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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 8, 2019 10:00am-10:30am BST

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this is bbc news, i'm ben bland. the headlines at 10: amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. it's the combination of the fact that there isn't enough work going into getting a deal, which i think is not what the prime minister signed up to try to do and secondly the expulsion of 21 of my colleagues who are good and moderate conservatives. she'll be replaced as work and pensions secretary by therese coffey, mp for suffolk coastal. business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election. peace talks between the taliban and the us are called off — president trump blames a deadly
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attack in the afghan capital, kabul. ships and aircraft evacuate thousands of people from islands in the bahamas worst hit by hurricane dorian — aid agencies say the situation is ‘desperate‘. british airways pilots prepare to go on strike — for the first time in the airline's history. and coming up later this hour, exclusive accesss to the campaign group extinction rebellion, on inside out west. good morning. amber rudd has been giving more details about why she's resigned from the government. she told the bbc‘s andrew marr she hasn't seen enough evidence that downing street is doing enough to get a brexit deal. and she's angry about the expulsion of what she called ‘good moderate‘ conservative mps.
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she said she spoke to borisjohnson last night who was ‘sad' about her decision to quit. here she is on the andrew marr show this morning. i believe that he is trying to get a deal with the eu. i'm just saying what i have seen in government is that there is this huge machine preparing for no deal, which is fine. you might expect in the balance between getting a deal and no deal 50—50 in terms of work but it isn't that, it is 80 or 90% of government time going into preparing no deal and the absence of trying to work to get a deal and has driven by 21 of my colleagues to rebel and i need tojoin them. so you think he is trying to get a deal? what deal? i think he prefers to get a deal... what deal, is the question? that is the question. and you have no idea? i have no idea, what we know is that angela merkel and the eu have said, give us your proposal — and we have not given them a proposal. where is the work that has to be
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done to come up with alternative arrangements to show where the landing place is and all that work needs to go behind it and instead we are hearing, we are going to get a deal. but there's very little evidence of it. are you going to leave politics? no, or the conservative party but i'm surrendering the whip alongside my colleagues, the 21 others, in order to stand with them. i don't think... i know i could not carry on in the conservative party at such a high level and see 21 of my colleagues who are good, moderate people who also want a deal excluded from it and ijust needed to move and stand by them. i hope that we will all be returned before a general election so we can all stand as conservatives. i am a conservative. i believe the conservative party is a force for good in our great country and i would like to see us in government. we have been before and we've done great things. in your letter to the prime minister, you said you no longer believe leaving with a deal is the governments main objective, that's quite close to accusing
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the government of lying to the british people? i'm not, i'm observing what i have seen. s0 what do you mean by the sentence? 80—90% of the work i've seen going on on the eu relationship is about preparation for a no deal. it's disproportion? exactly, but when it was first entered into after boris johnson became prime minister most people would have expected, i think everybody would have expected, there to be a lot of work on getting a deal. a whole team of people trying to build those relationships and work on alternative arrangements and i have not seen that. that was amber rudd on the andrew marr show earlier. with me is our political correspondent, helen catt. how big a blow is this for boris johnson and his government? she is a big figure, particularly in certain segments of the conservative party. the moderate one nation tori, and having her onside really boosted
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boris johnson's having her onside really boosted borisjohnson‘s leadership having her onside really boosted boris johnson's leadership and strategy. you heard her in that interview essentially going for both, his handling of the party and the stark figure of saying that 80-90% of the stark figure of saying that 80—90% of government effort is going towards a no—deal brexit. she believes not towards getting a deal. that could harm him among those who share amber rudd's views. the worry for him will be, does this unsettle unhappy tories? we know that there are some, and inspire them to follow suit. it will be interesting to see the reaction beyond westminster. i think that 80-90% the reaction beyond westminster. i think that 80—90% figure will cut through in places but i think there will also be a group of people, of those who backed leaving, saying this is boris johnson those who backed leaving, saying this is borisjohnson being serious. has amber rudd left? therefore it is removing a main impediment. and interesting to see what happens
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next, the no deal legislation passed by mps, that gets royal assent tomorrow. suggestions that the government may not abide by it? even though it is the law of the land. what happens next? the bill that sparked all of the controversy last week, that was the reason the 21 mps who rebelled and voted for it were sacked. that gets signed off by the queen tomorrow and gets royal assent. that compels borisjohnson, if he does not have a brexit deal by the 19th of october, to ask for an extension from the eu. there has been debate about whether or not he will do that. and we know that boris johnson will try once again to go foran johnson will try once again to go for an early election on october 15. and we know he is likely to fail because the opposition say he will not give that to them. shadow chancellorjohn mcdonnell explained why labour will not be backing on andrew marr earlier. we don't believe that we can pin him down, and i don't
