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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 8, 2019 6:00am-7:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and victoria fritz. our headlines today: amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. the conservative party, which is such a force for good in government in this country, no longer has a place for people who have different views on the european
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union and i can't stand by that. the former work and pensions secretary also raises concerns about the government's commitment to getting a new deal with the eu. at the moment there's a lot of work going on into no—deal and not enough going into getting a deal. the business secretary, andrea leadsom, accuses the speaker, john bercow, of breaking parliamentary rules by allowing mps to take control of the commons agenda. serena williams loses the us open final in straight sets to a teenager. in a gripping match, 19—year—old bianca andreescu beat williams, who's now lost four majorfinals in a row. we have another largely dry day today with plenty of sunshine for england and wales. a bit more cloud for northern ireland and scotland later with a few showers, i will have all the details in about 15 minutes. it's sunday september the 8th. our top story: the prime minister borisjohnson has suffered a new blow to his authority after his work and
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pensions secretary, amber rudd, resigned last night. ms rudd said she no longer believed the government's main objective was to leave the eu with a deal, and she described the sacking of 21 rebel tory mps as an act of political vandalism. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. once tipped as a future pm, amber rudd's time in this government is over. she backed jeremy hunt in the tory leadership contest, but found herself reappointed as work and pensions secretary, surviving the clear out of other former remain supporters in cabinet when the new pm came to power. in her resignation letter, amber rudd pulls no punches, laying into borisjohnson‘s brexit plan.
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the government is expending a lot of energy, she wrote, to prepare for no deal, but i have not seen the same level of intensity going into talks with the eu, who have asked us to present alternative arrangements to the backstop. she was also highly critical of the expulsion of her fellow tory mps who voted against the government. i have seen 21 of my colleagues, good, strong conservative mps, withdrew, moderate progressive values, excluded from the party, indicating that the conservative party, which is such a force for good in government in this country, no longer has a place for people who have different views on the european union. amber rudd was first elected in 2010. if she stands in the next election it will be as an independent, defending a slim majority. downing street said it was disappointed at the resignation, but her reasons reflect concerns that others in the government share.
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we're joined now by our political correspondent, helen catt. how much of a blow is this to boris johnson? amber rudd is a significant member, and having her in his cabinet was a boost for boris johnson. her acceptance then that are no deal should be kept on the table, also a boost for his plans. the fact that she has now come out and resigned in quite such a way, with quite such language, and hitting him on two fronts, especially on the treatment of her collea g u es especially on the treatment of her colleagues and also on this idea that she says she doesn't believe government is working hard enough to try to get a brexit deal — the dangerfor boris try to get a brexit deal — the danger for boris johnson is try to get a brexit deal — the danger for borisjohnson is that other conservative members start to reconsider their position. perhaps those who backed borisjohnson last week, saying they believed he was trying to get a deal, maybe this
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will give them pause for reflection. outside of parliament, a senior government source was set heard saying that this won't change the fa ct saying that this won't change the fact that people want brexit done. how will this be heard in places such as amber rudd's constituency? will they see this as a worry about boris johnson's strategy, will they see this as a worry about borisjohnson's strategy, orjust another impediment gone? the business secretary, andrea leadsom, has said the conservatives will break convention by fielding a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next general election. traditionally the major parties don't contest the speaker's seat, but mr bercow‘s handling of recent brexit debates has angered ministers. simonjones reports. order! order. in the seat for the crucial vote. the ayes to the right, 327. noes to the left, 299. when mps
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backed the bill aimed at blocking a no deal brexit at the end of october. butjohn bercow is now underfire from october. butjohn bercow is now under fire from the business secretary. andrea leadsom says that by allowing mps to use a procedure to trigger emergency debate as a means of taking over the timetable, he has permitted a flagrant abuse of parliamentary process. in the mail on sunday, she writes... the speaker is an mp who stands in general elections but is usually unopposed by the major political parties. andrea leadsom is warning that the conservatives will defy convention and field a candidate in his constituency of buckingham in the next boat. there is no love lost
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between these two. he was alleged to have labelled her stupid last year, although he said he muttered the words to talk about how the government had scheduled commons business. he is yet to comment on the latest developments. conditions in the bahamas are "rapidly deteriorating", six days after hurricane dorian ripped through the islands — according to the un's world food programme. tens of thousands of people are homeless and many are now desperate to flee the destruction in the abaco islands and grand bahama. cruise liners, private planes and helicopters are being used to help the evacuation effort. the official death toll stands at 43, but is expected to rise significantly. british airways pilots will go on strike tonight for the first time in the airline's history. the two—day strike, which will mainly affect heathrow and gatwick airports, concerns an ongoing dispute over pay and conditions. our business correspondent, katie prescott, reports.
