someone who said they worked for you forfour this, someone who said they worked for you for four years until 2016, saying about you, i astonished by his rapid political journey, saying about you, i astonished by his rapid politicaljourney, at one point he was quite eurosceptic and a lwa ys point he was quite eurosceptic and always contemptuous of the lib dems. what is your reaction to that?” think the individual concerned just needs to, you know... i gave that young man his first chance and i think he needs to respect the fact that, as a politician, i have responsible if is to best represent my constituents and his view of what my constituents and his view of what my attitudes are not necessarily the reality. what have historically been your views of the liberal democrats? look, i was a conservative party memberfor 27 years look, i was a conservative party member for 27 years and politics is a battle at the elections. i will be
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taking on who the lib dem candidate is in 2010 and the labour candidate and that is politics and everybody outside the westminster bubble in which this young man tends to inhabit too much understands...” don't want to get too personal.” know, but the thing is, i think the broader public understand that that is what politics is like. i have made a conscious decision, i think a principled decision, to cross the floor to the liberal democrats because i believe the party i am now a member of the best serves the future for this country. the chair of the lib dems lgbtq+ group has resigned after your decision. u nfortu nately, resigned after your decision. unfortunately, these resignations are off the back of a misunderstanding. what is the misunderstanding? pretty inaccurate report about something i did in 2013. itry report about something i did in 2013. i try to attach a probing member to a build which was essentially a public health issue and notan essentially a public health issue and not an equality issue. of course i believe in the equality regardless
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of somebody‘s sexuality possibly to look at an article i published, it explains everything. will you continue that conversation? i'm happy to have the conversation about it because i know some of the acquisitions that are flying around are totally inaccurate.” acquisitions that are flying around are totally inaccurate. i know you have watched the interview with kenneth clarke, at the way that people who have rebelled in your party are being treated. what you make of it? i think a conservative party that has injected nicholas soames, ken clarke, dominic grieve, is not the conservative party i joined but now a conservative party people like andrew bridgen and careerists who seemingly don't believe in anything and i don't believe in anything and i don't believe that serves the best interests of britain but is it a party deeply divided? how would you describe it? it is rather like the corn laws, i think this is a division between the conservative party ijoined division between the conservative party i joined and division between the conservative party ijoined and the rather ideological driven, ruthless party which i don't recognise as anything approaching conservative.”
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which i don't recognise as anything approaching conservative. i know things are moving quickly, but have you talked to some of those rebels? are they considering joining the lib dems for example? everybody has to make their individual decisions fault of their bean conversations are going over many months with some collea g u es are going over many months with some colleagues over political futures. whether they could say as a conservative. these conversations ta ke conservative. these conversations take place but individual have to make their own judgments. do you know if some are considering it?” think you might see some, you might not. it is a personal decision i don't want to influence other people who had to make thejudgment don't want to influence other people who had to make the judgment on the basis of what is in the best interest of their own constituents. talking about today, we know that the deal to effectively get no deal off the table, that goes through and how will you vote? i have been party to the genesis of this legislation and aware that it is coming and i will be voting with the legislation. if it comes to pass, there are so many ifs, the vote on a possible general election, how will you vote? at the moment, the liberal democrat put in and i believe the position of
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all opposition parties is to try to sort out the brexit impasse before an election and i hope all opposition parties adhere to that principle. if there is a general election, bring it on to the liberal democrats are ready to fight one any time. thank you very much indeed for your time this morning. so many things to look at every politician this morning and we have a panel later with different points of view, a panel of mps who will talk to us about what they are planning to do today also i nearly got soaked then! here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. thank you and good morning. it has stopped raining in central london and the rest of the day should be dry. some sunshine elsewhere, a lovely start in dorset. there will be further showers across the uk today but the big storm it will be later and how the wind picks up, strong and blustery later and it will add to a chillier and more autumnal feel in the afternoon and
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evening. this low pressure has brought the rain and as it moves eastward it will bring in air from the north—west and that will drop temperatures. this is the rain that is bringing louise a lot of wet weather now just is bringing louise a lot of wet weather nowjust confined to the far south—east and east anglia. some shells in northern england and the north midlands but they will move through. more showers in western scotla nd through. more showers in western scotland and northern ireland, the odd bit of thunder and they will become widespread. some are slow moving and then push back into northern england and north wales and the north midlands later boss of the more persistent rains in the far north of scotland. the south and east, after that rain, will be dry until late in the evening but the winds will pick up everywhere for a blustery day, may be touching 50 or 60 mph this afternoon and this evening in western scotland and northern ireland. temperatures down to ten or 11 degrees, 17 or 18 further south. if you are heading to the ashes and old trafford, be
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prepared, there will be a chilly and blustery feeling, the showers should hopefully clear for the start but they could return this afternoon. tonight, more showers in northern and eastern areas but overall things turning to riot for many with clear skies but because we have the colder air, the winds falling a little lighter in the night after a windy start, it will be a chilly morning commute tomorrow around 8—10d for many. not necessarily the waterproof jacket tomorrow but warmer, most places stay dry and white, early cloud close in the south—east, sunshine and hazy and if you shout in scotland, northern england and wales in particular but overall, tomorrow is dryer than to date with sunny spells continued into the afternoon. not especially warm at around 15—18d, and to get out of the breeze and in the sunshine when it should feel pleasant but through the night thursday into friday, more rain and strong winds put into scotla nd rain and strong winds put into scotland and northern ireland and by friday, noted these fronts are pushing southwards across england and wales. a lot of cloud again with
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outbreaks of rain, particular in the west but developing into southern areas later. further north, sunshine and blustery showers on friday and that wind will keep things on the cool side. weak state with things largely cool as we go into the weekend death market we stayed put up weekend death market we stayed put up good for those taking part in the great north run, not too warm —— we stay cool for most of the weekend. such a change from a couple of weeks ago. it feels like autumn already! thank you. we will be going back live to westminster shortly where louise is this morning, talking to people on all sides of the debate of what is going on. one of the big questions from all of this in the last 2a hours is if there is going to bea last 2a hours is if there is going to be a general election and if so, how would boris johnson to be a general election and if so, how would borisjohnson do. in the constituency of st ives in cornwall, the conservatives have a majority over the lib dems of just 312.