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we don't believe that we can pin him down, and i don't trust him an inch. i don't think anyone does. we've got a prime minister now who says he will not even abide by the law. by the law? i've never heard that before. we are in a situation now where no one could trust while he is in place what could happen. so what we've got to do now is use every mechanism we possibly can to rule out a no deal, and that's what we're trying to legislate on as best we can. but also, once we've got to that situation, we can then, i think, that's the time we can have a general election. you heard john mcdonnell saying the prime minister had said he would not obey the law. this morning, the chancellor sajid javid repeatedly denied that and insisted the government would obey the law but was equally insistent borisjohnson would not resign or be asking for the extension. and the mackie would not explain how the government intended to square the circle. the law talks about october the 19th in case there is no deal agreed in that council meeting. should we get to that position we will look at our
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options. we will obey the law. at that council, the prime minister would ask for an extension because thatis would ask for an extension because that is the law? we will not change oui’ that is the law? we will not change our policy. how does this work? it is completely baffling. if the law says one thing and you say the government will obey the law but we will not do that one thing, it's ha rd to will not do that one thing, it's hard to see how you will get out of that. the government will not change its policy and we will be consistent with obeying the law but sticking to oui’ with obeying the law but sticking to our policy and you will have to wait and see. there are a lot of days between now and october the 19th and we will be working full on right until october the 31st to either leave with a deal or leave with no deal. both sides, it looks like they are not moving or giving an inch. parliament, tomorrow, will have to see what happens this week. another fascinating week at westminster. helen, thank you. meanwhile, the business secretary, andrea leadsom, has said the conservatives will break convention by fielding
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a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next general election. traditionally, the major parties do not contest the speaker's seat — but mr bercow‘s handling of recent brexit debates has angered ministers. simonjones reports. order! order. in the seat for the crucial vote... the ayes to the right, 327. noes to the left, 299. ..when mps backed the bill aimed at blocking a no—deal brexit at the end of october. butjohn bercow is now underfire from the business secretary. andrea leadsom says that by allowing mps to use a procedure to trigger emergency debate as a means of taking over the timetable, he has permitted a flagrant abuse of parliamentary process. in the mail on sunday, the business secretary writes... the speaker is an mp who stands in general elections
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but is usually unopposed by the major political parties. mrs leadsom is warning that the conservatives will defy convention and field a candidate in his constituency of buckingham in the next vote. there is no love lost between mrs leadsom and mr bercow. last year, he was alleged to have labelled her "stupid", although he said he muttered the word to describe how he felt about the way the government had scheduled commons business. he is yet to comment on the latest criticisms. simon jones, bbc news. the liberal democrats have picked up their third mp in a week. angela smith , who defected from the labour party earlier this year , has left the independent group for change to join up withjo swinson‘s party. she described the lib dems as the ‘strongest party to stop brexit.‘
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the labour mp, john mann says he's stepping down after 18 years in parliament, and has launched a strong attack onjeremy corbyn. in an interview with the sunday times, he accused the labour leader of giving the "green light" to anti—semites in the party. he'll take up the full—time post as the government's anti—semitism tsar. president trump says he's called off peace negotiations with the taliban — after an attack that killed 12 people, including a us soldier, in the afghan capital, kabul on thursday. the announcement — via twitter— comes just days after the american envoy to afghanistan reached a draft peace deal with the group. mr trump said a previously secret meeting with taliban leaders and the afghan president, ashraf ghani, due to take place at the president's camp david retreat on sunday has been cancelled. our chief international correspondent lyce doucet has been following the story. stunning, in so many ways. it is the middle of the night in the united states and if officials had been
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tipped off about these tweets, they would be scrambling, i think, tipped off about these tweets, they would be scrambling, ithink, as people here in afghanistan are scrabbling to make sense of this. the prize of our prize, inviting the taliban to the presidential retreat, camp david, before they've even signed a deal with the united states, which is said to be a deal in principle, before they have proven their commitment to peace. it is absolutely astonishing. so the big question now is, the secret summit has been cancelled, according to president trump's tweets. what happens to this painstaking process of negotiation? nearly a year of talks between the us envoy and his tea m talks between the us envoy and his team and taliban negotiators in the gulf state of qatar. they were making progress but the feeling everywhere here from the presidential palace to impoverished afg ha n presidential palace to impoverished afghan villages is, why was there so much talk of peace? is there even more war? that is killing our hopes
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of peace. joining me now from kabus is fawzia koofi. she is the former deputy speaker for the afghan parliament and met taliban leaders in moscow earlier this year. is this peace process now dead, do you think? no. ithink it is is this peace process now dead, do you think? no. i think it is a new opportunity for the people of afghanistan and i guess for the united states. to probably reshape their messages and strategy when it comes to peace talks with the taliban. at least the public, they wa nt taliban. at least the public, they want some level of reduction in violence, and stopping civilian killing. the taliban have escalated and increased their attacks on civilians, women and children in the cities but also the battlefield. probably they wanted to close the principally agreed agreement with
