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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 7, 2019 7:00am-8:00am BST

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advantages, their plus points. but, you know, virgin has got a spaceport that is pretty much up and running. looking at blue origin's idea, jeff bezos is suggesting that it might be autonomous. so they might launch, with the tourists inside, they'd get to look out the windows and see the earth, and then it will land back on the earth, but without a pilot. now, i've got an amazon echo, and alexa can barely understand me. so whether the company behind that technology — whether i would trust them to send me to space or not autonomously, i don't know. i really, really don't know. to be fair, though, spacex are launching rockets and landing them autonomously. yes, they are, in all fairness. 0k marc, cheers. that's it for the short cut of click this week. there's plenty more in the full version which is waiting for you now on iplayer. you'll find us on social media, too, on youtube, facebook,
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instagram and twitter. thank you for watching and we will see you soon. good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. our headlines today: a call for schools in england to open at evenings and weekends. the children's commissioner says they'll be safe spaces to keep pupils away from gangs and violence. hundreds of people could be trapped as floodwaters rise after hurricane dorian lashes north carolina. mps from across the political divide are ready to go to court to force the prime minister to seek a delay to brexit. good morning. late wickets leave england in trouble in the fourth ashes test. they're still nearly 300 runs behind australia,
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so face a battle to save the match and the series. ahead of tonight's strictly launch, saffron barker and i check out fellow dancer will bayley‘s moves as the paralympic champion prepares for the european para table tennis championships. good morning. there's lots of dry, settled weather through the weekend. just the odd isolated shower, but with clear skies by day, that means chilly conditions overnight. i'll have all the details coming up shortly. good morning, it's saturday the 7th of september. our top story: schools should stay open at evenings, weekends and holidays to help protect pupils from crime and gangs, according to the children's commissioner for england. anne longfield said children no longer feel safe on the streets, and that opening classrooms outside of usual hours could offer a safe space. jane—frances kelly reports. bell rings the school bell marks the end of the day,
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but the children's commissioner for england would prefer it if pupils stayed on for a range of activities, rather than going straight home. anne longfield fears too many children are ending up indoors, stuck in front of their computers during theirfree time, because they don't feel safe playing outdoors. she warns that in more and more areas, gangs are operating in streets and parks, grooming increasingly younger children. to help tackle the problem, she would like schools to open at weekends, evenings and during school holidays to provide a safe place for extracurricular activities. anne longfield says about £2.6 billion a year of extra funding is needed to allow schools to stay open out of hours and to provide more high—quality youth support in communities. to put that cost in context, it's as much as the promised increase in school funding across the whole of england for 2020—2021. one head teachers‘ union
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has welcomed the idea, saying it would require extra money and careful planning but could create time for arts and sports, which are increasingly squeezed out of the school day. the government says it's making record investments in education and children's services to help young people overcome the challenges they face. jane—frances kelly, bbc news. officials in north carolina are warning that hundreds of people may be trapped as floodwaters rise following hurricane dorian. the storm is sweeping across the us state after devastating the bahamas, where hundreds of people are reported to be missing. our correspondent david willis sent this report. dorian grazed the carolina coast but certainly left its mark, leaving hundreds stranded amid rising floodwaters after they ignored a warning to leave. but the lashing winds and torrential rain bore little comparison to the destruction wrought
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earlier in the week. hundreds, possibly thousands of people are missing on the tiny island of abaco in the bahamas, and many fear the place will never be the same again. i honestly believe abaco is finished. i think abaco will not recover until the next ten years. like, fully recover, because everything is gone. absolutely everything is gone. a few miles off shore, the crew of a british ship, the rfa mounts bay, is spearheading what looks to be a massive relief operation. the united nations believes more than 70,000 people here are in urgent need of food and water. but the aim is to evacuate as many as possible to neighbouring islands, not least because those who remain face being homeless for months. dorian, for its part, has now headed out to sea, weaker than it was a week ago but still capable of doing serious damage.
