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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 5, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'm ben brown, here at westminster. the headlines at 5pm: the prime minister will say the time for an election is now and will call on his mps to back his plans for a snap poll. this is the scene live in yorkshire, where the prime minister is due shortly — we'll bring it to you live. the prime minister pays tribute to his brother —jojohnson — who has resigned as a government minister and mp, saying he's "torn between family loyalty and the national interest". he it's been an honour to be mp for orpington and a minister under three governments, but it's time to move on. and i've got to get to work! the government will try again on monday to get mps to vote for an early general election,
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but labour says it won't support that until a no—deal brexit has been ruled out. we have to wait for parliament to come back in october so we don't get any more shenanigans from this prime minister and we see either a deal or an extension — only then can labor possibly think about a general election. it's five o'clock — we're live from westminster. the prime minister is due to speak soon. earlier, government sources said borisjohnson regards today as the first day of an election campaign — but it's an election he hasn't yet been able to call.
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he'll ask mps again on monday to vote in favour of an early general election on october 15th. labour have said they won't agree to it until a no—deal brexit is off the table. we can see the scene now live in yorkshire, whether by minister will be speaking at the next few minutes. we will bring you that live. well, let's speak to our chief political correspondent vicki young. what do we expecting him to say? they are treating this as an election campaign, as you point out. there is one slight flaw in that he hasn't been able to get the election campaign. so i'm sure we will hear him, you can see from the pictures he is in front of police, i think, cadets. so this is all part of building on the announcements over the summer, more spending months police, the nhs, social care.
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because i think you'll be taking on some questions and they could be slightly more tricky, he will be asked about the decision by his brother to stand down as a minister and mp, and really notjust the fact he is standing down because of differences over brexit, but the fa ct differences over brexit, but the fact thatjo johnson decided differences over brexit, but the fact thatjojohnson decided to put ina fact thatjojohnson decided to put in a tweet that he felt he was pulled between family loyalty and the national interest, so the clear implication there he is suggesting the prime minister is not acting in the prime minister is not acting in the national interest. and i think thatis the national interest. and i think that is incredibly damaging, with just when you have labour really is their slogan, if you like, saying we can't trust you, they will then turn around and say it seems your brother can't either. so i think it is damaging for him. maybe even more than in the way tory mps are very upset about the way he has booted several mps out of the party. this is different, people can relate to this. he has a brother who is a member of the party alongside him, but even he feels he cannot serve under the prime minister. so i'm sure he will be asked about that.
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and i'm sure they will be questions about brexit as well, and how is he going to get to an election, the election he now wants. so there is a question, how will he get the election? try again on monday, ask mps to vote again, is likely to be more successful the second time around? it is difficult because it is the same process, they are using the fixed term parliament act. and he can't just the fixed term parliament act. and he can'tjust call the fixed term parliament act. and he can't just call an the fixed term parliament act. and he can'tjust call an election because the law changed in 2010 you have to go through this process where two thirds of mps have to vote for it. that's quite a high threshold and when he did not reach last night. i don't they think they will beast successful but they are trying to put pressure on labour to say, you have been calling for a general election four years, we are 110w general election four years, we are now offering you it, and you are not taking it. and i think, again, you heard last night borisjohnson saying this has to be the first opposition leader in history who has turned down the chance to become prime minister. so we'll hear more about that. labour have had their
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difficulties on all this, because of course they want a general election, but they are saying they want to be very sure that they can stop a nodal brexit. so they want to make sure that the no—deal bill has gone through parliament, has got royal assent, we think that will happen on monday. jeremy corbyn suggested in the house of commons that he would be willing to vote for it once the bill got royal assent, but that's not how all his party thinks. 0thers like you stammer are saying just because the bill goes through and is law doesn't mean it will happen. we wa nt to law doesn't mean it will happen. we want to see the letter sent to the eu, we want to see the delay to brexit already agreed. and of course borisjohnson has said he simply will not do that. so they will try again with a fixed term parliament act, but then they could try again with a different mechanism, couldn't they? remember the proroguing of parliament, parliament being suspended or sent off? that could happen any time from monday. so the original thought was it would be monday, but it does not have to be. it could go to thursday. so that
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could give them another chance. the problem they have with through a one line bill, which would supersede the fixed term parliament act, you bring the bill through and it says simply, notwithstanding that we will have an election on the 15th of october, it isa election on the 15th of october, it is a bill so it can be amended, it can be changed, and the fear and government is that all sorts of things could then be put into the bill, for example, the liberal democrats and the snp won the voters of the age of 16 and 17 have the vote, maybe they could put that in. they can also change the date of the election to make it november rather than october. so once you bring a bill to parliament, you are opening up bill to parliament, you are opening up all sorts of possibilities for the opposition. and of course boris johnson does not have a majority. how would you describe his position at the moment? some papers today suggest he is cornered, doesn't have an election yet, at least, he can't get his brexit through by october 31, which he promised he would, do
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01’ 31, which he promised he would, do or die. how do you see what is going on another ten right now? he is stuck, and what they will try to do is blame other people for that. their argument is you have mps saying we don't like what the government is doing, we will take over the house of commons, which they did. but equally they are not prepared to give him a general election. so boris johnson prepared to give him a general election. so borisjohnson would say to you, i have a plan for brexit and i want to take it to the people, i wa nt i want to take it to the people, i want the people to decide in a general election. but parliament is stopping me. so he wants to create a narrative of parliament against the people, that the mps and there are trying to stop brexit, they are not respecting that referendum result. soi respecting that referendum result. so i think that's the way they will try to play this. it does not take away from the fact that he hasn't got many options at the moment. they will try to find lots of ways to get the general election. i think the anything we can be sure of is i cannot envisage a scenario where borisjohnson goes to the eu and asks for a delay to brexit. because
