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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 8, 2019 7:00am-8:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and victoria fritz. our headlines today: amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. the conservative party, which is such a force for good in government in this country, no longer has a place for people who have different views on the european union and i can't stand by that. the former work and pensions secretary also raises concerns about the government's commitment to getting a new deal with the eu. at the moment there's a lot of work going on into no—deal and not enough going into getting a deal.
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business secretary andrea leadsom accuses the speaker, john bercow, of breaking parliamentary rules by allowing mps to take control of the commons agenda. serena williams loses the us open final in straight sets to a teenager. in a gripping match, 19—year—old bianca andreescu beat williams, who's now lost four majorfinals in a row. we have another largely dry day today with plenty of sunshine for england and wales. a bit more cloud for northern ireland and scotland later with a few showers, i will have all the details in about 15 minutes. it's sunday september the 8th. our top story: prime minister boris johnson has suffered a new blow to his authority after his work and pensions secretary, amber rudd, resigned last night.
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ms rudd said she no longer believed the government's main objective was to leave the eu with a deal, and she described the sacking of 21 rebel tory mps as an act of political vandalism. our political correspondent, jonathan blake, reports. once tipped as a future pm, amber rudd's time in this government is over. she backed jeremy hunt in the tory leadership contest, but found herself reappointed as work and pensions secretary, surviving the clear—out of otherformer remain supporters in cabinet when the new pm came to power. in her resignation letter, amber rudd pulls no punches, laying into boris johnson's brexit plan. "the government is expending a lot of energy," she wrote, "to prepare for no deal, but i have not seen the same level of intensity going into talks with the eu, who have asked us to present alternative arrangements to the backstop."
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she was also highly critical of the expulsion of her fellow tory mps who voted against the government. i have seen 21 of my colleagues, good, strong conservative mps, withdrew, moderate progressive values, excluded from the party, indicating that the conservative party, which is such a force for good in government in this country, no longer has a place for people who have different views on the european union. amber rudd was first elected in 2010. if she stands in the next election it will be as an independent, defending a slim majority. downing street said it was disappointed at the resignation, but her reasons reflect concerns that others in the government share. mps from across the political spectrum have been reacting on social media to the news of amber rudd's resignation.
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health secretary matt hancock said he was "gutted to see amber leave" but he hopes that other one nation tories will "stay and fight for the values we share". shadow brexit secretary keir starmer said the "johnson government is falling apart — he is being totally found out". lib—dem leaderjo swinson said ms rudd had made "the right decision" because — in her words — borisjohnson is not serious about negotiating with the eu and plans to force through a "disastrous" no—deal brexit. and rory stewart, who was one of the 21 tory rebels thrown out of the party on tuesday, said he was "proud" of amber rudd and that it's now time to unite behind a brexit deal. we're joined now by our political correspondent, helen catt. there has been quite a lot of
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reaction there, we were hearing from politicians across the spectrum. how much of a blow is this resignation to the pm? amber rudd is an influentialfigure ina amber rudd is an influentialfigure in a particular part of the conservative party, the so—called one nation tories, and having her there was a real bonus for that part of the party. but her resigning it with these little red terms, calling it political vandalism, the action of suspending her colleagues, will mean other conservatives might look at this and wonder if they should also be reconsidering their position. either way, it also be reconsidering their position. eitherway, it is also be reconsidering their position. either way, it is not a great start and what is going to be another big week in parliament tomorrow. we are expecting this bill that will be pushed through this
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week, we are expecting royal assent shortly. we are also expecting boris johnson to try, and fail again, get a general election. so, not the ideal to another big week. meanwhile, the business secretary, andrea leadsom, has said the conservatives will break convention by fielding a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next general election. traditionally the major parties don't contest the speaker's seat, but mr bercow‘s handling of recent brexit debates has angered ministers. simonjones reports. order! order. in the seat for the crucial vote... the ayes to the right, 327. noes to the left, 299. ..when mps backed the bill aimed at blocking a no—deal brexit at the end of october. butjohn bercow is now underfire from the business secretary. andrea leadsom says that by allowing mps to use a procedure
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to trigger emergency debate as a means of taking over the timetable, he has permitted a flagrant abuse of parliamentary process. in the mail on sunday, she writes... the speaker is an mp who stands in general elections but is usually unopposed by the major political parties. andrea leadsom is warning that the conservatives will defy convention and field a candidate in his constituency of buckingham in the next vote. there is no love lost between mrs leadsom and mr bercow. last year, he was alleged to have labelled her "stupid" last year,
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although he said he muttered the word to describe how he felt about the way the government had scheduled commons business. he is yet to comment on the latest developments. the former labour mp angela smith has joined the liberal democrats, calling them "the strongest party to stop brexit". she was among seven mps to quit the labour party in february over jeremy corbyn‘s approach to brexit, and his handling of anti—semitism. she's the third mp to join the lib—dems in a week, bringing their total number in the house of commons to 17. conditions in the bahamas are "rapidly deteriorating", six days after hurricane dorian ripped through the islands, according to the un's world food programme. tens of thousands of people are homeless, and many are now desperate to flee the destruction in the abaco islands and grand bahama. cruise liners, private planes and helicopters are being used to help the evacuation effort. the official death toll stands at 43, but is expected to rise significantly.