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for the first time in the company's history, british airways pilots are refusing to fly. the pilots union say after working with ba through lea n say after working with ba through lean times, they now want a greater share of the company profits. it made £2 billion last year. they have rejected an offer of an 11.5% pay rise over the next few years, and british airways says it is a generous offer and that there pilots already get world—class salaries. of course, in the middle of all of this other customers. they were warned about these strikes weeks ago, and the company says most have been rebooked, but for many that journey has not been smooth. rebooked, but for many that journey has not been smoothlj rebooked, but for many that journey has not been smooth. i got a text message out of the blue stating that my flight was cancelled, and it didn't give any explanation whatsoever. it just gave didn't give any explanation whatsoever. itjust gave a telephone number to call, which i did do. i couldn't get through on the phone, spent basically all evening, didn't
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sleep very well because i thought my holiday was in ruins. any passengers affected by the strike are entitled toa affected by the strike are entitled to a refund or a rebooking with ba or another airline. the company is advising them not to turn up at the airport tomorrow. if the two sides don't come to an agreement, a further day of strikes are planned for the seventh of september. pope francis has warned that the future of the planet is under threat from deforestation. he was speaking on the island of madagascar as part of his african tour. our religion editor, martin bashir, reports. pope francis was greeted with a military guard of honour as he landed in madagascar, the second stop on his visit to three african nations. in a country where 40% of forests have disappeared in the last 60 years, he warned against rampant exploitation, some of which he said
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was illegal. translation: the deterioration of that biodiversity compromises the future of the country and of the earth, our common home. as you know, the last forests are menaced by fire, poaching, and the unrestricted cutting down of valuable woodlands. it is endangered by contra band and valuable woodlands. it is endangered by contraband and illegal exportation. at a youth visual on saturday evening, he focused his attention on the human capital of the country, encouraging young catholics to turn away from apathy and towards service. the pope's visit here will conclude later this morning as he presides at a special open air mass, which is expected to attract more than 800,000 people.
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former emmerdale actor kelvin fletcher has been announced as the replacement for the injured made in chelsea starjamie laing on strictly come dancing. he's most famous for playing andy sugden in the itv soap for 20 years. kelvin will make his first appearance on strictly in the first live show later this month. it is almost 11 minutes past six in the morning. good morning to you. i'm glad we clarified in the morning, just in case you had a big night! letter only some of the newspapers. one story dominates the front pages today, the resignation of amber rudd from the conservative party. the sunday times leads with its exclusive interview with the former work and pensions secretary, saying she denounces borisjohnson's "purge" of rebel mps. the observer says ms rudd's departure plunges the prime minister into a "fresh crisis" as she condemns him in what the paper describes as a "devastating resignation letter".
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the sunday express says mrjohnson is threatening to paralyse the european union if mps do not back an election to settle brexit. the paper says he will use the eu's own rules to bring it to a standstill. and the sunday telegraph reports that mrjohnson is preparing for a supreme court showdown over mps' plans to delay brexit, as his aides also draw up plans to "sabotage" the eu if brussels grants an extension against his will. we will talk about all of those stories with a former adviser to david cameron a little later, and work out exactly what could happen next week. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. the second half of the weekend is looking pretty pleasant. a fairly
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weekend is looking pretty pleasant. afairly dry weekend is looking pretty pleasant. a fairly dry story yesterday and similar today. there will be spells of sunshine after what is a chilly start to the morning. a few isolated showers in the north—west, but if you are running the great north run today, looking at pretty decent conditions. temperatures up to 15, not too hot, and a light breeze around. it will also stay dry. we have a ridge of high pressure to the south—west. a couple of weather fronts approaching from the north—west, and a little bit of patchy rain possible as we head into the afternoon. for the eastern half of scotla nd the afternoon. for the eastern half of scotland and the bulk of england and one, we are in for a dry day. the sunshine will warm things up later in the day, about 14— 18 degrees. not as chilly a cost eastern scotland and north—east england, as we will have that cold north—easterly wind. at old
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trafford, looking like a dry picture. temperatures up to 16 or 17 degrees in spells of sunshine and fairly light winds as well. heading into this evening, the cloud will continue to thicken from the north—west, ahead of heavy rain that was sweeping across northern ireland, western scotland and eastern parts of scotland. clear skies towards eastern england, with east anglia with temperatures of 4-5. east anglia with temperatures of 4—5. further west, most east anglia with temperatures of 4—5. furtherwest, most places staying in double figures. through monday, we have this band of rain draped across the uk. a bit of a 5°99y draped across the uk. a bit of a soggy story as we start the new working week. the heaviest of the rain will be across parts of the western parts of scotland and western parts of scotland and western england and were. the east mostly dry. underneath the cloud and
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rain feeling quite cool and autumnal. then we are in for an u nsettled autumnal. then we are in for an unsettled week ahead. the remnants ofx unsettled week ahead. the remnants of x hurricane dorian, sitting to the north of the uk, with windy and wet weather at times. so if you are doing the great northern run, the condition should be ok. not too bad. here's a lovely thought. our guts are full of bacteria, viruses and fungi, known as microbes. they're crucial to keeping us healthy — but we still don't really understand how. now researchers are hoping to answer that question, with the help of hundreds of new mothers and their babies. our science correspondent richard westcott reports.