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it's expected to make landfall again in nova scotia, canada, sometime this weekend. david willis, bbc news. the bbc understands a group of mps, including some rebel conservatives, has assembled a legal team to try and force borisjohnson to seek a delay to brexit. the prime minister has been adamant the uk will leave the eu at the end of the october. let's get more on this from our political correspondent matt cole, who's in oui’ london newsroom. borisjohnson said he would rather be dead in a ditch than ask for an extension so is this likely to force his hand? there are many who think he is rather boxed in at the moment. he has got two choices, a law has been passed and they are waiting for royal assent and it is about to become law that will force him to write to the eu and ask for an extension to the october 31 exit deadline and if he has not got a deal done by october the 19th, so
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his choices are to break the law and not ask for the extension or to break his promise that he would not ever do that, but he would rather die ina ever do that, but he would rather die in a ditch. so there is concern he has been quoted as saying that in theory he has to follow the law. i think therefore mps, we understand, largely tory rebels, some of those who were sacked this week for voting against borisjohnson, who were sacked this week for voting against boris johnson, have who were sacked this week for voting against borisjohnson, have lawyers ready in case the october 19 deadline comes and borisjohnson then does not write the letter. as a consequence they are lining up to make sure they have enough time to go through the courts and force him to do that. still by no means clear whether he would do that or take a different option, design perhaps and perhaps getjeremy different option, design perhaps and perhaps get jeremy corbyn different option, design perhaps and perhaps getjeremy corbyn into number ten to make that decision and then head us to a general election to make us make the decision afterwards. thank you, matt. a large number of small businesses say they still aren't ready for a no—deal brexit, according to a survey
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from the british chambers of commerce. the organisation, which represents tens of thousands of small businesses in the uk, has found two—fifths of companies haven't made contingency plans, and there's a lack of awareness about new customs regulations. our business correspondent katie prescott has more. here in southampton, these warehouses are filled to the rafters. meachers logistics stores everything from food to car batteries and takes it on to where it needs to go. but not knowing when and how we'll leave the european union is causing problems for them and their customers. we are so reliant on what the changing environment will be between the eu and uk and what decisions are made, just to how hard the brexit is, but pretty much, we are there in capability, but not necessarily with the manpower we'll need because you can't employ people with no work to do. it's very hard for businesses, particularly those who are are
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—— it's very hard for businesses, particularly those who are pressed delivering orders or dealing with contracts to try to hit a moving target, and that's exactly what they've seen over the past three years. those firms who have been able to do some preparations have done them. many others have been watching and waiting, hoping for a resolution to the question, so that they can then prepare with greater confidence. and right now, a lot of businesses still don't have the basic information that they need, either, in order to take those steps and make those preparations. the government says it has put in place a lot of support for small businesses to raise awareness about what they need to do. there's a website with comprehensive information for different sectors, a £10 million brexit readiness fund for trade associations, and a finance council to support investment in small businesses. but for companies like meachers, there's one thing that politicians aren't giving them that they want, and that's certainty. katie prescott, bbc news, southampton. the bbc‘s announced a collaboration with three big social media platforms to try to tackle the spread of fake news.
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google, twitter and facebook have been involved in drawing up a plan, including improved online education. technology firms have been accused of not doing enough to tackle the issue. india's attempt to become the first nation to land a spacecraft near the moon's unexplored south pole has apparently ended in failure. contact with the craft was lost moments before its module was due to touch down on the surface. it's not yet known what happened to it. india's prime minister narendra modi has said he's proud of the programme, and promised more opportunities to explore the moon in the future. it is ten past seven. you are up to date. the artist alison lapper has told breakfast that her son parys, who died suddenly last month, was failed by mental health services. parys, who was 19, was found dead in a hotel room. his mother says he suffered
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with depression, had been bullied when he was at school, and struggled to find appropriate professional help. john maguire reports. never, ever thought i'd have a baby. to be doing this is amazing. it is brilliant. a dream come true, really. it's fabulous. in the year 2000 the artist alison lapper took pa rt 2000 the artist alison lapper took part in the groundbreaking bbc series child of our time. her son pa rys was series child of our time. her son parys was one of the 25 babies born that year and his development and childhood the programme has charted ever since. well my boy was beautiful, i am ever since. well my boy was beautiful, iam biased, i know, very bubbly, full on, i have filled him running around and i forgot exactly when he was little at a bag of energy he really was. i had a boy that went from being mr confident, like his mum, to i could not get him
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out the front door. he would not get ona train. out the front door. he would not get on a train. you know? what was i supposed to do? last month, alison's son was found dead, alone in a hotel in sussex. in recent years, he had struggled with mental health issues. and i miss him. and i think it is such a waste of his life. why? why? i don't understand. because he was beautiful and he had so much to offer. and i felt like beautiful and he had so much to offer. and ifelt like i couldn't protect him. properly. because that's what you're supposed to do as a parent is protect. and ifelt that i. a parent is protect. and ifelt that i,i a parent is protect. and ifelt that i, ifeel now, i didn't do it well enough. but i didn't know how. an inquest is yet to be held into his death but parys's mother believes bullying at school, depression and a lack of appropriate mental
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healthcare may all have been factors. if anything good can come out of losing parys then it has to be that, you know, somebody has to speak out. i mean, i have heard from so many mothers who have got lads inexact with the same position and they are tearing their hair out, they are tearing their hair out, they do not know what to do. there are they do not know what to do. there a re less they do not know what to do. there are less units now. if you're child needs to be sectioned, they could be in scotland and you could be in wales. it doesn't make sense to me. at all. at one stage, alison says pa rys was at all. at one stage, alison says parys was placed in a unit specialising in anorexia, despite not having the condition. after a lifetime of overcoming obstacles herself, she now believes her greatest challenge will be to help change the system that, she says, failed her son so tragically. sad story. that report from john maguire. a spokesperson for the department of health and social care said it is vital that anyone can access specialist treatment as quickly as possible, and that it was working with experts to review training
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and education resources to help professionals spot and treat eating disorders quickly. it is just it isjust coming up it is just coming up to 1a minutes past seven. we have been talking about hurricane dorian this morning on the other side of the atlantic. you are starting over there for us, sarah? we will start with looking at hurricane dorian because this storm is packing a very powerful punch. this is the satellite image from the last 12 hours or so stop the eye of the storm is tending to fill, so it is weakening a little bit, but it is still producing hurricane force winds as it makes landfall in nova scotia. we have hurricane warnings there. then the remnants of the storm start to move up towards