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president trump says he has cancelled a peace deal with the taliban after it admitted to carrying out a recent attack in kabul that killed a us soldier. mr trump was due to meet senior taliban leaders at his camp david retreat today, but said in a tweet that he had cancelled the talks. the proposed deal, which was struck last week, would have seen the us withdraw more than a third of its 111,000 troops from afghanistan. british airways pilots will start a two—day strike tonight over an ongoing dispute concerning pay and conditions. the industrial action is expected to cost the airline around a0 million pounds per day, and will mainly affect heathrow and gatwick airports. it's the first strike by pilots in the company's history. pope francis has warned that the future of the planet is under threat from de—forestation. he made the comments during a speech in madagascar, as part of his african tour.
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the pontiff said the loss of wildlife in individual countries should not be treated as local issues, because they threaten the world. the former emmerdale actor kelvin fletcher has been announced as the replacement for the injured made in chelsea starjamie laing on strictly come dancing. he's most famous for playing andy sugden in the itv soap for 20 years. kelvin will make his first appearance on strictly in the first live show later this month. what is going on with that top? what is going on with that top7|j think what is going on with that top?|j think all bets are off when it comes to the clothing. it was like a glittery pelt. a bit early for that! back to our main story now —
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the resignation of the work and pensions secretary, amber rudd. she stood down last night in protest at borisjohnson‘s decision to expel 21 conservative rebels who voted to block the possibility of a no—deal brexit. let's get some reaction from the politicaljournalist katy balls, who interviewed ms rudd just a couple of days ago. shejoins us from our london newsroom. welcome to breakfast. you interviewed amber rudd earlier this week, and i wonder if you got a sense about how this week would unfold, and whether she did. did she know she was going to resign?” think it was clear she was uncomfortable with some of the things coming out of number ten, some of the decisions being made by borisjohnson some of the decisions being made by boris johnson and his some of the decisions being made by borisjohnson and his team, and particularly that which would be withdrawn from those conservative mp ‘s who would rebel on a brexit vote. the fact that he then went ahead with that threat, clearly you could see that that might lead to
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something like a resignation. it was clear to me that she was someone who had serious concerns about the tone coming from number ten on brexit. there is a lot of reaction, as we would expect this morning, from politicians right across the political spectrum. her critics would say that she knew what she was signing up for when she signed onto the cabinet with borisjohnson, why leave it until the 11th to resign?” think if you look at all the people in borisjohnson‘s think if you look at all the people in boris johnson's cabinet, think if you look at all the people in borisjohnson‘s cabinet, the people who would be on that resignation watchlist, amber rudd will always be at the top of that list. some of borisjohnson‘s allies, some of his supporters who never thought amber rudd should have been brought back to cabinet in the first place because of her previous comments on a no deal brexit, they thought she was the kind of person who might quit at a time that would cause him damage. that appears to have happened. what i think was the last straw for amber rudd was not so
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much the fact that no deal was on the table, it was two things. it was the table, it was two things. it was the fact that she was seeing many of the fact that she was seeing many of the college she was close to, embers from her one nation conservative group, lose the web. and also the fa ct group, lose the web. and also the fact that there weren't very many details about how he planned to get a deal. boris johnson details about how he planned to get a deal. borisjohnson thinks the best way to get a deal is to prepare for no deal, but amber rudd wanted to see firm proposals on the backstop. and you talk about the timing causing maximum damage, but i wonder if it does. after 21 members of the party have left, does another one make much difference?” of the party have left, does another one make much difference? i don't think it is idealfor borisjohnson. they don't want to be talking about brexit plans but for all the things they want to do in a general election campaign. this clearly ta kes election campaign. this clearly takes away from that. i think if you look at the direction conservative party is going in, it is already the
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case that borisjohnson has decided to push people with similar political views as amber rudd, in that he withdrew the web as they rebelled. but what is tricky for borisjohnson ‘s rebelled. but what is tricky for boris johnson ‘s he rebelled. but what is tricky for borisjohnson ‘s he has tried to call general election, and parliament won't let him start a campaign, and we expect mps to stop him again this week, but i think there is a slight danger area for there is a slight danger area for the pm if he is unable to go to the public and have the vote, because certain members of his cabinet, tension is building.” certain members of his cabinet, tension is building. i wonder if the departure suggests other could follow her. where do you stand on whether it is likely this will tip others into doing the same?” whether it is likely this will tip others into doing the same? i think there is a good chance of potentially more cabinet resignations. at the moment, every minister had to sign up to the no deal brexit policy, but i think there are a few people who feel uncomfortable with the way it is
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being executed. if you look at the latest figures, i thinkjulian smith, the northern ireland secretary, is someone who has spoken at cabinet about his concerns of what boris johnson at cabinet about his concerns of what borisjohnson is up to. also if you look at the people closest to amber rudd and her politics, eddie morgan and robert buckland, those are people to watch, but i think it is important to keep the cabinet firm just to get through the next week, because again it is an uneasy sense from the conservative party right now. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. sarah, what have you got for us. high pressure in charge of the most of us. this is the sunrise in norfolk this morning. little blue, pink and yellow. —— beautiful.
