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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 8, 2019 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 11am. after her resignation from the cabinet and the conservative party — amber rudd attacks borisjohnson‘s handling of brexit. it's a combination of the fact that there is not enough work going into actually getting a deal which i think is not want to take back what the prime minister signed up to do. and secondly, the expulsion of 21 of my colleagues who are good, moderate conservatives. moderate conservatives. she'll be replaced as work and pensions secretary by therese coffey, mp for suffolk coastal. business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election. peace talks between the taliban
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and the us are called off — president trump blames a deadly attack in the afghan capital, kabul. ships and aircraft evacuate thousands of people from islands in the bahamas worst hit by hurricane dorian — aid agencies say the situation is ‘desperate'. british airways pilots prepare to go on strike for the first time in the airline's history. and coming up at 11.30am — carrie gracie discusses this weeks‘ events in westminster with uk—based foreign correspondents on dateline london. good morning. amber rudd has been giving more details about why she's resigned from the government. she told the bbc‘s andrew marr she hasn't seen enough evidence that downing street is doing enough
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to get a brexit deal. and she's angry about the expulsion of what she called ‘good and moderate' conservative mps. the chancellor sajid javid said he was saddened by her resignation — and he did not agree that the government wasn't putting serious effort into getting a new deal. here's what amber rudd had to say on the andrew marr show this morning. i believe that he is trying to get a deal with the eu. i am just saying what i have seen in government, is that there is this huge machine preparing for no deal, which is fine. you might expect in the balance between getting a deal and no deal 50 50 in terms of work. but it is not that. it is like 80 or 90% of government time going into preparing for a no deal and the absence of actually trying to work to get a deal. it is what has driven 21 of my colleagues to rebel and i need tojoin them. so you think honestly he is trying to get a deal. what deal? i think he prefers to get a deal... what deal is the question. well, that is the question. and you have no idea?
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i have no idea because what we know is that angela merkel and the eu have said, give us your proposal. and we have not given them a proposal. where is all the work that needs to be done to try and come up with alternative arrangements, to show where the landing places, all that work that needs to go behind it? and instead we are just hearing, we are going to get a deal. there is very little evidence of it. are you going to leave politics? no, iam not leaving politics. i'm actually not leaving the conservative party. what i am doing is surrendering the whip alongside my colleagues, the 21 others, in order to stand with them. i don't think... i know i couldn't carry on in the conservative party at such a high level and see 21 of my colleagues who are good, moderate people who also want a deal, excluded from it. and ijust needed to move and stand by them. i hope that we will all be returned before the general election so we can all stand as conservatives. i am a conservative. i believe the conservative party is a force for good in our great country and i would like to see us in government. we have been before. we have done great things. in your letter to the prime minister
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you said, i no longer believe that living with a deal is the government's main objective. that is quite close to accusing the government of lying to the british people. i am not accusing them of lying. i am observing what i have seen. i am saying that 80 to 90% of the work that i can see going on on the eu relationship is about preparation for no deal. it is about disproportion. when this was first entered into after boris johnson became prime minister, most people would have expected, everybody would have expected there to bea everybody would have expected there to be a lot of work and trying to get a deal. a whole team of people trying to build those relationships, alternative relationships.” trying to build those relationships, alternative relationships. i haven't seen that. did the cabinet know the legal advice and progression? we went circulated it now. i can only speculate. i asked for it and i was not giving it. it was only on progression and how it folded into
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the northern ireland bill and i was told that i would get it but after persistently asking for it i still hadn't got it when i resigned. earlier i spoke to our political correspondent, helen catt, about the significance of amber rudd's resignation. having her own side, on his team as it were, did reidy boost the view of boris johnson's it were, did reidy boost the view of borisjohnson‘s leadership it were, did reidy boost the view of boris johnson's leadership and it were, did reidy boost the view of borisjohnson‘s leadership and his brexit strategy and the fact that you had heard there go for both, both his handling of the party and that stack figure of saying that 80 to 90% of government effort is going towards a no—deal brexit, she believes, not to what is actually getting a deal. well that could well harm him, certainly among those who share amber rudd's views. the big worry for him is if it does untitled more unhappy tories. and we know there are some. and inspire them to follow suit. it will be interesting
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to see the reaction beyond westminster. again, ithink to see the reaction beyond westminster. again, i think that 80 to 90% figure will cut through in some places. also i think there will bea group some places. also i think there will be a group of people of leith backers who look at this and think, this means boris johnson backers who look at this and think, this means borisjohnson is serious. amber rudd has never wanted to leave really and therefore it is just removing another remain impediment. it'll be interesting to see how the fault outside westminster. interesting to see happens next. the no deal legislation passed by mps, that get royal assent tomorrow. suggestions that the government may not abide by it even though it is a lot of the land. what does happen next? tomorrow of this bill which actually sparked all of this controversy last week that was a reason that the 21 mps who rebelled and voted for it were sacked from the conservative party, that get signed off by the queen tomorrow. it get royal assent. that compelled borisjohnson if get royal assent. that compelled boris johnson if he get royal assent. that compelled borisjohnson if he doesn't have a brexit deal on the 19th of october to ask for an extension from the eu.