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the united states and show their strength and gain more. but, this means to the afghan people that the taliban have not changed their attitude towards people. this is an opportunity for the taliban and people of afghanistan to come back with more set goals and that should be ceasefire as a prerequisite for any negotiation. despite all of the horrific things that the taliban have done, do you think that talking to the taliban and making a deal with them, is that the only way of bringing peace to afghanistan? and there we have been in war. we do not know what it means to have a peaceful country and therefore, it is important for today's afghanistan to live with and you talk to your
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enemies, you definitely have to make an agreement with those you oppose. and you need to accept and adopt to the new afghanistan. it is not the time they have governed afghanistan and accommodated new ideas and freedom of speech. if the taliban are willing to be part of this, and peace talks are amassed, it has to continue but giving the taliban and upper hand and putting them in this position, to the extent that even in camp david there was a plan, a secret meeting that the people of afghanistan were not aware of. the public deserve to be aware of what is going on with their future. this has to be a piece that the future has to be a piece that the future has an assurance in what we achieve in office. do you think the taliban is genuine about wanting to be part ofa is genuine about wanting to be part of a new afghanistan? a modern
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afghanistan? do you think they are genuine? well, to be honest, i attended three rounds with the taliban, andi attended three rounds with the taliban, and i had the feeling, and i've said it time and again, that the taliban pretended in one picture to the national community and the americans that they have changed that the demonstrative face they gave to us, they announced and drafted a joint statement. they seem to be focusing and emphasising their position, particularly with women's rights. when i asked them to include in thatjoint statement women and human rights, that women, according to the human rights principle, will be protected. they did not agree to that end they said yes, women's rights, according to islamic values, i don't think anyone would oppose it but there is a different
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interpretation. my understanding is, the taliban need to believe they are ina win—win the taliban need to believe they are in a win—win situation and gain more international trust. and pretend they have changed that in reality, facing the new afghanistan, you have to be cautious about the future. it's good to talk to you. thank you for your time. the headlines on bbc news... amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. she'll be replaced as work and pensions secretary by therese coffey, mp for suffolk coastal. business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election.
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those are the latest headlines, let's ta ke those are the latest headlines, let's take a look at the sport now. history was made at the us open but not how people expected. serena williams failed in her bid for a record 24th grand slam title, losing in the final to bianca andreescu, the first canadian to win a grand slam. it's been 20 years since serena williams first won the us open. back then, bianca andreescu hadn't even been born. yet here they were, together, opponents on the game's biggest stage. andreescu chasing williams, and williams now chasing history. that is what the new york crowd had all gathered to see. what they actually saw was history of a different sort. andreescu still a teenager, but with an icy calmness belying her years. while she was still finding her way, williams, it seems, was losing hers. mistakes, and frustration.
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andreescu suddenly on the brink. but having saved a championship point, williams suddenly regained her composure as the us crowd lost theirs. but the fightback was as spectacular as it was short—lived. andreescu champion at her first attempt. williams' wait for another grand slam goes on. but the game now has a new superstar. adam wild, bbc news. this wasn't the only time i visualised playing in the finals actually against serena williams. i've been... it's so crazy. i've been... sorry. i've been dreaming of this moment for the longest time.
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an emotional bianca andreescu there. great britain has a champion at the us open too, jamie murray and bethanie mattek—sands retaining their mixed doubles title. he is the first man in the open area to win three successive mixed doubles titles at flushing meadows. at wembley, the england captain harry kane scored a hat—trick as they cruised to a 4—0 win over bulgaria, maintaining a 100% record in euro 2020 qualifying. he was set up in euro 2020 qualifying. he was set up by in euro 2020 qualifying. he was set up by raheem sterling for their first goal before adding two penalties and then harry kane returned the penalty, getting raheem sterling's name on the scoresheet as they showed off an impressive partnership. england women's captain steph horton played in the first manchester derby in the wsl yesterday, her club manchester city beat united 1—0 in front of a record—breaking crowd of 31,000 at the etihad arena. she has recently
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started the great north run, and is there to raise awareness for the mnd foundation, her husband was diagnosed with motor neurone disease last year. when stephen was diagnosed, his mindset was all about helping other people and coming here, i know how important the run is to everyone and having 12 of the family to run for his foundation and raising awareness is a great opportunity for us to do that. the main objectives of the foundation we re main objectives of the foundation were supporting those suffering from the disease and illness and we found out there isn't much research, and no cure. as much as we can, we would like to raise as much money to help those families and hopefully find a cure. in cricket, a criticalfinal day. it will get under way in the next hour at old trafford, as they attempt to
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save the ashes. england resume on 18-2, save the ashes. england resume on 18—2, after losing joe root and rory burns for ducks. england will have two bat with all their might today come with the aussies have a 382 run lead and are eight wickets away from returning the urn. all of the latest on that on the bbc sport website, more on all of those stories on the website. studio: jane, thank you. thousands of pro—democracy activists have marched to the us consulate in hong kong to urge america to support their bid for political reform. some of them carried the us flag, the stars and stripes, and called for president trump to "liberate" the territory. china claims the united states is orchestrating the protests, which have been going on for three months. our correspondent in hong kong, steve mcdonell, is following developments.