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he would then go to the country... you can imagine what nigel farage would say. you can imagine the brexit party... the only way boris johnson wins a general election is by taking back all the conservatives and others who went to the brexit party during the european election. so he needs them onside. so he won't do something which would completely repel them. what he does instead, who knows? he might even feel he has to resign before being forced to do that. so he's in a very tricky position but a lot of people say so isjeremy corbyn. he has been accused of being a coward by the prime minister. chlorinated chicken was the phrase he used. it is difficult for labour because they spent so long calling for a general election, and they've had their own problems over the issue of brexit, of course they have. and that split is still there. a lot of the reason why there are some of the labour
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party who don't want to have a general election is that they fear that means their wish for a second referendum might not happen. so the other problem the jeremy other problem thejeremy corbyn of course is that even if we got onto the vote of no confidence, because thatis the vote of no confidence, because that is the other route to a general election, brought by normally of course the opposition, borisjohnson could, bizarrely, bring that confidence vote in himself. but the problem jeremy corbyn has, if they don't have confidence in boris johnson, do theyjeremy corbyn? joe swinson said previously she would not want to be in a position where she backsjeremy corbyn to be prime minister, she would prefer someone else, she named ken clarke. she named harriet harman. anotherfigure she says would be more unifying, because she doesn't feeljeremy figure —— corbyn is unifying figure.
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so he could be in this position where the house doesn't have confidence either people and then we are stuck. so to sum up, not for the first time in this process we don't know where were going!” first time in this process we don't know where were going! i think that's fair to say. and the way downing street have operated in the last few weeks is that they have done the unexpected, so who knows what might happen on monday. and whether we then reach the point of a voice of no confidence coming one way or the other from the opposition 01’ way or the other from the opposition orfrom borisjohnson way or the other from the opposition or from boris johnson himself. way or the other from the opposition orfrom borisjohnson himself. but that would be pretty bizarre, to have a vote of confidence and boris johnson saying to his party, vote against me! thank you very much. let's show you the scene in yorkshire, we're still waiting for the prime minister to those remarks. no sign of him yet. he is a little delayed. we will bring it to you live of course. amid all the political drama here, there's also some drama in the courts with another legal
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challenge to borisjohnson‘s controversial decision to prorogue or suspend parliament. it's being heard at the high court in london, and led by the anti—brexit campaigner gina miller, with support from former prime minister sirjohn major. our legal correspondent clive coleman is at the high court. clive, one fascinating detail that has emerged today is this handwritten note from the prime minister, written in august, in his own handwriting. yes, part of that note we had had read out in the scottish case, where mrjohnson, in response to advice he's been given from his senior legal adviser, there isa from his senior legal adviser, there is a section for him to give notes, he talks about the september sitting of parliament, and describes it as a rigmarole, something to convince the public that mps are earning their crust. but in a part of the note we had not previously seen, that was released today, mrjohnson wrote
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that after those comments i've quoted, he wrote that because proroguing was over the conference season, the sitting days lost are actually very few. that seems to be an indication perhaps that the prime minister didn't see the suspending of parliament as that big a deal, and that may say something about his politicaljudgment because the proroguing of parliament has proved to bea proroguing of parliament has proved to be a very considerable political deal. but it was a fascinating insight into his thinking about how the proroguing of parliament was going to play out. elsewhere in the case, gina miller's case is very straightforward, she argues that the advice given by borisjohnson to the queen amounted to an abuse, really, of power. that that advice, which borisjohnson of power. that that advice, which boris johnson gave of power. that that advice, which borisjohnson gave to the queen, was
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simply... breached the fundamental principle we have at the centre of oui’ principle we have at the centre of our constitution, of parliamentary sovereignty. lord pannick said it wasn't right that prime minister should have an unfettered power to suspend parliament because if that was the case the prior minister could suspend the six months, for a year, for the government, the qc said this was a matter the proroguing of parliament was a matter of high politics and policy and that it wasn't really a matter that the courts were entitled to stick their noses into and adjudicate upon. and sirjames also pass comment on the bill that is going through parliament at the moment, to stop an ideal brexit, and he said it looks likely that bill will complete its passage through parliament and if so it will render this particular legal challenge perhaps a little bit, his precise word, i think, perhaps a little bit, his precise word, ithink, it perhaps a little bit, his precise word, i think, it would
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perhaps a little bit, his precise word, ithink, it would render perhaps a little bit, his precise word, i think, it would render it rather pointless. we are expecting a judgment tomorrow morning in this case. but there is a sense that the politics is loudly overtaking the legal challenges here. thank you, clive. the government has agreed that the bill to delay brexit and stop no—deal will have safe passage in the house of lords, that is after some conservative peers had threatened to try to thwart the legislation by effectively talking it out with a filibuster. we can trust the houses of parliament now and speak to the conservative peer. i think and speak to the conservative peer. ithink i'm and speak to the conservative peer. i think i'm right in saying you're one of those who were going to try to filibuster... i wasn't. one of those who were going to try to filibuster... iwasn't. iwas when he wanted to ensure there was proper scrutiny of legislation. we we re proper scrutiny of legislation. we were appalled that for the first time in history of the house of lords the opposition, not even the government, not have put down a guillotine motion to limit and curtail debate. it was full of phrases like, there will be no
