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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 7, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'm shaun ley. the headlines at five: the prime minister says he would "rather be dead in a ditch" than delay brexit — but a cross—party group of mps is preparing to take legal action if he refuses to abide by a bill to delay brexit. the court's making a decision to try to make a prime minister abide by the law made by a parliament of which he is a member. these are strange times for democracy. it's the law of the land and he is under an obligation to obey it. if he doesn't obey it, then he can be taken to court and, if necessary, the court will issue an injunction ordering him to do it. and if he doesn't obey the injuction, he could be sent to prison. satellite images appear to show an iranian oil tanker off the syrian coast — after it was previously impounded in gibraltar. the number of people killed as a result of hurricane dorian in the bahamas has risen to a3.
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australia recover from a top—order collapse in the fourth day of the ashes test. and in half an hour, we'll take a look at the best and worst of this week's film and dvd releases — in the film review. good afternoon. a group of mps are preparing legal action if borisjohnson refuses to carry out the instruction of a new law requiring him to ask for a further delay to brexit. the legislation, to rule out the option of a no deal exit at the end of october, is expected to become law on monday. the prime minister has said he would rather be "dead in a ditch" than ask for a brexit extension.
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our political correspondent, matt cole, reports. after a week of wrangling and some of the most testing days a fledgling prime minister has faced, borisjohnson now has a weekend to pause and think. as many of that opinion will say content... content! the contrary not content. the contents have it. the lords have followed the commons, approving legislation, so by monday it should be locked in law that britain can't leave the eu without a deal on october 31st. which appears to mean the pm is boxed in. either he can break his pledge not to ask for more time, or he can break the law and not ask for an brexit extension. remember, the new law means boris johnson has until october 19th to get a deal with brussels. if not, the new law says he must write and request more time, until at least january 31st. but yesterday he said this:
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this bill would in theory mean that the government was obliged to write a letter asking brussels for a pointless delay. downing street stress this is borisjohnson merely underlining he will not put pen to paper, but some fear he is seeking a loophole or way around the law, and seniorfigures are counselling caution. it is such a fundamental principle that we are governed by the rule of law, that i hope that nobody of any party will question it, and defying any particular law sets a really dangerous precedent. so concerned are some mps, not least tories sacked by borisjohnson this week for disloyalty, that they have confirmed readying lawyers to challenge the prime minister if he doesn't comply. courts making a decision to try to make a prime minister abide by the law made by a parliament, of which he is a member, these are strange times for democracy. putting it to the people, having a general election is one solution borisjohnson is pursuing,
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but without opposition mps‘ support that is not an option and they are refusing to help. of course, if this man can, as he has pledged, get a deal by mid—october, things could move in a very different direction, but right now, there is little sign of that. our political correspondent matt cole explained how likely it was the prime minister could ignore a law requiring him to request a further brexit extension. nanning street are trying to tell us, don't read too much into the prime minister saying in theory i would have to abide by the law here. his exact words were something similarto his exact words were something similar to that. you could have said, in practice, i have got to do this, the law said i have to do that. what they say would you take away as the message from what she was saying was that he was simply reiterating he has no intention of going to brussels i'd ask about other time. like a
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going to brussels i'd ask about othertime. like a big going to brussels i'd ask about other time. like a big that the question, what will he do, because it will be the law. will he resign? well if you somehow managed to get a general election, and loss, be able to win an election with a majority, swiftly get a bit of law in place that because of the law that has and he has to go to brussels. he would have to get an election, at the moment, you need is opposition support to get it, those opposition mps are saying no thank you. that brings back to the question will he d efy brings back to the question will he defy the law? hence, many of the mps that he sacked this week from his own party, labour and lib dems are aware of this action, this is largely driven by those he removed the whip from. they are angry about this and are getting the ducks in a i’ow this and are getting the ducks in a row just this and are getting the ducks in a rowjust in this and are getting the ducks in a row just in case. this and are getting the ducks in a rowjust in case. one of them being dominic grieve. you can't ignore the law, he is is bound by the rule of
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law, he is is bound by the rule of law as anybody else in the country. parliament has passed legislation, onceit parliament has passed legislation, once it has received royal assent, it is the law of the line and he is under obligation to abate. if he does not, he can be taken to court, if necessary, the court will issue an injunction ordering him to do it. if he doesn't obey the injunction, she will be sent to prison. in any case, it will be a contempt of court hearing because he hasn't carried out the instructions of government was up by then, it will have com pletely was up by then, it will have completely collapsed with no civil servant willing to work for him. this is fantasy, a child having a tantrum, his behaviour is that of a 4 euros having a tantrum because he can't have what you are sure to stop what he asked for was entirely improper. dominic grieve grape speaking on the new channel. strong stuff, i suppose he might not have news that language when he was a conservative mp, he is unbound now.