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today's protest in hong kong threatens to drive something of a diplomatic wedge in between beijing and washington. that is because, in their tens and thousands, demonstrators have come out calling on washington to take a tougher sta nce on washington to take a tougher stance on their city. they want congress to pass a bill which would mean that, in orderfor hong kong to enjoy this special trading status, the special trading privileges from the special trading privileges from the united states, they would have to pass an annual human rights test. now, this has bipartisan support, so there is some sense that such a bill is going to pass in washington. but just to make sure, in their thousands, activists are marching to the united states consulate. it is
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somewhat of a risky strategy, because imagine if hong kong does not pass this annual human rights test, and loses it special trading status in north america, it would drive the economy down and that could lead to an even bigger crackdown from beijing's. it is something of a risky strategy. however, in the minds of the pro—democracy movement, they believe it is worth leveraging some of this momentum that they have and some of the concern being generated in washington, as people have seen this political crisis and have wondered whether or not the government in hong kong really enjoys the political autonomy it is supposed to have. the other thing we are seeing here today, their calls showing even though carrie lam's administration
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has now officially canned this much hated extradition bill, allowed people to be sent to communist china, that is not enough. they say one is gone, four more to go. if the government in hong kong hoped that by taking the bill off the table there would be no more large protests here, as you can see, that is not the case. british airways pilots begin a two day strike at midnight in their dispute about pay and conditions. passengers are being advised not to go to airports and ba. says most customers have made alternative arrangements. here's our business correspondent, katie prescott. for the first time in the company's history, british airways pilots are refusing to fly. the pilots' union say after working with ba through lean times, they now want a greater share of the company profits. it made £2 billion last year. they have rejected an offer of an 11.5% payrise over the next
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few years, and british airways says it is a generous offer and that their pilots already get world—class salaries. of course, in the middle of all of this are the customers. they were warned about these strikes weeks ago, and the company says most have been rebooked, but for many that journey has not been smooth. i got a text message out of the blue stating that my flight was cancelled, and it didn't give any explanation whatsoever. itjust gave a telephone number to call, which i did do. i couldn't get through on the phone, spent basically all evening, didn't sleep very well because i thought my holiday was in ruins. any passengers affected by the strike are entitled to a refund or a rebooking with ba or another airline. the company is advising them not to turn up at the airport tomorrow. if the two sides don't come to an agreement, a further day of strikes are planned for the seventh of september. katie prescott, bbc news.
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ships and aircraft are helping to move thousands of people from the islands in the bahamas worst hit by hurricane dorian. one cruise ship with more than a thousand evacuees has arrived in florida. aid agencies say the situation on great abaco island is desperate, with residents unable to find food or clean water. at the moment, the death toll in the bahama is 43 — but is expected to increase with hundreds still missing. time for a look at the weather and the latest on the hurricane which has been downgraded. sarah keith—lucas has that for us. that ex—hurricane will be starting to head across the north atlantic through the week. it has made landfill in eastern canada and brings heavy rain and dangerous wins. it will head towards northern parts of the uk, well to the north
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of us. but the tail end of what is left will bring some wet and windy weather through the week. ahead, we have a beautiful day. across the country, blue sky and a lot of sunshine. dry weather in most places, a couple of spots of rain. but in general, we have sunny spells, particularly here. it is parts of england, wales and the eastern half of scotland that will keep the best of the sunshine. filed in the western part of scotland and some rain later in the day. 1a—19d, a great day for those taking part in the great north run. through the evening and overnight, rain in scotland, northern ireland and eastern wales. they are in the east. we have the lowest temperatures here and it will not be as cold as it was last night. we have quite a lot of
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cloud and rain should clear in northern ireland and a return to sunny spells but it will not feel particularly warm, with temperatures of 14-17d. hello, this is bbc news with ben brown. the headlines:
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amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government. it's the combination of the fact that there is not enough work going into actually getting a deal, which i think is not what the prime minister signed up to try to do, and secondly the expulsion of 21 of my colleagues, who are good, moderate conservatives. she'll be replaced as work and pensions secretary by therese coffey, mp for suffolk coastal. business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election. peace talks between the taliban and the us are called off. president trump blames a deadly attack in the afghan capital, kabul. ships and aircraft evacuate thousands of people from islands in the bahamas worst hit by hurricane dorian. aid agencies say the situation is desperate.

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