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iceland by the middle part of the week. so the implications for us in the uk, we will be seeing a little bit of windier and slightly wetter weather for the bit of windier and slightly wetter weatherfor the middle part of bit of windier and slightly wetter weather for the middle part of the week. but we are certainly keeping a very close eye on that hurricane at the moment. for us, it is a serene start to the day. this is the picture in salt ash in cornwall, a beautiful sunrise out there. things are looking mostly dry and settle, just a few isolated showers here and there —— saltash. parts of eastern england will keep those showers through the day. but those hours will tend to fade, high—pressure building in from the west. a northerly breeze for scotland on the eastern coast of england as well, so one or two heavier showers for east anglia and the far south—east. for northern ireland in the far south of england, a few showers, but most
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places should avoid them. temperatures generally somewhere between about 17 and 19 degrees. that should feel reasonably pleasant with the blue sky, but cooler along the east coast. and the ashes continue at old trafford. we expect drier conditions with some long spells of sunshine and temperatures getting up to about 17 degrees or so. getting up to about 17 degrees or so. into the evening, i largely dry picture across the uk, and that is an indication that things will turn quite chilly. we could see a touch of frost across parts of eastern scotland, north—east england as well. even further south, those temperatures well down into single figures. and it is of course great north run tomorrow. after that cold and fresh start to the day, blue sky, lots of sunshine stop a light breeze, so pretty decent conditions for the runners there. through the day, we will keep sunshine across parts of eastern scotland and for much of england and wales as well stop at cloud moves in from the north—west. it will cloud overfor the western half of scotland, a little bit of patchy and light rain here in the middle part of the afternoon. temperatures similar to today, 15— 18 degrees. but we will lose that chilly wind from those eastern coasts. as we had to sunday night and on into monday morning, this frontal system works in from the western brings us a soggy start
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to the new working week. many places will receive a bit of rainfall through the day on monday, and with all the cloud and the outbreaks of rain, it is not going to feel warm. temperatures only at about 1k rain, it is not going to feel warm. temperatures only at about 1a to 16 degrees for us on monday, but that range should clear away. it leaves a slightly drier spell of weather towards the middle part of the week. temperatures will start to rise as we had through tuesday, but with the re m na nts of we had through tuesday, but with the remnants of that ex— hurricane to the north of us, we could see a little bit of rain and some breezy conditions through the middle part of the week. we will of course keep you updated on the progress of that hurricane. now it is back to you both. just watching closely to see what the forecast might be at old trafford, for the cricket. i don't think they will be saved by the rain either. the uk's top doctors are recommending that we take up activities such as tai chi, bowls, or even brisk walking to help us stay well when we are older. new national guidelines being issued today say focussing on building strength and balance can help prevent falls in old age. we are joined now byjane mcdermott, a researcher in healthy ageing
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from the university of manchester, and susan spain, who is a nordic walking instructor. good morning to you both. good morning. let's start with way balance is so important. we are saying balance and strength, why is balanced so important as we get older? said the evidence is that from about the age of a0 we lose muscle mass at approximately 8% per decade. for those of us who are more sedentary, it is probably higher than that because we all sit in offices, so we know that this is really important. in orderfor us offices, so we know that this is really important. in order for us to age well and you have a good later life, to be able to do the things that are really important to us, to remain independent, to stay connected to our communities. so it isa connected to our communities. so it is a critical part of ageing well. and does nordic walking help? is a critical part of ageing well. and does nordic walking help7m
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course, we are out walking on uneven terrain, which we know is important for improving balance, and because you are walking with poles, it is one of the few exercises which works your upper body as well, so it helps improve your bone density and flexibility, your mobility, and also it strengthens your upper body. as you age you need the balance. the poles are crucial, they help you propel as well as support you, so you can work a lot harder than you would normally do if you are just going walking alone. so jane, if you are giving people advice who are watching this at home, what would your targets be? what do we need to be able to do to keep ourselves fit as we get older, in terms of keeping hold of our muscle and keeping hold of our balance? so we just need to keep working our strength, our balance. there's a range of exercises you can do, both integrated into everyday life, so brushing your teeth, if you lift a leg up, balance on one leg. that's
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hard! it is hard, but when you have a bit ofa hard! it is hard, but when you have a bit of a wobble, that's great, because your balance is actually working. in terms of strength, take stairs more, use muscles, make sure your lower body is actually functioning well. cleaning can help, heavy housework is fantastic, doing the garden is fantastic. these are all really great ways. it is one way to motivate yourself. and if you feel a little bit of soreness the next day, that is a bonus, in the same way as if you wobble when you balance, you know you are balancing. ijoke about balance, you know you are balancing. i joke about vigorous hoovering, balance, you know you are balancing. ijoke about vigorous hoovering, but if you work a bit harder while you are doing the cleaning, it gets your heart rate up, doesn't it? it does, yes. one of the things i am interested in, nordic walking is great for developing balance, but how much does it helpjust being outside? well, we know that
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sociability, being in the fresh air, i always say the four fs, fitness, fun, fresh air. people that come to my groups, i walk in salford and manchester and there are instructors all across the country. you need to find them. they can with all sorts of issues. some come for weight loss, some come because of balance, some are recovering from illness, some are recovering from illness, some have got things like type ii diabetes or cardiovascular issues, and it really helps. it can help reduce blood pressure, helps with... it just improves reduce blood pressure, helps with... itjust improves your sense of well—being and builds your core strength. so we build balance exercises into the sessions that we do. and you talked about falling, jane. anyone who is older or has an elderly relative, you often hear the
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phrase he has had a fall and she has had a fall, and that can often be the start of a slippery slope, can't it, in terms of general overall health? yes, very rapid decline and a huge cost of the nhs. falls are not an inevitable part of ageing. we need to change that myth, because thatis need to change that myth, because that is what people believe that it is not true. if you engage in muscle strength and activities, especially balance and co—ordination, from mid to late in life, you are much less likely to have a fall. the most important modifier is muscle strength and balance. while sarah keith lucas was doing the weather i had a go at the test, and there is something that is really crucial when you do this test. you stand up, you stand on one leg, is that right? and make sure you have something near you you can grab onto. do grab hold of me if you need to. you lift your leg like that, and that is fine, but you have to close your
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eyes. and when you close your eyes, all of a sudden... thank you. you go. ideally you need to get that to 30 seconds, you need to be able to do that for 30 seconds. make sure you are near something safe so you can grab hold of it, lift one leg up and close your eyes, and it is the closing your eyes that really does affect your balance. it is very disconcerting. one of the things i had heard is that for older people, one of the things you should work on much earlier in life is really simple, it is getting out of a chair, getting out of a chair without using that or anything, so keeping basically those muscles strong. when you have the nordic walking poles, because you are working the triceps and biceps and it strengthens your core, it is very equal and balanced. unlike when you go to the gym and you have to do ten on one side or ten on the other, this will do it for you within an hour. i will have to go nordic walking, i think.