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largely dry today. not dry everywhere but a chilly start under the clear skies. it means we're in for some sunshine later today. if you are running the great north run, temperatures only about three degrees in newcastle at the moment and it won't be too later on, 1a or 15 celsius. i really great day for taking part. the area of high pressure to the south which is trying to hold onto our weather a couple of weather fronts moving in. weather front will bring more cloud and later on a few spots of rain pushing in. the bulk of rain in england and wales. beautiful skies and sunshine. turning hazy later on in the day at the cloud tends to build. temperatures 14— 18 degrees today. warm up for eastern scotland as north—east england as we have lost that northerly breeze. for the cricket today at old trafford, we
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won't see any interruptions to play. it looks dry with sunny spells, up to 17 degrees or so. heading into the evening hours, a dry and to the day. we will see heavy rain moving in and officially for northern ireland and western scotland and sitting down into western england and wales. the clear skies towards east anglia and the far south—east, thatis east anglia and the far south—east, that is where you will see the temperatures falling lowest but not as cold as last night. dominated by this frontal system moving its way gradually west to east. the heaviest of the rain will be across the western half of the rain. the rain should slowly clear away with the return to sunshine and a few showers andi return to sunshine and a few showers and i think parts of eastern england should avoid the rain for much of the day. with all the cloud and outbreaks of rain, it will feel cooler. a real autumnal feel. outbreaks of rain, it will feel cooler. a real autumnalfeel. only around 14— 16 degrees. looking further ahead through this coming
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week and it is an unsettled pick, we have the remnants of x hurricane dorian. it is moving well to the north of the uk and heading towards iceland. there will be trailing weather fronts that could bring us wet and windy weather. it is looking a little bit breezy with a few showers and things will old —— also turn milder through the week ahead. some pretty mixed weather for the great north run. good luck if you are out running. in theatre—land they call it "the half" — those precious 30 minutes before a performance begins. it's normally a private time but one photographer has spent years capturing the moment as some of the country's biggest stars get into character. now he's put his work on display. the bbc‘s nicola rees went to take a look. big stars captured moments before the curtain goes up. a new exhibition called simply the half.
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the half is the period in a theatre as the actor gets him or herself ready to go on stage. tannoy: this is your half-hour call. the half—hour before an actor goes on stage is precious. these are the minutes of concentration and composure. it is a period that has long fascinated photographer simon annand. i'm trying to show the actors as workers who have a serious job to do and they need a lot of discipline to do it. i'm not particularly interested in the ephemera of the room, it is really what is in their head that i'm interested in, and their relationship to themselves, not the camera. i have andrew in the foreground, can you just look at him and not move too much? paul in the background, it'sjust amazing. for 35 years, simon has had backstage access at theatres across the world.
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here we have david suchet, which is interesting i think for a number of reasons. people might think that is a pose, but actually he is performing to himself in the mirror as lady bracknell. a man as a woman, can he get away with it today? that face, so disapproving! that's lady bracknell. the exhibition has been organised to celebrate 25 years of the lawrence batley theatre. it's such an amazing opportunity to have an exhibition that maybe would have had a life in london or internationally, and we get to bring it to huddersfield, to the centre of yorkshire, where it is starting its life, and it is such an amazing thing to celebrate our 25th with. ian mckellen and patrick stewart, almost 97% in the character they are going to play. the two leads in waiting for godot. they are ready to go. they are ready to go, they are not really interested in me, they are trying to get a sense of the journey they are about to go on.