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he indicated he would stand as an independent? part of the threat to the tory mps have been to remove the whip, they have also been told they will not be allowed to stand in their constituencies as a tory mp. dominic grieve was the former attorney general, philip hammond was the chancellor just a attorney general, philip hammond was the chancellorjust a few attorney general, philip hammond was the chancellor just a few weeks attorney general, philip hammond was the chancellorjust a few weeks ago, this is astonishing how big players have been excluded in this way and they are not going down without a fight. an iranian oil tanker, which was seized by royal marines off the coast of gibraltar injuly, because it was suspected of travelling to syria against eu sanctions, has been spotted near a syrian port. the ship was released on the condition it would not take oil to syria. it's been photographed by satellite near tartus, as helena wilkinson reports. this is the iranian oil tanker, the grace 1, which this summer was detained just off gibraltar, sparking an international diplomatic crisis. back injuly, it was stopped by royal marines, suspected of moving oil to syria —
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a breach of eu sanctions. the americans tried to stop the tankerfrom being released. but last month, iran gave assurances it wouldn't discharge cargo in syria, so authorities in gibraltar let the ship go. but look at these recent satellite images released by a us space technology company. they appear to show the iranian oil tanker, now renamed adrian darya i, in the waters just off the syrian port of tartus. the tanker is believed to have turned off the transponder tracking its location earlier this week. the president's national security adviser, john bolton, has responded with this: "anyone who said the adrian daryer i wasn't heading "to syria is in denial. "tehran thinks it is more important to fund the murderous assad regime "than provide for its own people."
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just this week, iran admitted it has begun using advanced technology to enrich uranium, taking a step back from its 2015 nuclear deal. today's developments have added to the international diplomatic stand—off over iran, which shows no signs of nearing its end. the number of people now known to have died in the bahamas as a result of hurricane dorian has risen to a3. but the death toll is expected to rise significantly. efforts are continuing to provide aid to survivors and find further victims of the storm on the islands. david willis reports. dorian grazed the carolina coast but certainly left its mark, leaving hundreds stranded amid rising floodwaters after they ignored a warning to leave. but the lashing winds and torrential rain bore little comparison to the destruction wrought earlier in the week.
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hundreds, possibly thousands, of people are missing on the tiny island of abaco in the bahamas, and many fear the place will never be the same again. i honestly believe abaco is finished. i think abaco will not recover until the next ten years. like, fully recover, because everything is gone. absolutely everything is gone. a few miles off shore, the crew of a british ship, the rfa mounts bay, is spearheading what looks to be a massive relief operation. the united nations believes more than 70,000 people here are in urgent need of food and water. but the aim is to evacuate as many as possible to neighbouring islands, not least because those who remain face being homeless for months. dorian, for its part, has now headed out to sea, weaker than it was a week ago but still capable of doing serious damage. it's expected to make landfall again in nova scotia,
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canada, sometime this weekend. david willis, bbc news. russia and ukraine have completed a long—awaited exchange of prisoners. it's hoped the swap will ease tensions between the two neighbours. the bbc‘s jonah fisher was at the airport in kiev as the prisoners arrived home. there were emotional scenes here in kiev as the aeroplane behind me touched down after the one hour flight from moscow. on board were 35 ukrainians who had been held prisoner in russia including 2a sailors who had been detained in november of last year by the russian navy and 11 other civilians including all the most high—profile ukrainian detainees and russia. the ukrainian president was here to greet them and i had
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a quick word with him as he gave a press c0 nfe re nce in front of the plane. i hope we will have the nearest meeting and speak about it and speak all the steps during the nearest future. we have to do all the steps to finish this horrible war. do you think this is a new chapter in relations between russia and ukraine? i think this is the first chapter. what did ukraine give up in return for these prisoners? 35 people flew in the opposite direction to moscow and it looks like the key person among them was a ukrainian who was operating mhi7 was shot down. he could potentially have been a crucial witness for dutch investigators. we know they wanted to speak to him
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and that is perhaps why the russians have insisted he be part this exchange. it has not been officially stated, but there is plenty of evidence to suggest that he has now been sent to moscow as part of this exchange, that was the price that ukraine had to pay in order to to get the key prisoners released. the family of a six—year—old french boy who was allegedly thrown from a viewing platform at tate modern in london last month say he has made "amazing progress", and they've thanked well—wishers who have donated more than £54,000 to help him. in a message shared on the gofundme page, the family said: a 17—year—old boy is in custody in connection with the incident.
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health officials in the united states are urging people to stop using e—cigarettes after another death from a mysterious lung illness linked to vaping. there've now been five deaths confirmed in recent weeks across the us, with 215 cases of people falling ill after vaping, but the problem could be much greater, with experts investigating a50 cases of lung illness that may have been caused by e—cigarette use around the country. our reporter, alydia noble, has more. over 12 million people use flavoured e—cigarettes, or vapes, in america, but fatalities are on the rise from a respiratory illness which seems to be related. at least 215 people are confirmed to have been affected, but hundreds more cases are being investigated. on friday, the centre for disease control released a statement urging people not to vape, and encouraged users to monitor themselves for symptoms.