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hour. i will have to go nordic walking, ithink. understanding you can do in your own home. basically, just first of all work your bottom up just first of all work your bottom up to the end of the seat, make sure your heels are back, and then it is straight up. straight up, without using your hands. do not use your hands. thank you both very much indeed for coming on. educating yorkshire, the channel a series which followed life in a dewsbury secondary school, became a sensation after one of its pupils, mushy, learnt how to cope with his stammer thanks to his teacher mr burton and a pair of headphones. now, six years on, mushy‘s life is the subject of a new musical. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson caught up with him at rehearsals. i will put you some music on. it was atv i will put you some music on. it was a tv moment which became a viral video and made millions cry. the documentary series educating yorkshire. mushy, in year11, able to read a poem despite his acute
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stammer, when his teacher mr burton tried out a technique he had seen in the king ‘s speech. tried out a technique he had seen in the king 's speech. it's the same moment when the trees unloose their soft arm from around you, the birds ta ke soft arm from around you, the birds take back their language. now, six yea rs take back their language. now, six years later, mushy‘s story has been turned into a musical. # mushy, you put yorkshire on the map. # mushy, we saw you on tv, mushy, you're the man. and this is the moment he went to rehearsals to meet the man who would be playing him. how's it going? a little bit nervous! how are you doing? you all right? how is it for yourself? playing a role like this? that's a very good question, because when you are doing plays
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about people who are living, usually they are a bit older, and someone who is the same age as me, it is really quite interesting, because what school was like, everything like that, there's so many comparisons. but obviously your experience was a whole lot different. mushy then watched on as scenes from his life were acted out. how many weeks does it take my boys to change a lightbulb?” how many weeks does it take my boys to change a lightbulb? i don't know. it's like how the hell has it happened? it's awesome seeing how each and every person has put their ha rd each and every person has put their hard work in, and obviously really shown how far i come. hard work in, and obviously really shown how far! come. # i tell my mum i'm famous, i'm not a gig ora freak... mum i'm famous, i'm not a gig ora freak. . . the mum i'm famous, i'm not a gig ora freak... the aim was to encourage asian audiences into the theatre. mushy in this particular story can't
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speak so he uses hip—hop and lyrics to tell his inner thoughts, what he is going through, his emotions, and it is direct contact with the audience. i get the feeling there will be tears when people watch this. that's notjust will be tears when people watch this. that's not just the will be tears when people watch this. that's notjust the idea, the idea is to put on an amazing piece of theatre with kind of comedy, representation of what happened in his real life. i wanted to tell his whole story, not just his real life. i wanted to tell his whole story, notjust the kind of viral video, the before and after. and this is what mushy does no, —— does now, giving motivational talks at places such as this. princess lady, bruce springsteen has —— prince has played here, bruce springsteen has played here, and now you. obviously getting to the situation where i thought i would never speak again, situation where i thought i would neverspeak again, and situation where i thought i would never speak again, and speaking at this, it is awesome. his audience, 2000 people at the teach first development conference. hi guys, i
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am mushy, and hopefully you guys saw me onatv am mushy, and hopefully you guys saw me on a tv show six years ago called educating yorkshire. back at rehearsals, one important question remains. is he good—looking enough to play you? he is, i feel like i should be talking him mushy, i feel like i am playing him now. # mushy, your demand... like i am playing him now. # mushy, yourdemand... —— you are the man. mushy: lyrically speaking is on stage in watford, before going on tour to slough, northampton, birmingham, london and leeds. coming up in the next half—hour: we will catch up with table tennis champion will bayley. it is a busy time for him, with the european championships this week, and of course the small matter of training for strictly. we will hear how it is all going in a few minutes. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast
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with rogerjohnson and sally nugent. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. schools should stay open at evenings, weekends and holidays to help protect pupils from crime and gangs, according to the children's commissioner for england. anne longfield said children no longer feel safe on the streets, and that opening classrooms outside of usual hours could offer a safe space for activities. the government says it's making record investments in education and children's services to help young people overcome the challenges they face. they have got fantastic sports facilities, arts facilities, technology there, all of which gets locked up just at the time when children need it most, and the sad fa ct children need it most, and the sad fact is that we know that the violence picks between four and 630 in the evening when children are leaving school. that's just when schools need to be open. —— peaks.