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further debate, this will pass without further debate, this will any pass with unanimity, that is what appalled us and we succeeded in getting a promise from the opposition that they would never resort to a guillotine motion again. so you don't think the government has thrown in the towel, effectively, and caved in? there is a separate issue of the bill. what we we re a separate issue of the bill. what we were debating yesterday was the guillotine motion. the government has accepted that the bill itself will go through and presumably completed stages before prorogation. they want, in a sense, they want that. but they want to ensure the excuse the labour party has for running scared and the general election is removed, becausejeremy corbyn said that once this bill is passed he would support an election. so it will be passed before
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prorogation, let him therefore vote foran prorogation, let him therefore vote for an election. are you happy with that decision then? i am certainly happy if it succeeds in forcing jeremy corbyn to stop being what was described as a chlorinated chicken, afraid of facing up to the electorate. what you think of the government's handling of all of this in the last few days, that the prorogation of parliament, which is as we have been hearing hugely controversial, kicking out 20 odd rebels from the party as well, what you make of all that? i think the prime criticism over the last few days should relate to parliamentarians who have broken their promises they made at the last election to the electorate to prevent brexit. but you don't want me to talk about that, i gather. you wa nt me to talk about that, i gather. you want me to criticise the government. 0n the question of people who voted against the government on a vote of confidence, i've never known that happen without people losing the whip. big difference between now and
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the past is that when people lose the past is that when people lose the whip they have an mechanism, and so the whip they have an mechanism, and so these people having been voting against the government will be able to appeal against losing the whip, and presumably if they promise to be good boys and girls in future, some of them may be allowed back in. 0nly the repeat offenders will lose the wet, that is my guess. what you think is the prior minister's position right now? some of the papers today are characterising him as being cornered because he can't at the moment get the election that he says he wants, he can't achieve brexit by october 31, which is what he promised to do. the papers are saying he is cornered, effectively. well, let us hope we have a general election, the british people give him the mandate to secure a departure from the eu, and therefore strengthen his bargaining position and we will either leave with a good deal or leave without a deal and
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negotiate a deal once we have left. are you confident he would win a general election? i am never confident before elections. anyone who is has no experience of politics. but i think you ought to win, and! politics. but i think you ought to win, and i hope he does. what about the threat from nigel farage and the brexit party? that is worrying. if they were to split the vote that would make things more difficult. so what is your message to them? to mr farage and his colleagues? to put the national interest first. i hope it will be made absolutely clear that we still stick by our intention to leave on the 31st of october, with or without a deal, and to secure possibly a good free trade... i have to interrupt you because he was the prime minister as we have been mentioning. he is in yorkshire at the moment. and we willjust hear his remarks. good afternoon,
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everybody. how fantastic to be here in the west yorkshire sunshine. it is extraordinary. lovely to see you. it must be the safest place in west yorkshire here! thank you all very much for coming along and this is the beginning, the launch of a fantastic programme that we have in this government, that we are very proud of, to recruit a big new wave of police officers across our country. and i want to say a big thank you to all those here, all those who are signing up, and everything, and for everything that you are going to do. and this is pa rt you are going to do. and this is part as you may know of a big effort by this government to deliver on the priorities of the british people. and, as you may have seen yesterday, i hope you saw it, there was a big announcement about more spending for the nhs, 20 new hospital upgrades on top of the 3a billion that we are
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putting in to the nhs, new money, we are levelling up education funding where the country so that all schools get an uplift, both primary and secondary schools, but in my view policing, safe streets is the absolute bedrock of society. it is what drives a successful and productive economy. it gives people the confidence to invest, to improve their neighbourhoods. safe streets are absolute vital for our country, and it is you in the police who are delivering safe streets, and i absolutely want to thank you from the bottom of my heart for what you do. i used to be mayor of london, andi do. i used to be mayor of london, and i was effectively... i was police and crime commissioner for london. and i know the incredible work that the police do. and i think the most important thing politicians can do is back the police. give you
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the top cover for what you do. whether that is ensuring you have the proper legal protections for important things like stop and search or, above all, making sure you have the funding that you need. in this programme, as you know, is just the beginning, the first 6000 ofa just the beginning, the first 6000 of a programme to recruit 20,000 more police officers. and are you quys more police officers. and are you guys new recruits? fantastic. thank you very much for what you are doing. thank you. and everyone is learning the caution. do you know the caution? you know what you have to say when you collar someone? you do not have to say anything, is that right? but anything you... know, do not have to say anything, is that right? butanything you... know, but if you fail to mention something which you later rely on... hang on, let's get this right. do you remember it? they all know it! which
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you later rely on in court, may be taken into account... anyway, you get the gist. and it is part of the training of the police in a law—abiding country that we know peoples rights and we give them their rights. and it is part of the trust between the public and the police. and it is absently vital that the public has a trust in the police. and i think the police in our country have a unique relationship with the public. it is quite unlike what you find in whether it other countries around the world. and i am immensely proud of the way we do it and of our record in bringing crime down. and we wa nt record in bringing crime down. and we want to go on, as i say, to recruit another 40,000 officers in this country. and i hope you think thatis this country. and i hope you think that is the right thing to do. and
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yes, of course, i understand crime is changing and crime is now a lot more online, but i think people in this country want to see police officers on the streets, spreading that sense of reassurance, making sure everyone in their neighbourhood feels safe and looked after. and we are going to insist on that. and this first push will cost, as sajid javid announced yesterday, £750 million for the first wave, there will be more to come. and i want to make a quick point about spending money in this country, which is that there are some people who are now suggesting that we should spend £1 billion more a month, not £700 million but a month to stay in the european union beyond 0ctober million but a month to stay in the european union beyond october 31. and i have to tell you, i don't think that would be a good use of public money. and i am going to make sure that we don't have that