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the photographs are a celebration of everything theatre. what better place to showcase them? what a great exhibition. you don't wa nt to what a great exhibition. you don't want to see us 30 minutes before we go on air. to be honest, 30 seconds. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. time now for a look at the newspapers. one story dominates the front pages today — the resignation of amber rudd from the conservative party. the sunday times leads with its exclusive interview with the former work and pensions secretary, saying she denounces borisjohnson‘s purge of rebel mps. the observer says ms rudd's departure plunges the prime minister into a "fresh crisis" as she condemns him in what the paper describes as a "devastating resignation letter". the sunday express says mrjohnson is threatening
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to paralyse the european union if mps do not back an election to settle brexit. the paper says he will use the eu's own rules to bring it to a standstill. and the sunday telegraph reports that mrjohnson is preparing for a supreme court showdown over mps' plans to delay brexit, as his aides also draw up plans to "sabotage" the eu if brussels grants an extension against his will. laura trott, former special advisor to david cameron, is here to tell us what's caught her eye. and you have plenty of westminster stories to go at this morning, laura. what a week in westminster! they will be a lot of turmoil in number ten as they try to work out what to do next. you have picked out some of the highlights. talk us through. this is in the observer. it starts getting into tactical voting territory. yes. and because the
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poles are turbulent and unpredictable at the moment. a lot of talk in the coming weeks will come to tactical voting as we look at the election. in the face of it, it is actually quite positive for borisjohnson it is actually quite positive for boris johnson and the it is actually quite positive for borisjohnson and the government. it shows them as having a seven seat lead as they get rid of all the people who, as they put it, blocking, a no deal accent. but as soofi as blocking, a no deal accent. but as soon as we start seeing the words tactical voting, people start thinking it is a stitch up. they get angry with the system, that the politicians are trying to pre—empt how they vote and they still will get their own way by moving people around. that is not how a democracy should work, is it? and many people won't do it but because of the system we have, people are trying to
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use their vote to the best possible and because we don't have a system where your vote will count regardless. it means you can have more of an impact in certain constituencies than you would do otherwise. although i don't endorse it, it is a way of amplifying your vote if you live in an area which has a tight, if you are trying to unseat a certain party. the sunday times has the big splash about amber rudd but also this one. this story, no backstop joy rudd but also this one. this story, no backstopjoy in ireland. boris johnson heading to ireland, soon? obviously the amber rudd story is dominant today but in the background they are still trying to get a deal and whatley leo the writer has said publicly is what they are worried about here is the fact that when borisjohnson about here is the fact that when boris johnson came in, about here is the fact that when borisjohnson came in, he thought he might be the person to get through parliament in the way that theresa may couldn't. —— leo the the. parliament in the way that theresa may couldn't. -- leo the the. so it is that idea of even if they grant
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some sort of concession, it wouldn't work. ———— leo varadkar. some sort of concession, it wouldn't work. ---- leo varadkar. it makes it less likely to offer something substantial. this is a saying that amber rudd herself doesn't believe that boris johnson amber rudd herself doesn't believe that borisjohnson is trying to get a deal. in fact, that is not his primary objective. is she right?” don't think that is true. there is someone out there almost permanently trying to push things true but it is true that in the government there is still -- true that in the government there is still —— there is now a lot of emphasis on preparing for a no deal exit and they say the point of that is to try and get them a better deal because they know that we are prepared to leave if we don't get a good deal. this is been pointed out in the mirror this morning. the story in the mirror, the government we re story in the mirror, the government were taken aback this week by the
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fa ct were taken aback this week by the fact that labour were not supporting an election in the way that they thought they were going to do. now they are thinking about what else they are thinking about what else they can do. one of the constitutional wheezes is that they would not appoint a commissioner which means that they would be constitutionally in breach and according to this story, and according to this story, and according to this story, and according to the advice that a p pa re ntly according to the advice that apparently boris johnson has received, the uk would then be kicked out of the eu. talking of the advice and this is a tough question to throw at you but look, you have done this, you have been there, what was your thinking —— what advice can you give the government?m was your thinking —— what advice can you give the government? it is incredibly tough being in there at the moment and you can't underestimate how difficult and stressful it would be for the individuals involved but the one thing that the house of commons has shown is that it doesn't want a no deal. borisjohnson shown is that it doesn't want a no deal. boris johnson is shown is that it doesn't want a no deal. borisjohnson is a unifier. there is a possibility of bringing people back in and back together and reuniting the tory church and
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allowing him to get on with his one nation agenda which is what i think he is actually in politics to do. there has been a lot of controversy about the speakerjohn bercow. comments by the business secretary andrea leadsom saying that for the first time the conservative party will can —— defy convention and put a candidate up against him. they are actually upset at the way he has dealt with the brexit debates. yes, this is controversial. they are elected from a party, the speaker, but then they are impartial. at elections, that candidate is unopposed by other parties. lyle —— bizarrely in this case, the speaker isa bizarrely in this case, the speaker is a conservative the conservatives are saying they're going to put someone up are saying they're going to put someone up against him and say he is not a conservative anymore because of the way he has acted over brexit. their view is that he has behaved in such a way which is pushing an agenda which is inappropriate for a speaker. politics aside, if he was
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ousted, he would have a big career because he has suddenly risen to fame ina because he has suddenly risen to fame in a way that no—one else has. everyone is fascinated with the way that our politics work because of his barking orders in the commons. order! it is famous now. it isn't by accident. he may be carving out another career. we will see a little later. thanks. for strictly fans, the wait is finally over. we'll be looking back at last night's launch show, in which the pro—celebrity pairings were unveiled — including brea kfast‘s mike bushell and katya jones. and we'll hear more from "bush—kat" on tomorrow's show, as mike and katya check in to breakfast with a progress report.