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bacteria, viruses, even fungi — we are all full of them. you might think they make you ill, but they make you healthy too. if you look at what humans are made up of, we are more bacteria than we are human being, and most of it is concentrated in our guts. scientists are now looking at how that directly affects our health. things like what we are allergic to or whether we have asthma. they have launched a study to try to understand this link between the cocktail of microbes in our gut between the cocktail of microbes in ourgutand our between the cocktail of microbes in our gut and our well—being. they are specifically looking at babies. what is interesting is even though we do live for a long time as humans, we actually get our adult like microbial community when we are two or three years of age, and those beneficial bacteria are really important for the ba by‘s beneficial bacteria are really important for the baby's overall health, including programming the immune system, food digestion, and
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really important for fighting off infections as well. over the next two years, they want to analyse the gut contents of more than 200 women and children, starting when they are pregnant. i'm kate, and my baby is due in three weeks time. i'm natalie, and my baby is due in, oh god, eight weeks! oh my god! like all the volunteers, kate and natalie will be asked to do some simple things at home, like this swab test. ido things at home, like this swab test. i do freelance cooking, and i have come across a lot more children in the last two or three years who have dietary problems. obviously, that his gut related, so i thought that maybe becoming part of the study would help in the research to find out more about why these children get such horrendous allergies. out more about why these children get such horrendous allergieslj have a bachelor of science degree, andl have a bachelor of science degree, and i thought it was perfect for me and i thought it was perfect for me
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andl and i thought it was perfect for me and i wanted to get involved, and as it is something that can help in the future with future babies and future mothers, i thought what is the harm in doing it, it is so easy? by analysing healthy mums and babies, they can begin to work out what's different in children who develop problems. if a baby presents with a particular question like analogy, for example, we can see if that baby is missing beneficial microbes, and give those microbes back to help reduce symptoms or cure disease. we'll be back with the headlines at 6.30. now it's time for the film review with jane hill and mark kermode. hello and welcome to the film review on bbc news. to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode.
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so, mark, what do we have this week? very interesting week. we have rojo a film set in argentina about corruption. we have it: chapter two, following in the footsteps of the biggest horror film of all—time. and we have the shiny shrimps, a story about a swimming team with a difference. so, rojo, a director i'm not familiar with. should i be? he has made films before, but this is a breakthrough feature. it is a story set in argentina in the run—up to the coup. we open with a shot of a house being emptied of all is possessions and we are not entirely sure why. we then cut to a scene
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in a restaurant of a man who seems very cultured, he is a lawyer, he is sitting at a restaurant table waiting to have his meal, but his wife is late. somebody says i need the table, because you're not actually eating. he says fine and stands up, he then proceeds to chastise the other guy, as he explains that he would only do that because he is rude and he eviscerates the man in front of a crowd. outside on the street afterwards, they meet. here is a clip. i am already quite tense and i do not even know what happens. unsurprisingly, the encounter does not end well.
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i am already quite tense and i do not even know what happens. unsurprisingly, the encounter does not end well. the central character is in quite a dilemma. whether to do the honourable thing, whether to bury what has happened and try to pretend it did not happen. the film then becomes a story that is unfolding in a land in which people are disappearing. in which sinisterforces are at work, but the bourgeois middle—class are pretending it is not happening. you get a collision between on one hand a satire of bourgeois middle—class life, full of tennis and dinner parties, and on the other hand this creeping sense of real horror around the edges of it. a detective turned up to investigate a case in which the central character was involved. he is a tv detective, he is notjust a detective, he is a television personality. the whole film, what i really like about it, there is a knife edge between on the one hand it is chilling and on the other it is satirical. it obviously has a strong
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political undercurrent, but the best thing about it is you do not have to know that in advance. you not uses phase of the time, show do not tell do not have a film in which somebody gets up and explains the plot. it is one of those films which creeps up on you. you could probably interpret it in many different ways, the story is told through what characters do, not what they say. i have always found that that is something, show do not tell, is key for me. action is character, let the character tell the story. wider implications become i think derry are based. it is a drama with specifics, which expands much greater. ok, sounds interesting. number two. we know how this goes. did you just ask me if i have seen that in all seriousness? it was not particularly scary, it was a mainstream movie, but it was hugely successful. so now we have it: chapter two. an adaptation of the stephen king novel. 27 years later, the losers club returns back to derry by the re—emergent of it, the clown —like shape shifter. the problem with this film, the first was a coming—of—age story with horror elements in it. i thought it was really well directed. this feels like something which is altogether more episodic, altogether more bitter. it is nearly three hours long.