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no common brand or ingredient has emerged among cases, leaving doctors at a loss for the disease's cause, and how best to treat it. the cdc is working with the us food and drug association to investigate the illness and what chemicals might be behind it. the illness, which leaves patients struggling to breathe, appears to be a form of lipoid pneumonia, which is caused by inhaling oils and, in most cases, developed after the patient vaped thc or nicotine—containing products. the cdc statement comes after michigan became the first us state to ban flavoured e—cigarettes on wednesday, after the state health department found that youth vaping constituted a public health emergency. alydia noble, bbc news.
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good evening. pressure is growing on borisjohnson to make clear he'd abide
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by legislation requiring him to seek a further brexit extension if there's no deal with the eu. a group of conservative mps are preparing legal action if the prime minister refuses to carry out the instruction which is expected to become law on monday. the former attorney general dominic grieve has warned that mrjohnson could end up in prison if he defies the law. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. another jonathan blake reports. stand—off in westminster. protest another stand—off in westminster. protest a nd cou nterprotest another stand—off in westminster. protest and counterprotest today. over the prime minister's plans to suspend parliament and mps‘s attempt to force a delay to brexit. boris johnson has spent the week in campaign mode. preparing for an election he wants by opposition parties won't allow, before an extension to brexit is a secure, something he is adamant he won't ask for. i'd rather be dead in a ditch. as
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many of that opinion is content. to the contrary, not content. the contents have it. parliament has 110w the contents have it. parliament has now passed a bill compelling the prime minster to ask for a delay, if a new deal cannot be reached. the law means boris johnson a new deal cannot be reached. the law means borisjohnson has until october 19 to get a new deal with brussels. if not he must write and request more time till at least january 31. yesterday he said this. this bill would in theory mean the government was obliged to write a letter asking for a pointless delay. some feel the prime minister is looking for wriggle room and are preparing a legal challenge if he does not comply. he cannot ignore the law, he is as bound by the rule of law as anyone else in the country. it has passed primary legislation, once it has received royal assent it is below of a lad and he is under an obligation. if it doesn't obey he can be taken to the court and the court will pursue an injunction ordering him to
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do itand pursue an injunction ordering him to do it and if he does not obey the injunction he could be sent to prison. those behind the anti—no deal bill are confident it will not allow mr johnson a way out. he must write a letter to donald tusk specifying the wording he must use tusk specifying the wording he must use it to apply for an extension. i am very concerned and troubled by the fact the prime minister is going around the country saying he will never ask for an extension. either we have a rule of law or we do not. in aberdeenshire, the traditional spectacle of the highland games, the queen arrived having posted the prime minister at balmoral overnight. a constitutional crisis caused by brexit is sure to have been discussed. where it will lead next we cannot predict. jonathan is here with me. temperatures being raised. angry scenes outside parliament. anna soubry mp due to speak at that rally
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was too intimidated and feared for her safety. that, along with the extraordinary situation of mps preparing a legal challenge against the prime minister to ensure he abides by the rule of law, is a measure of the extremes to which brexit and the fallout from the result of the referendum has taken westminster. downing street insists the prime minister's form of words saying in theory he would be forced to ask for an extension is his way of him saying he would not ask for it. the fact mps feel he is somehow going to try and wriggle out of that legal commitment he looks certain to face legal commitment he looks certain to fa ce u nless legal commitment he looks certain to face unless he can get a new deal with brussels is a measure of the lack of trust they have in him. parliament due to be suspended on monday, we will see further moves by the government to reach the general election they want and further news from the opposition stop it. an iranian oil tanker, seized by royal marines injuly has been spotted outside a syrian port. the ship had been held in gibraltar
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having been suspected of intending to take its cargo of oil to syria in breach of eu sanctions. it was only released on condition it would not travel on to syria. however, satellite photographs reveal it is now sitting at anchor outside the syrian port of tartus. our diplomatic correspondent james landale reports. this is the iranian oil tanker at the heart of the latest tensions, grace1 the heart of the latest tensions, grace 1 as she was known but now renamed. detained injuly by gibraltar with the help of british marines. suspected of heading to syria in breach of eu sanctions, released in august after errani gave written assurances that this was not the case. look at this. new satellite images appearing to show their tanker moored a few miles from their tanker moored a few miles from the syrian port of tartus potentially there to off—load its cargo. a foreign office spokesman said the reports were deeply troubling and any breach of
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assurances would be morally bankrupt and a violation of international laws. this is hugely disappointing, demonstrates why the uk government was right to impound the vessel in gibraltar and wrong to release it. ina gibraltar and wrong to release it. in a terse tweet pointed at european allies, the us national security adviserjohn bolton said anyone believing the ship was not headed for syria was in denial. tehran thinks it is more important to find the murderous assad regime and providing for its own people. so far there has been no comment from tehran which is desperate to evade tough us sanctions and curbing its ability to export oil which have hit its economy hard. iran announced today a further breach of the deal is agreed in 2015 to curb its nuclear programme. western officials said the move had been expected. the tensions with iran are deepening and optimism remains thin on the ground.