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would like to them. —— good luck to them. in the meantime, stay with us — the latest headlines are coming up.
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hello, this is breakfast with victoria fritz and ben thompson. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news: prime minister borisjohnson has suffered a new blow to his authority after his work and pensions secretary, amber rudd, resigned last night. ms rudd said she no longer believed the government's main objective was to leave the eu with a deal — and she described the sacking of 21 rebel tory mps as an act of political vandalism. number ten said it was "disappointed" by the resignation of a "talented" minister. the business secretary, andrea leadsom, has said the conservatives will break convention by fielding a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next general election. major parties don't usually
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contest the speaker's seat but mr bercow‘s handling of recent brexit debates has angered ministers. he is yet to comment on the latest criticisms. president trump says he has cancelled a peace deal with the taliban after it admitted to carrying out a recent attack in kabul that killed a us soldier. mr trump was due to meet senior taliban leaders at his camp david retreat today, but said in a tweet that he had cancelled the talks. the proposed deal, which was struck last week, would have seen the us withdraw more than a third of its 111,000 troops from afghanistan. conditions in the bahamas are "rapidly deteriorating", six days after hurricane dorian ripped through the islands,
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according to the un's world food programme. tens of thousands of people are homeless — and many are now desperate to flee the destruction in the abaco islands and grand bahama. cruise liners, private planes and helicopters are being used to help the evacuation effort. the official death toll stands at 43, but is expected to rise significantly. british airways pilots will start a two—day strike tonight over an ongoing dispute concerning pay and conditions. the industrial action is expected to cost the airline around a0 million pounds per day, and will mainly affect heathrow and gatwick airports. it's the first strike by pilots in the company's history. now it's time to look at the sport. what an amazing 48 hours, starting with the tennis! when serena williams is in a final, you expect her to win it, but she didn't! history was made at the us open but not in the way many expected. serena williams failed in her bid
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for a record—equalling 24th grand slam title, losing in the final to bianca andreescu, who became the first canadian to win a grand slam. adam wild was watching. it's been 20 years since serena williams first won the us open. back then, bianca andreescu hadn't even been born. yet here they were, together, opponents on the biggest stage. andreescu chasing williams, and williams chasing history. that is what the new york crowd had gathered to see. what they actually saw was history of a different sort. andreescu still a teenager, blessed with an icy calmness beyond her years. and williams, it seemed, was losing her way. mistakes and frustration. bianca andreescu suddenly on the brink. but, with a championship point, williams suddenly regained her composure as the crowd lost theirs. but the fightback was as spectacular as it was short—lived.
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bianca andreescu champion at her first attempt. williams's wait for another grand slam goes on. so that's the fourth grand slam final in a row that serena williams has lost. tennis reporter anne—marie batson stayed up to watch the match and joins us now. thank you for speaking to us. why is it that serena keeps having difficulties in these finals? is the pressure getting to her? it is a really good question, and i struggle to find the answer. i think it is the pressure. i think her desire to win 2a grand slams to equal margaret court's record, but then go one better and get the 25th, to be the greatest of all time, must weigh extremely heavily on her mind, yet when she is in a grand slam final you know she will play her best. she has described this match is one of the worst of the tournament. i'm going to disagree with that, i think
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she displayed someone who up to level across the net. you cannot count serena williams out, i fully expect to see her in the australian open next year. that'sjust it, we expected her, or at least thought she was probably going to win this final, because she had done so well in the tournament. i think she only dropped one set in the tournament, but she is 37 years old, she turns 38 later this month. will we see her equal the record? 38 later this month. will we see her equalthe record? i think we 38 later this month. will we see her equal the record? i think we will, the desire to be the competitor, to be the greatest of all time, is there. i think she needs that title to cement her status. whether she makes 25 i don't know. i'm willing to ta ke makes 25 i don't know. i'm willing to take it one step at a time, but i think she will want the 24th, so she can say to people she has equalled margaret court's record. i see no sign from her in her words or behaviour that she is looking to retire anytime soon. when you
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mention her age it goes right over her, like water off a duck‘s back. roger federer is still playing and going deep into tournaments, there is no reason serena williams can't do the same. and we can take nothing away from bianca andreescu, what can we say about her? she is amazing. a year ago she rated 208th in the world, but now canada has its first us open champion. the fact she has beaten nearly six or seven of the top ten women of the wta says it all. she now has a grand slam title under her belt, as well as winning in auckland, new zealand, as well as in toronto. i'm really excited to see how far she's going to go. and staying with tennis — great britain has a champion