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thousands of people have gathered at ports in the bahamas as they attempt to flee the devastation left behind by hurricane dorian. a3 people are known to have died, hundreds of others are feared missing. the storm is now sweeping across the us state of north carolina. the uk's promising £1.5 million to help the relief effort. the bbc understands a group of mps, including some rebel conservatives, has assembled a legal team to try and force borisjohnson to seek a delay to brexit. legislation aimed at enforcing a possible delay is due to gain royal assent on monday, but the prime minister has said that he would rather "be dead in a ditch" than ask for an extension. meanwhile, a large number of small businesses say they still aren't ready for a no—deal brexit, according to a survey from the british chambers of commerce. the organisation, which represents tens of thousands of small businesses in the uk, has found two—fifths of companies haven't made contingency plans, and there's a lack of awareness about new customs regulations. the uk's top doctors say we should take up activities such as dancing
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or brisk walking to help us stay well when we're older. bowls and tai chi are also amongst the recommended activities for over—65s, according to new national guidelines being issued today. they say focussing on building strength and balance can help prevent falls in old age. the biggest cause of loss of independence as you get older is actually falling over and not being able to cope. so develop the strength and balance as you go through adult life, so that you can continue in your later years. health experts in america have warned people to stop vaping, while they investigate a respiratory condition which has killed at least four people. officials are looking into more than a50 possible cases of a severe breathing illness among e—cigarette users, but the cause of the condition is not yet known. a woman in india is thought to have become the world's oldest mother after giving birth to
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twins at the age of 73. mangayamma ya ramati had undergone ivf treatment. she said she and her husband, who is 82 years old, have always wanted children, but had been unable to conceive until now. congratulations. twins at that age! and good luck. a big day, notjust because the cricket is going on in the ashes but also mike, it is your big night. cricket is going on in the ashes but also mike, it is your big nightm is! definitely, dancing as you get older is physically good for you and mentally. does it make you feel happier? absolutely, yes! could you be any happier? and you have obviously shed a few pounds. yes, the weight loss has started but there are still a few more pounds... i cannot wait until you bound the stairs and have your interview with
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claudia... the dancers do not get away with that. a long way to go in the cricket for england and how many times have we said this this summer, it is about ben stokes and jonny bairstow. and stokes is the man capable of pulling off another miracle. again! trying to save the ashes once more. england's ashes hopes hang in the balance once more after a late flurry of wickets saw them close the third day of the fourth test on 5—200, so still 297 runs behind australia's first innings total. andy swiss reports from old trafford. oh, the joys of cricket in september! a morning wash—out at old trafford, but it wasn'tjust the skies that looked a little gloomy — england's ashes chances were fading fast. they had to bat well and, for a decent while, they did, as rory burns and joe root combined to impressive effect. together, they shared a stubborn century stand and it was australia fluffing their chances, much to their very obvious frustration.
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but once burns was snaffled for 81, suddenly, the pendulum swung. moments later, root was following him, trapped leg before for 71. that brought in the hero of headingley, ben stokes, to a predictably raucous reception. cheering and applause but at the other end, there was rather less to cheer... commentator: bowled him! ..jason roy emphatically dismissed by josh hazlewood. that late clatter of wickets leaving australia in control and england still trailing by a hefty 297. while stokes is still there, england fans will believe anything is possible, but they know they face a huge battle to save this match, and their ashes hopes. andy swiss, bbc news, old trafford. we probably wouldn't have liked to lose a couple of wickets at the end there but, you know, i think it's set it out pretty, you know, clearfor us in terms of there's a follow—on to get past and there's a score to get as close as we can, and i think we're only
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a couple of partnerships away from that. gareth bale was wales' hero as his late goal helped them beat azerbaijan 2—1 in their euro 2020 qualifier in cardiff — that keeps their hopes of qualifying alive, but scotland's are hanging by a threat after a 2—1 defeat to russia. patrick gearey reports. this is the type of margin qualification campaigns can be decided on. this is the type of player that does the deciding. within inches and minutes to spare gareth bale saved wales. he makes things happen, they say, they really happen quite like this though, the shia was not looking and fortunately for him everyone else was. few will forget his own goal in a name —— game they needed to win, well struggled to create anything more deliberate and cardiff was stunned when azerbaijan hit back. they really even had a chance for a second go, his nation ranked 109 in the world were level. now wales, memorable semifinalist at the last
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championships, were up against it to reach the next one, only seven minutes remained when bale climbed above the chaos, the ball had crossed the line and wales scraped home. scotland have also taken a meandering path through qualifying so far but under new boss steve clarke there is belief which turned into full on chest thumping confidence injohn into full on chest thumping confidence in john mcginn's into full on chest thumping confidence injohn mcginn's first goalfor his confidence injohn mcginn's first goal for his country put them ahead against russia. since reaching the last eight of their own world cup last eight of their own world cup last year russia have been arising force, they only needed a glimpse. the russians had the best of position, playing a97 passes in all, but it only took two to win it, the second so good stephen o'donnell had no choice but to put it in his own goal. scotland could soon —— still reach the euro through the play—offs and they may need that safety net. patrick gearey, bbc news. england manager gareth southgate says his side still have everything to prove as they take on their groups bottom side bulgaria at wembley this afternoon.