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there's been some debate about whether or not he will do that. we also know that tomorrow he will try to go foran also know that tomorrow he will try to go for an early election on 0ctober to go for an early election on october the 15. he is likely to fail because the opposition say they will not give that to him. john mcdonnell explained why labour won't be backing to andrew marr earlier. we don't believe that we can pin him down and i don't trust him and i don't think anyone does. i think we have got a prime minister now who says he won't even abide by the law, by the law. i have never heard that before. we are in a situation now where no one can trust while he is in place what can happen. so we have got to use every mechanism we possibly can to rule out eight no deal and that is what we are trying to legislate on as best we can, but also once we have got to that situation we can then, i think, have a general election. you heard john mcdonnell —— say that the prime minister had said he would not obey
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the law. this morning he said... sajid javid denied that. he was equally insistent that boris johnson wouldn't resign and that he would be asking for that extension and you wouldn't really explain how the government intended to square that circle. the law talks about october the 19th in case there is no deal agreed in the council meeting. should we get to that position we will look at our options. of course we will obey the law. the prime minister would ask for an extension. we will not change our policy. our policy is clear. how does this work? it is completely baffling. the law says one thing and you are saying the government is going to obey the law but we are not going to do that one thing, it is hard to see how you will get out of that. the government will get out of that. the government will not change its policy and we will not change its policy and we will be consistent, obey the law and stick to our policy. there is a lot of data between now and october the 19th and we will be working full on
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until october the 31st to either leave with a deal only with no deal. so both sides, it looks like they are not so both sides, it looks like they a re not really so both sides, it looks like they are not really moving, not giving an inch. parliament back we'll have to see what happens this week. helen kat there, our political correspondent. helen kat there, our political correspondent. meanwhile, the business secretary, andrea leadsom, has said the conservatives will break convention by fielding a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next general election. traditionally, the major parties do not contest the speaker's seat — but mr bercow‘s handling of recent brexit debates has angered ministers. simonjones reports. order! order! in the seed for the crucial vote. ayes to the right 327, noes to the left 299. will mps. .. john bercow is now underfire
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noes to the left 299. will mps. .. john bercow is now under fire from the business secretary. andrea leadsom says that by allowing mps to use a procedure to trigger emergency debate as a means of taking up the timetable, he has permitted a flag ra nt timetable, he has permitted a flagrant abuse of parliamentary process. in the mail on sunday their business secretary writes... the speaker is an mp who stands in general elections but is usually unopposed by the major political parties but mrs led to me is warning that the conservatives will defy convention and field a candidate in his constituency of buckingham at the next vote. there is no love lost between andrea leadsom and mr boco. last year he was alleged to have labelled her stupid. he has yet to
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comment on the latest criticisms —— john bercow. the liberal democrats have picked up their third mp in a week. angela smith, who defected from the labour party earlier this year, has left the independent group for change to join up withjo swinson‘s party. she described the lib dems as the ‘strongest party to stop brexit.‘ the labour mp, john mann says he's stepping down after 18 years in parliament, and has launched a strong attack onjeremy corbyn. in an interview with the sunday times, he accused the labour leader of giving the "green light" to anti—semites in the party. he'll take up the full—time post as the government's anti—semitism tsar. ships and aircraft are helping to move thousands of people from the islands in the bahamas worst hit by hurricane dorian. one cruise ship with more than a thousand evacuees has now arrived in florida. aid agencies say the situation on great abaco island is desperate,
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with residents unable to find food or clean water. at the moment, the death toll in the bahama is 43 — but is expected to increase with hundreds still missing. darren tosh is the executive director at samaritan‘s purse — a christian humanitarian aid organization that has airlifted an emergency field hospital and a medical team to the bahamas. hejoins me now. tell us more about what you've been able to do to help. over the past week we have been airlifting supplies straight into the bahamas. we have our own aircraft so we have been able to deliver at least five rotations of relief. there are 30 tonnes worth of shelter supplies, desalinisation units which are essential for getting fresh water to people. the situation underground requires that we need people into shelter and with fresh water. we have been working with the ministry of health in the world health
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organization to deliver an emergency field hospital. the field hospital is up and running today. we can report that they can be taken up to 100 patients a day with eight delivery unit as well. on the grand bahama island the hospital is unable to operate so this field hospital is providing essential care for those who have been rescued and need recovery. our team is active today and trying to do our best to be able to get relief supplies into the most remote areas. the situation is tough. we are having to use badges and our own helicopters to deliver to the most remote areas to ensure that people are getting life—saving supplies. give us a picture, we are seeing some aerial shot of the devastation now, give us a sense of the devastation and destruction the level of need. you have to imagine this was a larger storm to ever hit in the atlantic and it packed over the bahamas. the bahamas. the devastation is absolute in some areas. houses have been by clean to