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we've sentjohn maguire down there to find out how people are feeling. morning, john. it looks beautiful this morning there. absolutely right, totally beautiful in st ives, stunning views and the place has been a draw for artists over the years because of the light you get here in this part of west cornwall come on the north coast. it is looking stunning. when you think about heat and light, it seems like we have been getting a lot of it but not much light out of westminster in the past few months, maybe even the last couple of years with no real solutions or answers and that is what people here are saying to me consistently. they want some sort of certainty or answer so they can plan, so they can work, so they can figure out, like the rest of us, exactly what is going on. newlyn harbour feels every inch of the 288 miles away from westminster. and, of course, it's even
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further away from brussels. yet, for a generation, that's where the decisions have been made about how much these fishermen can catch and land. the problem is all this waiting. you know, we just want to get out on the 31st of october. they want to leave the european union and, to coin a phrase, take back control of the fishing grounds. theyjust need the go ahead so that we can start with the rejuvenation programme for our coastal communities. you know, they are desperate for it, crying out for it, and we need to leave in order to do that and we need to leave with a clean break. this constituency, st ives, voted 5a% to a6% in favour of leave, but where there is consensus here is that everyone you talk to wants an end to all the uncertainty and to move on. penzance is a town with ambitious plans to make the most of its resources. we've got thermal energy below
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the ground which is going to heat a portion of the pool so that people can swim in heated water all year round. and for businesses here, the never—ending brexit saga is damaging and frustrating. people just want an end to it. i think we've all got fed up with the whys and wherefores now and i think we've all lost track of why we started this in the first place and people just want to get an end, be it one way or the other, and i know a lot of people are quite passionate about the way they feel, be it brexit or remain, but i think we just need the certainty. we just need stability, at the end of the day. this is a conservative seat with a majority ofjust 312 votes over the liberal democrats who would see st ives as a key target. a general election — more uncertainty — may well affect the strength of the pound which, for the vital tourism sector here, isn't necessarily a bad thing. the pound may be low today and people are thinking, crumbs, i can buy fewer coffees when i go
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on holiday, i must have a staycation in britain instead. or we have people on the continent or in america seeing the pound reducing in value and therefore thinking, my stay in britain now is going to be much better value. these days, hunting fish seems an easier task than hunting for a solution to the brexit crisis. any definitive outcome is once again on ice. john maguire, bbc news, west cornwall. borisjohnson boris johnson says borisjohnson says he does not want an election and the country does not wa nt an election and the country does not wantan an election and the country does not want an election but you mentioned those two words, the general election, to people here and the eyes start to roll but what they have also said to me is that if an election does bring some sense of certainty a final decision, are way ahead, then bring it on. from sometimes, we will hand you now to our news teams across the uk for the news, travel and weather where
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you're watching this morning. good morning. it is going to remain pretty unsettled over the next few days, low pressure will be fairly close by, bringing fairly strong winds today. you can see the area of low towards the north of scotland. a weather front clearing its way from the south east. behind this weather front, the air is coming in more from a northerly direction and it will feel chillier compared to the last few days. the early morning rain in the south east of england clears away and in much of southern england, the midlands, eastern england, the midlands, eastern england, plenty of sunshine into the afternoon. quite a few showers across north west england, north wales, scotland and northern ireland, and that is where we have the strongest winds today. up to
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about 50, 50 five miles per hour. quite a windy day. and temperatures, they will struggle a bit today. they will fall into the afternoon, ten to 15 celsius in the north and 17 degrees this afternoon in the south east of england. tonight, showers drift away, but still one or two across north—western areas, some clear spells. chili overnight tonight, especially in the north and the countryside, temperatures down to fairly low single figures. thursday, a dry day for many, a good deal of sunshine as well. some showers into the north and west of scotla nd showers into the north and west of scotland and into north wales and north west england. for most, some sunny spells and top at about 16 to about 90 degrees. to the end of the week, still weather systems moving through on friday. but into the weekend, an area of high pressure sta rts weekend, an area of high pressure starts to develop which settle things down for many others into the
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weekend. some sunshine to enjoy over the weekend. a bit of rain likely on friday which clears away. sunny spells over the weekend and maximum temperatures up to about 15 or 19 celsius. that is everything, goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news, with samantha simmonds in westminster and susannah streeter here in the studio. uk pm borisjohnson loses the first round of his heavyweight brexit showdown with the house of commons. where does it all leave business? live from london, that's our top story on wednesday, september ath. the pound bounces after last night's parliamentary vote, opening the door for another brexit delay. but the uncertainty continues, with a vote today on holding another general election. and the uk finance minister, chancellor, sajid javid, is to press

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