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it has numerous strands and operates over two different timeframes with individual set pieces, you are saying one now, which are played out really brilliantly and well orchestrated. but for a movie which concentrates so much on memory, forgetting, on characters going underground and discovering what lies beneath, the film itself is much more about service. its individual moments work in and of itself, when you put them together, they do not add up to a coherent narrative.
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my biggest problem is that i think for horror to work properly, you have to be emotionally engaged and ifound myself 90 minutes into the nearly three hours of this thinking that is engagement is not kicking in. that is not to say it is not brilliant, it is clearly made by somebody who loves the story and the genre. but the problem is what it does not have is that emotional through line that the first one did. you should see the first one, because it is basically a coming—of—age movie thatjust happens to have scary stuff in it. i do remember you telling me that. something that is three hours, it has to be worth that. that is an issue. it starts to feel like a tv miniseries. of course, it was all those years ago. you do wonder, why is this feeling so episodic? the third film. i saw a trailer for this in the cinema and i was the only one he chuckled.
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oh, really? the shiny shrimps, the professional swimmer who is interviewed by a tv interviewer he keeps saying you are past your prime, everything is going wrong for you. he then rebuts him with a homophobic epithet. he said something outrageous and immediately he is thrown out and told you have to make it up to the lgbt community and the way you have to do that is to become the coach to the shiny shrimps. a gay men's water polo team he will take place in croatia. initially he isn't thrilled but inevitably, as you see in the trailer, it all works together. here is a clip. you are late. follow me now. two minutes, copy that.
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so, you get a sense of the movie from that. it is charming and funny. it is also full of cliches and stereotypes. there is nothing surprising about the narrative whatsoever. you can tell from the first ten minutes where it is going to go. the best way of describing this is like... with priscilla queen of the desert.
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you have to be pretty hard—hearted not to chuckle at this. the heart of it is in right place. it is rather a charming film, i enjoyed it. i do not think it is ground—breaking in anyway, but it is good fun. there's a lot to be said for fun in today's world. markjenkins made this film about a fishing village in cornwall. it is about the battle between past, present and future. it is shot on clockwork cameras with 16mm black and white which markjenkins developed in his studio. it is i think a genuine modern masterpiece that i think it is one of the defining british films of the decade. it has done so well in its opening week that they have expanded the number of cinemas in which it is playing, i think it is in twice the number of screens that it was playing in the first week, because the response has been great. it is notjust a film which critics are saying is great, audiences are loving it.
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i am struck by the fact that i have thought about it every day since i have seen it. i do not love everything about it, but i think it is extremely clever. i was really struck by the sound, as well. something, i am afraid i do not always notice sound, there is something really unusual, in a good way, about that. really haunting imagery and the way in which the sound bubbles up on the ground is really impressive. it gives you the sense that you're watching something that is completely organic and utterly in and of the place that it is set in. i really enjoyed it. i felt you could tell that he was so passionate and it comes through. absolutely, it is a passion project for it is a labour of love and it is really wonderful. quick thought of what else is around? hi life is a really interesting sci—fi film with robert pattinson.
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it is a film which goes into outer space, but it is really about inner space. it is about what is happening within, rather than about what is happening without. it is enigmatic, very strange and something that you really have to give yourself over to. it is really worth seeing. i really enjoyed it. pattinson is brilliant. really interesting week. thank you very much. that is all for this week, enjoy your cinemagoing, whatever you decide to go and see. thanks for watching, goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with victoria fritz and ben thompson. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: the prime minister, borisjohnson, has suffered a new blow to his authority after his work and pensions secretary, amber rudd, resigned last night.