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labour have said they would severely constrain — or even ban — staff bonuses paid by banks and financial institutions, if they won an election. in an interview with the financial times, the shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell said people were "offended" by the current level of payouts. russia and ukraine have completed a prisoner swap involving 70 detainees. it's hoped the swap will ease tensions between the two countries. more than 13,000 people have died in fighting since russia annexed crimea in 201a. the freed prisoners include captured ukrainian sailors and a man who dutch prosecutors want to speak to about the downing this swap had been rumoured for weeks. so, when the plane finally touched down from moscow, relief echoed across the tarmac. the families of 35 ukrainian prisoners had come to see their loved ones return.
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among them, high—profile detainees, like film—maker oleg sentsov, and 2a sailors, like andre, who was captured in the black sea late last year. and we are happy, too. we can't even understand that this has all happened. this is clearly a very emotional moment for the relatives of these ukrainian prisoners, but it is also politically significant. it opens the door for meaningful talks between ukraine and russia and the prospect of an improvement in relations between the two countries. this man, volodymyr tsemakh, was russia's price. a potentially important witness in the downing of the passenger plane mh17 five years ago, he was flown today to moscow. for ukraine's president, the swap is a sign ofjust how serious he is about trying to end the long conflict with russian—backed rebels. we have to do all the steps
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to finish this horrible war. but do you think this is a new chapter in relations between russia and ukraine? i think this is the first chapter. jonah fisher, bbc news, kiev. a massive relief operation is under way in the bahamas, devastated by hurricane dorian earlier this week. crowds of people have been trying to flee the worst hit island, great abaco, where there's been looting by armed gangs. a3 people are now known to have died in the storm, though that figure is expected to rise. hundreds of activists have staged a sit—in on the red carpet at the venice film festival. they‘ re protesting about visiting cruise ships which they say are causing erosion of the city's foundations and contributing to global warming. the italian government has already banned the ships from waterways close to the historic centre of venice. cricket, and australia remain in control of the fourth ashes test at old trafford, despite a collapse in their second innings. if australia do win in manchester, they will retain the ashes. our sports correspondent
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andy swiss reports. searching for another ashes miracle, an army of ben stokeses descended on old trafford, hoping the real one could once again rescue england, but there was to be no headingley star heroics. stokes gone for 26 as australia rattled through the england batting. that was until the arrival of their new cult hero, last manjack leach, and he helped england avoid the follow—on, much to his fan clubs delight. but when jos buttler was emphatically out, they still trailed australia by a hefty 196. surely there was no way back... or maybe there was. two early wickets for stuart broad, and then jofra archer joined in the fun, dismissing first marnus labuschagne, and then travis head with a 92 mph rocket. australia were wobbling on aa—a. the fans were daring to dream. but as ever, there was steve smith. australia's star batsman once again
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frustrating england in what's been a dramatic day. ican i can tell you steve smith has just completed another half a century. australia now 123—a, which means their lead is over 300. england have fought back well but australia are still very much in control. there's more throughout the evening on the bbc news channel. we're back with the late news at 10. now on bbc one it's time for the news where you are. goodbye. welcome to bbc london. we have this there's been some patchy cloud today, in the north—east of england, it's been quite chilly in that
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breeze which is beginning to ease down now. further south, that has been much more cloud around the london area, still if few showers started about towards kent in particular. on the whole, a dry end to the day, there will be some sunshine too. cloud is increasing across northern ireland and into western scotland, elsewhere, clear skies and light winds, it will get cold. we could see a pinch of frost in rural parts of north—eastern scotla nd in rural parts of north—eastern scotland and north—east and england, which leads us into the great north run, which is going to be cool for people waiting to start the race. otherwise, ideal race conditions, wind is light, dry with some sunshine. most of the cloud tomorrow is going to be across northern ireland, increasingly pushing into western scotland, there could be some drizzle in that as well. the chance of one or two showers running down coastal areas. on the whole, it will be dry with spells of sunshine,
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temperature 16 to 18 celsius. probably warmer today in eastern scotla nd probably warmer today in eastern scotland and north—east england. for the final day of the test match at old trafford, there is no sign of any rain, cloud amount will increase for the day, it is going to be fine and dry. rain is on the way, arriving overnight. on monday, rainbow push into the uk, it's going to get so far and then just stall. for the moment, eastern parts of england will be dry it was like. rain in scotland and northern ireland will peter out throughout the afternoon. wales, the eastern side of england, the heavies bit of rain pushing down the south—west. temperatures will be about 16 celsius, a bit of sunshine in eastern areas of england could be 18 celsius. it remains unsettled, maybe warmer around southern areas. for the part of the week, it could be quite windy.