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jamie murray and bethanie mattek—sands retained their mixed doubles title, beating the top seeds chan hao—ching and michael venus in straight sets. murray is the first man in the open era to win three successive mixed doubles titles at flushing meadows. it looks as though england now have little hope of saving the ashes. they need 365 to win the fourth test and they'll start the final day at old trafford on 18/2. england did manage to stop australia's run machine steve smith from scoring another century — but he still made 82 — incredibly, that's his lowest score of the series. australia declared on 186—6 and then england made the worst possible start, losing two quick wickets, captainjoe root out for a golden duck. they're in for a tough day. at wembley, england captain harry kane scored a hat—trick as they cruised to a 4—0 win over bulgaria, maintaining their 100% record in euro 2020 qualifying. kane was set up by raheem sterling
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for his first, before adding two penalties. and kane returned the favour, getting sterling's name on the scoresheet too, as the pair showed off their deadly partnership. a little taste of success in the world cup, obviously it didn't go where we wanted it to go, but we have to use it as motivation for the euros. hopefully we'll have a few days here at wembley, and we need to use the atmosphere to our advantage. a record crowd of more than 31,000 were at the etihad to watch the first manchester derby in the professional women's game, as the super league season got under way. city beat united 1—0, the only goal of the game coming early in the second half, when caroline weir picked up a poor clearance and slammed it home. great attendance at the etihad, but later today chelsea women host tottenham at stamford bridge — they're hoping to surpass that
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crowd. ireland will go into the rugby world cup as the number one ranked side in the world. they moved to the top spot after beating wales by 19 points to 10 in theirfinal warm—up game in dublin. rob kearney going over early for the first of their three tries. and it was a fitting send off for captain rory best in his last game at the aviva stadium — he'll be retiring after the world cup injapan. that is fascinating. i'm really interested in the psychology of playing a match like that and winning against an entire stadium. that is a tough ask. i suppose sometimes that can galvanise you, because you know the whole of the crowd is shouting for the other
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player and you can maybe feed off that and think, i'll show them! that is exactly what she did. at one stage she put the towel over her head as if to block everything out, and she did it, she came back out. tough if they are cheering for double faults and things. yes, it is being quite rude actually. you don't often seeing that happening in wimbledon, but in the us i'm sure some of the fans can be a bit more vocal and perhaps don't have as much etiquette as they do in other countries. controversial! we are going to create a transatlantic storm! i think it was quite diplomatic!
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here's a lovely thought. our guts are full of bacteria, viruses and fungi, known as microbes. they're crucial to keeping us healthy — but we still don't really understand how. now researchers are hoping to answer that question, with the help of hundreds of new mothers and their babies. our science correspondent richard westcott reports. bacteria, viruses, even fungi — we are all full of them. you might think they make you ill, but they make you healthy too. if you look at what humans are made up of, we are more bacteria than we are human being, and most of it is concentrated in our guts. scientists are now looking at how that directly affects our health. things like what we are allergic to or whether we have asthma. they have launched a study to try to understand this link between the cocktail of microbes in our gut and our well—being. they are specifically looking at babies. what is interesting is even though we do live for a long time as humans, we actually get our adult—like microbial community when we are two or three years of age, and those beneficial bacteria are really important for the baby's overall health, including programming the immune system,
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food digestion, and really important for fighting off infections as well. over the next two years, they want to analyse the gut contents of more than 200 women and children, starting when they are pregnant. i'm kate, and my baby is due in three weeks' time. i'm natalie, and my baby is due in, um, oh god, eight weeks! oh my god! like all the volunteers, kate and natalie will be asked to do some simple things at home, like this swab test. i do freelance cooking, and i have come across a lot more children in the last two or three years who have dietary problems. obviously, that is gut—related, so i thought that maybe becoming part of the study would help in the research to find out more about why these children get such horrendous allergies. i have a bachelor of science degree, and i thought it was perfect for me and i wanted to get involved, and as it is something that can help
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in the future with future babies and future mothers, i thought what is the harm in doing it? it's so easy! by analysing healthy mums and babies, they can begin to work out what's different in children who develop problems. if a baby presents with a particular question, like an allergy, for example, we can see if that baby is missing beneficial microbes, and give those microbes back to help reduce symptoms or cure disease. the andrew marr show is on bbc one at 8.30 this morning. let's speak to andrew now to find out what he has in store. you have quite the lineup today!” certainly do. the most winding, jawdropping week in british politics for decades has concluded with the resignation of amber rudd from the cabinet. he would hope she would
