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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 5, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at two. borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister and conservative mp, saying he's "torn between family and the national interest". it's been an honour to be mp for orpington but it is time to move on andi orpington but it is time to move on and i have to get to work. the prime will address the public later this afternoon, as it's announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. but labour have suggested they might not support an election until they're certain a further brexit delay has been secured. coming up on afternoon live — all the sport with ben croucher. what is happening in the cricket? steve smith continuing to bat simon. he is defying england in the fourth ashes test, struck another century
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to push australia past 250. his third tonne of the season. only don bradman has more. and we are all thrilled! and we are all thrilled! and nick miller has the weather. we have rain and high pressure building infor we have rain and high pressure building in for the weekend, to settle things down. briefly. i have your full forecast coming up. see your full forecast coming up. see you in half an hour. see you in half an hour. thanks nick, also coming up on afternoon live. away from the drama of westminster, we'll be finding out what young people make of it all. hello everyone — this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. good afternoon, you're watching afternoon live from westminster. the tensions at the heart of government have been laid bare after borisjohnson‘s brother, jo, quit the government — and announced he's stepping down as a conservative mp.
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he says he's been torn between "family loyalty and the national interest". he spoke to the bbc, just a few moments ago, outside his london home. i haven't got any further comment to say, it has been an honour to be an mpfor say, it has been an honour to be an mp for orpington but it is time to move on and i have to get to work. i beg your pardon. are you at odds with your brother, mrjohnson? beg your pardon. are you at odds with your brother, mrjohnson? see you folks. see you folks. we'll bring you more on the latestjohnson family machinations shortly. the prime minister will speak later, accusing jeremy corbyn of ‘a cowardly insult to democracy‘ for not backing a general election. labour have suggested that they might not agree to a poll until after the prime minister has been forced to agree another brexit delay. mps are due to vote again on an early election on monday. it all comes as the government says a bill to stop a no—deal brexit will pass through the house of lords tomorrow. our political correspondent chris mason reports. point at the man who is prime minister and you completely disagree with on brexit.
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this is jo johnson with his brother, boris. he is also an mp but not for much longer. take a look at this tweet, he's packing it in because he says he is torn between family loyalty and the national interest. ouch. i knowjo and this will have been a difficult decision for him but done without malice. he did say he was putting national interest ahead of family loyalty so that means he believes his own brother, the prime minister, is not acting in the best interests for this country. every mp will have their own individual view. the collective view of our party is clear, we want to leave the european union with or without a deal by the end of october. the big row now is when a general election happens. as soon as possible says the government, but some within labour are tempted to put it off.
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give me a date, is it in october or november? my view, later rather than sooner. so after the date of the 315t of october? so after the date of the 31st of october? possibly. why the disagreement over timings? some want to make the prime minister sweat and have to ask brussels for a delay to brexit, the very thing he has said he will not do. others within labour say let's get on with it. once the plan to block a no—deal brexit is the law of the land. meanwhile, the government says it will try again to push for a general election. everywhere you look at westminster, something is moving today. the other day the lib dems recruited a former conservative mp, now former labour mp luciana berger has signed up. we find ourselves at a moment of national emergency and i don't use those words lightly but you see what's going on around us, and we need to do everything possible to make sure the country when the
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election might come has a proper choice, and something to vote for rather than choosing between terrible options ofjohnson versus corbyn. with an election in the offing, look who else is surveying the political landscape. nigel farage is offering a deal with boris johnson if the conservatives commit to a no—deal brexit but whatever happens, he says, bring it on. a prime minister who cannot come and support in parliament, he is calling for a general election and unbelievably the labour party want to stop brexit and want to stop us having a vote. what's going on in parliament right now, people are disgusted by. westminster might look serene today but it feels very different. nobody knows exactly what on earth is going to happen next. chris mason, bbc news. i'm joined now by conservative mp damian green.
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good afternoon to you. good afternoon simon. let us talk about jojohnson‘s departure, afternoon simon. let us talk about jo johnson's departure, a afternoon simon. let us talk about jojohnson‘s departure, a shock in its own rights for the prime minister, but the timing. yes, but i mean, ithink minister, but the timing. yes, but i mean, i think to some extent i imaginejo has mean, i think to some extent i imagine jo has been mean, i think to some extent i imaginejo has been wrestling with this since he came into the government. he resigned from theresa may's government because he was much more strongly pro european than theresa may's approach so even more so theresa may's approach so even more so with worst‘s approach. —— boris's approach. so obviously i it, because it's the prime minister's brother it has a huge amount of attention, in political terms it is not that surprising. come on, in political terms this is massive given the timing, isn't it? i mean, et tu brother sort of thing. this is not like ed miliband running against david miliband. i think the timing is presumably all to do with the fa ct is presumably all to do with the fact at some stage in the next
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possibly four weeks, possibly eight weeks we will have a general election, and he has to give his constituency time to select a new candidate. let us talk about the timing of the election, another vote on monday, do you have any doubt that, that this time it will go through? well, i have doubts ability what will happen, in that the sense it is in the hands of the opposition parties, i don't know what labour will do, what other opposition party also do, the snp, the liberal democrat, they may not have the same interest as the labour party. i think there will be an election, some motion will go through, think the country is prepared for it but when, i don't know. do you accept the labour explanation for not saying yes straightaway is frankly they don't trust boris, they need to be sure that the whole issue of a no—deal is taken off the table com pletely no—deal is taken off the table completely before there is an election. no, i think completely before there is an election. no, ithink that completely before there is an election. no, i think that is a wholly bogus explanation. i think it is hilarious almost, if it wasn't so
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serious, that the labour party has spent years saying we want an election now, and strongly in recent money, they were offered a general election and they ran away from it. but they are wrong footing the tories with this, aren't they?” don't think so at all. whenever the election is, october or november, people will be able to take a long calm look and decide whether they wa nt calm look and decide whether they wantjeremy calm look and decide whether they want jeremy corbyn calm look and decide whether they wantjeremy corbyn running the country north and i think we know what answer they will come to. let us what answer they will come to. let us look at the prime minister's position. he has got himself boxed into a corner. how does he get out of this without breaking the law or in terms of what he has promised the british people so far, or, just resigning, because there is no way come hell or high water he will go to brussels and ask for an extension. he certainly won't break the law, the government won't break the law, the government won't break the law, the government won't break the law and indeed one foolish court case in scotland brought against the government earlier this week. i see no reason for him to resign. this is wild talk, that he will put his case
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to the country at the general election, whenever it is, but meanwhile, it is, you know, we have got this deadline, i think it is very important we stick to this deadline, i think the only, the only way we will get a deal is if the european union appreciates this is a serious deadline, and if it does that, then we have a chance of a deal, which, the vast majority of people agree, is betterfor britain. everyone wants to leave with a deal. you can only have a deal if you are in talk, if you speak to michel barnier we are not in talks or negotiations even enow. think think, i know there are discussions going on, there is... discussions are one thing but serious negotiations, we are way beyond the discussion phase? discussion are serious negotiations happening between officials, they are not in the narrow terms of definition negotiations because ministers aren't involved.” definition negotiations because ministers aren't involved. i don't know how this works. how they work is official levels they get together
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the detail, they have the broad, the outline, the mandate as the european union calls it, and within that you have to hammer out the details. when you have those hammered out that is when the negotiation start in a formal sense. so to some extent michel barnier is playing with language, you know, he says negotiations haven't started but in fa ct negotiations haven't started but in fact the prime minister we know is talking to european leaders, steve barclay is talking to lots, there are negotiations going on. so people watching you now who maybe suspicious because they may not trust boris johnson suspicious because they may not trust borisjohnson as much as they did a week ago because central to his claim has been, i want a deal. and is that still his position as far as you are aware? yes, absolutely he wants a deal. and he has proposed, i think the british government has alternatives to the irish backstop which is clearly the most difficult part of the deal, and i know those discussions are going on. so yes, there is still despite
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the sort of political excitement here, there are still hard negotiations going on, on the tough details of what you have if you don't want to have the irish backstop, and i still remain hopeful that because we have a deadline, minds will be focussed and we can get a deal next month. theresa may's a friend of yours has she heard anybody say we are missing theresa may? i wonder what her reaction is? i have seen her in the last couple of days as parliament is back and she is as you would expect pursuing a diligent backbencher‘s job. she is as you would expect pursuing a diligent backbencher's job. thank you. good to talk to you. good to talk to you. let pick up on that story about the departure of boris johnson. let pick up on that story about the departure of borisjohnson. the prime minister would like to thank him for his service, he has been a brilliant talented minister and a fantastic mp. it goes on the prime
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minister as both politician and brother understands this will not have been an easy matter forjo, the constituents have could not have asked for a better representative. that is the downing street line. what the two ebrothers have to say, well, who wouldn't want to be a fly—on—the—wall that the conversation. fly—on—the—wall that the conversation. let's speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young. just when you think you might have got a handle over what is going on, we hear aboutjo johnson. got a handle over what is going on, we hear about jo johnson. yes, i mean, it was a massive surprise, and i don't think people really saw that coming. apart from the fact it was probably more of a surprise that he took a job in the first place, we know they are completely on different pages when it comes to brexit. jojohnson different pages when it comes to brexit. jo johnson resigned from theresa may's, from theresa may's government because he wanted to bier sue a second referendum. so he wasn't willing to go along with a deal at that point. when his brother
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becomes prime minister, he takes a job even though you know he knows they are in completely different place, when it comes to this, but it is the way he has done it, the timing, i mean there are ways of doing this kind of resignation if you are the prime minister's brother. to put it out in a tweet and talk about, you know, how he is split between the loyalty. to say that you know, he is accusing of his brother of not acting in the national interest, coming after the defeats in the house of commons, really difficult week, and i think jojohnson, like really difficult week, and i think jo johnson, like lots really difficult week, and i think jojohnson, like lots of other tory mpsi jojohnson, like lots of other tory mps i have been speaking to, they are very upset about the purge as they see it of those tory mps, who have a different opinion on brexit. they think it has gone way over the top. it is splitting the party. it could alienate potential tory voters if and when that general election comes. so i think, it is is a big problem for borisjohnson, and you know, it is hard for him to, you
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know, it is hard for him to, you know e explain what is going on. know, it is hard for him to, you know e explain what is going onm the meantime he is somewhere in the country, election nearing, making a speech but at the moment we don't have a general election. so she has a slight problem in maybe that is their tactic, they will go round the country pretending there is a general election, that could be one approach they could take! he will go round campaigning for we know because the leader of the house has said they will try again on monday. what they are trying to do is say to labour, you said once that bill which is the anti—no—deal bill, once that has royal assent and is through both houses of parliament, actually you will vote for an election, they are trying to put pressure onjeremy corbyn and the snp, to vote for it. now, both the snp and labour party are not in the same place on this. they are split. both parties about the best way to do someone in the snp said yesterday they are slightly worried about looking like they are keeping borisjohnson worried about looking like they are keeping boris johnson in worried about looking like they are keeping borisjohnson in power, a
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tory prime minister, a day longer than he should be, according to them. so they are worried about that. nicola sturgeon went out quickly and said bring it on. so they are in a difficult place. labour are they are in a difficult place. labourare ina they are in a difficult place. labour are in a difficult place. it is interesting, those closest to jeremy corbyn are more confident about a labour victory at a general election, because if you think about it, none of this matters if labour win the election, they don't need a bill, because if labour win an election they can do what they like. don't go way. i am going to try and ta ke don't go way. i am going to try and take stock if possible given what is going on. the prime minister is urging other parties to back his plan for an early general election. but can he force them there are several different ways in which a general election could be held. let's look at the possibilities and when they might take place. the most simple would be for the government to hold a new vote — requiring the support of two—thirds of mps — under the fixed term parliament act next week, once the bill to delay brexit has been approved by both houses of parliament and received royal assent. alternatively, the government
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could introduce a simple bill — possiblyjust one—line long — to create a new law which would allow an election. or there could be a motion of no—confidence in the government. let's look at those options in some more detail. firstly another vote under the fixed term parliament act. this would allow the government to set the election date and we know they say they want it to be the 15th of october. but crucially it still requires two—thirds of mps to vote for it. and it's not clear the opposition parties will do so even after the no—deal bill becomes law. what about a new law to allow an election? this could be passed by a simple majority — but the bill could be amended by mps along the way. and one thing this might allow them to do is change the election date, pushing into a brexit extension period. then there's the no—confidence motion. one of the more bizarre ideas is that the government could table this in itself. but if it was successful it would be followed by a 14—day period during which another government could be formed. so what if there's no election at all? the government might chose to refuse to send the no—deal bill for royal assent.