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ms rudd said she no longer believed the government's main objective was to leave the eu with a deal, and she described the sacking of 21 rebel tory mps as an act of political vandalism. no 10 said it was "disappointed" by the resignation of a "talented" minister. the business secretary, andrea leadsom, has said the conservatives will break convention by fielding a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next general election. major parties don't usually contest the speaker's seat, but mr bercow‘s handling of recent brexit debates has angered ministers. he is yet to comment on the latest criticisms. conditions in the bahamas are "rapidly deteriorating", six days after hurricane dorian ripped through the islands, according to the un's world food programme. tens of thousands of people are homeless and many are now desperate to flee the destruction in the abaco islands and grand bahama. cruise liners, private planes
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and helicopters are being used to help the evacuation effort. the official death toll stands at 43, but is expected to rise significantly. british airways pilots will start a two—day strike tonight over an ongoing dispute concerning pay and conditions. the industrial action is expected to cost the airline around a0 million pounds per day, and will mainly affect heathrow and gatwick airports. it's the first strike by pilots in the company's history. let's go to jane with the sport. history was made at the us open but not in the way many expected. serena williams failed in her bid for a record—equalling 24th grand slam title, losing in the final to bianca andreescu, who became the first canadian to win a grand slam. adam wild was watching.
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it's been 20 years since serena williams first one the us open. back then, bianca andreescu hadn't even been born. here they were opponents on the biggest stage. bianca andreescu chasing williams, and williams chasing history. what they actually saw was history of a different sort. bianca andreescu still a teenager, beth with an icy calmness beyond her years. and williams, it seemed, was losing her way. mistakes in frustration. bianca andreescu suddenly on that brink. but, championship point, williams suddenly regained her composure as the crowd lost theirs. but it was as spectacular as it was short lived. bianca andreescu champion at her first attempt. williams's wait for a
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new grand slam goes on. and staying with the tennis, great britain has a champion at the us open. jamie murray and betanie mattek—sands retained their mixed doubles title, beating the top seeds chan haoching and michael venus in straight sets. murray is the first man in the open era to win three successive mixed doubles titles at flushing meadows. england have a mountain to climb if they're to take the ashes to a final test. they're 18/2 in their second innings against australia on the final day of the fourth test against australia, needing to bat the day out to draw. andy swiss reports. searching for another ashes miracle, an army of ben stokesdescended on old trafford. once the real ben stokes was gone, the innings fell away. they trailed by a hefty 196.
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there seems no way back, but briefly they dared to dream as australia lost four quick wickets. but then, guess who? the phenomenon that is steve smith once again swatted england's hopes aside. the time they finally got him 482, his lowest score this series, australia was ahead. first, rory burns, then captainjoe ahead. first, rory burns, then captain joe root — ahead. first, rory burns, then captainjoe root — pat cummins with two wickets in the first over to leave england's chances hanging by the slender wrist thread. after headingly perhaps anything is possible, but if england can somehow bat all day, the ashes will be staying with australia. at wembley, england captain harry kane scored a hat—trick as they cruised to a 4—0 win over bulgaria, maintaining their 100% record in euro 2020 qualifying. kane was set up by raheem sterling
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for his first, before adding two penalties. and kane returned the favour, getting sterling's name on the scoresheet too, as the pair showed off their deadly partnership. a record crowd of more than 31,000 were at the etihad to watch the first manchester derby in the professional women's game, as the super league season got under way. city beat united 1—0, the only goal of the game coming early in the second half, when caroline weir picked up a poor clearance and slammed it home. great attendance at the etihad, but later today chelsea women host tottenham at stamford bridge. they're hoping to surpass that crowd. four games into the premier league season and we have the first managerial casualty. watford have parted company with javi gracia, and named theirformer manager, quique sanches flores in his place. he returns after three years away to a watford side bottom
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of the premier league with just one point from four games. gracia had been in charge since january last year. ireland will go into the rugby world cup as the number one ranked side in the world. they moved to the top spot after beating wales by 19—10 in theirfinalwarm—up game in dublin. rob kearney going over early for the first of their three tries. and it was a fitting send off for captain rory best in his last game at the aviva stadium — he'll be retiring after the world cup injapan. ferrari's charles leclerc took pole position for today's italian grand prix, amid a farcical end to qualifying at monza. only leclerc and carlos sainz of mclaren posted a final lap, with all the other drivers jostling for position and failing to make the start in time. despite that, lewis hamilton managed to get second on the grid, ahead of his mercedes team—mate valtteri bottas.
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just a word on the tennis, because i find it absolutely astonishing, the scale of that for the final. but, that crowd was so clearly behind one person. and it wasn't the winner! of course they wanted serena williams to win because it was her home final, but had she wanted it would have been her 24th grand slam final title, which would have equalled the record, which has been held for decades by margaret cort. it was going to be a fantastic record, but she keeps choking at finals. amazing for a 19—year—old to be able to hold it together and come through against that kind of pressure against who is probably her idol. perhaps the confidence of youth! we could all do with a bit of that!