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hello, this is bbc news with shaun ley. the headlines: the prime minister says he would "rather be dead in a ditch" than delay brexit, but a cross—party group of mps is preparing to take legal action if he refuses to abide by a bill to delay brexit. the court's making a decision to try to make a prime minister abide by the law made by a parliament of which he is a member. these are strange times for democracy. it's the law of the land, and he is under an obligation to obey it. if he doesn't obey it, then he can be taken to court and, if necessary, the court will issue an injunction ordering him to do it. and if he doesn't obey the injuction, he could be sent to prison. satellite images appear to show an iranian oil tanker off the syrian coast after it was previously impounded in gibraltar. ukrainian prisoners are united with theirfamilies following an exchange of 70 detainees with russia. it's hoped it will ease tensions between the two neighbours. the number of people killed
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as a result of hurricane dorian in the bahamas has risen to a3. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, here's lizzie greenwood—hughes. good afternoon. england are clinging on to the ashes. they've taken four australia second innings wickets at old trafford this afternoon, knowing if they lose this fourth test, australia will retain the famous trophy. our correspondent andy swiss is following the action for us. andy, what's the latest? australia had a bit of a wobble earlier on in the afternoon but they are now going nicely thanks to steve smith who completed a century. australia 123—a which means their lead is more than 300. earlier on, england were bowled out for 301 in
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their second innings. jos buttler their second innings. jos buttler the last man out. he managed to guide england passed the follow—on figure but even so, they still trailed by 196, a huge margin. surely there was no way back but they were early wickets for england. stuart broad trapping david warner for a duck. he then took a wicket off marcus harris a6, a really good start from stuart broad. that gave the england fans hope that something special could happen again after the miracle at headingley. and then mark roe —— jofra archer joined miracle at headingley. and then mark roe ——jofra archerjoined in miracle at headingley. and then mark roe —— jofra archerjoined in and took two wickets. then it travis head bowled by an absolute rocket, 92 mph, that reduced austria 2aa—a and at that point the england fans daring to believe something special could happen but since then, steve smith has taken the game away from england. smith unbeaten after
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another half—century, so australia more than 300 runs ahead and england are going to have an awful lot of batting to do tomorrow if they are to say this match and it save their ashes hopes at the same time. onto my next question then, wickets are good but in ways, england does not wa nt good but in ways, england does not want england to bowl australia out today and that means they have to bat all day tomorrow. let's face it, they have not been very good at doing that this series, have they? the danger is if they get australia out too quickly that gives an even more time they have to bat later on today and also all day tomorrow to get a draw which would keep their ashes hopes alive. some might think hang on, they have 350 at headingley a couple of weeks ago, but that was a couple of weeks ago, but that was a batting wicket that was improving throughout the match as the weather got better. here, it is getting worse. we are seeing the odd low bounce and it is pretty testing for the batsmen out there but steve
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smith is making it look fairly straightforward as ever. and then we'll know that anything really above we'll know that anything really a bove 350 we'll know that anything really above 350 is incredibly unlikely and really it will be a question of whether they can survive tomorrow, get a draw and take the ashes into the final match at the oval next week. we will all begin our rain dance then. thank you very much. england's footballers are in euro 2020 qualifying action hoping to build on their impressive campaign so far. they're up against bulgaria right now at wembley before taking on kosovo in southampton on tuesday. and they are a goal up. captain harry kane making the most of some very poor defending by slotting in from two yards out. the match kicked off at 5pm, so there are around 15 minutes left of the first half. if england win both these matches, they'll be almost guaranteed a place in next year's tournament, which is across europe, with the final at wembley. well, elsewhere in england's group, kosovo have shown they're to be taken seriously,
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beating the czech republic 2—1. kosovo are currently ranked 120th in the world, the lowest ranked in their group by far, but they're leading the group and are the most in—form national team in europe, unbeaten in 15 matches. a crowd of over 31,000 people were at the etihad to watch manchester city beat manchester united on the opening day of the women's super league season. it's the first time the sides have played each other in a professional match and only the second time city's women have played at the club's main stadium. the only goal of the game came early in the second half, when city's caroline weir scooped up a poor clearance and slammed it home from around 25 yards out. united almost equalised towards the end, but jackie grernern's strike somehow hit the post. and it's a point a piece for bristol city and brighton after city keeper sophie baggaley brilliantly saved victoria williams' penalty in the first half to keep it goalless. we may be in an international break, but there's still action
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in the lower divisions, and in league one, mk dons got the better of their bitter rivals afc wimbledon. they were 2—0 up within 25 minutes, rhys healey with a great strike for their second. the win moves mk dons close to the top half of the table but their visitors stay in the relegation zone. all today's results are on the bbc sport website. ireland will go into this month's rugby world cup as the number one ranked side in the world. they moved to the top spot after beating wales by 19 points to ten in their final warm—up game in dublin today. it was an emotional occasion for captain rory best, who played his final home match and will retire after the world cup injapan. lydia campbell reports. it is rarely easy to say goodbye. just ask rory best. this is his home farewell before he retires after the world cup. and on theirfinal game before japan, the irish claimed the first points of the day. robert