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and undoubtedly end up in the courts. there's a suggestion borisjohnson could use the uk's veto as a member of the eu to block any brexit extension agreed at the summit in october. or failing that there's the possibility the prime minister could just walk away and resign from thejob. i will be testing you later! you say labour are confused, but are they? they seem to be fairly clear nothing changes until there is no question ofa changes until there is no question of a crashing out, or leaving without a deal and then they will say yes to an election. at what point do you reach the point there is no question of that happening. you talk about the bill going through, they could argue that is enough or go down the route of we don't trust boris johnson. the narrative is we don't trust boris johnson on anything. once it has royal assent it has royal assent. but it hasn't been implemented. are
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they saying they need to prime minister to have gone to brussels for the extension to have been agreed, then they are happy or some are saying we could do an election before that because we think we are going to win and we can do it. that is the issue for labour there, now the other thing about the one line bill is interesting, because lots of people have talked about this as an option, the problem as one minister said last night is it gets amended beyond recognition, if it is is a bill rather than the two thirds majority, it is a normal bill, it goes through both houses, what will happen? they will change the date potentially. the snp would put down an amendment saying 16—18—year—olds should have a vote. they can't control it the government because they don't have a majority, no—one has a majority at that point. they might not go down that road. the idea i was told last night the government is still considering not recommending to the queen that bill gets royal assent, the anti—no—deal bill, run that must a couple of tory
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mps now and i mean they were literally if that happens, it's all over. so, i mean it is a very difficult thing for the prime minister to do if he decides to go down that road. at the moment, yeah, he is potentially stuck, he stands there accusing labour of running scared of a an election, they accuse him of being untrustworthy. he has a date in his direry, he has to go to brussels october 17th. and he has to come back. and then he has this date of 31st. if he comes back from brussels with no change, which is very, very possible, he has said if, if we go beyond 31st october and we haven't left, he is in an impossible position, what does he do then? he could ignore that law, but of course then, you know, again tory mps are saying, you know, he can't ignore the law, he could end up, one said he would be taken to court, you know, prime minister breaking the law, that is quite a bold move. his
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other options are to sit there. another option of bringing a vote of know confidence in himself, so then you end up in the bizarre situation where he is telling his mps to vote against him, and then what do labour do then? they can't vote to have confidence in him, can they? that is one way of getting towards a general election but you have 11! days. days. ifiam election but you have 11! days. days. if i am watching you right now i am going this is utterly ridiculous, this has been the problem for the last few year, this place is doing its own thing, it doesn't have any connection with what is going on in the greater public. there is a difference between what is happened in the last three years and this, the real problem is is the fixed—term parliaments act. in the old days if we had reached this position where a prime minister has lost their majority, and they want to go to the country and say this is what i want to put to you, and i am willing to lose myjob if you tell me you don't want this, they would be able do that but the problem is
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parliament isn't in some way allowing him to govern because they are taking control but other the other hand they are not allowing him to call a general election. most people as labour figures to call a general election. most people as labourfigures have to call a general election. most people as labour figures have said, if we goes to the country and wins on that manifesto of a no—deal, i mean you can't argue with that, but at the moment he is not allowed do that. so we are stuck in this really string limbo which wouldn't have happened before the law was changed and the fixed—term parliaments act. the other question is worth raising and tory mps have been raising. i have been speaking to those who have been booted out of the party and said are there olive branches coming your way. they said there is talk of it but it hasn't happened. there is a question of whether they would wa nt to a question of whether they would want to stand against as conservatives. they would want a guarantee of what is in the ma nifesto. guarantee of what is in the manifesto. if they are told you have to sign up to no—deal they are not going to do it. it is notjust the 21. i spoke to others who said i will not stand on a manifesto of no—deal because i don't believe in it. so there is other problems
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coming down the road if we get to the position of the election. my head hurts... i'm sorry. but it's not my fault! testify so it's been a dramatic week at westminster so far — but what are people across the uk making of it all? and particularly young people? leigh milner has been speaking to a group of sixth form politics students at a college in colchester. so it's been a dramatic week at westminster so far — the relief effort is ramping up, this is the united states coast borisjohnson is boris johnson is challenging borisjohnson is challenging the sovereignty of parliament, so... parliament is challenging the will of the people. people. it is trying to stop, and borisjohnson is trying to stop, and borisjohnson is trying to deliver what we asked for.” to stop, and borisjohnson is trying to deliver what we asked for. i feel the way that boris johnson to deliver what we asked for. i feel the way that borisjohnson and the government are going about what they are doing, i think it is wrong. we
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are doing, i think it is wrong. we are never going to get an answer.” can understand why they are politics students. holly, you are 71, if a general election is called, you won't be able to vote —— 17. how do you feel about that? i would feel gutted that i don't get the chance to express my voice. however, ifeel like the time is right for a general election. nobody knows what the national interest is, parliament says they do, the government says they do, neither do. that is from three years ago the referendum, we need to find out now what the interest is. you have protested in the past, why did you protest and why did you feel it was so important do that? i was at the people's vote march in march. i i thought it was important to express my opinion and make sure my voice was heard on issues that affected me but i couldn't have a say on. do you think it has made a difference?” couldn't have a say on. do you think it has made a difference? i think it has made a difference to mps in parliament who have stood up for
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what they clearly believe, when they wouldn't have done so before. do you think we need more young people in politics? it is important for young people to have their say especially when they can't vote and have an effect on what is going to affect them in their lives. how easy has this been been to follow? it has been difficult but as a politics student we talk about it in lessons, we catch each other, times are changing so you have to keep watching the news and keep your thought, everything that is going on. so have you guys got classes this afternoon? yes. all right. more enthusiasm. come on. ok, we will leave them to go to class but lot will be happening over the next couple of days in terms of brexit. stay tuned. i'm joined now by labour's jack dromey. what at the moment is your understanding of what your leader wa nts to understanding of what your leader wants to do? there is an utter
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determination, we must not allow him to cut and run and take us over the cliff into the abyss of a no—deal brexit at the end of october. the legislation passed this week is a crucial first step in that direction. next we have to be confident that it is adhered to and enforced. therefore it, this is about putting the national a interest first. and the coming days will determine what then happens, there will be an election, but to be frank, what i amfo cussed on, and i know my colleagues in the house, is the people that we represent, in my case the jaguar plant in my constituency, there can be no question of taking any risks with the public interest. you said coming days and we know there will be a vote on monday, that the bill will have had royal assent but that won't be enough for you. the bill has to be enough for you. the bill has to be implemented, and that means that borisjohnson has be implemented, and that means that boris johnson has got be implemented, and that means that borisjohnson has got to do what parliament has asked him to do and to be frank what the country expects
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us, which is to seek to negotiate a new deal and come back to the house of commons. what is clear beyond any doubt in the last its—hours, it has been derisory attempts at talk, nothing is happening, that is wrong. when does the labour party want to say yes to an election? that will be made in time for monday, but forgive me... you will say we will say yes. for give me if esay this, the focus right now and we are talking across opposition parties standing together, how do we stop boris johnson doing irreparable damage to this country, that is the starting point. the british national interest and the precise tactics that flow from that are a subject of discussion. thank you forjoining us. headlines coming up but time for a look at the weather. there st another weather system set to move south. that will bring more rain. after that, things will settle in
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time for for the weekend briefly. here is is a look at some broken cloud and sunny spells in kent and it is this area of high pressure which is keeping things quiet out there. this weather front has brought showers in scotland, some to northern england, one or two in wales. most in northern england and eastern scotland. a lot will clear on through, away from showers you are getsing to see sunny spells and many places are dry, temperatures fairly similar compared with yesterday, they are still brisk wind out there coming from the west or north—west, so it is not as blustery as it was yesterday. just one change in the feel of the weather, that is in northern ireland, where you have a bit more in way of sunshine coming there and it is feeling warmer compared with yesterday. let us look at things progressing in the test match, weather—wise we have seen a bit of rain at old trafford. there isa bit of rain at old trafford. there is a chance of catching a shower again as the afternoon goes on but there will be drier and sunnier weather coming through but rain to start the day tomorrow, and here is why. as we go into tonight, look at
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this area of rain spreading across scotland, turn things wetter. northern england and north wales. northern england and north wales. north of that we will have clear spells returning to northern scotland with a few shower, is south of that in the clear weather in south—east england a chilly night to come, down to sings or seven in the countryside. rain in northern england and for old trafford that is going to push further south across england and wales, so some outbreaks of rain moving south. once that is cleared on through notice sunny spells come through across a large part. there will be shower, more especially in scotland and some heavyin especially in scotland and some heavy in the north and west. it is a windy day and temperatures in the mid to high teens, as that area of high pressure builds don't expect it to feel warmer, a chilly night to come on saturday night. there may be a touch of frost in north east scotland. a lot of dry weather round, the chance of picking up the odd shower. i want to finish with the latest at —— satellite image of hurricane dorian. the eye has
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strengthened and it is just pushing ever closer to the coastline of south carolina an on to north carolina, tornados are being reported with this, flooding, rain, storm surgeon and damaging wind which strengthen on the coastline as the storm moves in. hurricane dorian still packing a punch, this time in parts of the usa.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines. borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister and conservative mp, saying he's "torn between family and the national interest". it's been an honour to be mp for orpington and a minister under three governments, but it's time to move on. and i've got to get to work! the prime will address the public later this afternoon, as it's announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. but labour have suggested they might not support an election until they're certain a further brexit delay has been secured. sport now on afternoon live. good afternoon. steve smith continues to frustrate england in the fourth ashes test at old trafford.
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he's scored an unbeaten century on day two. england thought they'd got him out too — only forjack leach to have bowled a no—ball when he was caught at slip. australia started the day on 170 for 3. smith was 60 not out. he's now unbeaten on 129. australia 291—5. the wickets to fall today. travis head for 19. matthew wade caught for 16. smith was on 118 when england thought they had him. earlier in the day, jofra archer dropped him on 65 too. not going that great for england. great if you are an australia fan. you can follow it all on 5 live sports extra with the test match special team. rafael nadal is through to the semi—finals of the us open for the ninth time in his career as he edges towards his 19th grand slam title. in the women's draw, a canadian teenager continues her rise to the top of the game — asjoe lynskey reports. right now, in charge in new york is a man from miyako. it can feel like an onslaught. after the rally, comes
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the roar of the crowd. getting swept away. he is one of the shortest players on tour. five for seven, but with the boy in a series gail. his opponent said he felt like he played like a lion. this was a quarterfinal that felt like a fight. that is one of the keys of the success. i was a good fighter on court with a good character, positive character. there area character, positive character. there are a lot who fight a lot. this tournament now seems set up for the spaniard. the three players left with him having got this far before. his next opponent had to come
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through an epic. he was taken to five sets, nearly four hours of tennis. beating him like this would have felt like a summit. but waiting next on the mountain is the three times champion. in the women plasma game, the teenagers are making the noise. 19 years old and from toronto, and driving through the rounds. this year, she is climbing up rounds. this year, she is climbing up the rankings. this is herfirst time in the main draw and now into the semifinals. she asked after the when if it was real life after all. the dream of a final is just one game away. that semifinal takes place later on this evening. rhys patchell will start for wales, in theirfinalwarm up match before the rugby world cup. they play ireland on saturday. the scarletts man will start
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at fly half in dublin, with tomos williams his partner at half—back. captain and lock alun wynjones is among those who return with no uncapped players in the welsh matchday squad their opening game for the world cup injapan, on the 23rd september — they play georgia. the premier league has it's largest number of nominations for fifa's team of the year for the first time in a decade. 21 of the 55 nominees play their club football in england, with seven of them coming from liverpool — full backs andy robertson and trent alexander arnold amongst them. the nominees were selected by more than 23,000 professional players around the world, and the team will be revealed later this month. that's all the sport for now. let's ta ke let's take you live to the scene in the house of lords. we have already heard from the former conservative leader. he says it is in breach of the nation's unwritten constitution and he has urged peers to reject the
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bill. lord howard said it was the latest instalment of parliament passed mac sad endeavour to thwart the referendum result. he says gets us the referendum result. he says gets us nowhere. it has given us six months of extra time and has resulted in no conclusion. let's listen in. on polling uncertainty. the 3 million eu citizens who live in this country, if for no other reason this insurance policy, this bill before us today, gives them a degree of certainty and hope, if for no other reason, i would grab this bill with both hands. and as the bishop of leeds said, what about the division? by going for a no—deal brexit, what happens to the 16 million plus, like me, who without values feel completely disconnected
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from our country. do we heal the division there? no, we reinforce it. therefore, my lords, for no other reason than the ability to stand in the shoes of the others, and, yes, those people who voted leave and wa nt those people who voted leave and want a resolution, we have to work together and therefore i want to give the prime minister that you refer to, and others who prefer to, and trusted him, and some of our concerns as we do not believe what he says. other noble lords have referred to the reports that if this bill that we have before us today gives the prime minister, that most of you seem to have faith and belief m, of you seem to have faith and belief in, gives him the time to reach a deal, that brings parts of this country together that at the moment seem country together that at the moment seem forever divided, then we should give your prime minister this
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insurance policy of extra time. there are moments when one is reminded what a privilege it is to be in this place. this debate is one of them. i think of what the lord hasjust said, how lord patten ended with his warning on northern ireland, i think of what lord hayne said. ido ireland, i think of what lord hayne said. i do not attend to address any of the great themes they have touched on today. i do think it is a privilege to take part in a debate of such calibre. i didn't feel that about yesterday, for some reason. i wanted to address two things. one is a constitutional theme and one is a negotiating theme. one is about our domestic affairs and one is about out domestic affairs and one is about
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our relationship with the 27. and both arise directly from the times of the bill that we are debating. —— terms of the bill. lord patten courting my hero, kenneth clarke, yesterday in the house of commons, referred to an element of disingenuousness in the prime ministerial position. i found it very shocking that the document revealed in the court case in edinburgh show that the prorogation plan and time was decided in the middle, and for another two weeks, the numberten middle, and for another two weeks, the number ten spokesman denied there was or could be any such plan. i find it very shocking that the
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prime minister, when the plan became clearer, when the proclamation issued, the prime minister maintained that his motives had nothing to do with brexit. now, nobody in the country believed that. but to me, it was still shocking to see in these documents, in the case in edinburgh, that it was precisely about brexit, that it was knowingly and deliberately about brexit. ken clarke, disingenuous. we have here an issue of trust. the number ten spokesman said this morning that if the bill that we are debating now became an act, the government, prime
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minister, would not abide by it. i would assume he must book, but we re call would assume he must book, but we recall mr gove last sunday discussing with andrew marr and refusing to say that the government would implement the law of the land, they would wait and see what it said. —— he misspoke. not sending the bill for royal assent. this is not exactly the good theory of government. i find not exactly the good theory of government. ifind it not exactly the good theory of government. i find it difficult to deal with this issue of trust. i spent a long time in the public service and one did not see 1's
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political masters being disingenuous or telling lies. the house of lords they are, as the lords debate the second reading of the eu withdrawal bill. let's get more of the latest in westminster. thank you very much. let's talk to the labour mp. george johnson, what was your reaction when you heard he was quitting? —— george johnson. ——jojohnson. the final blow today with his own brother, saying he is trashing the national interest antique at the pa rt national interest antique at the part of it. i think christmas is going to be a prickly affair at the johnson is this year. why is labour running away from a general election? we do not trust boris
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johnson, we know he will do everything to save his party by annihilation from the brexit party by crashing us out without a deal from the european union. we will not allow that happen. we saw opposition parties working together to stop that, to force the prime minister to go back and get a deal or an extension. took me through the timing of this. there is another vote on monday. you see labour party will not be voting for that? it is not enough for the bill to just have royal assent, we have to wait for the parliament comeback in october, so we the parliament comeback in october, so we don't get any more shenanigans from the prime minister, and we see a deal or extension. only then can labour party possibly think about a general election. we are not going to put the future of manufacturing jobs, our nhs at stake for the chance to beat this prime minister. what is the suspicion of what boris johnson would do after monday, before he goes to brussels? he says he wants a deal. if he does come off
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he wants a deal. if he does come off he goes. he has one month to get one. he says both things, doesn't he? a great deal, or, well, no deal will not be a problem. if he thinks it is not a problem, why does he think it's his best negotiating card? if think it's his best negotiating card ? if it's think it's his best negotiating card? if it's going to be so bad across the capitals of the european union, why would not be so bad across the cities this yet a kingdom? what he is learning this week is that it is very different talking to the nation, compared to talking to the nation, compared to talking to the nation, compared to talking to a compliant conservative party. what if he comes back from brussels empty—handed says i cannot get what i want to come over to you? if he comes back without a deal, thenit if he comes back without a deal, then it is his problem and he has decided. he has to seek that extension. we cannot have the country crashing out without a deal. if there is a two—week period where borisjohnson says, i give up. if there is a two—week period where boris johnson says, i give up. yes, he can resign and the labour party
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will have the chance to form a government. i think that that would bea government. i think that that would be a sensible approach. we would then have to make sure that we don't crash out without a deal and plan what the future election, a referendum. personally, iwould like to see a referendum on brexit to kiss this issue to bed once and for all. we would have to take over the reins. -- put the issue to bed. that suggests it is not unity within your own party, some of you want different things from one another. no, iam different things from one another. no, i am very clear. you labour mps are united and leadership is united, we will not see borisjohnson take our country over a cliff on the 31st of october. we do not trust him, we wa nt to of october. we do not trust him, we want to see the bill's provisions enacted and keir starmer it was very clear when he spoke to labour mps yesterday. you are not running scared because you do not believe you are going to win this?m scared because you do not believe you are going to win this? if this week was the start of the election campaign from the prime minister,
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desperate spending review, finding money out of nowhere, again acting in the tory party interest to try and make some spending pledges,.... lot of people watching this as saying the country, outside london, outside the bubble here, the country is terrified of what is going on. yes, terrified of a no—deal brexit. terrified because we do not know what is going on. here are all these politicians once again talking about their parties and it is a game of party politics. we are way beyond this, aren't we? you asked me what my party approach was. the labour party will pit the national interest ahead of party political interest. and so have all the other opposition parties, but that forehead this week. people are writing to me from a weak terrified of no—deal brexit, from insulin supplies, we know the nhs are ordering extra body bags. we
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cannot, as the fifth richest country in the world, stole our economy to protect boris johnson from the brexit party. that is not a good enough reason to crash the economy. thank you very much for coming to see me. first our headlines... borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister and conservative mp, saying he's "torn between family and the national interest". the prime will address the public later this afternoon, as it's announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. but labour have suggested they might not support an election until they're certain a further brexit delay has been secured. here's your business headlines on afternoon live.