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unnecessary delay. and i am going to do everything i possibly can to make sure that this country comes out of the eu on october 31. but u nfortu nately the eu on october 31. but unfortunately parliament voted yesterday effectively to scupper our negotiating power. and to make it much more difficult for this government to get a deal. so what i wa nt to government to get a deal. so what i want to do now is to really give the country a choice, we either go forward with our plan to get a deal, ta ke forward with our plan to get a deal, take the country out on october 31, which we can, or else somebody else should be allowed to see if they can keep us in beyond 0ctober should be allowed to see if they can keep us in beyond october 31. and i have to tell you, i don't think that would be the right way forward, and i think if people really think that
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this country should stay in the eu beyond 0ctober this country should stay in the eu beyond october 31, then that really should be a matterfor the people of this country to decide. because at the moment what parliament is voting for, or voted for yesterday, was a system by which the eu itself would decide how much longer we had to remain in. and iforthe decide how much longer we had to remain in. and ifor the life of me cannot think that is the right way forward. so what i can say, and i hate banging on about brexit, i don't want to go on about this anymore, and i don't want an election at all, i don't want an election at all, i don't want an election at all but frankly i cannot see any other way. the only way to get this thing done, to get this thing moving, is to make that decision, do you want this government to take us out on october 31 or do you wantjeremy corbyn and the labour party to go to that crucial summit in brussels on 0ctober crucial summit in brussels on october 17, crucial summit in brussels on 0ctober17, effectively hand over control to the eu and keep us in
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beyond 0ctober control to the eu and keep us in beyond october 31? i think it is a no—brainer, i'm sorry to bring this painful subject at this afternoon, but that is the reality of what face. anthony, there can be any one way forward for our country. i think the people of this country want to see the government of this country focusing not on brexit, that has gone on for three years, i think the people of the country want to see us focusing on their priorities and their needs, and i think they want to see people like you serving police officers, men and women, being able to get out on the streets and do yourjob, they want to see a government that funds you properly and allows you to get on and do that. and directs all their attention and all their concern on that priority, and i can tell you that priority, and i can tell you thatis that priority, and i can tell you that is what i want to do. but we must, must, must settle this eu debate. we must come out of the eu on october 31, and then i want to get on and deliver all the
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priorities of the british people. and, as! priorities of the british people. and, as i say, policing, making our streets safer, that comes first and thatis streets safer, that comes first and that is a top priority of this government. so thank you all very much for what you are doing. i'm sorry to have tested you on the caution, and myself got it wrong. but you are going to go on, you guys, but you are going to go on, you guys, to have fantastic careers as police officers, and it is a wonderful, wonderfuljob, police officers, and it is a wonderful, wonderful job, and police officers, and it is a wonderful, wonderfuljob, and i know you will find it immensely rewarding. thank you all very much for coming along this afternoon. i think i'm going to take some questions from the media. there they are! they have been patiently waiting at the back. i'm going to go to andy bell of channel five. and then pull brand of itv. thank you, prime minister. aren't people entitled to ask if your own brother
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can't back you, why should anyone else? actually, my own brother, as you will have seen from what he said this afternoon dotted at first i wa nt to this afternoon dotted at first i want to pay great tribute... he is asking about my brotherjojohnson, who is a fantastic guy and a great minister for science, who is a fantastic guy and a great ministerforscience, universities, did a fantastic amount of good work for us, for this country in that area. he doesn't agree with me about the european union because it is an issue that obviously divides families and divides everybody, but i think what he would agree is that we need to get on and sort this thing out. and i think what he certainly would agree, and he said as much this afternoon, is that this government has exactly the right priorities when it comes to dealing with the issues that really matter to the british people, and i'm talking about making streets safer, improving hospitals, and improving education services. so i thankjo
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for all the work he's done and for the support he's given for our domestic agenda. and i'm going to go now to paul of itv. thank you. if your own brother has lost faith in... hang on,... isa your own brother has lost faith in... hang on,... is a related topic. but a different question. if your own brother has lost faith in your own brother has lost faith in your plan, surely you will have to be the next member of the johnson family to resign? well, my intention, as i said just now, and i'm absolutely determined to do this, is to deliver on the mandate of the people. we have democracy in this country. and the way we work is that when the people of britain take a decision, parliamentarians are sworn to uphold that decision. and thatis sworn to uphold that decision. and that is what we all said we would do several times in the house of
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commons, to respect the result of the 2016 referendum on the eu, when people voted by very substantial majority to leave, we all said we would do it and that is what i want to do. and i have to say, i think there is a stark contrast between my approach and, i hate to be a party political, but that is the sad reality, that ofjeremy corbyn and the labour party. because at the moment, he won't... not only are they voting to make it impossible for this country to decide on its own to leave the eu, but they're also making it impossible for the people of this country to have an election. and i think you must be the first leader of the opposition in history to refuse to have an election. in fact, in history to refuse to have an election. infact, it in history to refuse to have an election. in fact, it seems to me to bea election. in fact, it seems to me to be a breach of his job description. he is part of the opposition, he should be actively seeking an election. i don't think i've ever seen anything like it. but myjob is
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to get us out on october 31 and that is what we are going to do. when he became prime minister you said you would unite our country, instead you are splitting your party and now even your own brother feels he cannot serve under you. if your own brother does not trust you to act in the national interest, why should all as we? well, you will have seen whatjo had to say about our agenda. look, people have seen whatjo had to say about ouragenda. look, people disagree about the eu. the way tonight the country is to get this thing done. that is the reality. the longer this goes on, the more dead and delay we have from parliament, inspired i am afraid ijeremy corbyn, the worse this thing will be. the people want to see as getting this thing done.