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nearly 60,000 runners are gathering in newcastle this morning for the 38th great north run. sir mo farah will be among them — he's hoping to become the first athlete to win the half—marathon six times in a row. the bbc‘s alison freeman is at the start line for us this morning. alison, there are plenty of races across the uk every year. what makes this one so special? i think it has captured the imaginations of people across the world, across the country, with people from all over coming to take pa rt people from all over coming to take part in the great north run. it is the end of a series of really special sporting events, we had the mini andjunior special sporting events, we had the mini and junior great north runs yesterday, and then the 100 metres sprint in stockton. it is the pinnacle, that one mile half marathon race, which goes all the way down to the tyne bridge, through
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gateshead and down to south shields. i know it is hard to imagine it now, it is so quiet, but in a couple of hours this place will be thronging with people. the biggest and brightest sporting eventin the biggest and brightest sporting event in the north—east. 57,000 runners are registered for this yea r‘s runners are registered for this year's great north run, taking in the landmarks of newcastle, gateshead and beyond. the legendary sirmo farah leading gateshead and beyond. the legendary sir mo farah leading out the elite men hoping to win this half marathon for a record sixth time. i'm confident, training has been going pretty well, and i'm just here to test myself and obviously enjoy the quayside. go over that bridge, and i know better than anyone else the course, i think that's what helps even more. behind the wheelchair races and the elite runners will come the hordes of ordinary people. many running for extraordinary reasons. some will be raising money for charity, others, like darren
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mcclintock from middlesbrough, taking ona mcclintock from middlesbrough, taking on a very personal challenge — this his first great north run after losing 20 stone. i'm going to get the rundown, i know for a fact i do it. my heart and determination will hold up, and i know my body will. it is about raising money for local charities stop byjust one of thousands of stories of determination that will be played out over the run's 13.1 determination that will be played out over the run's13.1 miles this morning. is probably given you a flavour of what it's like. we get the privileged position of being on top of that bridge looking down on the thousands of runners. it takes about half—an—hour to pass through the start line, and all of them with many different stories, personal challenges, wanting to raise money for personal charities that have helped them or their loved ones. ali dixon, the sunderland long—distance runner, is trying to break the record for running the fastest time
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completing a half marathon dressed asa completing a half marathon dressed as a superhero. so we have the elite men heading off at 10110, with the wheelchairs before that. it really is those individual stories from people about why they are running that are so important. in theatreland, they call it the half. the 30 minutes before it begins. one photographer spent years capturing the moment as some of the biggest stars get into character.
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big stars captured moments before the curtain goes up. a new exhibition called simply the half. the half is the period in a theatre as the actor gets him or herself ready to go on stage. this is your half— hour called. ready to go on stage. this is your half-hour called. half-hour before an actor goes on stage is precious. these are the minutes of concentration and composure. it is a period that has long fascinated this photographer. i'm trying to show the actors as workers who have a serious job to do and they need a lot of discipline to do it. i'm not particularly interested in the fm of the room, it is really what is in their head that i'm interested in, and their relationship to themselves, not the camera. and their relationship to themselves, not the cameralj and their relationship to themselves, not the camera. i have andrew in the foreground, can you just look at him and not move too much. all in the background, it's just amazing. for 35 years, simon has had backstage access at theatres across the world. here we have david
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suchet, which is interesting i think for a number of reasons. people might think that is opposed, but actually he is performing to himself in the mirroras actually he is performing to himself in the mirror as lady bracknell. a man as a woman, can he get away with it today? that face, so disapproving! that's lady bracknell. the exhibition has been organised to celebrate 25 years of the lawrence pa pley celebrate 25 years of the lawrence papley theatre. it such an amazing opportunity to have an exhibition that maybe would have had a life in london or internationally, and we get to bring it to huddersfield, to the centre of yorkshire, where it is starting its life, and it is such an amazing thing to celebrate our 25th with. ian mckellen and patrick stewart, almost 97% in the character they are going to play. the two leads in waiting for godot. they are ready to go. they are ready to go,
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they are not really interested in me, they are trying to get a sense of the journey they are about to go on. the photographs are a celebration of everything theatre. what better place to showcase them? that's incredible. imagine what the 30 minutes is like before we come in the studio. hair like this, toothbrush, a banana! no-one is taking any photos of that. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. out of the 30 minutes look before you go on air? getting all the latest info, making the graphics as well. a pretty busy 30 minute period before we appear on air. thanks for watching, goodbye. today's weather is looking decent across the country. another dry