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the cbi says the vote by mps to try to stop a no deal brexit is a " small chink of light". but the business lobby group is warning that uncertainty could still continue to hold back investment. it says a trade deal with the eu is crucial to safeguard jobs. meanwhile the manufacturing lobby group make uk says firms are less prepared today for no deal brexit than they were in march. it's also warning that uncertainty is holding back demand. increasing the cost of sugary snacks could be a better way of tackling obesity than taxing sugary drinks to a new study. the british medicaljournal says snacks like biscuits, cakes and chocolate make up more of our sugar intake than drinks. more trouble for boeing's efforts to get its 737 max plane back in the air. europe's safety watchdog says it won't accept any decision by the american watchdog on whether its safe to fly again — but will run its own tests instead.
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the jet has been grounded since march after two crashes which killed nearly 350 people. samira hussainjoins us now from new york. what impact it is likely to have on the company? this is really a major blow to the company. they are working to try and get the planes back up in the air. they were working closely with the federal aviation authority here in the us, the american aviation authority. i'm sorry about that. to try and get these planes approved if fly again. we are seeing the europeans are not going to take the expertise, that really sets back the likelihood of these planes going back up in the area by the end of the year, as the company had intended. why is europe
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doing this? it sounds like they don't trust the ffa? global regulators would take the advice of other regulators for a long time, especially when it came to the americans. they wear the gold standard in terms of airline safety but their reputation in the wake of the boeing 737 tobacco. it was shown how closely the ffa were working with boeing and how many of the checks they passed on to boeing. in light of that, and the light of the fa ct light of that, and the light of the fact the europeans had made some pretty strict demands in terms of what they would want to see in order to ta ke what they would want to see in order to take the verdict on the plains, those demands were not met and that is why they are saying, we are going to do our own safety checks. ok,
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thank you very much indeed. as the wrangling over brexit continues — there are fears the country could be slipping into recession — for the first time since the financial crisis. the biggest, most valuable part of the economy is the services sector. that lost momentum last month. and the economy contracted between april and june. yael selfin is chief economist at kpmg. imean, i mean, essentially fiscal policy is really the only game in town now. we have had the government of the bank of england yesterday seeing the interest rates are likely to be cut after a no deal and recession, and it is only the government and extra spending that i they are to help the economy in an event of a recession
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cushioning a little bit the blow, as well as triggering better growth, higher productivity and slightly more equal distribution of gross outcomes across the uk. this is really a lot to do stale, as far as the chancellor is concerned. that's all the business news. i will hand you back to simon in westminster. we are live from westminster, where there is a lot going on. there are things going on elsewhere in the world. the united nations says 72,000 people in the bahamas are in immediate need of food, shelter and medical aid — in the wake of the devastation caused by hurricane dorian. 20 people are known to have been killed, but that figure is expected to rise. in the us, north and south carolina are being lashed by 100 mile an hour winds and by torrential rain, as the strengthening storm nears the coast. the national hurricane centre has issued warnings of life—threatening rises in sea levels.
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richard galpin has the latest. the relief effort is ramping up, this is the united states coast guard, coming into the worst affected area, the islands which bore the brunt of hurricane dorian. the devastation he continues for mile after mile. homes, shops, a hospital, and the port, all damaged or destroyed. many who were injured in the winds of 200 mph and the rapid storm surges are being flown to the capital nassau for treatment. this is what the hurricane did to the home of ramon. with his mother had had to run from their car into the house when the storm hit. he also saw his neighbor's house lifted up by the winds. my island is finished. everything is gone. no banks, no stores, no nothing. it'll take at least four to five
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years to complete only myjob. i don't know how long it takes for the rest of the island but nothing is here. nothing at all. everything is gone. just bodies. a british ship is also helping with the relief effort getting urgently needed supplies including shelter and hygiene kits to the tens of thousands of people on the islands who now have nothing. the needs are great, from clean water to medicines and generators. but while the situation here is dire, there's better news about the neighboring island of grand bahama and its main city freeport which also lay on the hurricane's path. as we moved into the freeport area, i can report that the flooding had receded and most homes in grand bahama appeared to have received minor damage. freeport, infrastructurally, had done well. for those caught up
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in this disaster. one of the most traumatic parts has been losing contact with family members and friends. these are the lucky ones — reunited. but there are many people who are missing. and meanwhile, people on the east coast of the united states are bracing themselves as hurricane dorian moves into the area. there are warnings of hurricane—conditions later today and life—threatening storm surges. the us state department has confirmed it offered millions of dollars in cash to the captain of an iranian oil tanker — if he steered the vessel to a port where it could be seized. the adrian darya one has changed course more than once since it was released by the authorities in gibraltar last month. american officials are concerned it
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could offload its cargo in syria. the existence of the loch ness monster is one of scotland's oldest myths. now scientists say the creatures behind repeated sightings could be giant eels. researchers from new zealand have tried to catalogue all living species in the loch by extracting dna from water samples. our correspondent iain macinnes is on the shores of loch ness for us. what exactly it lies beneath the murky waters of loch ness? from here to the tale... the sightings of the loch ness monster stretch back hundreds of years, but no definitive explanation has been found. a team of scientists have been testing water samples and collecting environmental dna from all forms of
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life in loch ness, including plants, insects, fish and mammals. you take a litre or two of water and you filter it out. any stuff that is filtered out will be dna. using that dna, you can sequence it and on the basis of the sequence, identify the types of organisms that are present in the water. this morning, the world's media gathered at the lochside to hear what they have found. this idea of a giant reptile, we do not think that is very possible based on the samples and the analysis we have undertaken. we are looking for another idea, a giant eel. we do not know if the eels are giant or not, we have found a lot of real dna, more than i have expected. —— eels. a lot of real dna, more than i have expected. -- eels. eels in loch ness? expected. -- eels. eels in loch mess? a —year—old boy could tell you that. to say we have found evidence
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of eels is like saying we have found evidence of fish in a scottish lock, well done. more than 2096 of the dna found was unidentified, meaning the search for the loch ness monster goes on. you think i am cynical. it is like hearing you have fish in loch ness, i am with him. staying with slippery creatures, here is nick. it takes one to know one. i hope you are enjoying it is not too windy out there. we have seen one or two showers windy out there. we have seen one or two s howe i’s a cross windy out there. we have seen one or two showers across scotland and england. it is a story of lot a cloud around, some rain. some coming back to north—west scotland. this is our next weather system. it hits
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northern england and north wales. south of that, staying dry in england. apart from the south—east and countryside, down to seven celsius. northern scotland, clearing two spells and showers. tomorrow, rain further south across england and wales. drier spells. rain further south across england and wales. drierspells. behind that, some sunshine again. showers, especially in scotland. heavy as to the north and west. a blustery, breezy and not particularly warm day. not a particularly warm weekend. quite chilly on saturday night. a lot of dry weather this weekend. one or two showers around.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3. borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister and conservative mp, saying he's "torn between family and the national interest". it's been an honour to be mp for orpington and a minister under three governments, but it's time to move on. and i've got to get to work! the prime minister will address the public later this afternoon, as it's announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. but labour have suggested they might not support an election until they're certain a further brexit delay has been secured. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with ben croucher. steve smith still at the crease, while he is still going england's chances of winning the ashes
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diminish. smith unbeaten on 143. australia past 300. maybe at 3.30 we will have news of his wicket, maybe not. and nick miller has the weather. we have another weather system heading into tomorrow, taking more rain southwards as it does so, but once that is out of way it is high pressure building into the weekend and things settle down briefly. i have your forecast coming up. i have your forecast coming up. thanks nick, also coming up on afternoon live. away from the drama of westminster we'll be finding out what young people make of it all. hello everyone, this is afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. good afternoon, you're watching afternoon live from westminster. the tensions at the heart of government have been laid bare after borisjohnson's brother, jo, quit the government — and announced he's stepping down as a conservative mp.
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he says he's been torn between ‘family loyalty and the national interest‘. his resignation comes as borisjohnson prepares to make a direct appeal to the public arguing for an early general election, in a speech in west yorkshire later this afternoon. mps are to have another vote on whether there should be an early election on monday, after the prime minister failed in his attempt to get parliament to agree to a snap poll yesterday. meanwhile, peers have begun debating a bill to stop a no—deal brexit, which is due to pass through the house of lords tomorrow. our political correspondent chris mason reports. point at the man who is prime minister and you completely disagree with on brexit. this is jo johnson with his brother, boris. he is also an mp but not for much longer. take a look at this tweet, he‘s packing it in because he says he is torn between family loyalty and the national interest. ouch.
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i don‘t have any further comment to make. it has been an honour, it is time to move on and i have to get to work. i knowjo and this will have been a difficult decision for him but done without malice. he did say he was putting national interest ahead of family loyalty so that means he believes his own brother, the prime minister, is not acting in the best interests for this country. every mp will have their own individual view. the collective view of our party is clear, we want to leave the european union with or without a deal by the end of october. the big row now is when a general election happens. as soon as possible says the government, but some within labour are tempted to put it off. give me a date, is it in october or november? my view, later rather than sooner. so after the date of the 31st of october?
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possibly. why the disagreement over timings? some want to make the prime minister sweat and have to ask brussels for a delay to brexit, the very thing he has said he will not do. others within labour say let‘s get on with it. once the plan to block a no—deal brexit is the law of the land. meanwhile the government says it will try again to push for a general election. everywhere you look at westminster, something is moving today. the other day the lib dems recruited a former conservative mp, now former labour mp luciana berger has signed up. we find ourselves at a moment of national emergency and i don‘t use those words lightly but you see what‘s going on around us, and we need to do everything possible to make sure the country when the election might come has a proper choice, and something to vote for rather than choosing between terrible options ofjohnson versus corbyn.