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kearney driving over. these warm—up matches are for fine—tuning ahead of the world cup and this was pitch perfect. leigh halfpenny added the conversion, giving wells a 10—7 lead at the break. but the second half was all about the men in green. their second try it down to pure brute force. and james ryan added the third shortly after. eventually give in after some discussion. and thatis give in after some discussion. and that is how it finished. the wind lifting ireland to top of the world rankings for the first time. ahead of the world cup, rory‘s side are simply the best. olivia campbell, bbc news. well, ireland may be world number one, but new zealand are still world cup favourites. they hammered tonga 92—7 in their final warm—up game. the all blacks were in great form, scoring 1a tries by nine different players. ryan crotty and ben smith each
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with two, george bridge leading the way with four tries. new zealand begin their quest for a third successive title against south africa in yokohama on 21 september. australia also ended their world cup preparations with a win. they beat samoa 3a points to 15, scoring six tries in sydney. dane haylett—petty and matt to'omua crossed in the last ten minutes to see the hosts home comfortably. ferrari's charles leclerc will start tomorrow's italian grand prix in pole position, just ahead of lewis hamilton. but final qualifying in monza was described as "farcical" after most of the drivers failed to record a fastest lap whilst waiting for the best slip stream opportunity. jim lumsden reports. the third round of qualifying got off toa the third round of qualifying got off to a disastrous start. after a few moments, he shunted into the
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wall and the second time his applet but remain went astray this weekend. leclerc had topped the first qualifying with lewis hamilton quickest in the q2. in bizarre circumstances quickest in the q2. in bizarre ci rcu msta nces after quickest in the q2. in bizarre circumstances after the round three got back under way, many of the drivers failed to make the starting time. that left leclerc to keep its place on the pole for a second successive grand prix. his ferrari team—mate on pole three times before and will begin fourth on sunday. hamilton will start second on the grid and bottas will begin in third. but a week after winning his third grand prix, the rising star leclerc leaves from the front. earlier today, third practice at monza was delayed after a huge crash in the formula 3 race. these were worrying scenes, particuarly after the death of f2 driver anthoine hubert last weekend. here, alex peroni's car
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was launched into the air after colliding with a kerb, landing upside down on the barrier. thankfully, he was unhurt. serena williams will attempt to win a record equalling 2ath grand slam title tonight when plays in the us open final. the 37—year—old will take on the canadian teenager bianca andreescu exactly two decades after winning herfirst title in new york, before andreescu was even born. but in her pre—match interview, williams said the record isn't her only motivation to keep playing. i would definitely still be playing ifi i would definitely still be playing if i had already passed it. but i have had so many chances to pass it and to have a lot more, so... but it is cool but i am playing with so many life air of so many amazing players. i think if you look at the span of the career of the players i
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have played, it is amazing that i was able to play this many. i have always dreamt of this moment ever since i was a little kid but i don't think many people would have actually thought that it would become a reality. i think for me, it all started in auckland and then at indian wells and then i kept believing in myself. but i think that that moment after the match, i wasjust in shock. but at that that moment after the match, i was just in shock. but at the that that moment after the match, i wasjust in shock. but at the same time, i fought really hard to get to this point sol time, i fought really hard to get to this point so i really think i deserve to be in the finals. we will let you know how they get on and that match later on this evening on bbc news. jamie murray is in the mixed doubles final alongside bethanie mattek—sands. they're taking on the number one seeds, and are 5—2 up, serving for the first set. there were plenty of british winner
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at the great north city games in stockton, among them paralympic champion jonnie peacock, who took the taa 100 metres, showing why he's favourite for the world para athletics champions in dubai in november. and the olympic champion allyson felix of the united states won the 150 metres. with six gold medals and three silvers to her name, she's the joint most decorated woman in olympic history, and it's only nine months since she gave birth to herfirst child. i want to teach her what hard work is all about and what you can accomplish in the face of all kind of obstacles. i am really proud of what i have done this season. it is going to help me a lot next year. this was all about building momentum. big goals next year. the tour of britain cycling race got under way today, and the first stage from glasgow to kirkcudbright was won by the dutchman dylan groenewegen
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of team jumbo—visma. tomorrow, the riders head to kelso to race on a giant loop through the scottish borders. britain's pippa funnell leads the burghley horse trials after an influential cross—country phase of the equestrian triathlon. just a week after taking team silver in the european championships, funnell showed her class and experience guiding grafton street, a first—timer at five—star level, to go clear with just four time penalties. british team—mate piggy french is just behind her in second on her badminton winner vanir kamira. the final showjumping phase is tomorrow on the bbc red button. and in the past few minutes, watford have announced that they've parted company with managerjavi gracia. watford are bottom of the premier league table with just one point. ican i can also tell you england art 1—0 up i can also tell you england art 1—0 up at their match at wembley. that's all the sport for now.