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kate ferguson from the bat son. can you make a promise today to the british public that you will not go back to brussels and ask for another jadeja backs it? yes, i can. —— and ask for another extension to brexit? would you resign first? it achieves absolutely nothing, what is the point of furtherjuly? it is totally pointless. claire and the daily mail. thank you. your own chancellor has become the latest tory mp to voice concern of your purge of 21 rebels from the party, deep regret your actions? was it a hasty and is
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there a way back for those mps? let us be clear, i think what this country once and what people and parliament want is to see as coming out of the eu on october the 31st and i'm afraid that the bill that was passed yesterday, alas, makes it much more difficult for us to negotiate. what it says, it actually draws up, the mps wrote a letter, that the prime minister would have to give to brussels. demanding an extension beyond 0ctober to give to brussels. demanding an extension beyond october the 31st, and then brussels, the eu, which decide how long the uk was going to remain in the eu. but the best will in the world, i cannot see how that is democratic for unless that is put to the british people. i think that is really what parliament once, to give the eu this power, to keep us in the eu themselves, to scupper the
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negotiations, then i think there should be a clear choice for the country. we should decide who do you wa nt to country. we should decide who do you want to be at that crucial summit on 0ctober want to be at that crucial summit on october the 17th? do you wantjeremy corbyn going there, with his plan to extend and delay and keep us in the eu forever and a day? where do you wa nt to eu forever and a day? where do you want to settle this thing, bring us all together and deliver on the mandate of the people? that is what i will do. so, for me, that is very, very clearly the way forward and thatis very clearly the way forward and that is the point i make to all my collea g u es that is the point i make to all my colleagues and friends in parliament. nobody, of course, discipline is always tough, but here we are amongst a body of man and women who know that sometimes you have to administer discipline and you have to be very clear about your message and that is what we are being. so, kate, in the guardian.
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thank you. prime minister, exactly when are you going to hold an enquiry into islamophobia in the conservative party, that you promise to do on live television? we are going to have, as i think sajid javid and i agreed, we will have a general enquiry into all manner of racism and h crime as inasmuch can be got under way. but i have to tell you we have a zero tolerance policy towards islamophobia and all manner of hate crime and prejudice in the conservative party as you can imagine. i think that is going to be at. i will take one right there and one mother. —— won more than.
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at. i will take one right there and one mother. -- won more than. the irish times. over the one mother. -- won more than. the irish times. 0verthe past one mother. -- won more than. the irish times. over the past few days she have including the late reverend ian paisley who spoke about how his people were british, but his colours we re people were british, but his colours were irish as a justification by the idea that there could be a different i referred... could you foresee a different gucci regime for anything else in northern ireland, except agri— food? else in northern ireland, except agri- food? well, you are right. that is what ian paisley said, he said that the people were british, but the cattle were irish. in that idea, there is the germ of a solution to the question of cross—border action and movement across the northern irish border. we do want to minimise all theoretical checks, as well as practical checks. we think practical checks can of course be taken away from the border, there is no need for, the uk
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will not be introducing any border checks of any kind in northern ireland. we also think there is scope for recognition of the practical reality on the ground in the agri— food sector in northern ireland. any extension, you know, all that depends entirely, and indeed whether it could be extended to any other sectors, depends entirely on democratic control by the people of the united kingdom. do you see what i'm in? that is the crucial thing. i will take one you see what i'm in? that is the crucialthing. i will take one more. thank you. you have talked today, prime minister, about the need for trust. jeremy corbyn says he cannot trust. jeremy corbyn says he cannot trust duty for the election before the brexit date and before the eu council, can you today give a
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commitment... yes, is at his line today? aha! that is a new one. if i have understood you correctly, the leader of the opposition has said he cannot trust us, trust me to hold an election before brexit was not right, i set about five times in parliament, how many times i have to say? we want an election on october the 15th and indeed, earlier if he wa nts. the 15th and indeed, earlier if he wants. let us crack on that. i really do not see how we can have a situation in which the british ability to negotiate is absolutely torpedoed by parliament in this way. with powers of the british people handed over to brussels so that we can be kept incarcerated in the eu without that actually being put to the people in the form of a boat. you know, time and time againjeremy corbyn, do not worry i will end
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facing... are you all right? i am so sorry. i think that is a scene for me to actively wind—up. time and time again, jeremy corbyn has said he wants a boat and, you know, he said he wants an election and here is, he has got an election absolutely being offered to him and for reasons i do not quite follow, he seems to be opting out. i leave you to speculate as to why he may be relu cta nt to you to speculate as to why he may be reluctant to do it. but it seems to me, a p1 toa reluctant to do it. but it seems to me, a p1 to a bowhead, you know, a no—deal brexit or about a hard brexit, then he should believe in himself to go to brussels on that crucial summit on october the 17th and sorted out. that seems to me the obvious thing. i think what we should do is have an election and decide who goes to get there. 0k,