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with an election in the offing, look who else is surveying the political landscape. nigel farage is offering a deal with boris johnson if the conservatives commit to a no—deal brexit but whatever happens, he says, bring it on. a prime minister who cannot come and support in parliament, he is calling for a general election and unbelievably the labour party want to stop brexit and want to stop us having a vote. what‘s going on in parliament right now, people are disgusted by. westminster might look serene today but it feels very different. nobody knows exactly what on earth is going to happen next. chris mason, bbc news. i‘m joined now by former conservative mp and father of the house, ken clarke. hello. good afternoon. we picked you
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up hello. good afternoon. we picked you up from downing street. is there anything you want to tell me? no, the the car driver didn‘t know london very well, so he was sitting in parliament street opposite downing street when my office discovered him on the telephone. he collected me from my office so there is no hidden symbolism at all, it is the latest zany event in a mad week in westminster. what is mad, i wonder if you have any sympathy for borisjohnson, given wonder if you have any sympathy for boris johnson, given he wonder if you have any sympathy for borisjohnson, given he has got rid of you. any sympathy his brother has turned his back on him?” of you. any sympathy his brother has turned his back on him? i feelvery sorry for both of them and particularlyjo, because they are a close family. i do know father and both brothers pretty well, very well. jo he is notjust an mp, he is a good minister, he is in boris‘s government. but he is obviously been torn. for me, you know, someone who is not standing again, it is a straightforward political decision, what is in the national interest, am i prepared to override it for a silly reason, that downing street
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want? for him, it must have been agonising, and i have every sympathy forjo whos has put his conscience, national interest first, and, there are national interest first, and, there a re lots of national interest first, and, there are lots of conservative mps like him, a lot of minister, several in the present cabinet who are com pletely the present cabinet who are completely torn, because if he had ale lowed o free vote, most of the conservative party would have voted with the 21 who were thrown out, just as most of the conservative party including boris at one stage voted for theresa may‘s deal, to leave with a soft brexit. you talk about the 21 thrown out, you were one of the more high profile of those, are you angry? well, i am a bit like michael hessle on the a, bemused to find that we really are establishment conservatives, so to suddenly have the whip withdrawn is a novelty. i am not sure, i think i am probably still a member of the party. everybody is very friendly, nothing
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has changed. i have friendly conversation with hard line brexiteer, we all mingle, so it is a confusing situation, but at the heart of it, unfortunately, there is an element in the people around boris, who are doing what, the left—wing and momentum were trying to do to the labour party, they are trying to purge the party of its moderate one nation element, which is actually been the backbone of the conservative party for my 60 years of membership. here we are, boris johnson, he has had three orfour daysin johnson, he has had three orfour days in the commons, lost every vote he has faced. how would you assess how he is doing? well, he, prime ministers have a difficult start but this puts the rest completely into the shade. hejust this puts the rest completely into the shade. he just is going to have to get, give us some leadership, to calm down firstly, and realise that the government of a country like
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britain, a developed country in a dangerous complicated world in the zist dangerous complicated world in the 21st century, where all countries are interdependent on each other, got to get down to taking solid decisions, it is all been run, i don‘t know, by who, for tactical reasons at the moment, you have to govern the country, and for example, the northern ireland secretary, julian smith, had to reveal to the house of commons this morning that he wasn‘t consulted on prorogation at all, despite the fact he is in the cabinet and he doesn‘t know exactly how northern ireland will have a government after we prorogue. there is no devolved government, no local politicians in power. he is a minister if it is prorogues for election loses his authorities as a minister and i don‘t think we will have leaderless rudderless civil serva nts have leaderless rudderless civil servants looking after the shop until some government comes back, thatis until some government comes back, that is probably enough detail, people are more interested in the
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personalities, but this is all chaotic, just treating it all as a game and trying to tee up to make the conservative party look like the brexit party for some snap election, rushing to get what might be a lucky bigger majority, for boris to do whatever he eventually decides he wa nts to whatever he eventually decides he wants to do. your manner suggests you are not pro the idea of a general election but it is only option now isn‘t it. ? general election but it is only option now isn't it. ? it is fairly inevitable but we must settles the basics first, it would be absurd given we have caused chaos, vacuum, real practical crises, places like northern ireland, for parliament to give up and walk away, we have put together a majority, in the house of commons, on a cross—party basis. most conservative mps have a great deal of sympathy with that cross— party deal of sympathy with that cross—party unity. it is only green on “— cross—party unity. it is only green on —— agreed on one thing, we won‘t
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letjeremy implement a labour party ma nifesto. letjeremy implement a labour party manifesto. would he be leader, are you suggesting he would be the leadser of that group?” you suggesting he would be the leadser of that group? i don't think it matters that much. the one thing that has to be clear is that the government, the the, would have to be formed if boris, boris‘s authority collapses or he resigns or something, but then solely for the purpose of getting an extension, settling, if we can, a brexit on sensible terms, it it is only a withdrawal agreement. the real negotiations have to start when we are past this. that is true even if we left with no—deal, so—called. but just get brexit settled and over with, i think in elections is necessary because the conservative party is now in such a fragmented state, it will be a long time before you know, we see a settled government, only an election can sort it out. you know what my next question is going to be if, if it is
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notjeremy corbyn leading that group, many people, many watching you right now thinking it should be you. how very kind. to say it is, what you are talking about, is a figurehead of a government that has one task only, which is to take us through the first stages of brexit. brexit. so until we have a withdrawal agreement we are in a transition period, then a new government will have to get down to negotiations, and the present government has no other policies and —— policies and it wouldn‘t be allowed to do any other policy, there is harriet harman, yvette cooper. if you were asked would you do it, yes or no, it haven‘t got much,s time, sorry. if! do it, yes or no, it haven‘t got much,s time, sorry. if i was asked ina much,s time, sorry. if i was asked in a sensible way by people who could explain why it was me and my duty to do so, i would do it, but this is really, just an entertaining little foot note, the key thing is to get bah back to the grown up
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government of the country, leave the european union, sadly, i think it is the only compromise on sensible terms, then get a real government with a proper imagine they can start taking up all the other policies it has to and complete the negotiations with the other members of the european union, which, whoever wins this temporary struggle, haven‘t even started yet and will take a year or two once we get past the brexit moment. thank you. good to talk to you. good to talk to you. let‘s get some more reaction to events of the past 24 hours. i‘m joined now by the co—leader of the green party, sian berry. hello. where, how would you describe boris johnson‘s position? hello. where, how would you describe boris johnson's position? it is very weak. it is astonishing to see what is going on within the conservative party, so many mps out there doing thejob party, so many mps out there doing the job they party, so many mps out there doing thejob they are party, so many mps out there doing the job they are elected to do, representing the national interest and for his own brother to be doing that now, it shows how seriously he has misjudged what mps will vote for, he has misjudged the damage
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they are prepared do to the country, they are prepared do to the country, they are prepared do to the country, they are trying to make sure we don‘t have a crash out brexit yet he is employing undemocratic means to do itand is employing undemocratic means to do it and it is alienating everybody in his party and disregarding what the majority of parliament wants to do which is sign the deal, let us guarantee we don‘t crash out on 31st october and then we can get on with having a general election as everybody is... look, the conservative party is saying there will be another vote on monday as to whether there will be a general election, so on that basis you would vote for it? we have to make sure before parliament is disso —— dissolved we have guaranteed we cannot crash out the eu, without a deal. is that... after that. that is a good yes question. my preference rob after the letter has been sent to the eu, requesting it. after the formal letter the bill requests, because that, we cannot trust this prime minister. even after royal assent, i think we cannot trust him to do what it says. this is how bad
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things have got. this is how much he has been ignoring. you are saying that letter needs to have been sent. labour was saying, it is only after borisjohnson labour was saying, it is only after boris johnson returns from the labour was saying, it is only after borisjohnson returns from the eu summit. if you are all talking to one another, when will the message become one? i think, one another, when will the message become one? ithink, ithink one another, when will the message become one? i think, i think one would hope that this, the bill would be complied for, with as soon as it was passed. but if it isn‘t we can‘t go ahead and ok a general election if it looks like the prime minister is not go following low what the bill suggests. i don‘t trust him. i wa nt to bill suggests. i don‘t trust him. i want to see the thing done and dusts before we do anything like risk a general election, risk the prime minister putting off a general election till after 31st which is what we are concerned about. we want to see a general election but we have to ensure against a crash out brexit before then, it would do so much damage in the country, it seems like the mps here in parliament, so insulated from the effects of brexit
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are not insulated from the effects of brexit a re not really insulated from the effects of brexit are not really getting what the consequences would be. a no-deal brexit or... we are getting warnings from doctor, the police, the people who run supermarkets who supply our food. we have heard... they are worrying people on the ground. we have heard the warnings before, there is a lot of talk of project fear still under way. if boris johnson gets to the point where he has nowhere to go, where he has to say look, i can‘t do this, i resign, would you, as the group that are opposed to him, would you allow jeremy corbyn to be the leader of that group, if there was another parliament? if the prime minister resigns, that probably has the same consequence as a vote of no consequence as a vote of no confidence we would need to put together a temporary government. we have to stick to the conventionings, the leader of the opposition has the first refusal at trying to put together a coalition. we have asked
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caroline lucas, we have said we will look for someone else and he would be willing to serve under ken clarke or harriet harman. is that something that has been discussed. it has been suggested in parliament a number of time, suggested by lots of people. we would support anything that works to bring together the mps who are working in such a good way, cross— party working in such a good way, cross—party at the moment, in opposition, to create the government that would do that importantjob of preventing crash out brexit. what is it that you are most afraid of boris johnson doing, if he comes to the house has he says he will on monday and says we are going to have a general election, what are you afraid of? i am not afraid of having afraid of? i am not afraid of having a general election but i am afraid of no—deal brexit. it is not a game, i have been sitting in the london assembly, we have had a brexit debate there today. and we have seen some the proponents of brexit describing things as your cards, you know what i mean? it is like this is a game. you know, borisjohnson has
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been using language like that, like this is some sort of game we are playing with the eu. we are not, people‘s lives are at stake. people‘s medicines are potentially not going to get through. this is not going to get through. this is not project fear, this is the advice we are getting from doctor, from these people who control our supply chain, they know how difficult it will be. this is a risks we cannot take. yet, the more the prime minister keeps saying he will run that risk, with our country, with our lives, the more minister, the more mps are haemorrhaging out the party, i think he is starting to realise that he cannot get away with this, he will have to do what parliament asks him to do and that is thejob of parliament asks him to do and that is the job of prime minister. good to talk to you. thank you. goodbye. the
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it is getting huge traction on twitter, the resignation ofjo johnson. the prime minister would like to thankjo johnson, johnson. the prime minister would like to thankjojohnson, he has been a brilliant minister and mp and downing street goes on the prime minister as with, as both a politician and brother understands this will not have been an easy matter for this will not have been an easy matterforjo. the this will not have been an easy matter forjo. the constituents could not have asked for better representation. so, on the face of it, an acknowledgement there there is understand for whatjo johnson has done, but looking at the timing of it it is difficult to see it as anything other than a bitter blow to prime minister. get let us talk about this with vicki young. have i overstated it? the timing is very damaging. yes, there are different ways he could have done this, it is not a surprise he? a different place to his brother on brexit, we knew that. jojohnson to his brother on brexit, we knew that. jo johnson resigned under theresa may and from her government,
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because he couldn‘t even live with the prospect of her deal. he decided he wanted to go for a second referendum. it is surprising that he decided to take a job at all, with his brother as prime minister, given where they were. he didn‘t need do that, it wouldn‘t have been a surprise if he hadn‘t. but he has been wrestling with this, i mean he could have left it until next week when parliament prorogues, he could have not put out a tweet suggesting he thinks his brother is not acting in the national interest. it couldn‘t be more damaging, after what has happened for borisjohnson in the last 448—hour, losing the votes in the house of commons, not being able to get the election he wa nts, being able to get the election he wants, this is just, being able to get the election he wants, this isjust, you know, an added dimension which maybe might cut through with the public more than anything else, the idea as it will be painted by labour the prime minister‘s own brother thinks he is doing the wrong thing for the country is not helpful. yet labour, having said we want a general
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election almost every day are saying not quite yet. that is a problem for them, isn‘t it. not quite yet. that is a problem for them, isn't it. it is, although think they it is not that much of a problem, because the reason they say they are not doing it is because adon‘t trust the prime minister. so thatis adon‘t trust the prime minister. so that is the narrative they are putting forward. so you have the conservatives and borisjohnson as we heard, saying to labour, you are scared because you know you can‘t win, and on the other hand you have labour saying it is because we can‘t trust you because we think you might move the election date or might take us out on no—deal the end of october. we don‘t trust what you are doing, that is where we are. labour are not all on the same page with all of this, there are some close to jeremy corbyn who make the point that actually, you wouldn‘t even need this anti—no—deal bill, if labour win the election, so if labour win the election, so if labour are confident they can win, then why don‘t they have that election, none of that would matter, jeremy corbyn can come in and stop no—deal happening. the other point they make is the timing of the election is important for labour in
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the sense of when is the best time for them to win it. if you think about it, if you go into the election, it doesn‘t matter when it is and boris johnson election, it doesn‘t matter when it is and borisjohnson wins, then he can come back, change any law and do a no—deal at the end of november, or the end of december. ok. now, interesting just speaking to ken clarke, because there is is a scenario by which borisjohnson is no longer prime minister. he might have resigned, there might have been a vote of no confidence. there will bea a vote of no confidence. there will be a push to say tojeremy corbyn form a government. he can‘t, or he can, but not with him as leader. so, who then? i ken clarke said if it was a serious offer he would accept. what happens, this is under terms of a vote of no confidence. so we get to that point, if there is a vote of no confidence, put by labour or intriguingly by boris johnson himself, so if the prime minister loses a vote of no confidence, there
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is then 14 days for somebody else to prove that they have the numbers in the house of commons to do so. labour on their own, jeremy corbyn on his own doesn‘t. it would mean working with others and this has arisen because jo working with others and this has arisen becausejo swinson said before i couldn‘t backjeremy corbyn as prime minister. it would have to be somebody else such as i think she suggested harriet harman or ken clarke. so you have... someonejust said we have had a suggestion suggesting it could be both. that would be more confusing but they would be more confusing but they would have to get together. you have 14 days where borisjohnson stays as prime minister, he is within his right. we can‘t not have a prime minister, during the 14 days somebody else, the opposition parties have to decide can they get behind one person to make them prime minister? so it involves them all agreeing and getting together and that could be difficult given how disparate they are, although they all do agree on trying to stop a no—deal. 0k. no—deal. ok. don‘t go too far. things are
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happening by the hour. things are happening by the hour. the prime minister is urging other parties to back his plan for an early general election. but can he force them to? there are several different ways in which a general election could be held. let‘s look at the possibilities and when they might take place. the most simple would be for the government to hold a new vote — requiring the support of two—thirds of mps — under the fixed term parliament act next week, once the bill to delay brexit has been approved by both houses of parliament and received royal assent. alternatively, the government could introduce a simple bill — possiblyjust one—line long — to create a new law which would allow an election. or there could be a motion of no—confidence in the government. let‘s look at those options in some more detail. firstly another vote under the fixed term parliament act. this would allow the government to set the election date and we know they say they want it to be the 15th of october. but crucially it still requires two—thirds of mps to vote for it. and it‘s not clear the opposition parties will do so even after the no—deal bill becomes law. what about a new law to allow an election? this could be passed by a simple majority — but the bill could be amended by mps along the way.
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and one thing this might allow them to do is change the election date, pushing into a brexit extension period. then there‘s the no—confidence motion. one of the more bizarre ideas is that the government could table this in itself. but if it was successful it would be followed by a 14—day period during which another government could be formed. so what if there‘s no election at all? the government might chose to refuse to send the no—deal bill for royal assent. this would create howls of constitutional outrage and undoubtedly end up in the courts. there‘s a suggestion borisjohnson could use the uk‘s veto as a member of the eu to block any brexit extension agreed at the summit in october. or failing that there‘s the possibility the prime minister could just walk away and resign from thejob. let‘s get the thoughts of one of theresa may‘s former strategists, james johnson. no relation. hello. a lot of people
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watching you now know all the parties are getting together. all the various things that could happen. what is your assessment, what would his team be telling him they would think about how to get the election as soon as possible, as a lot of guests have said there is a risk of them going beyond 31st october because the brexit party will have a good case to make. at the moment that seems to be go for a vote on monday. they will be looking for back up plan, whether it is looking... so the lingle line bill. this is the idea you, that if you can‘t get two thirds of mps to back a vote, foran can‘t get two thirds of mps to back a vote, for an election through the fixed—term parliaments act, which is required through that legislation, then you can bring through a single line bill, to go into law, that basically says not withstanding the fixed—term parliaments act... basically says not withstanding the fixed-term parliaments act... that needs a majority? a simple majority but it is legislation so it needs to go through the lords and it needs,
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it is open to amendment. so it is not impossible bill, to go into law, that basically says not withstanding the fixed—term parliaments act... that needs a majority? a simple majority but it is legislation so it needs to go through the lords and it needs, it is open to amendment. so it is not impossible that remain mps could am & the date of the election, other requirements as well. talking to those, i have been, it seems unlikely that boris johnson will get that election call through on monday. it seems to be the case. i think there is one flip side to all of this, which i expect dominic cummings and others in number ten are thinking about, which is that the longer this goes on, the more they can point to mps in parliament trying to block brexit, trying to do silly game, infighting and division. that will be their hope that the more they can point to the people versus parliament line, the more they can get support whenever an election is. it is a gamble but that will be part of their back up plan. the opposition parties seem to be speaking with one voice, they say they don‘t trust boris johnson. speaking with one voice, they say they don't trust boris johnson. the one thing that the conservative party have in all of this is the fa ct party have in all of this is the fact that we do have lots of different opposition party, at the
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moment in the polls labour and the liberal democrats are on about the same amount, that is a real problem for trying to deprive borisjohnson of his majority. because as you saw in 2017 it was that strong labour vote that stopped the conservative party‘s getting that majority, so i imagine while that labour and liberal democrat vote is split and both leaders are vocal, the conservatives will be thinking there might be something in this. really, given they have got rid of 21 of some of their most loyal member, they have a minority that nobody would envy, they are in a weaker position than they were 48—hours ago am it doesn't seem to have gone to plan. i don‘t think they, i think they anticipated that jeremy plan. i don‘t think they, i think they anticipated thatjeremy corbyn would have backed an election in 2017 when theresa may went gone for an election, but it turned out that labourdid an election, but it turned out that labour did back it. i expect they we re labour did back it. i expect they were hoping for the same there. but look, they are going, they know that there is going to be a general election in the next couple of months so that is certain, whether it is october or november. they will
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just have to take the cards they have been dealt and try their best to win. it won't be boris johnson as the tory leafeder if he has had to go brussels and say we need an extension, he has made it clear, and it puts him in an impossible position? it is possible. there are various, i think some the oions being talked about is whether boris johnson could reach out to hungry and get them to block no—deal and various other war games like that. that is a possibility, is it? you think we could be looking to get one other country to stop it? it is being discussed. i would be surprised if it worked out. james, thank you forjoining us. broken clouds, sunny spells, that sums it up for much of the uk summer sunshine coming down. rain coming down. there have been showers in
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northern england and scotland. still one or two out there. for many of us, afine one or two out there. for many of us, a fine end to the afternoon. it is blustery. more rain coming into north—west scotland to end the day. spreading into northern ireland overnight, to northern england and north wales. northern scotland turning clearer again. further showers in the night. quite chilly in northern english countryside. six or seven celsius to start the day tomorrow. outbreaks of rain pushed southwards tomorrow. when the rain has pushed away, sunny spells. showers, mind you, in northern and west of scotland, some heavy and blustery. a cool day. not much warmer at the weekend. with high—pressure moving in, it is going to be mainly dry.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister and conservative mp, saying he‘s "torn between family and the national interest". it‘s been an honour to be mp for orpington and a minister under three governments, but it‘s time to move on. and i‘ve got to get to work! the prime will address the public later today, as it‘s announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. but labour have suggested they might not support an election until they‘re certain a further brexit delay has been secured. and coming up — the story of how police brought down the biggest slavery network that‘s ever been caught in the uk.