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england have won two out of two qualifiers so far. after bulgaria, they play kosovo at st mary's on tuesday. victories in both games would make qualification for next year's tournament a near formality. attendance records for women's super league matches will almost certainly be smashed this weekend with some games being played at their clubs' main grounds for the first time. the new season kicks off with manchester city hosting newly promoted manchester united at the etihad. the two sides, haven't met in the super league before, with united playing theirfirst season in the wsl. —— the two sides haven't met in the super league before, with united playing theirfirst season in the wsl. we're making sure that we're diligent in — in all of our preparation, making sure the players know their roles and responsibilities. are we there yet? no. we've got a long way to go and we're probably still gonna be finding our feet in this league campaign when we start. but we start in a very, very tough way, you know? man city, arsenal, liverpool for your first three games is a tough ask for a promoted team, but it will give us a good guide and a good barometer of where we're at.
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rafael nadal‘ has reached the final of the us open final with a straight—sets win over italian matteo berrettini. the spaniard survived two set points in the opener before his class shone through in a 7—6, 6—a, 6—1win at flushing meadows. nadal is going for a fourth title in tomorrow's final against russia's daniil medvedev in new york. counting down to the rugby world cup. england will fly out to japan for the rugby world cup on sunday on the back of a straight—forward victory over italy — they won 37—0 at stjames' park in their last warm—up game. after a tryless first half, england took three minutes to score after the re—start as ben youngs crossed the line. three more tries followed, anthony watson with the last of them. scotland beat a stubborn georgia side in theirfinal world cup warm—up match. ali price was one of the try scorers in a close first half. scotland pulled away after the break, though, with a try from darcy graham helping to complete a 36—9 win at murrayfield. the former south africa rugby legend chester williams has passed away at the age of a9, after a heart attack. sad news.
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williams was famously part of the springbok squad that won the rugby world cup in 1995. he played 27 tests for his country, scoring 1a tries, before retiring and moving into coaching. ferrari's charles leclerc is the man to beat once again at the italian grand prix. he was fastest in both practice sessions yesterday. following his maiden win in belgium last weekend, the frenchman set the pace, just ahead of championship leader lewis hamilton in his mercedes. what the tifosi — the ferrari fanatics — wouldn't give for a first victory at monza since 2010! in rugby league's super league, leaders st helens thrashed huddersfield giants a8—6 with second—placed wigan beating catalans dragons a6—12. and it was the battle at the bottom as hull kingston rovers took on london broncos, and it was the visiting broncos who prevailed 20—16. jay pitts one of their three try scorers. elsewhere, warrington beat wakefield, and salford won at leeds.
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now, as well as limbering up for strictly with the launch show tonight, my fellow dancer will bayley has the table tennis european championships to prepare for. hats off to him. the british team head to sweden next week with the paralympic champion from brighton hoping to add to his medal haul. talking about having to do training and table tennis at the same time! i've been to the club on the sussex coast, where it all started for will, thanks to his gran. his feet may be dancing to the strictly beach these days but will bayley is still having to keep his hands busy with bat and ball. —— eight. i'm taking some tips on how to multitask. we'll have to keep going because the european cup in sweden starts on monday weekend with
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his paralympic title to defend in a yea r‘s his paralympic title to defend in a year's time in tokyo he cannot afford to miss anything. year's time in tokyo he cannot afford to miss anythinglj year's time in tokyo he cannot afford to miss anything. i am loving it, as you know the dance training is full on and stuff but i am still getting on my table tennis every day, so important, i'm looking to ta ke day, so important, i'm looking to take sweden and to bring another metal back to great britain is my dream. and you have to bring it back into the strictly studio. 10096. dream. and you have to bring it back into the strictly studio. 100%. will into the strictly studio. 10096. will you be wearing it in your first dance? it would be perfect, wouldn't it? he started when he was seven, one of the condition that affects all of my limbs and a seven i had blood cancer and i was in hospital in and out for two years and my grandma bought me a mini table tennis table and i started playing on that and it is the only sport i could beat my brother at. one of the keys of your success has been the brighton table tennis club. it runs sessions for asylum seekers, homeless people, a community for everyone. i would! homeless people, a community for everyone. iwould! william homeless people, a community for everyone. i would! william shot from harry! fantastic! you just scoi’ed
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everyone. i would! william shot from harry! fantastic! you just scored a point against the defending will champion! will is my hero. me and will know each other very well. and it isn't just table will know each other very well. and it isn'tjust table tennis curry has been learning from will. —— harry. will is been learning from will. —— harry. willis a great been learning from will. —— harry. will is a great role been learning from will. —— harry. willis a great role model for the kids. everybody that really likes to play with will. and everything that he has been through in becoming number one in the world and becoming paralympic champion. and inspiring his new strictly friends too including brighton's saffron barker. i have got my butt and i am ready! gosh! my dancing skills have to be better than my table tennis skills. i never realised how hard it was. keep your eye on the ball. stay, move as quickly as you can towards the ball. good shot! and enjoyed it,
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have fun with it. and it is movement of the feet. critical. she has done it again! 2—1! she is a new talent in table tennis! saffron barker! having seen her take the point there was no more mr nice guy as will showed us why he won. right in the ear! what a shot! we had probably better stop there. our strictly dance partners will be revealed two so we had better get going! she is right, we cannot walk anywhere normally anymore so cue the theme tune, maybe. dancing on pebbles isn't the easiest thing. doing the conger on brighton beach! there we are.