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come on the andrew marr show and you will be right, she will bejoining me here after 830. i also have the chancellor of the exchequer, sajid javid, and the shadow chancellor of the exchequer, number two in the labour party, john mcdonald, to try to chart the way ahead for yet another extraordinary week coming up. quite the man, his off already! he has things to do! here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. good morning! we have a stunner of a morning this morning, high this is how things are looking in norfolk at the moment. not everyone will be dry but a lot of dry weather on the cards and after the fresh and chilly start, largely dry and sunny. the cloud building up a little bit later on but nice conditions for anyone taking part in the great north —— rate north run. it will be
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warming up to 15 celsius with a light breeze. a couple of weather fronts. the cold front will bring rain overnight and also a warm front which is pushing more cloud today across northern ireland and the western half of scotland. a few spots of light rain moving in from the northwest here but for eastern scotla nd the northwest here but for eastern scotland and the bulk of england and wales, it will be a dry day. just the chance of catching a shower for eastern parts of east anglia and perhaps for north wales, too. most parts will avoid them and damages will be up to 1a or 18 degrees. temperature is staying dry at old trafford and of course the cricket continues today. temperatures up to around about 16 or seven degrees with a light breeze. into this evening, things are staying dry for england, wales and eastern scotland but then the cloud moved in from the north—west ahead of this area of
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rain. particular the second half of the night is turning quite soggy. in the night is turning quite soggy. in the east, that is where you will see temperatures dipping lowest but not as cold as it was last night so a reasonably mild but also waste —— 5°99y reasonably mild but also waste —— soggy start to your monday morning. the heaviest of the rain on that front is likely across the western half of england, wales, scotland as well. for northern ireland, the rain should clear through the day so a return to sunny spells. under the cloud, with the rain and the breeze freshening, it won't feel particularly warm tomorrow. top temperatures around about 14— 16 degrees. quite an autumnal field to the weather for monday. through the coming week, an unsettled picture. we have the remnants of ex hurricane dorian. this area of low pressure which will be pushing up towards iceland. well to the north of the uk but trailing weather fronts from that weather system could bring us some fairly lustily, unsettled weather through tuesday and into
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wednesday. then it looks like mild air pushes enzo temperatures in london up to about 22 degrees by the time we get to thursday. ——it is starting to look distinctly autumnal. we will be back for the headlines at eight o'clock but now it is time for click. 50 years after the first humans landed on the moon, a new space race is under way. but today, it is notjust nations
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that are competing to put ships and people into space. private companies are getting in on it as well. in fact, they are leading the charge. elon musk‘s spacex already delivers cargo to the iss, and is now one of several companies exploring the notion of space tourism — putting non—professional astronauts into space. it has also signed up billionaire yusaku maezawa to take a trip around the moon. amazon boss and the world's richest man, jeff bezos, is also planning to take passengers to the edge of space by the end of 2019, with his company blue origin, and has ambitions to land humans on the moon by 202a. but there is one company that is further along the space tourism journey than any other, and now virgin galactic has opened the doors to its new hq and given marc cieslak exclusive access. fire, fire.
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it is a little after 7:00am, and i'm heading into the desert in new mexico, about 20 miles past a place called truth or consequences. the reason for that really early start is that we are going to get a very rare glimpse inside that. it bills itself as the world's very first commercial spaceport. thank you very much. welcome to spaceport. thank you. the only way that you can get
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to space today is with the russians, and they're currently charging nasa about $80 million a ticket. spaceport america is the new home of virgin galactic, the company founded by billionaire sir richard branson to take paying customers on 90—minute flights to the edge of space. the spaceport‘s exterior is the product of british architects foster + partners. eventually, five spaceships and two carrier aircraft will reside in the hangar. and spaceship from base, you go from zero minus 10 on time. it is also home to mission control, where all flight operations are monitored from, and this is the very first time that a tv crew has been allowed to film inside this room. the winds are holding, 160 at ten knots... virgin galactic has moved all of its operations to new mexico from its original base in mojave, california. the white knight two mothership aircraft has already moved in,
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and continues flight testing. but the actual spacecraft, dubbed spaceshiptwo, will arrive at spaceport america at a later date. the white knight carrier aircraft is really performing a rehearsal for a real spaceflight. it is going to ascend to the altitude where it would normally release a spaceship, perform a few manoeuvres, and come back around to land on this runway. scotsman dave mackay is virgin galactic‘s chief pilot. he takes me for a drive along the spaceport‘s two mile runway. this is something that i wanted to do all my life. i wanted to be an astronaut, and i wanted to go to space. dave successfully completed a spaceflight earlier this year, and has been awarded his commercial astronaut‘s wings. welcome to the club, astronaut. thanks, base. i like this club. what is the spaceship like to fly?