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sport now on afternoon live with ben croucher. he has all the sport. he is going to start with the cricket and he is going to tell us in australia have added more to that total. they have, u nfortu nately for added more to that total. they have, unfortunately for england fans. steve smith is still batting. and whilst that‘s happening — australia look more and more likely to retain the ashes. they‘ve had a couple of chances today. jofra archer dropped him on 65. ben stokes caught him on 118 only forjack leach to have bowled a no ball. all this means australia are firmly ahead in this one. resuming on 170 for 3 this morning, it‘s his 3rd century in 4 innings in this series alone. only don bradman has scored more tons against england than him.
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he averages more than 150 in his last eight innings against england dating back to the last ashes series down under. here is what his contemporaries see... and the all—time leading run scorer says... mps will hear evidence from those involved with bury football club and the decision to expel them from the football league. a failed takeover of the league one club meant they were kicked out of the league last week. the digital, culture, media and sport committee will hold hearings in the next few weeks
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to take evidence relating to the crisis at bury, and the role of the english football league and the fa in safeguarding the long—term interests of clubs. the committee says it will also inquire into what needs to be done to strengthen football governance rules in this regard. the premier league has it‘s largest number of nominations for fifa‘s team of the year for the first time in a decade. 21 of the 55 nominees play their club football in england, with seven of them coming from liverpool — full backs andy robertson and trent alexander arnold amongst them. the nominees were selected by more than 23,000 professional players around the world, and the team will be revealed later this month. from manchester to new york then where rafa nadal says his appearance in the us open semi—final means everything to him. it‘s his ninth time in the last four at flushing meadows and comes after he saw off argentina‘s diego schwartzman in straight sets. with novak djokovic and roger federer already out, he‘s favourite to take a 19th grand slam title.
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he must overcome 24th seed matteo berrettini tomorrow though. it‘s the women‘s semi finals tonight. canadian teenager bianca andreescu will play belinda bencic. andreescu is only playing in the tournament for the first time and said she needed somebody to pinch her after she beat elise mertens. the other semi sees serena williams play johanna konta‘s conqueror elina svitolina. jamie murray is in men‘s doubles semi final action with neil sku pski today. they‘re up against the top seeds in robert farrah and juan sebastian cabal. murray is through to the mixed doubles final though with bethany matteck sands. that takes place on saturday. rhys patchell will start for wales, in theirfinalwarm up match before the rugby world cup. they play ireland on saturday. the scarletts man will start at fly half in dublin, with tomos williams his partner at half—back. captain and lock alun wynjones is among those who return with no uncapped players in the welsh matchday squad their opening game for the world cup injapan, on the 23rd september —
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they play georgia. that is all your support for now. more in the next hour. thank you for that. a bit of breaking news, boris johnson and the israeli prime minister have issued a statement that... that is coming from downing street. any court, both prime ministers agreed on a need to prevent iran getting the nuclear weapon. the prime minister stressed the need for dialogue and a diplomatic solution. that is the latest from downing street. —— in a quote.
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thousands of people across britain are being forced into human slavery by ruthless gangs. tonight panorama follows west midlands police as it carries out the biggest ever investigation and prosecution of a modern slavery case in the uk. it‘s the story of a polish gang which held hundreds of people captive, set them to work, stole their wages, made them eat from skips, wash in canals and threatened to kill them if they tried to escape. tonight‘s panorama features first—hand testimony from the victims of the slave gang. happy? 0k. and can we have a clap, please? tell me why you decided to tell your story here in this interview. translation: people need to know that in the 21st—century people can be used for money, treated like animals. that story needs to be told.
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joining us now is detective chief inspector nick dale from west midlands police — he was in charge of the investigation. perhaps we should explain, it was a three—year investigation. how did you first become aware of this gang‘s actions? you first become aware of this gang's actions? good afternoon. the investigation started in 2015. we received a number of reports that victims had been brought in from poland and trafficked into the uk, put to work and not given access to their bank accounts that their wages we re their bank accounts that their wages were being put into. we were supported in identifying those victims by a charity, hope for justice, that were able to help us gain the trust of the victims to come forward to the police. and picture that emerged was, well, it was horrendous and the most horrific example of humiliation you will ever come across. that is correct. i didn‘t appreciate and a lot of
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people won‘t appreciate the profound effect this has had on the victims until the cb testimony from the victims themselves. these traffickers took not only the livelihoods, but the dignity from the victims, and they made them work for weeks, and sometimes for months on end, made them live in very poor conditions, sometimes used violence against them. they really took away the dignity of these individuals.” remember when we broke the story about the convictions for this, i think the gang were described as well—organised. i don‘t know what that means. in real terms, what does that means. in real terms, what does that mean? this was a very sophisticated, well—organised family business. they have a network of people in poland who are able to victims from a large area in poland, able to control their activities, their bank accounts, able to keep ta bs their bank accounts, able to keep tabs on them and enforce on them if the victims stepped out of line,
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they are able to monitor their victims and it is all for the greed of that family based business, which we think has made probably at least £2 million out of this enterprise. and that is by literally ticking all the money they earned and feeding them rubbish? certainly ticking most of the money they earned. on the face of this, this would have looked in the legitimate. these people were loftily in the country, they were able to work, they had a national insurance numbers and bank accounts. the traffickers controlled the bank accou nts the traffickers controlled the bank accounts and controlled where the victims lived. the essentially isolated them from any support they could have in order to maximise the income that they could get out of their victims. like i said, income that they could get out of theirvictims. like i said, if income that they could get out of their victims. like i said, if they stepped out of line, they would use threats of violence are used violence against them at the victims that were very real and they thaw their lives were endangered.” that were very real and they thaw their lives were endangered. i where they lured here in the first place? are we talking about people who were
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already vulnerable in poland? somewhere recently released from prison, somewhere unemployed, some had medical bills for serious conditions to pay for family members. they were promised this better life where they could and what is a lot of money back in poland, if they were earning up to £300 per week, that is a lot of money for somebody in poland to turn their life around, they were promised that life. they were not given it a lot of time to make a decision. within 24 hours, they would have been on a coach or plane to come into england and start in life that vary quickly would spiral down to a life of misery that you will see from the victims. you are in charge of the investigation. what was the moment during the three yea rs was the moment during the three years that if you walked into an interview room, where you suddenly realise the scale of what you are dealing with? it sort of crept up on us. dealing with? it sort of crept up on us. we started off with 22 crime
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reports. like i say, with the support of the local charity hope forjustice, we were able to build that up quite a lot. because they we re that up quite a lot. because they were able to help the victims trust west midlands police, a lot of victims came forward. in a short space of time, there were 60 victims andi space of time, there were 60 victims and i realised this was a major investigation and we had created a lot of material, bank material, evidence, ford materialfrom the suspects. it became really large and complex investigation. when you saw them going down on conviction, how did you feel? it was very satisfying. so far, we have convicted eight of the gang for a total of 55.5 years. to see that conviction and to see on the faces of the victims they feel their voices have been heard, they have got justice voices have been heard, they have gotjustice and they feel they can move on from that, is probably the most satisfying thing i have seen so far in my career. it is good of you
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to talk about it. great to talk to you this afternoon. thank you for your time this afternoon. thank you. and you can hear more about this case, as well as some gripping first—hand testimony, on panorama — the hunt for britain‘s slave gangs, tonight, on bbc one at 9 o‘clock — and at eleven thirty five on bbc one in scotland. the brexit delay bill is currently being debated in the house of lords where former tory leader michael howward has branded it ‘illegitimate‘. there‘s a suggestion the government may simply ignore the bill once it passes through parliament, something lord howard says would be fair as it is in breach of the conventions of the nation‘s unwritten constitution... our unwritten constitution is based on the separation of powers. in particular, the separation of powers between the executive and the legislature. it is the role of the executive to govern, it is the role of the legislature to hold the
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executive to account, to hold to account, but not itself to govern. this bill represents an attempt by the legislature to assume the mantle of government. that is why it is wrong and that is why it is illegitimate. that is why it constitutes a fundamental breach of the good theory of government. that is why it is in breach of the conventions of our unwritten constitution. respondiong directly to those comments by lord howard was lord kerr, a crossbencher. he said it was ‘ridiculous‘ that it was even being discussed that the brexit delay bill may not be given royal ascent. a bill is a bill. if a bill has been passed by the house of commons and comes to us here, it is legitimate, it is the voice of the house of commons. if we approve that bill,
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thatis commons. if we approve that bill, that is parliament. the two houses of parliament. it does not matter who drafted it originally, it is legitimate. it would be wholly legitimate. it would be wholly legitimate for the government to decide to do what mr cummings hinted he would do, is to sit on it, not send it to the palace. —— illegitimate. what the spokesman said this morning what he would do, is ignore it. i think that is a major constitutional issue. and when the government replied to this debate, i hope he will confirm that if this bill is tomorrow passed by this house, it will be sent forward for royal assent and once it has received royal assent, it will be acted on. these are ridiculous questions to have to ask in our parliamentary democracy, but such is theissue parliamentary democracy, but such is the issue of trust. a flavour of the
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debate going on in the house of lords. let‘s go back to where we are at the moment. labour mp wes streeting joins me. good to see you. monday, another vote put forward by the prime minister for a vote put forward by the prime ministerfor a general vote put forward by the prime minister for a general election. what are the labour party do? we are waiting to see the emotion and the terms that we do not want a general election if there is any risk of there being a no—deal brexit in the process. our position on that is clear. it is the principled position, the patriotic position. it is the only position we could adopt. whether by accident or design, we know that the biggest risk to our country is the united kingdom crashing out of the european union without a deal. if there‘s one thing we know about this government, boris johnson cannot be trusted, any promises he makes cannot be trusted. we already see in the house of lords, the government already plotting to unravel that bill before it has even passed through
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parliament. if there is a general election on october 15, and you are voted in, you can do what you want. well, firstly, it is all about the timing. after the general election, there was a significant period of delay. a queen‘s speech and all the trappings of the state opening of parliament and everything else that comes with the aftermath of a general election. the european union we re very general election. the european union were very clear, do not waste the time when you were given the extension. this is irresponsible. secondly, although we go into that general election with a clear position, united, ready to take on the tories and to get borisjohnson out, every general election is a gamble and we would effectively be rolling the dice with the country‘s future. it general election is inevitable, it is necessary given the state of the house of commons, but we want to put to bed completely the risk of there being a no—deal brexit in the process of a general election. reading between the lines, tell me if i am wrong, if you are
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convinced you were going to win a general election, you would be voting for it on monday. no, i do not think that is the case. i don‘t think anyone wants a general election within jeremy think anyone wants a general election withinjeremy corbyn. i have lost count the amount of time dotted that is the irony of he is doing anyone who is pro—minister wa nts to doing anyone who is pro—minister wants to be prime minister do it, putting the country and the interests first. the official government warnings, the warnings from every sector of industry, from every pa rt from every sector of industry, from every part of the public sectors of the risks of no deal, we are quite rightly stopping no—deal brexit over and above our own partisan interest, which is having a general election. all parties want a general election to have the opportunities to get the other lot out and take over. the only thing stopping that is putting the whole question of a no—deal brexit by accident to bed. once that happens in november or december, we would welcome a general election. we
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to put to bed the risk of a no—deal brexit to bat first. thank you very much forjoining us this afternoon. in february this year, the labour mp for liverpool wavertree, luciana berger, left the party to join the newly established independent group for change. she left the group after disappointing results in the european elections earlier this year. today, she‘s announced she‘s joining the liberal democrats. the bbc‘s political editor for the north west nina warhurst sent this report. luciana berger was one of seven mps who left their parties back in february to form a new independent group. at that time, she said that labour was institutionally racist, and that is why she couldn‘t remain a part of it. today here in wavertree, members of the constituency labour party have expressed their disappointment. the chair of the party says she should have held a by election months ago because now she only represents around 7% of the electorate here. if there were a general election, labour will not be worried here on merseyside. they won 80% of the vote in
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wavertree, and it‘s a similar story across the merseyside region. but if you look at parts of cumbria, lancashire, greater manchester, cheshire, so seats like barrow, bury north, blackpool south, crewe and nantwich, labour are quite vulnerable to the conservatives. these are areas where lots of people voted to leave and they don‘t feel that jeremy corbyn is particularly clear on his brexit stance. that said, the conservatives will be vulnerable themselves because of brexit in places like hazel grove, places like cheadle in stockport, where people voted remain and have been liberal democrat seats in the past. people there have expressed their wish to me for a second vote on leaving the european union. but the last general election threw up some real anomalies because of the brexit. for example, in southport a surge
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in support forjeremy corbyn cell voters there take the seat away from the liberal democrats and give it to the conservatives. if there is a general election over the coming weeks and months, i‘m sure in the north—west there will be a few surprises. in a moment egon cossou will update us with all the business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live. borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister and conservative mp, saying he‘s "torn between family and the national interest". the prime will address the public later this afternoon, as it‘s announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. labour have suggested they might not support an election here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. facebook says about 200 million phone numbers of its users have been exposed online. they were left on an online database and include the phone numbers of 18 million people in the uk. the company says it‘s investigating. the cbi says the vote by mps
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to try to stop a no deal brexit is a "small chink of light". but the business lobby group is warning that uncertainty could still continue to hold back investment. it says a trade deal with the eu is crucial to safeguard jobs. increasing the cost of sugary snacks could be a better way of tackling obesity than taxing sugary drinks according to a new study. the british medicaljournal says snacks like biscuits, cakes and chocolate make up more of our sugar intake than drinks. household debt is hitting record levels according to the tuc. it says that average non—mortgage household debt rose to almost £16,000 in the first three months of the year. most of that is on credit cards or overd rafts — with young people more likely to have this kind of debt. kate bell, head of economics, tuc.