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and strictly come dancing starts tonight on bbc one at 7:10. so tonight... how is your er? it didn't hurt too much. and tonight we find out who your partner is? it will all be revealed. we were just grilling him, he wouldn't tell us. it is full of drama, tonight's show, it really is. here is sarah with a look at this morning's weather. i believe starting on the other side of the atlantic, sarah. yes, we will start the other side of the atlantic, because hurricane dorian is still a very powerful storm. although it has weakened to a category 1 storm, it although it has weakened to a category1 storm, it is producing winds of 170 mph. hurricane warning still in force across nova scotia, and that storm makes its way into the north atlantic. by the middle pa rt the north atlantic. by the middle part of the coming week it will be sitting well to the north of the uk.
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it will not be the hurricane anymore, but the remnants of ex— hurricane dorian. it will bring some wet and windy weather for us through the middle part of the week but at the middle part of the week but at the moment we are still keeping our eyes on that hurricane. it is producing dangerous conditions across eastern canada through the remainder of the weekend. back to our shores, and for us it is a fairly quiet start to the day. this is the picture as the sun has risen now in cornwall. so a fine start to the weekend and with high pressure in chargea the weekend and with high pressure in charge a lot of dry weather with some sunshine. a few showers around here and there, especially for parts of eastern england, eastern scotland, wales, northern ireland and the south—west. with high pressure moving its way in from the atlantic, that should tend to squeeze most of the showers away. a few showers around this morning, but one or two continuing across parts of eastern england. increasing amounts of sunshine as we head on towards this afternoon and those
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temperatures not doing too badly. for most of us about 17— 19 degrees, but if you are exposed to that northerly wind for the likes of eastern scotland and the east coast of england as well, it will feel a touch cooler. no sign of any rainfall at old trafford. the ashes continuing today. sunny spells with top temperatures getting up to about i7 top temperatures getting up to about 17 degrees or so. we keep the largely clear, dry conditions as we go through this evening and overnight, and you can see the green hue to the map, showing us those temperatures dropping fairly quickly tonight. we could see a touch of frost, especially for parts of eastern scotland and north—east england as well. in the countryside a frosty start to the day, and it is the great north run tomorrow. after that cold start, it should be a pretty decent day for the runners taking part. quite a lot of sunshine, it will be dry with some light wind as well. those conditions are setfair light wind as well. those conditions are set fair through the day. for england and wales you keep the dry and sunny weather. for scotland and northern ireland, the cloud will increase through the day and for the afternoon you will see a few light patches of rain moving in through the west. further south and east, blue skies through the afternoon and temperatures fairly similar to today. we will lose that cold
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northerly wind from the east coast. heading through sunday night and overnight into monday, this mental system overnight into monday, this mental syste m m oves overnight into monday, this mental system moves its way in from the west. for many of us that will bring a soggy west. for many of us that will bring a soggy start for the new working week. this is how monday is looking. we have that front ringing ran initially to western parts of the uk but edging further eastwards through the course of day. underneath the cloud, with the rain, it is not going to feel particularly warm. quite an autumnal field, only about 14 quite an autumnal field, only about ia to 16 quite an autumnal field, only about 1a to 16 degrees or so stop for the rest of the week, it looks like those temperatures should start to edge up again. with the remnants of hurricane dorian through the end of the week, breezy conditions on wednesday. we will be keeping a close eye on that hurricane as it nears eastern canada. we will talk to you again in the next hour. and salvation for the cricketers not forthcoming in manchester. we will be back with the headlines at 8:00am. now it's time for newswatch.
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hello, and welcome to newswatch. presenters outside parliament are now wearing the type of headset more often seen on pop stars. has this satisfied those complaining of noisy protesters disrupting outside broadcasts? and will the andrew neil show, just launched on bbc two, get the big political hitters on and offer any further clarity on brexit? one way you can tell the levels of excitement and drama at westminster is by counting the number of temporary structures put up by broadcasters on college green, opposite the houses of parliament. this week we seem to be getting pretty near to peak gazebo, with journalists jostling for space, mps scurrying from interview to interview, and of course the noisy presence of protesters representing all shades of opinion. we have discussed before on newswatch how some viewers find the presence of protesters distracting and annoying and there were more objections this
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week, following moment such as this. a date that they choose, and i think that is bonkers... protesters shouting. we have our next guest, as well, alison mcgovern... protesters shouting. ..a labourmp. good morning. there are so many divisions. let's be clear. who are you going to vote for today? i am going to vote... mcgovern drowned out by protesters. ..no deal. melanie cox was one of a number of viewers to respond in this way. my point is that i feel that the bbc, by broadcasting from parliament square during this brexit debate, are fuelling the animosity between the two sides. both sides are only there in these big numbers
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because of the tv cameras. the bbc should move away from parliament green so that we can actually get the reports without having the interruptions from the brexiteers and from the remain side. by tuesday evening, a partial solution to the noise problem had been found, with the bbc following sky's lead in using headset microphones, so—called madonna mics, in the style of pop stars or sports commentators. katie searle, head of bbc westminster, said the intention was not to block out the background noise entirely. but on thursday's news at ten it seems the new microphones were not excluding as much background noise
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as some might have wished. it looks as if no deal brexit is a very real possibility... protester shouting. ..and the coming election could be vindication or backfire very, very badly. there is... protester shouting. ..and certainly there are some in government and in the conservative party who believe that plan may need to go back to the drawing board. some very vocal protesters, not many of them here tonight, but they're certainly making their feelings known. work to be done, perhaps. and some, such as this telephone caller, remain unconvinced about the value or necessity of broadcasting from college green, new microphones or not. why do they have to be standing outside with what looks like a sports commentator‘s microphone? put them in a studio. it is of course a bonanza time for political programmes. question time returned on thursday for its new series, a week earlier than scheduled.