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thank you very much. thank you all for listening so patiently. congratulations to all of you on what you are doing. thank you very much for all that you are going to do, of the risks you're going to take, running towards danger rather than away from it to make our country and our society safer. thank you very much. so, there we are. the prime minister in yorkshire with police cadets there as he was saying. taking three questions asking him about his brotherjo johnson's resignation. he said families disagree about the european union and paycheque it to the workers by the had done in government. he said he would rather be dead in a ditch and ask for a july two brexit. 0n the question of throwing rebels out of the party, he said discipline is tough sometimes you have to administer discipline. 0ur chief political correspondence is that me now. what tojimmy carter
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that question mark it was bizarre in places. almost as epi had dropped his speech on the way there and was making it up as he went along. he did not deliver some of the lines, we are often given some paragraphs in advance and none of that seem to be delivered. maybe he is a bit shaken about his brother suddenly resigning and the circumstances. but of course he was asked about that, no surprise. interestingly, he said he does not agree withjo about brexit. but he says thatjo agrees we need to get our mothers and i do not think that is the case was not jojohnson was not think that is the case was not jo johnson was another not think that is the case was not jojohnson was another referendum, he is against brexit happening. so, that was slightly strange. you can see that the one thing that we can be sure of is that borisjohnson will not go to the eu charter a delay to brexit. because the hem thatis delay to brexit. because the hem that is political suicide if it came to him. so they praise their eye would rather be dead in a ditch is a pretty strong indication he will not do that. how he gets a general
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election is also unclear. but that is what this look like. the police standing behind him, the picture almost that he wanted to, rather than what he was saying. we come back here on monday to parliament, where he will try again to get labour to vote for a general election and there is no indication they will do that. let us take another listen. there are some people that are now suggesting that we should spend £8 billion more a month, not 750 million, but a billion. —— £1 billion. to stay in the european union beyond 0ctober the european union beyond 0ctober the 31st and i have to tell you i do not think that'll be a good use of public money. i am going to make sure that we do not have that unnecessary delay. i will do everything that i possibly can to make sure that this country comes
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out of the eu on october the 31st. but unfortunately, parliament voted yesterday, effectively to scupper our negotiating power. and to make it much more difficult for this government to get a deal. so, what i wa nt to government to get a deal. so, what i want to do now is to really give the country a choice. we either go forward with our plan to get a deal, ta ke forward with our plan to get a deal, take the country out in october the 3ist, take the country out in october the 31st, which we can or else somebody else should be allowed to see it they can keep us in beyond 0ctober they can keep us in beyond 0ctober the 31st. i have to tally, i do not think that would be the right way forward and i think if people really think that this country should stay in the eu beyond 0ctober think that this country should stay in the eu beyond october at the 3ist, in the eu beyond october at the 31st, then that really should be a matter for the people of this
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country to decide. because at the moment, what parliament is voting for, what parliament voted for it yesterday was a system by which the eu itself would decide how much longer we had to remain in. and icon up longer we had to remain in. and icon upfor longer we had to remain in. and icon up for the life of me, cannot think thatis up for the life of me, cannot think that is the right way forward. so, all i can say and i hate banging on about brexit, i do not want to go on about brexit, i do not want to go on about this anymore and i do not want an election at all, but frankly i cannot see any other way. the only way to get this thing done, to get this thing moving is to make that decision. do you want this government to take us out on october the 31st or do you wantjeremy corbyn and the labour party to go to that crucial summit in brussels on 0ctober that crucial summit in brussels on october the 17th, effectively hand over control to the eu and keep us in beyond 0ctober over control to the eu and keep us in beyond october the 31st? i think it isa in beyond october the 31st? i think it is a no—brainer, i am sorry to bring this painful subject at this afternoon, but that is the reality
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of what we face. for me, there can be only one way forward for our country. i think what the people of this country want us to see is the government of this country focusing not on brexit, that is going on for three years. i think the country wa nt to three years. i think the country want to see us focusing on their priorities and needs. i think they wa nt to priorities and needs. i think they want to see like you serving police officers, men and women being allowed to get out on the street and do yourjob. they want to see a government that funds you properly and allows you to get on and do that. and directs other attention and other concern on that priority. so, that was borisjohnson but those remarks in front of police with cadets in west yorkshire a short time ago that let us get some analysis of what he has been saying where the former director of communications at downing street and theresa may's books men. craig, some quite colourful language and boris
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johnson. he said he was rather be dead and a ditch then asked the eu for a delay. he talked about the necessity to administer discipline sometimes on the rebels, what a jamaican at? i think he came very close to saying i will have to resign if i get a situation where britain has to go to europe and ask foran britain has to go to europe and ask for an extension. that would have been an extraordinary story, but he just pulled back. i think the most interesting thing is the bait was set up, in front of a bunch of police cadets, actively and election technique. what the conservative party has done over the last few weeks is focus on policies that will work and a general election, one of them is boosting the police. why are they doing that? they want to appeal to traditional working builders and a north of england and they have to pick up the seats in the campaign. so, they are going to appeal as much as possible to that group and when those labour seats. he cannot get the election he was yet, but