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thank you forjoining us. i was curious, these figures at the beginning of the year are going to beginning of the year are going to be higher because of the fallout of christmas. that is right. we have seen christmas. that is right. we have seen these figures rise year for some time now. it is notjust over christmas, it is having to borrow to make ends meet. we think the main cause of that is in people going on a spending splurge, it is because they do not have enough money coming into their households. it has been the longest wage squeeze for 200 yea rs. the longest wage squeeze for 200 years. it is no surprise it is going up. some people might ask about the role of personal prudence and responsibility. it is hard to be prudent only very small budget. we know people on low incomes are the most careful with the money because they have to be. this is not people splurging out, it is people having to make tough choices between heating our buying healthy food. we know are skipping meals so their
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children have dinner. this is the crisis we have today. what do you wa nt to crisis we have today. what do you want to see done? it is about making sure we fix that pay squeeze and we make sure people have secure jobs. that is about giving people more voice in the workplace, enabling them to negotiate themselves for better terms and conditions. we know employers don‘t hand out pay rises, so we employers don‘t hand out pay rises, so we want more employers don‘t hand out pay rises, so we want more powers for employers don‘t hand out pay rises, so we want more powers for workers to negotiate through the unions for their pay rise that they desperately need. what about measures to improve productivity? we know when wages rise, productivity rises as well. we know talking more to workers in the workplace would be a good way of boosting productivity. there are many workers who say they have good ideas of how to improve their business. how the business works, but the are never asked. we think more worker voice in the workplace isa more worker voice in the workplace is a way to fix that voice, too. is this message getting drowned out in brexit, do you think? it is important we make sure that brexit
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isa important we make sure that brexit is a huge effect to wages and jobs and living standards and the threat of no—deal brexit is the biggest threat that working people currently face, but we do need to keep that focus on making sure people have a voice at work and that they get the pay rise they deserve. thank you so much. that is all the business news for now. back to simon in westminster. thank you very much indeed. all the talk down here is about what has been happening within boris johnson‘s own family, with about what has been happening within borisjohnson‘s own family, with the news that his brotherjo has stood down as a minister and dealt a huge blow to his brother. if there is any doubt, have a look at the evening standard, edited by george osborne. that is an addition updated earlier headline that said a disaster, but someone headline that said a disaster, but someone had fun with the headline
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writing there. he has resigned as a minister and writing there. he has resigned as a ministerand mp, writing there. he has resigned as a minister and mp, saying writing there. he has resigned as a ministerand mp, saying he writing there. he has resigned as a minister and mp, saying he was... writing there. he has resigned as a ministerand mp, saying he was... he could not continue. the family rift being blown open, says the paper, as borisjohnson decided being blown open, says the paper, as boris johnson decided to being blown open, says the paper, as borisjohnson decided to strip 21 mps. that is the headline headline writers are trying to beat for the morning papers. the decision to suspend parliament, the gina miller case, is being held tomorrow. that has been adjourned until tomorrow. a change of gear now.
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the existence of the loch ness monster is one of scotland‘s oldest myths. now scientists say the creatures behind repeated sightings could be giant eels. researchers from new zealand have tried to catalogue all living species in the loch by extracting dna from water samples. let‘s have a look at the weather. nick miller has that. one more weather system across the british isles and then high pressure comes infor isles and then high pressure comes in for the weekend and things will settle for a time. here is a look of a busy sky in shropshire earlier. some showers working through wales, the midlands, northern england and scotla nd the midlands, northern england and scotland courtesy of the weather front that is now pulling its way eastwards. where you have had thick cloud, showers move on through, as the afternoon goes on, they were clear and sunshine coming back. variable cloud, sunny spells, still a brisk breeze coming in from the west or north—west. not as strong as it was yesterday, but not particularly warm out there. temperature is fairly similar to
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yesterday. it is warmer and particularly in the afternoon, sunny spells in northern ireland. for the cricket, we have seen rain at old trafford already today. it looks like the rest of the day, will deliver sunny spells. tomorrow, wet weather around before that clears and the sun returns. because we have and the sun returns. because we have a weather system moving south across tonight and tomorrow, takes the rain through scotland and into northern england and north wales. behind that in northern scotland, some showers. clear weather in south—east england. quite chilly in the countryside. down to six celsius as we start the day tomorrow. tomorrow, this area of cloud, some outbreaks of rain. becoming late and patchy as we reach further southwards during the day. a bit of rain out of that. behind that, some sunshine, some showers, most of these in scotland. some heavy towards the north and west. italy went once again. tomorrow it
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may be stronger. —— make a chilly wind once again. don‘t expect a long mac warm weekend. a bit of light rain on sunday. a chilly night on saturday night. i will leave you with the latest view of the satellite picture of hurricane dorian, close to the south—east coast of the usa. a big storm surge, flash flooding rain. it is still a major hurricane, damaging winds and getting even stronger as it reaches the coastline. that is your weather forecast.
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hello. you‘re watching afternoon live. i‘m simon mccoy. today at 4pm: borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister and conservative mp, saying he‘s "torn between family and the national interest". it‘s been an honour to be mp for orpington and a minister under three governments, but it‘s time to move on. and i‘ve got to get to work! the prime minister will address the public later this afternoon, as it‘s announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. but labour have suggested they might not support an election until they‘re certain a further brexit delay has been secured. ben croucher has the sport. how do you get steve smith out? any ideas, send them to the england bowlers. he has passed 150. he is
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pushing the touring side into a commanding position in the fourth assets test —— ashes test. nick miller has all the weather. one more weather system is set to move south one more weather system is set to move south across one more weather system is set to move south across the british isles tonight and tomorrow some rain. after that, high pressure that things are settling down just in time for the weekend. good afternoon. you‘re watching afternoon live from westminster. the tensions at the heart of government have been laid bare after borisjohnson‘s brother, jo, quit the government and announced he‘s stepping down as a conservative mp. he says he‘s been torn between "family loyalty "and the national interest".
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his resignation comes as borisjohnson prepares to make a direct appeal to the public, arguing for an early general election in a speech in west yorkshire shortly. mps are to have another vote on whether there should be an early election on monday after the prime minister failed in his attempt to get parliament to agree to a snap poll yesterday. meanwhile, peers have begun debating a bill to stop a no—deal brexit, which is due to pass through the house of lords tomorrow. our political correspondent chris mason reports. point at the man who‘s prime minister and you completely disagree with on brexit. this is jo johnson with his brother, boris. he is also an mp — but not for much longer. take a look at this tweet. he‘s packing it in, and why, because he says he‘s torn between family loyalty and the national interest. ouch. reporter: can you tell us when you‘re planning to resign? i haven‘t got any further comment to say, other than it has been an honour to be an mp for orpington,
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and a minister under three governments, but it is time to move on and i have to get to work! reporter: do you think your brother‘s wrecking the party? i knowjo both as a colleague and a friend, i think he's a fantastic guy, and i know this will have been a very personal and very difficult decision for him, but one done without any malice at all. he did say he was putting national interest ahead of family loyalty. that means he believes his own brother, the prime minister, is not acting in the best interests for this country. every mp will have their own individual view. the government‘s position is clear, the collective view of our party is clear, we want to leave the european union with or without a deal by the end of october. the big row here now is when a general election happens. as soon as possible, says the government, but labour — or some within labour — are tempted to put it off. give me a date, is it in october or november? my view, later rather than sooner. so that could be late october... so after the date we all know... well, one of the arguments that's been put forward... sorry, after the 31st of october? possibly.
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why the disagreement over timings? well, some want to make the prime minister sweat and have to ask brussels for a delay to brexit, the very thing he has said he will not do. but others within labour say let‘s get on with it, once that plan to block a no—deal brexit is the law of the land. meanwhile, the government says it will try again to push for a general election. everywhere you look at westminster, something is moving today. the other day the lib dems recruited a former conservative mp. now former labour mp luciana berger has signed up. we find ourselves at a moment of national emergency, and i don‘t use those words lightly, but you can only see what‘s going on around us, and in that building over the last couple of days to know that we need to do everything possible to make sure the country, at the election, when it might come, has a proper choice, and has something to vote for rather than having to choose between the terrible options ofjohnson versus corbyn. with an election in the offing,
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look who else is surveying the political landscape. nigel farage is offering a deal with boris johnson if the conservatives commit to a no—deal brexit. but whatever happens, he says, bring it on. a prime minister who cannot command support in parliament, he is calling for a general election, and unbelievably the labour party want to stop brexit and want to stop us having a vote. what‘s going on in parliament right now, people are disgusted by. westminster might look serene today, but it feels very, very different. and nobody knows exactly what on earth is going to happen next. chris mason, bbc news. i‘m nowjoined by the conservative mp and leave campaigner daniel kawczynski. what are you expecting to happen on monday? borisjohnson
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what are you expecting to happen on monday? boris johnson is what are you expecting to happen on monday? borisjohnson is going to be talking within the next half hour. we know there is going to be a vote ona we know there is going to be a vote on a general election. now that the house of commons, now that labour, the lib dems and the snp have managed to hoist the white flag up to the european union...” managed to hoist the white flag up to the european union... i have got to the european union... i have got to stop you there. i think that is the earliest intervention i have ever had to make. what they are saying is, they do not trust boris johnson. no, i understand that they don‘t want to trust the conservative prime minister, but at least give him the opportunity to get the european union to move on the most difficult aspect of their withdrawal agreement, which is the northern ireland backstop. ifi agreement, which is the northern ireland backstop. if i was part of the european commission, what reason doi the european commission, what reason do i now have to give the british side what they require, which is a change to the northern ireland backstop? our one remaining card,
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then no deal card, has been stripped away from the prime minister. they wa nt away from the prime minister. they want the prime minister to play poker with the european union with transparent cards. so what does borisjohnson do transparent cards. so what does boris johnson do if transparent cards. so what does borisjohnson do if he doesn‘t get a general election? i very much hope and pray that we will have a vote on monday and that somehow the labour party... having spoken to every labourmpi party... having spoken to every labour mp i have spoken to and other parties, they are pretty resolute that they are going to not vote for a general election. absolutely. and there is this issue of kicking the can further down the road, more gridlock, more paralysis, which is now starting to have an impact not only on our international reputation overseas but our manufacturing and business confidence. that will continue. but a day of reckoning will come when the british electorate finally do have their say on what has been going on in this building and! on what has been going on in this building and i rather suspectjeremy
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corbyn‘s actions in trying to thwart and overturn brexit will be punished by the british electorate. when we get in with a majority of our own rather than at the moment with no majority, we will ensure that brexit is delivered. and yet you are talking about a leader in boris johnson and a party that has just got rid of 21 of the same obvious most seniorfigures got rid of 21 of the same obvious most senior figures and in the last few hours of the prime minister‘s own brother says the national interest means he‘s got to leave. you will know there are tensions and divisions with all political parties over brexit in all political parties. what i am really upset about what has happened by these 21 collea g u es about what has happened by these 21 colleagues is that this was a motion of confidence in the government. we all vote against the conservative government from time to time. i have done it on many occasions. but when the prime minister is going in and saying, and he has been overwhelmingly elected by
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conservative party members, standing ona conservative party members, standing on a platform, deal or no deal, do ordie, on a platform, deal or no deal, do or die, that has been sanctioned not just by a small margin but by overwhelming conservative party members and associations, so it is very regrettable that these colleagues, many of whom have also been disciplined by the local associations who encompass both brexiteers and remain voters, feel they can‘t support our own prime minister. whatever happens, an election seems more likely, it is just a question of when. you have just a question of when. you have just announced that you are going into a civil partnership, congratulations. the first week of november. what are the chances that you are going to have to postpone that? i had a debate in the house of commons yesterday on a subject which is very dear to me, lgbt rights and promoting tolerance, and i said even if there is an election, i am going to abandon it for two days because i am not going to leave my hubby on
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the altar by himself and i will be coming back to perform that civil partnership even if it is in the middle of a general election campaign. you have onlyjust announced this and how difficult a decision has that been?” announced this and how difficult a decision has that been? i was brought up in communist poland which was a highly homophobic society, the roman catholic church trying to instill in us that homosexuality is a sin, that we would be punished, that we would go to eternal damnation in hell, and of course it plays a highly negative role in 1‘s own self worth and confidence and in mental well—being. what i am doing now is something very important. anyone who has come out, either as a footballer, a radio or television presenter or a politician, we have a duty or responsibility to make sure that the next generation, that young people do have self worth, that they do believe they are equal and they have confidence in coming out. my own experiences shows how the
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conservative association treated me, i will take that love and kindness which i had for the rest of my life. it is very empowering and i want young people today to have more confidence than i had when i came out. congratulations. not something many tory mps are hearing at the moment. thank you. over the past couple of days, borisjohnson has seen his narrow majority wiped out in the commons. first, the former tory mp, philip lee defected to the liberal democrats, then a further 21 mps were booted out of the party after voting against the government. christian fraser looks at how the numbers now stack up in the house of commons. so let‘s take a look at the make—up of the house of commons now that boris johnson has followed through on his threat to remove the whip from those conservatives who voted against him. it means he‘s gone from being a prime minister with a working majority of one to the leader of a minority government. the conservatives now have 288 mps.
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they still have the support of the ten dup mps, which means altogether there are 298 mps who would, in theory, back the government in the commons. on the opposite benches, there are 245 labour mps. the snp currently have 35. there are, as of today, 16 liberal democrats, there are 14 declared independents, plus five more who belong to the independent group for change. plaid cymru have four mps and there‘s one green, so, in total, the opposition parties have 320 mps, 22 more than the conservatives and the dup. but, on top of that, there are now 21 conservatives who no longer have the whip and have shown themselves ready to vote against the government, which is why people are saying the government now has a majority of minus 43.