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now on bbc news, it's time to take a look at the best and worst of this week's film and dvd releases in the film review. hello, and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. so, mark, what do we have this week? very interesting week. we have rojo, a film set in argentina about creeping corruption. we have it: chapter two, following in the footsteps of the biggest—selling horrorfilm of all—time. and the shiny shrimps, a story about a swimming team with a difference. so, rojo, a director i'm not familiar with. should i be? he has made films before, but this is a breakthrough feature. it is a story set in argentina in the run—up to the coup.
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we open with a shot of a house being emptied of all its possessions and we're not entirely sure why. we then cut to a scene in a restaurant of a man who seems very cultured, he's a lawyer, he's sitting at a restaurant table waiting to have his meal, but his wife is late. somebody says, "i need the table, because you're not actually eating." he says fine and stands up, he then proceeds to chastise the other guy, as he explains that he would only do that because he is rude and he eviscerates the man in front of a crowd. outside on the street afterwards, they meet. here's a clip. speaking spanish.
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i'm already quite tense, and i don't even know what happens. unsurprisingly, the encounter doesn't end well. the central character is in quite a dilemma. whether to do the honourable thing, whether to bury what has happened and try to pretend it didn't happen. the film then becomes a story that is unfolding in a land in which people are disappearing, in which sinisterforces are at work, but the bourgeois middle—class are pretending it's not happening. you get a collision between on one hand a satire of bourgeois middle—class life, full of tennis and dinner parties, and on the other
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hand this creeping sense of real horror around the edges of it. a detective turns up to investigate a case in which the central character is involved. he's a tv detective, he's notjust a detective, he is a television personality. the whole film, what i really liked about it, there is a knife edge between on the one hand it's chilling and on the other it's satirical. it obviously has a strong political undercurrent, but the best thing about it is you don't have to know that in advance. i use this phase of the time, show, don't tell, do not have a film in which somebody gets up and explains the plot. it is one of those films which creeps up on you. you could probably interpret it in many different ways, the story is told through what characters do, not what they say. i have always found that that is something — show, don't tell — is key for me.
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action is character, let the character tell the story. the wider implications become i think very obvious. it is a drama with specifics, which expands much greater. ok, sounds interesting. number two. we know where this goes. did you just ask me if i have seen that in all seriousness? it wasn't particularly scary, it was a mainstream movie, but it was hugely successful. so, now we have it: chapter two, an adaptation of the stephen king novel. 27 years later, the losers club return back to derry by the re—emergence of it, the clown—like shapeshifter. the problem with this film, the first was a coming—of—age story with horror elements in it. i thought it was really well—directed. this feels like something which is altogether more episodic, altogether more bitter. it's nearly three hours long.
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it has numerous strands and operates over two different timeframes with individual set pieces, you're seeing one now, which are played out really brilliantly and well—orchestrated. but for a film which concentrates so much on memory, forgetting, on characters going underground and discovering what lies beneath, the film itself is much more about surface. it's individual moments that work in and of itself, when you put them together, they do not add up to a coherent narrative. my biggest problem is that i think for horror to work properly, you have to be emotionally engaged, and ifound myself 90 minutes into the nearly three hours of this thinking that engagement isn't kicking in. that is not to say it's not brilliant, it's clearly made by somebody who loves the story and the genre. but the problem is what it doesn't have is that emotional throughline that the first one did. you should see the first one, because it's basically a coming—of—age movie thatjust happens to have scary stuff in it.
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i do remember you telling me that. something that's three hours, it has to be worth that. that's an issue. it starts to feel like a tv miniseries. of course, it was all those years ago. you do wonder why is this feeling so episodic? the third film... i saw a trailer for this in the cinema, and i was the only one who chuckled. oh, really? the shiny shrimps, a professional swimmer who is interviewed by a tv interviewer, he keeps saying, "you're past your prime, everything's going wrong for you." he then rebuts him with a homophobic epithet. he said something outrageous, and immediately he is thrown out and told you have to make it up to the lgbt community, and the way you have to do that is to become the coach to the shiny shrimps. a gay men's water polo team, who will take place in the games in croatia.