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government sources were saying he sees this as the start of the election campaign and it did certainly look like that. he certainly look like that. he certainly would not have an ally to do that with a bunch of police cadets behind them in an actual election campaign. in order to be able to prosecute the strategy that craig has laid out there, he possible has to make sure that he does not blow his party completely apart in the next few days. i think on the labour side, obviously they are relishing the fact that the payments is a bit on the back fit. the honeyman has come to a juddering halt. there was a period of the summerwhere it halt. there was a period of the summer where it felt as though boris johnson and dominic cummings walked on water and now they are dancing to somebody else's chain. you can understand by the labour chief whip said that labour plans to let him straight in his just said that labour plans to let him straight in hisjust for a bit. is there strategy but the sort of rhetoric effectively to take on the backs party? two out brexit the brexit party? they have worked out that they do not stop the brexit
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party and neutralise that, they are in serious trouble. this entire strategy is based on the idea that there is one party that can go to there is one party that can go to the country and say that we can deliver brexit as we are the people that can be trusted. nigel farage is currently waiting in the wings, he is waiting to see is borisjohnson going to be true to his word and deliver us out of the eu before october tour with a 35. at the moment, it is touch and go. it is all down to labour. i hear that jeremy corbyn is saying i'm going to have to go whenever there is an election, but about 80% of his backbenchers are saying no way, do not be stupid. that be a huge strategic problem if we did that. do not give him that. let him stew in hisjustice. not give him that. let him stew in his justice. what do not give him that. let him stew in hisjustice. what do labour do? are they better off with an election after the 31st? i think they need to think hard about whether they over 399 think hard about whether they over egg this. they know there will be an
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election coming, they probably, i mean, this is a three—dimensional procedure that we have seen played out. a lot of what is happened in the commons and in the lords has beenin the commons and in the lords has been in uncharted and unprecedented territory. yes, they have had the better of it over the past couple of days, but they may be many more tress in the tail and i think that while labour are on top at the moment, they should consider if it could swing back by quickly. the other thing of course is that the government has identified notjust obviously brexit voters, a lot of those were labour voters. the writ for success lies a smack through the labour party and they have identified weakness in labour. they had identified that this is a party thatis had identified that this is a party that is held together with sticky tape and string and that they have a brexit message themselves that is, shall we say, not doorstep ready. finally, jojohnson shall we say, not doorstep ready. finally, jo johnson resigning today. three questions were about his brother resigning and saying you
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know, if your own brother does not back you, why should the country back? no good answer to that question. jojohnson back? no good answer to that question. jo johnson having back? no good answer to that question. jojohnson having agreed to be part of the cabinet, his brother weathering to go abroad and join an out saying i am sorry, i cannot stomach it. there is no way you can sell out as a good thing. it isa you can sell out as a good thing. it is a serious problem for them. the question is, how much is that punching through outside westminster question mark i think it well, because we saw what happened with ed miliband his brother. it is the kind of thing that when it is a fight turn a of thing that when it is a fight turna family of thing that when it is a fight turn a family feud, it really cuts three. last question, is there going to be an election october the 15th? i still feel though it will come earlier. ijust think that stringing this out is going to end up being messy, potentially both sides and labour probably having had their fun for a few days, and had a think about what policies they might want to take to the british people, but probably eventually wish to get on
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that. thank you both very much hoping with us here at bbc news. let us go back to yorkshire now. as we we re us go back to yorkshire now. as we were just hearing, us go back to yorkshire now. as we werejust hearing, quite us go back to yorkshire now. as we were just hearing, quite an extraordinary backdrop for what the prime minister and his people really see as the opening of an election that has not yet been called. i mean, iwas that has not yet been called. i mean, i was beginning to think that we was very much feel like the starting gun is at the general election today, from what the payments are set. but when he eventually got on with his press conference on which was quite late, those 35 trainee police officer standing as they behind them for a good hour or so i think before he eventually came out, he did get on talking about what he was therefore originally. he was coming appear to west yorkshire to talk about recruiting more police officers and he was praising them for their commitment, hence the audience here
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at the west yorkshire headquarters. after that, the floor opened, if you like, to the questions from journalists, they hugger straight in on the announcement from jo johnson this afternoon. with questions like if your own brother does not spank you, how can you expect the rest of the country to back you? the prime minister was adamant sane people disagree, people and families disagree, people and families disagree all the time for so, he battered that one away as being just one of those things. he praised his brother for what he had one of those things. he praised his brotherfor what he had done in the past. he was also asked specifically, i think it was quite interesting, about whether or not he was going to make a commitment that he is not going to go back to brussels to ask for an extension beyond the deadline of october the 3ist beyond the deadline of october the 31st of he said yes, i can make a promise not to go back to brussels and ask for promise not to go back to brussels and askforan promise not to go back to brussels and ask for an extension, i was rather be dead in a ditch. he was asked about expelling mps from his parties, 21 had to go because they