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or, to put it another way, borisjohnson is 22 short of a working majority. just in case you‘re keeping count, there are of course some other mps in the house of commons who don‘t vote — the speaker and his deputies by convention don‘t vote. sinn fein don‘t take their seats. but looking at the big picture, what is clear from these benches is that with 341 mps who aren‘t with him, the prime minister — who promised to take back control — has lost control of the commons, at least until a general election. and even that is not within his gift. i‘m joined now by peter kellner, the former president of the public polling organisation yougov. this must be an impossible time to be trying to guess what would happen if there was a general election on monday, that if there is one called, who has got the numbers? let's start
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off with will there be an early election? looking at those numbers we have just seen, election? looking at those numbers we havejust seen, if election? looking at those numbers we have just seen, if all the opposition parties gang up, boris johnson can‘t get near an election, evenif johnson can‘t get near an election, even if he does it through a bill that needs a simple majority. but we re that needs a simple majority. but were not the opposition parties seems to be divided and that is the snp. i think labour, the liberal democrats, the x tories, they are all likely to say we need a delay until... you think the former tories, the 21... i think until... you think the former tories, the 21. .. i think they will say don‘t have an election now, have it once we have extended britain‘s membership of the eu. the party still arguing internally is the snp and if the snp go with the government, then boris johnson and if the snp go with the government, then borisjohnson has the numbers and we will have an election in october. if the snp stand with the other parties, we
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will not have an election in october. and you think they are ' 7 october. and you think they are split? that is what i am hearing but there are plenty of them across the road. i am just there are plenty of them across the road. i amjust wondering there are plenty of them across the road. i am just wondering about the whole process for boris johnson because at the back of his mind is the brexit party. that is the real bogey for him, isn‘t it? the brexit party. that is the real bogey for him, isn't it? it is both the bogey and the opportunity. the brexit party are now around 14% in the polls. it is practically impossible to see how borisjohnson gets a conservative majority in an early election. if he can either drive the brexit party down to 5% or doa drive the brexit party down to 5% or do a deal with them where they don‘t stand in the seats that matter to the conservatives, thenjohnson‘s prospects are utterly transformed. what happens to the brexit party is crucial. and what about the opposition parties? packs, standing
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down, informal deals, ithink opposition parties? packs, standing down, informal deals, i think the packs are going to be limited. i don‘t see liberal democrats standing down for labour. back in 1997, paddy ashdown, tony blair, tactical voting cost the conservatives around 30 seats they would otherwise have won. if you can get tactical voting on that scale this time, that could well make the difference between a new parliament has a majority for a borisjohnson brexit or doesn‘t have a majority for that kind of brexit. so watch out for tactical voting. that could be at peak key part of the next election. with ed miliband and david, it did not seem to work well that it seemed that ed had stabbed his brother in the back. i wonder how the public will see boris johnson‘s brother‘s decision today. i think the position is based. if this was an isolated one—off event,
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i think he would brush this aside quite successfully. after all, most members of the public are probably not aware he has a younger brother in politics. however, in the last few days and weeks, the issue of whether you can trust borisjohnson over prorogation, his tactics on negotiations with the eu, the issue of trust has been bubbling up, and if you now get people saying, even his younger brother doesn‘t trust him, that adds to that distressed agenda, so in that context, i think it could play quite a big part in the argument about whether the prime minister is trustworthy or not. what if borisjohnson, minister is trustworthy or not. what if boris johnson, after minister is trustworthy or not. what if borisjohnson, after he comes back from brussels, says, i can‘t go on. he stands down. there is a 14 day period where somebody has to ta ke day period where somebody has to take over. would you sayjeremy corbyn was the only one who could do that, or, as we have been hearing,
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asi that, or, as we have been hearing, as i spoke to ken clarke earlier, is there a chance we might see somebody brought into k take for a while?m might be jeremy corbyn. brought into k take for a while?m might bejeremy corbyn. if boris johnsonjust resigns, might bejeremy corbyn. if boris johnson just resigns, that does might bejeremy corbyn. if boris johnsonjust resigns, that does not trigger a 14 day... that is triggered by a vote of no confidence. that is very precise in the legislation. he could do that himself. if he engineers a no—confidence vote, the 14 day clock sta rts no—confidence vote, the 14 day clock starts ticking. if he resigns, that is not necessarily produce an election. we will need another prime minister, whether it is a conservative, labour, jeremy corbyn, who knows? have you ever known a period like this? no, i haven't, and for two reasons. firstly, the old certainties about the old political system we have, a representative, that has gone for another year, and what people are arguing about. for
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most of our lives it has been left, right, capitalise —— capitalist, socialist, and now those arguments seem socialist, and now those arguments seem to have gone nowhere and we are into a new set of arguments, and my guess is that whatever happens with brexit over the next six months, two yea rs, brexit over the next six months, two years, this new line, liberalism versus nationalism or authority versus nationalism or authority versus freedom, england versus outward, drawbridge app, howeveryou define it, this is going to be the new dividing line in politics, long after brexit has gone. i think we have seen a sea change in how britain does politics. it is always good to see you. thank you very much. just a quick look at what is happening in the house of lords where they are still debating that bill, which, at the end of it, if it gets sent, it means a no deal —— if
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it gets royal assent, that means a no deal will be ruled out. the discussion goes on. we expect a decision tomorrow. let‘s pick up on what is going on in the wider spaces in westminster. sonia sodha is the chief lead writer at the observer and deputy opinion editor at the guardian. she‘s also former adviser to ed miliband. she‘s with me now. this is a relationship, the brother relationship, which came to the fore ina most relationship, which came to the fore in a most unpleasant way between those two. what are your memories of that moment when one brother knew the other was stabbing him in the back? i would not characterise it as one brother stabbing the other in the back, but what i would say is, asa the back, but what i would say is, as a former adviser to ed miliband, i know from experience that family stuff really sticks. so focus groups
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with voters very shortly after ed miliband became leader, for a long time that one thing that stuck in voters‘ mines is that this is the quy voters‘ mines is that this is the guy who beat his brother. stabbed him in the back. i wouldn't put it quite like that. i put it as a guy who beat his brother. so we know that family stuff does tend to stick with voters. they find it quite hard to get their head around if your own brother, your own sister can‘t even support you, how should i as a pro to be putting my trust in you? i think it plays because i don‘t think it is something that chimes with people, this idea that a very close family member can‘t support you, it is pretty damning, borisjohnson‘s brother, jojohnson, talking brother, jo johnson, talking about tensions between the national interest and his family, and what does it say about you, a close family member is stepping down from your government? i‘m sure boris
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johnson feels it might have been better ifjo johnson had johnson feels it might have been better ifjojohnson had notjoined this government in the first place. many people may not have realised that boris johnson had many people may not have realised that borisjohnson had a younger brother in his government. jo johnson quick theresa may‘s cabinet as well. obviously, he has a high bar in terms of what makes him happy ina cabinet bar in terms of what makes him happy in a cabinet role. and a lot of people are going to say, my family is split over brexit. they are reflecting what is going on in the country. there are splits around the dinner table of friendly chat with your mum or your dad or your brother or sister. very quickly it doesn't become friendly. but there is also quitting the government and that sends a really strong message home. jojohnson went into his brother‘s government thinking he was committed to doing a deal and that has come under immense scrutiny in the last couple of weeks. it is reported that even dominic cummings, boris
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johnson‘s top adviser, has talked about the eu negotiations being a sham. it is a very serious step to step away from the government when you are a minister and i think this shows that an mp likejojohnson has seen shows that an mp likejojohnson has seen people that he is very close to on the political spectrum be brutally ejected from the conservative party for voting against the government in the last couple of days and i suspect this means he does not think boris johnson is committed to getting a deal. we all know all the parties right now are in little rooms, they are working out what happens if this happens, if this happens, if this happens. this will never have appeared in any scenario. but where we are at the moment, there is so much uncertainty about what is happening, it feels like political news is breaking every couple of minutes or so. we have seen luciana berger move to the lib dems today as well. we have already seen labour put out some statements aboutjo
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johnson‘s impending resignation and so johnson‘s impending resignation and so there is no doubt that the tories really look to make political capital over the brother issue when ed miliband was leader of the labour party and i think you will see labour doing exactly the same. what about monday‘s vote? a general election. how do you think that will play out? i think it is going to be tricky for boris johnson to play out? i think it is going to be tricky for borisjohnson to get play out? i think it is going to be tricky for boris johnson to get that vote through again. the fact that the conservatives seem to have conceded on this extension bill, they have said that the lords will get it passed by 5pm on friday, that shows that the government thinks the best route now for them, the best route to a general election, which isa route to a general election, which is a top priority, a general election in mid—october before the 3ist election in mid—october before the 31st of october, the best route is getting that bill through and putting it to parliament on monday and trying to shame labour into voting for a general election by essentially calling jeremy corbyn a
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chicken. labour is very divided on this issue... well, is it? it is in the sense that, should they back an early election in mid—october or should they delay a little and have an election after the 31st of october when an extension has been implemented or at least the prime minister has gone and asked the eu foran minister has gone and asked the eu for an extension. i think the head of stea m for an extension. i think the head of steam is really building around the later option. their thinking in labour ranks is that if you delay it bya labour ranks is that if you delay it by a bit, you are denying boris johnson being able to tell the country that he got brexit through, do ordie, on country that he got brexit through, do or die, on the 31st of october and that that is going to play really badly for him. he looks very wea k really badly for him. he looks very weak as a prime minister. he has never enjoyed a victory in the house of commons. he has only suffered three defeats so far and they are pretty significant ones and he‘s not even been able to call a general election. i do think that is where
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labour thinking is moving but there are divisions within labour thinking at the moment. thank you very much. so, a dramatic week at westminster so, a dramatic week at westminster so far but what are people across the uk making of it all, and particularly young people? leigh milner has been speaking to a group of sixth form politics students at a college in colchester. it is their first week back this week, they all study politics. what do you make of what is going on in westminster at the moment?” do you make of what is going on in westminster at the moment? i think it is disappointing that our prime minister, who is leading the country, is behaving in a way that makes me uncomfortable to call these people my mps and my prime minister. borisjohnson is people my mps and my prime minister. boris johnson is challenging people my mps and my prime minister. borisjohnson is challenging the sovereignty of parliament in my eyes. parliament is challenging the will of the people. parliament is trying to stop brexit. borisjohnson is trying to deliver what we asked for in 2016. i feelthe is trying to deliver what we asked for in 2016. i feel the way boris johnson and the government are going around what they are doing is wrong.
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we are never going to get an answer between you two. you can understand why they are politics student. if a general election is called, you won‘t be able to vote. how do you feel about that? i would feel extremely gutted that i don't get a chance to express my vote and i would have to wait another five years. however, ithink would have to wait another five years. however, i think it is time for another general election. no one knows what the national interest is. the referendum was three years ago. you have actually protested in the past. where did you protest and why did you feel it was so important to do that? i was at the people's vote march in in march and i thought it was really important as a young person who can‘t vote to get my voice heard. but do you think it really made a difference?” voice heard. but do you think it really made a difference? i do think it has made a difference, not as any policies passed but i think it has made a difference to mps in parliament who have stood up for what they clearly believe when they
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would not have done so before. do you think we need more young people in politics? yes, i think it is really important for young people to stand up and have their say, especially when they can‘t vote on issues that could effect them for the rest of their lives. how easy has this been to follow? as a politics student, we talk about it in lessons, that times are changing so in lessons, that times are changing so rapidly at the minute that you have just got to keep watching the news and keep on top of everything thatis news and keep on top of everything that is going on. have you guys got class this afternoon? yes. more enthusiasm, come on. a lot is going to be happening over the next couple of days in terms of brexit. a visitor to the uk at the moment is the vice president of the united states. he says he has been tweeting.