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wednesday also saw the launch, two weeks before it was planned, of the andrew neil show. the timing of this new vehicle for the much—fea red veteran interviewer was unfortunate, as it went on air at 7:00pm while mps were voting on proposals to rule out a no deal brexit, and so could not appear live in the studio. as a result, these two interviews with chief secretary to the treasury rishi sunak and the shadow housing secretary john healey were conducted down the line, and pre—recorded. preparing for no deal, making sure our borders are ready, customs is ready... i understand that. are you hearing the questions i'm asking you? i am trying to get to that, you are asking about the future... we have a government with no majority in parliament... i understand that, but... sorry. i understand that, but that is the rhetoric. i am trying to pin you down to what is happening. some, like david herman, were underwhelmed with that lineup of interviewees.
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others were more complementary, with raj kumar advising: iamjoined now by the bbc‘s editor of live political programmes, rob burley. robert peston on itv did have the prime minister that night, but not andrew neil. you had two quite minorfigures. not a great start. i think "two minor figures" is unfair. we had the chief treasury secretary
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on the day of a major economic statement, we had a member of the shadow cabinet who's close tojeremy corbyn. obviously i congratulate the peston programme for getting the prime minister that night, but it's interesting to me that if you look at the ratings, more people watched our show with andrew neil than that show with the prime minister. so i think there is a big draw for people who want to watch andrew neil, in a time of extraordinary politics, they want what many regard as the best interviewer in the business to hold people to account. so that's what happened. obviously it's about big names and big figures, that's part of politics, but also the issues and the the questions, those are really the most important things. what we're trying to do is establish a few things on what was a very dramatic night. aren't there too many political programmes on tv and radio, chasing the same guests? no, i don't think that is right. obviously there is lots of news programmes happening in the day, there are different kinds
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of interviews on different political programmes, some which are more considered and some which are at length. that interview with rishi sunak was 15 minutes long. that is something offered on the weekend by andrew marr, fa ntastically. we offer a different kind of programme on politics live during the day. i think the time could not be more right to have these longer interviews. lots of people, including yourself, have been talking about andrew neil and his reputation. is there a danger you're not going to get the big political names because people are too scared of him now? no, i think he's respected, hugely, by politicians. there was a survey of who is the most respected broadcast journalist, or it might have been journalists in general, among the political class. andrew neil was right up there, because they recognise he knows the material and is incredibly well briefed, and an encounter with him is also an opportunity for them to prove their mettle in an interview setting. if you recall, a couple of months ago we had interviews with borisjohnson and jeremy hunt in the leadership race for the conservative party and they both submitted themselves to the andrew neil interview.
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politicians know it is a serious place, they know it will get heard, they know they will be subject to questions. i think we will be fine. an interesting point that allen lane, one of the viewers, made by email. is andrew neil too often pushing for a simple answer when they might not be a simple answer? you can't really accuse andrew neil of giving into simplicity. sometimes? what he does... i think what people want, when they watch an interview with a politician, is that they want the answers. what andrew neil does is, when he spots an answer which is disingenuous or not quite hitting the actual specific point asked about, he will pick them up on it. i think that is what we should doing in a democracy, and that is what our role is. look, there is more than one way to skin a cat when it comes to political interviewing styles. different people have different techniques. andrew has his own technique, arguably it is the most effective technique, others would say there are different ways they prefer, and i think that's what the viewing figures showed,
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with very little people warned, because we brought this forward by two weeks, people want to watch andrew neil interview people. the andrew neil show launching on bbc two comes after this week, which he presented for all those years, was taken off air. can you tell us why? very straightforward, really. this week is a late—night political show. it was a fantastic programme, on air more than 15 years. its character was built into that slot on the schedule. andrew neil, for understandable reasons, thought it was time to stop doing a late—night political show. the question then is, what do we do? and we felt that in times like these, the very best vehicle for him now will be to do a programme like we are doing, with the andrew neil show, much more straight on politics, analysis, interviewing. so once this week wasn't possible anymore, that is how we ended up doing this different thing, which i think is very different, but very important.
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rob, thank you. thank you. if the andrew neil show is a brand—new programme, newsnight is in television terms a very old one. a0 years old next year. but this week it unveiled something of a new look, with a different logo, a modified set and an updated version of its theme song. newsnight theme plays. well, the rebrand enjoyed a mostly positive response, with a twitter user called mr celtic loving: daniel demoses thought
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it was: but natasha bellamy disagreed. thank you for all your comments this week. please get in touch with your opinions about what you see on bbc tv news, online or bbc social media. you may even get to appear on the programme. you can email us or find us on twitter. you can call us, and do have a look at previous discussions on our website. that's all from us. we will be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week.

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