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did not support the party line. he said discipline is tough, but has to be maintained. he said this audience here of pleas officers know that discipline can be tough. as ever, he had an answer for everything. lots of people having a good go at him with questions about jo of people having a good go at him with questions aboutjo johnson of people having a good go at him with questions aboutjojohnson and his announcement today. thank you very much, indeed. that is our correspondence in yorkshire. well, now the leader of the house of commons jacob rees—mogg has been criticised, you may remember, for comparing a probe remained doctor to the discredited doctor who was widely blamed for the scare over the mmrjab. he widely blamed for the scare over the mmr jab. he called widely blamed for the scare over the mmrjab. he called an lbc radio phonein mmrjab. he called an lbc radio phone in show and asked jacob rees—mogg what mortality rate he would exaggerate the uk were to leave the european union without a deal? let us have a lesson to what has been set in the house of
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commons. i am afraid it seems to me that the doctor is as irresponsible as doctor wakefield. what he had to say, ivory peters, is as irresponsible as doctor wakefield, in threatening that people will die because believe the european union, what level of responsibility was that? well, that was jacob rees-mogg in the comments and doctor david nichol joins in the comments and doctor david nicholjoins me now. you heard what was said in the commons, effectively send your every responsible, how do you respond? i am appalled, that tax notjust me but anyone who you respond? i am appalled, that tax not just me but anyone who speaks truth to power. anyone who has concerns truth to power. anyone who has concerns about safety and an attempt to bully me by using the cabbage as a parliamentary privilege, which is why i have come down to parliament literally with a megaphone to shout
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at parliament and challenge him to repeat what he said was not if he does, i will see repeat what he said was not if he does, iwill see him. repeat what he said was not if he does, i will see him. just recapture us what you would believe it happen in terms of lives, the talent he is. it is important to put it in context. every responsible body, there have been several articles about this, there is no such thing about this, there is no such thing about a zero harm no—deal brexit. that is something with which he disagrees. they may disagree with that advice, but they should be prepared to listen to it. but to dip them in expert... just be clear, what exactly are you saying about the mortality rate? i believe if we crashed out with a chaotic no deal there will be a patient harm and by that i mean some patients will die. what is your evidence for that? there in mind, i have dealt with a
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smalljigsaw there in mind, i have dealt with a small jigsaw puzzle with yellowhammer, i have just been looking at pharmaceuticals for neurology, i appreciate a huge amount of work has been done to the department for health, but i do not believe the plants are robust. even you appreciate that people will say that this is scaremongering... you appreciate that people will say that this is scaremongering. .. since i spoke to the news in march, the response i've had is this isjust project. i wrote the litigation and i rate them according to project. i wrote the litigation and irate them according to red, amber and green and, you know,... but i know somebody who backs the nhs and stay boated about that. well, that is fine, but did they contribute yellowhammer? it comes down to whether a government expert is willing to listen to expert advice.
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thank you for being with us here. that is just about it for me here at westminster. another very dramatic table time for the weather now. today there are some very pleasant spells of sunshine and not as windy. mind you, some areas of cloud brought some other nagging showers earlier today. pretty much cleared from scotland, one or two lingering across parts of northern england. this is coming our way during this evening and night. high pressure, these weather p toppling in and decreasing the cloud. may not far away from scotland at the moment. it will edge its way by the savages scotland, northern ireland and into northern england and north wales later on. they went will pick up as well as the rain. it should be a warmer night than last night,
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temperatures typically in double figures. heading into tomorrow, the rain banned clears away from southern scotland and northern ireland. slips further south into england and wales. heavy rain over the hills in the west. some rain throughout southern england during the afternoon. behind the brain, some sunshine and showers. temperatures and they northern have adkis temperatures and they northern have a dk is seen as today, cooler than today in southern parts of england with the rain. not much rain for the ashes at old trafford. it is a sharper, more likely earlier on in the day's proceedings. but in most pa rt the day's proceedings. but in most part it will be dry. probably a bit windier, a bit chillier perhaps. gusty wind across many parts of the country and they went direction changing to a more north—westerly as we head towards the end of the day. we will draw don't cooler air from the north around the top of that area of high pressure. that was not to baltimore as the begin goes on about a lot of dry weather, table top we are not without one or two showers, though, on saturday. on the
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whole, it will be dry. still a little bit bocelli went down there is not sequels, pegging back the temperatures that the best they want bobby across south wales and south—west england. overnight, saturday could turn quite cold. you will notice that if you're up early on sunday morning. a sunny site for the most part, they went will be lighter. my cloud coming into the north—west. this rain band heading off probably until after dark. a lot off probably until after dark. a lot of dry weather again and there's temperatures around 16 to 18 degrees. that rain band will move down for the north west for the start of next week.
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a bitter blow for the prime minister as his own brother resigns from government and from politics in the midst of the brexit crisis. jojohnson said he was stepping down as universities minister and won't stand as an mp at the next election because he is torn between family loyalty and national interest. in wakefield tonight, as the pressure continues to mount on borisjohnson he insisted that whatever happens he will not ask the eu for another extension to brexit. i'd rather be dead in a ditch. here in westminster — the government has confirmed that they will try again on monday to get mps to vote for an early general election. but the prime minister's day on the road here in yorkshire has been
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anything but

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