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initially, he isn't thrilled, but inevitably, as you see in the trailer, they all work together. here is a clip. you're late. follow me now. two minutes, copy that.
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so, you get a sense of the movie from that. it's charming and funny. it's also full of cliches and stereotypes. there is nothing surprising about the narrative whatsoever. you can tell from the first ten minutes where it's going to go. the best way of describing this is like swimming with men crossed with priscilla, queen of the desert. you have to be pretty hard—hearted not to chuckle at this. the heart of it is in right place. it's rather a charming film, i enjoyed it. i don't think it is ground—breaking in anyway, but it's good fun. there's a lot to be said for fun in today's world. markjenkins made this film bait about a fishing village in cornwall. it's about the battle between past, present and future. it is shot on clockwork cameras with 16mm black and white,
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which markjenkins developed in his studio. it is i think a genuine modern masterpiece that i think is one of the defining british films of the decade. it's done so well in its opening week that they have expanded the number of cinemas in which it's playing, i think it's in twice the number of screens that it was playing in the first week, because the response has been great. it is notjust a film which critics are saying is great, audiences are loving it. i've been struck by the fact that i have thought about it every day since i have seen it. i don't love everything about it, but i think it is extremely clever. i was really struck by the sound, as well. something, i'm afraid i don't always notice sound, there is something really unusual, in a good way, about that. really haunting imagery and the way in which the sound bubbles up from the ground is really impressive. it gives you the sense that you're watching something that's completely organic
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and utterly in and of the place that it's set in. i really enjoyed it. i felt you could tell that he was so passionate and it comes through. absolutely, it's a passion project, it's a labour of love and it's really wonderful. quick thought of what else is around? claire denis' high life is a really interesting sci—fi film with robert pattinson. it's a film which goes into outer space, but it's really about inner space. it's about what's happening within rather than about what's happening without. it is enigmatic, very strange and something that you really have to give yourself over to. it's really worth seeing. i think you'll really enjoy it. pattinson is brilliant. really interesting week. thank you very much. that is all for this week. enjoy your cinemagoing, whatever you decide to go and see. thanks for watching, goodbye.
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hello there. it has been quite a pleasa nt hello there. it has been quite a pleasant day today. a little on the chilly side throughout the weekend but most places will remain dry. more sunshine to come. we have this area of high pressure responsible for this drying out of our weather although there is a band of cloud on this weather front to approach the northwest as we head into tomorrow. some patchy cloud today and in the northeast it has been quite chilly in that breeze which is beginning to ease down now. further south, much more cloud here around the london area and still a few showers got it about towards kant in particular. but on the whole, a draw into the day and at some sunshine. cloud increasing across northern ireland and the western fringes of scotland but clear skies elsewhere with light winds and it will get cold. those are the two in towns and cities but could see a pinch of frost in rural parts of northeastern scotland and northeastern england which leads us nicely into the great north run
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which will be cold when he for those who start the race but otherwise ideal running conditions with lighter winds than today and dry with sunshine. most of the cloud really tomorrow is going to be across northern ireland and increasingly pushing into westra scotla nd increasingly pushing into westra scotland and could be a little drizzle in that as well. still a chance of one or two showers running down the coastal areas from norfolk towards kent and on the whole dry with spells of sunshine and temperatures 16—18 and warmer than today in eastern scotland and northeastern england. and for the test match, the final day at old trafford, no sign of any rain but cloud amounts will tend to increase through the day but it will be fine and dry. we have rain on the way but it is arriving overnight and into monday, that weather front waiting in the wings will push it rain down across the uk and will get so far and thenjust across the uk and will get so far and then just going to stop. it will stall. it looks at the moment as if many eastern part of england will be dry and maybe a bit of sunshine and then rain in scotland and northern ireland that tends peter out for the
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afternoon and then ran for wells in the western side of england and in the western side of england and in the heaviest rain pushing towards the heaviest rain pushing towards the southwest and the channel islands where temperatures are going to be about 60 degrees and a little sunshine for easter england and could be 18 celsius. over the weekend, he remains very unsettled with spells of sunshine and a little warmer across the areas but in the middle part of the week, it can be windy. goodbye.
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this is bbc news — i'm shaun ley. the headlines at six: a cross—party group of mps is preparing to take legal action if the prime minister refuses to abide by a bill to delay brexit. the courts making a decision to try to make a prime minister abide by the law made by a parliament of which he is a member. these are strange times for democracy. it's the law of the land and he is under an obligation to obey it. if he doesn't obey it, then he can be taken to court and, if necessary, the court will issue an injunction ordering him to do it. and if he doesn't obey the injuction, he could be sent to prison. satellite images appear to show an iranian oil tanker off the syrian coast — after it was previously impounded in gibraltar. the number of people killed as a result of hurricane dorian

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