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the spacecraft is amazing to fly. at launch, we're sitting underneath white knight two. at release, it's like going over the top of a rollercoaster, so you get this lightness in your stomach, which is nice. two, one — release, release, release. you haven't lit the rocket motor yet, so there is silence just for a few seconds. we light the rocket motor. fire, fire. so we accelerate away. within a few seconds, we go through the sound barrier. we go mach 1. we are going to space. the sky goes from blue to dark blue to black in what seems like a few seconds. immediately after shutdown, you are in weightlessness. that point, we'll allow the customers to unstrap. at the end of boost, you are there with no forces on your body, no motion, because it'sjust sitting there, and no sound.
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as we are coming back down, in this feathered configuration, now we're a glider, and we've got about 15—20 minutes of gliding to come back down and land at spaceport. so different, really, to what i expected, that the words that came out of my mouth was this is unreal — just astonishing. the curvature of the earth, you see so much of it that you now get a sense of scale, of the size of the planet. and in the meantime,
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you're looking out into this blackness of space, and you can't help but think, well, what else is out there? i think something that a lot of people will take away with them after their spaceflight is how thin the atmosphere is, and how important it is to look after it. so far, over 600 people have signed up to take a flight with virgin galactic, with tickets costing £200,000. but, at a time of increased concern about the environment, is it responsible to send wealthy people to space for fun? actually, environmental impact, the co2 impact of this vehicle, is much less than you would think. by air—launching it, and because it's so small and uses carbon fibre, we actually don't have a very big rocket motor in the back. and so the per person co2 emissions is, for the average flight, around that of a business—class flight from new york to the uk. there's an awareness of our planet documented scientifically with astronauts. they come back changed, with a greater realisation of the fragility of our ecosystem and ecosphere. the irony of this idea isn't lost on space experts, though. the fact that they have to go that
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far into space above the planet to have that emotion of feeling protective over the world that they live in is sort of ridiculous. but you have to put it into perspective of the fact that space travel is very limited in how much it actually contributes to co2 emissions, in comparison to aircraft. it's a tiny fraction of what aircraft put out there. there have been delays and setbacks for virgin galactic. in 2014, one of its spacecraft crashed during flight testing, resulting in the death of its co—pilot and serious injuries for the pilot. dave mackay acknowledges the time that testing is taking. so, if you look at military test programmes, the risk levels are different. we're building a safe, reliable commercial system. it's very, very different to everything that has been done before. but we still have some more flights
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to do, with more people in the back, and once we've done a few more of those flights, we'll be ready to start commercial operation. so we're getting very close. it has taken longer than i guess we thought it would do initially, but i don't think — with hindsight, i don't think that's at all surprising. on paper, space tourism can seem a bit frivolous, but we are moving into an era of commercialisation of space travel anyway. most government—funded experiments in space, either on a space station or probes for other planets, are going to be shipped out to commercial companies, and so furthering space travel in that sense is actually going to benefit from space tourism as well. so we have to take into account not just the impact of space tourism in the sense of our economy, but also the impact from the life—changing impact that the people who will be on those planes will go through, and the impact they will have when they return to earth. when do you think virgin galactic
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is going to be putting paying customers up into space? when is the date — when is that going to happen? right now, according to our current projections, we think that we can start commercial operations next year. so the race is on. space could be about to get a lot more crowded — for those that can afford the price of a ticket, of course. wow, that was marc. this is marc. how was your trip to almost—space? it's great. it's difficult not to get excited by spaceships. yeah. so we've got amazon doing blue origin, we've got spacex doing a variety of space tourism projects, and now we have virgin galactic as well. they look like they've got the most advanced proposition. but how would you rate these different companies at the moment? they're all completely different, and they all have their own advantages, their plus points. but, you know, virgin has got a spaceport that's pretty much up and running. looking at blue origin's idea, jeff bezos is suggesting
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that their capsule might be autonomous. so they might launch, with the tourists inside, they'd get to look out the windows and see the earth, and then it will land back on the earth, but without a pilot. now, i've got an amazon echo, and alexa can barely understand me. so whether the company behind that technology — whether i would trust them to send me to space or not autonomously, i don't know. i really, really don't know. to be fair, though, spacex are launching rockets and landing them autonomously. yes, they are, in all fairness. ok marc, cheers. that's it for the short cut of click this week. there's plenty more in the full version which is waiting for you now on iplayer. you'll find us on social media, too, on youtube, facebook, instagram and twitter. thank you for watching and we will see you soon.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with ben thompson and victoria fritz. our headlines today: amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. the conservative party which is such a force for good in government in this country no longer has a place for people who have different views on the european union — and i can't stand by that. the former work and pensions secretary also raises concerns about the government's commitment to getting a new deal with the eu. at the moment there's a lot of work going on into no deal and not enough

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