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so, helpful words at least for boris johnson they are from the american vice president. we are waiting to hear from boris vice president. we are waiting to hearfrom borisjohnson. vice president. we are waiting to hear from boris johnson. he vice president. we are waiting to hearfrom borisjohnson. he is about to address the public in the next few minutes. we will take you to west yorkshire as soon as he does that. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. here is how the rest of the afternoon looks. showers clearing away from eastern scotland. a lot of
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fine weather, broken cloud, sunny spells. temperatures are fairly similarto spells. temperatures are fairly similar to yesterday. not as windy as it was yesterday. tonight we take as it was yesterday. tonight we take a band of rain across scotland, through northern ireland, and into north wales. clearing skies in northern scotland. they could be some in the far south—east of england. six or seven celsius. this area of cloud and patchy showery rain pushing further south across england and wales during the day tomorrow. behind that sunshine, a few showers, especially in scotland. and quite a brisk and gusty wind as well. it will feel quite cold in that wind. it is not a one week i‘ll bet it will be mainly dry weekend.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister
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and conservative mp, saying he‘s "torn between family and the national interest". it‘s been an honour to be mp for orpington and a minister under three governments, but it‘s time to move on. and i‘ve got to get to work! the prime minister will shortly address the public, as it‘s announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. labour have suggested they might not support an election until they‘re certain a further brexit delay has been secured. i was just showing you some tweets from the american vice president mike pence. boris johnson from the american vice president mike pence. borisjohnson has also been speaking about this and told the us vice president that the nhs will not be for sale in any post brexit trade deal with america, and that britain is not keen on chlorinated chicken, he said. this happened at downing street, the prime minister said, the national
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health service is not on the table as far as health service is not on the table as faras our health service is not on the table as far as our negotiations go. we are not keen on that chlorinated chicken. and then a clear dig at the labour leaderjeremy corbyn, he said, we have a gigantic chlorinated chicken of our own on the opposition benches. which just illustrates the level of the argument at some stages a nyway level of the argument at some stages anyway and what is a huge week in westminster. let‘s speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young... she is on the phone, anything happening? no, very quiet. people are saying the resignation ofjo johnson is a disasterfor boris johnson. if you look at what labour are trying to do, they are saying we can trust you so how can the public trust you, then his brother is leaving suggesting the prime
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minister is not doing what is in the national interest, and labour are saying your own brother doesn‘t trust you either. so it is damaging. i had trust you either. so it is damaging. ihada trust you either. so it is damaging. i had a chat with him a couple years ago, andjo i had a chat with him a couple years ago, and jo johnson spoke i had a chat with him a couple years ago, and jojohnson spoke openly about the fact it had been very difficult for their families, and boris johnson‘s sister stood difficult for their families, and borisjohnson‘s sister stood for the liberal democrats. they have another brother, and they haven‘t really forgiven borisjohnson brother, and they haven‘t really forgiven boris johnson for what brother, and they haven‘t really forgiven borisjohnson for what he did.jo forgiven borisjohnson for what he did. jojohnson said that the —— it was in the interest of the government to make brexit work, but then resigned under theresa may because he wanted to go down the route of another referendum. the mystery is why did he take another job when his brother became prime minister, knowing he did not agree with him at all, and the other question is how he did this, he did not have to tweet in manner he did, when he knew his brother was going to a nswer when he knew his brother was going to answer questions from journalists
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today, and a lot of mps are really angry on the tory side about how some mps have been booted out. boris johnson is in wakefield and is about to make a speech. the problem is, there is no general election.” think he is pretending there is one, this is one way he can go, just carry on as if there is a general election. the government announced they will have another attempt at getting their general election, and we had it confirmed that will be on monday as we expected, exactly the same as the vote last night, under the fixed term parliament act, which means he needs two thirds, more than 400 mp5, to means he needs two thirds, more than 400 mps, to vote for it for it to pass. what does he know that we do not, because every labour mp i have spoken to is clear that they are not going to support it on monday. jeremy corbyn said they would support it if the anti—no deal bill got royal assent, and it will have done by then. hang on, that's interesting, because every mp i have
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had standing here says that is not enough. they do say that and something that is not enough, but if you look at whatjeremy corbyn said yesterday in the house of commons, he said they would do it. there is an argument going on about this because there are others including john mcdonnell, diane abbott, emily thornberry, kier starmer, and kier starmer said it had to be enacted, so starmer said it had to be enacted, so the prime minister has to have gone to brussels and asked for the delay. mary creagh says the letter needs to have gone to brussels, they are not on the same hymn sheet. that is why it is interesting, you can see what they government are trying to do, they are trying to build labour and then say tojeremy corbyn, you have not voted for it again. i was looking at the big jeremy corbyn, chlorinated chicken being used in a derogatory way, a
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lot of people will say this is a problem because we are beyond the sort ofjoke, aren‘t we? problem because we are beyond the sort ofjoke, aren't we? we are in election mode, and you are going to have more and more of this and boris johnson trying to paintjeremy corbyn is running scared from an election and saying you do not want to have an election because you do not think you will wind it, but the problem for borisjohnson as if he cannot get his election, he is stuck, and has nowhere to go. the only thing we can be sure of is that i cannot imagine borisjohnson under any circumstances going to the eu and asking for a delay to brexit because if he does that and then there‘s an election, he will be destroyed, his whole strategy is out of the window because he loses votes to the brexit party, so he‘s not going to do that. if i was now, i would see is talking about parliament against the people, government against parliament, we are not talking about the people at
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this stage, it is all about what‘s going on here. yes, but then if you are talking about borisjohnson and the government, they would say, exactly, parliament is not solving the so you need a general election, but the way that the law is, because of the fixed term parliament act, you cannot get at election. parliament has been stuck for three yea rs parliament has been stuck for three years because people have genuinely held beliefs on different sides and could not compromise, but now, once you reach that position in parliament, you would have a general election to break that deadlock, but it just election to break that deadlock, but itjust happens that the law changed in 2010 and that is not open for a prime minister to do. as the prime minister realising the impact that the kicking out of 21 very senior members of his own party has done? many people suggesting that is what broke the back for his brother. yes, i think he probably does partly because people did confront him about it yesterday in a meeting so he will be left in no doubt, and there are many tories who think it
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has gone way too far. yes, you needed to restore discipline if you look at what happened under theresa may, there was no discipline whatsoever and she was unable to govern, there were leaks all the time, unable to achieve anything, so ican time, unable to achieve anything, so i can see how the new regime came in and said we have got to stop this, but many people think they have gone too far, and maybe not understanding parliament. it is all very well talking tough but when you‘re up against parliament they do have powers and they are able to achieve things. i spoke to a lot of the tory mps who have been booted out, they may think they are on an olive branch at some point, they are not sure, the others, even if they are offered the chance to come back into the tory party, they want to know what will happen when the election ma nifesto what will happen when the election manifesto comes out because if they are asked to sign up to the no—deal brexit, they won‘t do it, but neither will other mps. there are other mps who are not part of the
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block who say there is no way they will go to the country on a ma nifesto will go to the country on a manifesto they do not agree with. so, the issue of europe will still split the party even with a general election. thank you very much. we are waiting to hear from boris johnson, but from westminster for now, let‘s go back to samantha in the studio. in a moment, we will get the studio. in a moment, we will get the business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live. borisjohnson is dealt a major blow as his own brother quits as a government minister and conservative mp, saying he‘s "torn between family and the national interest". the prime will address the public later this afternoon, as it‘s announced the house of commons will vote again on holding a general election on monday. but labour have suggested they might not support an election
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until they‘re certain a further brexit delay has been secured. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. facebook says about 200 million phone numbers of its users have been exposed online. they were left on an online database and include the phone numbers of 18 million people in the uk. the company says it‘s investigating. the cbi says the vote by mps to try to stop a no—deal brexit is a "small chink of light". but the business lobby group is warning that uncertainty could still continue to hold back investment. it says a trade deal with the eu is crucial to safeguard jobs. increasing the cost of sugary snacks could be a better way of tackling obesity than taxing sugary drinks, according to a new study. the british medicaljournal says snacks like biscuits, cakes and chocolate make up more of our sugar intake than drinks. time for a look at the stories moving the markets.
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shall we do that? it‘s been another bumper year for the house—builder redrow. profits hit a record high ofjust over $400 million that‘s the sixth year in a row its achieved record results. but the company says brexit is still causing uncertainty — despite these blockbuster results. and speaking of brexit — the pound is actually doing rather well — that‘s despite all of the political drama. investors now think we are less likely to see a no deal brexit. gervais williams, senior executive director, miton group, joins us. talking about sterling, do you think we will see more increases? sterling has been weak over the last number of weeks because of the expectation that brexit was round the corner. in the last few days, we have seen that is less likely, and we are seeing
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the sterling beginning to bounce. what happens next is anyone ‘s guess. impact does this having on exporters, they cannot be pleased about this? it has been weak for the last number of years, so we are looking at it being weak compared to the dollar overseas. if sterling recovers the good news as imports become a little cheaper. let's move on to the house—builder, redrow, record profits for the sixth year in a row. i thought the housing market was supposed to be slowing down. it's was supposed to be slowing down. it‘s interesting, new housing continues to be pretty good, the help to buy scheme has been good at stimulating additional demand which is excellent, but the number of —— to house—builder themselves have a number of new sites. you get a 5% yield on the showers when you hold them. there will be big changes when
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you —— to help to buy. them. there will be big changes when you -- to help to buy. will that make a difference? people are a little sceptical, valuation is low because people are unsure about what the changes will mean. let's move on to fashion, and boohoo. sales going through the roof, what is happening there? boohoo has grown 3596, and has lots of brand online, including pyt and karen millen, they have good fashions and having good sales, which is coming through in the share price which has risen today. there isa price which has risen today. there is a move away from fast fashion, how come the company is not feeling the impact of that? you have seen some profit warnings from other brands that have lost market share. the good thing about boohoo as they have remained on fashion relative to what other companies have done, leading them to take market share from those that are failing. thank
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you very much forjoining us. as the wrangling over brexit continues, there are fears the country could be slipping into recession for the first time since the financial crisis. the biggest, most valuable part of the economy is the services sector. that lost momentum last month. and the economy contracted between april and june. yael selfin is chief economist at kpmg. really fiscal policy is the only game in town now. we had the governor of the bank of england yesterday say that interest rates are likely to be cut in the event of no deal in a recession, but still the bank of england are limited. in the bank of england are limited. in the event of a recession,...
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they are looking down, thank you very much indeed, we see you later. this is the seen live in wakefield where the prime minister is expected to arrive to give a speech. the prime minister is there, lots of
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police officers lined up, no doubt he will talk about the big boost the government has announced for the police force, it is going to be interesting to see if he references his brotherjojohnson‘s interesting to see if he references his brotherjo johnson‘s resignation earlier today, who was a conservative mp and minister, but no more because he resigned, says he is going to be stepping down, said he is too conflicted about his personal life, indeed being the brother of the prime minister and also his own co re the prime minister and also his own core beliefs. we also understand there is going to be another election, thought on that on monday, the prime minister will no doubt talk about that. there is a debate going on at the house of lords at the moment as well, debating the second reading of the eu withdrawal bill which is aimed at avoiding a no—deal brexit. and that was defeated, rather that went through the house of commons yesterday, so the house of commons yesterday, so the house of lords are discussing it and we are expecting a vote on that at the end of play tomorrow. we will
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keep an eye on the picture in wakefield and west yorkshire and go back as soon as borisjohnson takes to the podium. in the meantime, let‘s look at some of the day‘s at the news. the united nations says 72,000 people in the bahamas are in immediate need of food, shelter and medical aid — in the wake of the devastation caused by hurricane dorian. 20 people are known to have been killed, but that figure is expected to rise. in the us, north and south carolina are being lashed by 100mph winds and by torrential rain, as the strengthening storm nears the coast. the national hurricane centre has issued warnings of life—threatening rises in sea levels. richard galpin has the latest. the relief effort is ramping up, this is the united states coast guard, coming into the worst affected area, the islands which bore the brunt of hurricane dorian. the devastation here continues for mile after mile. homes, shops, a hospital, and the port, all damaged
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or destroyed. many who were injured in the winds of 200mph and the rapid storm surges are being flown to the capital nassau for treatment. this is what the hurricane did to the home of ramon. with his mother he had to run from their car into the house when the storm hit. he also saw his neighbour‘s house lifted up by the winds. my island is finished. everything is gone. no banks, no stores, no nothing. it‘ll take at least four to five years to complete only myjob. i don‘t know how long it takes for the rest of the island but nothing is here. nothing at all. everything is gone. just bodies.
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a british ship, the rfa mounts bay, is also helping with the relief effort getting urgently needed supplies including shelter and hygiene kits to the tens of thousands of people on the abacha islands who now have nothing. the needs are great, from clean water to medicines and generators. but while the situation here is dire, there‘s better news about the neighboring island of grand bahama and its main city freeport which also lay on the hurricane‘s path. as we moved into the freeport area, i can report that the flooding had receded and most homes in grand bahama appeared to have received minor damage. freeport, infrastructurally, had done well. for those caught up in this disaster, one of the most traumatic parts has been losing contact with family members and friends. these are the lucky ones, reunited, but there are many people who are missing.
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and meanwhile people on the east coast of the united states are bracing themselves as hurricane dorian moves into the area. there are warnings of hurricane—conditions later today and life—threatening storm surges. richard galpin bbc news. thousands of people across britain are being forced into human slavery by ruthless gangs. tonight panorama follows west midlands police as it carries out the biggest ever investigation and prosecution of a modern slavery case in the uk. it‘s the story of a polish gang which held hundreds of people captive, set them to work, stole their wages, made them eat from skips, wash in canals and threatened to kill them if they tried to escape. tonight‘s panorama features first—hand testimony from the victims of the slave gang.
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happy? can we have a clap, please. tell me why you have decided to tell your story here, to give the —— this interview? translation: people need to know that in the 21st century people can be used for money and treated like animals. that story needs to be told. that is a clip from tonight‘s panorama.
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and you can hear more about this case, as well as some gripping first—hand testimony, on panorama — the hunt for britain‘s slave gangs, tonight, on bbc one at 9 o‘clock — and at 1:35 on bbc one in scotland. britain‘s leading children‘s hospital has been strongly criticised over the death of a teenage girl. (oov)14—year—old criticised over the death of a teenage girl. 14—year—old amy allan died from complications following a spinal operation in september last year. a coroner concluded that great ormond street hospital in london had failed to properly plan for her care after the procedure. however, the coroner said he was not able to make a firm conclusion that the failures had caused her death. the existence of the loch ness monster is one of scotland‘s oldest myths. now scientists say the creatures behind repeated sightings could be giant eels. researchers from new zealand have tried to catalogue all living species in the loch by extracting dna from water samples. from the shores of loch ness, iain macinnes sent us this report. it‘s a mystery which endures: just what exactly lies beneath the murky waters of loch ness?
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and that's what you actually saw? yes. as long as a bus? the sightings of nessie stretch back hundreds of years, but as yet, no definitive explanation has been found. a team of scientists, led by new zealand‘s otago university, has been testing water samples and connecting environmental dna from all forms of life in the loch, including plants, insects, fish and mammals. you basically take a litre or two of water, and you filter it out and then, in the stuff that is filtered out will be dna, and using that dna, you can then sequence it, and on the basis of the sequence identify the types of organisms that are present in the water. this morning, the world media gathered at the loch—side to hear exactly what they had found. this idea of a giant extinct reptile, well, we did not find any reptilian dna, so we don‘t think that sounds very plausible based on the samples and the analysis that we have undertaken.
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and we also went looking for another idea, which is a giant eel. well, we don‘t know if the eel is a giant or not, but we certainly found an awful lot of eel dna, i guess more than we expected. but one long—time nessie hunter is unconvinced by today‘s news. eels in loch ness? personally, i think a 12—year—old boy could tell you that. there could be some massive eels in there. that could be the explanation. but, to say, "we have found evidence of eels," is like saying we have found evidence of fish in a scottish loch. "well done"(!) the sense of mystery here at the loch, though, remains. more than 20% of the dna found was unidentified, meaning the search for nessie goes on. it‘s a mystery which endures: just what exactly lies beneath the murky waters of loch ness? princess charlotte is spending her first day at school. the four—year old arrived at thomas‘s battersea with her parents and brother
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prince george, who has been attending the school for the past two years. prince william said his daughter was "very excited." now it‘s time for a look at the weather with nick miller. hello. we have one more weather system to move we have one more weather system to m ove a cross we have one more weather system to move across british isles, then things will settle a time. a busy sky in shropshire earlier. we have had some showers going through the midlands and scotland because of this weather front moving east. we have had thick cloud, a few showers move through as the afternoon was on —— as the afternoon goes strong as yesterday, but temperatures fairly similar to yesterday, but it is warmer and sunny spells in northern ireland. for the cricket we have already seen some reign at old trafford today, it looks like the rest of the day, bar the chance of a passing shower, will
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deliver further sunny spells. tomorrow there will be some wet weather around before that clears and the son returns. we have a weather system moving south across the uk tonight and tomorrow, tonight it takes the rain through scotland, northern ireland and into northern england and north wales. behind that in scotland some clear spells, some clear weather in south—east england, chilly and the countryside down to six or seven as chilly and the countryside down to six or seven as we chilly and the countryside down to six or seven as we start the day tomorrow. tomorrow, this area of cloud, some outbreaks of rain becoming light and patchy as it reaches its way further south during the day, but many of us will see some rain out of that. behind that, some rain out of that. behind that, some sunshine, showers, most of these in scotland. some of these heavy, especially into north and north and west, and a chilly wind again, if anything north and west, and a chilly wind again, ifanything it north and west, and a chilly wind again, if anything it will be stronger tomorrow, with temperatures in the mid to high teens. high pressure building into the weekend. don‘t expect a warm weekend, perhaps the chance of a shower for england
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and where is on saturday, and scotla nd and where is on saturday, and scotland on sunday. i will leave you with a satellite view of hurricane one, heading ever closer to the coastline of carolina. still a major hurricane, so damaging winds, and getting ever stronger as it hears the coastline. —— nears the coastline.
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this is bbc news — i‘m ben brown, here at westminster. the headlines at 5pm: the prime minister will say the time for an election is now and will call on his mps to back his plans for a snap poll. this is the scene live in yorkshire, where the prime minister is due shortly — we‘ll bring it to you live. the prime minister pays tribute to his brother —jojohnson — who has resigned as a government minister and mp, saying he‘s "torn between family loyalty and the national interest". he it‘s been an honour to be mp for orpington and a minister under three governments, but it‘s time to move on. and i‘ve got to get to work! the government will try again on monday to get mps to vote

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