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saturday. this is a beautiful sunrise captured by one of our weather watcher ‘s. some clear skies with fairweather cloud. it is a chilly start with clear skies and temperatures overnight have fallen to freezing and below the one or two areas. if you are running the great northern, and bridges are only about three degrees. a fresh sort of start but plenty of sunshine this morning. later this afternoon, the son and cloud will be building but it won't be too warm. weather fronts are moving in from the north—west. being more cloud to parts of northern ireland and the western half of scotla nd ireland and the western half of scotland with a few spots of light rain. the eastern scotland and for the welcome of england and wales, you are set to be staying dry. just the nice chance of an isolated shower and perhaps the far south—east. temperatures today
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fairly similarto south—east. temperatures today fairly similar to what we saw yesterday and around about 15— 18 degrees will stop not as chilly as it was for eastern scotland and the north—east of england. as the cricket continues, we are looking at a dry day. very low chance of catching any rain with some sunshine on offer. most of us stay dry but cloud increasing into the north—west. the weather front will bring heavy rain during the early hours of monday morning. towards the east where we have the clear skies, temperatures dipped down further. five degrees in norwich. this weather front on monday is set to bring a fairly soggy start of the new working week. that will bring the heaviest of the rain into southwest scotland. northern ireland should see the rain clear link document clearing. the cloud is
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increasing —— clearing. it will feel autumnal so temperatures around 1a to 16 degrees on monday. things looking unsettled towards the middle pa rt looking unsettled towards the middle part of the week with the remnants ofx part of the week with the remnants of x hurricane dorian moving in from the north. some slightly unsettled breezy conditions on the way but also the temperatures, after a chilly day on monday, should start to recover a little bit more. hurricane dorian has been dominating the headlines in the international news and obviously it has caused huge devastation across the bahamas and the abaco island. where are we with that storm now? the storm is now no longer a hurricane but it is still producing very, very strong winds. it made landfall in nova scotia last night and still producing winds of up to 100 mph. a
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week after it originally made la ndfall week after it originally made landfall in the bahamas, we are still seeing the storm meeting other not —— and other landfall. it has brought problems in terms of flooding and damage from wins. the storm system is now eventually weakening and pushing off into the atla ntic weakening and pushing off into the atlantic us make wins. it will bring a bit of wind but nothing like we have seen the other side of the atlantic. —— wins. —— winds.. now on breakfast it's time for the travel show — and this week the team are in switzerland. coming up on this week's programme: i'm in switzerland at one of the world's most colourful and crazy wine festivals.
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plus i'll be finding out why the natural wine movement is on the rise. that's really nice. theme music plays. hello and welcome to the travel show, with me, lucy hedges. this week i'm in vevey, a small swiss town on the shores of lake geneva, as it hosts the world's biggest and perhaps most infrequent wine festival. as well as being home to unesco—projected lavaux vineyards, vevey is known for its living tradition, the fete des vignerons, a three—weeklong celebration of wine that transforms the town. while switzerland might not spring to mind when you think of wine, they actually produce around 100 million litres a year, exporting only 2% of it. it is said that during the fete des vignerons, visitors to this unsuspecting lakeside town work their way through — are you ready — over half a million bottles of wine.
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the festival itself actually began as a one—day feast, hosted by an ancient brotherhood, as a way to reward the best winemaker in the region, and it clearly takes locals a while to recover, as the festival only takes place once every 20 to 25 years. the fete des vignerons began in 1797 as a small parade through the streets of vevey. but because of unrest in the region over the next couple of decades, the next event was not organised for another 22 years. a cycle that has remained ever since. unbelievably, this year's fate is only that 12th festival since then, with each year's show growing in size and spectacle. today, the climax of the celebration is a daily show that takes place
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in a specially built stadium, and features over 5000 volunteers. and this year, the show has been created by the man behind cirque du soleil. i'm loving the vibe back here — there's people in costumes, there's props everywhere. now, as the creator of this incredible show — what's going to be an incredible show — what is it like creating something that only happens once every 20 years? it is something very unusual, in some form, and it is like, really, a theatre show, but with 5000 actors, maybe more, 6000, something like that. you can be very precise and tell the story about the work that the people are... or you can try to find a different form to bring them like in a strange journey. so it's about using your imagination, not doing things conventionally, doing things a little bit outside the box, having a bit of fun with it, basically? yeah. so with 5000 people in your show, do you think you've got room for one more?
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dance with your hands, do this... dance with my hands? yeah (laughs). does that mean i'm in? you're in! the show itself represents a year in the life of a vineyard and, in order to have enough roles for that many volunteers, it means even the bugs and birds get their moment in the spotlight. sabine, talk me through what i'm going to be doing. right, so you're going to be an etourneau dancer, a starling dancer. the idea is that your upper body is completely separated from your lower body, and that your arms feel like wings and you can fly. you make that look really easy. i think i'm getting it. yeah, you're looking great. be honest. no, i'm being honest, you're definitely getting it. i'm believing you. ok, so, at the minute, ifeel like im a little bit stiff, especially on the left—hand side, but i've got time to perfect my wingspan movements. i'm quite looking forward to getting
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involved in the show, so bring it on. so i've got my moves, now it's time to get my costume. these are huge! how do i look? am i working it? you're amazing! (laughs). then the three—hour extravaganza began. the crowd sounds huge. a little bit scary. the first—ever festival for the fete des vignerons held a capacity of 2000 people, i'm about to perform in front of almost 20,000 people! showtime! it wasn't until i ran out into the stadium that
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the olympic scale of the show truly sank in. the sun is blazing, it's so hot, i am melting. totally worth it! look at this atmosphere! i can't think of another place where multiple generations from one family get the chance to be involved in such an epic experience together. this really means a lot to a lot of people, a lot of emotions running high, and i can see why. applause. the choreography wasn't as important in the end, everyone was restyling, but it looked really good and what an honour to take part in some thing that only happens once every 20 year. i ain't going to be this limber in 20 years, i tell you that now!
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now, i'm heading to the swiss alps to meet a winemaker who is doing things a little bit differently. peter hans—schmidt set up mythopia when the natural wine movement was taking off. today, the consumption of natural wine is on the rise, with emerging names creeping onto wine lists in most of the world's best restaurants. there is no official definition as to what makes a natural wine but it is all about low intervention, letting nature do the work without using any chemicals or additives. and i've heard peter's vineyard is a pretty good example of this. that was quite the trek. i'm used to vineyards being a bit more — a bit tidier. there's a lot going on, there's brambles, there's bushes, there's loads of wild plants — this is not your typical vineyard, is it? the thing is to have really a living space for nature.
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so there's a method behind the wildness? there's definitely a method. we do not need any fertiliser, so it only comes from the greens that we have planted here. i'm starting to see what you are talking about. this is definitely your patch, this isn't. no. it looks quite barren, there's no undergrowth. you look this way, it's wildflowers, bees, butterflies. there's a lot going on on this side. i mean, this is the traditional way, like winegrowing was done here for the last 50 years and more. and all our vineyards, they looked exactly like this. very dense production. we took out half the wines to make space and to give light. peter has clearly put a lot of effort into making his vines as wild as possible. apparently his vineyards are home to 64 species of butterfly. but having never tried natural wine, i'm looking forward to tasting how it differs from the wine i'm used to. so, peter, what are we tasting?
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the disobedience is a white wine. but if you see, the colour is more like golden. they call it like orange. yeah, it's a nice colour. not one you would expect when someone says white wine. in the old days the wine had four colours — there was red and white, and it was rose and orange. when we did this wine we broke all the rules. it is like doing all in the wrong way so in the end it comes to this. that is really nice. it is quite tangy but really flavoursome but very different to the white wines i'm used to. i've never had orange wine before, i've never heard of orange wine before. i did not actually know that it existed so i am learning something too.
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speaking to peter has made me realise that natural winemaking is as much a philosophy as it is a process. that part of the excitement within the movement is the unpredictability of nature that helps make each bottle different from the last, something traditional winemakers have spent centuries trying to avoid. he has also made it clear that even the wildest of vineyards need taming. so he's agreed to let me have a go on his little red tractor. from the outside, it looks wild, but if you do not manage it, it is just all overgrown and after a three years there is nothing to harvest anymore. so it is controlled wildness. yes. it is myjob to manoeuvre the roller backwards, down the hill, flattening the grass that will then act as a natural fertiliser for the soil underneath. but i've never been that good at reversing. this is a lot harder to manoeuvre than i thought. i have done many things for the travel show
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but driving a tractor backwards down the swiss alps, definitely was not in the original job description, but i think i nailed it, right. i think it is fair to say that a lot of us have got expectations of how wine should taste based on what we have been told so it is quite a refreshing and fascinating to see people like peter refusing to conform and it's easy to see that, by using more natural methods, not only is he doing his bit for the environment, but he's shaking up the wine industry a little bit too. and that's it for this week's travel show. but coming up next week: ade's in amsterdam to see researchers prepare to restore rembrandt‘s the night watch in full view of the paying public. wow. oh, man, so that's it? all of this scrutiny and all of this work for one artist. i really think that he would think we are crazy. so make sure you catch that and, in the meantime, don't forget, you can check us out on social media. but for now, from me, lucy hedges, and the rest of the travel show team, here in switzerland, it's goodbye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and victoria fritz. our headlines today: amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. the conservative party, which is such a force for good in government in this country, no longer has a place for people who have different views on the european union and i can't stand by that. the former work and pensions secretary also raises concerns about the government's commitment
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to getting a new deal with the eu. at the moment there's a lot of work going on into no—deal and not enough going into getting a deal.

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