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the foundation, there is no infrastructure. when you have a storm like this come in, it's once any fresh water or the national sewage supply so we have a horrible situation for those who have survived and the critical days are right now for us to get emergency supplies to them to be able to save lives over the next couple of days. the challenge of course is access. and roads are covered. the airstrips are covered. the airport in the north is under water still. so it is becoming a great challenge to be able to reach people and get them emergency supplies. are you worried about disease? of course, after a div element like this when you end up div element like this when you end up having unsafe water, you have a mix of bodies and destructed crops. there is a horrible amount of disease can develop after an event like this. which is why we have the emergency field hospital working with the bahamian ministry of health. these are critical days and
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this is going to be a long—term recovery programme for the bahamas. this will be resolved over the next weeks or months, this will be a massive recovery programme. the death toll is officially 43 at the moment. still an awful lot of people unaccounted for. absolutely. the world health organization and the government there has projected into the hundreds, if not thousands. we know that people haven't even been fully recovered yet so the access into some areas, we are uncertain as to how the level of destruction and life loss in some areas and small islands. good to talk to you and thank you for being with us and good luck with all your efforts. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news... amber rudd resigns from the cabinet and the conservative party in another major blow for boris johnson's government.
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she'll be replaced as work and pensions secretary by therese coffey, the mp for suffolk coastal. business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election. sport. to williams losing in the final of the us open. but before that, the final day of the fourth test has just gone under way at old trafford and it is critical that england batted well today otherwise they could lose the ashes to australia. that is after... they narrowly avoided the follow—on but england will have to do well today because the aussies have a 382 run lead. just eight wickets away from
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retaining the urn. there was a big shock at the us open. history was made at the women's final, but not in the way many expected. serena williams failed in her bid for a record equalling grand slam title, losing in the final six — three, 7-5. it is losing in the final six — three, 7—5. it is a fourth major final in april that has lost. 7—5. it is a fourth major final in aprilthat has lost. it is 7—5. it is a fourth major final in april that has lost. it is really ha rd april that has lost. it is really hard right now to take that moment in and to say, you did 0k. because i don't believe i did. you know? i believe i could have played better and done more and i believe i could have just been more serena today. i honestly don't think serena has shown up and i have to figure out how to get her to show up in grand slam final. this wasn't the only timel slam final. this wasn't the only time i visualise playing in the
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finals actually against serena williams. i think it is so crazy. sorry. i have been dreaming of this moment for the longest time stop very emotional. great britain has a champion of the us open because jamie murray retained their mixed doubles title beating the top seeds in straight sets. andy murray's first man to win three successive mixed doubles titles. around 57,000 people have been taking part in the great north run this morning between newcastle and south shields. the elite women's race got under way a little while ago but the elite men's race and the main race hasjust
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started. mo farah is the biggest name in bold. he is going for a record sixth successive title in newcastle. the key names include britain's column hawkins. and in the last few minutes multiple paralympic champion david weir has won the men's wheelchair race. he claimed his eighth wheelchair title at south shields and it was a double when four brits. the england women's captain was one of the starters of the great north run. she played in the great north run. she played in the first manchester derby in the wsl yesterday. her club manchester city beat united one nil in front of a record—breaking crowd of 31,000 at the end he had. she was at the great north run to raise awareness for the derby foundation. her husband was former liverpool defender stephen darby who was diagnosed with motor neuron disease last year. when
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stephen was diagnosed his mindset was all about trying to help other people. i know how important this run is to everyone to have 12 of theirfamily run is to everyone to have 12 of their family running for his foundation and to raise awareness. it isa foundation and to raise awareness. it is a great opportunity for us to do that and get out there. the main objective of the foundation was to personally support those who are suffering from the disease and the illness and support their families but also for the research. i think we found out over the last year that there is not much research and there is obviously no... we are trying to raise as much money to help those families and finally hopefully find a cure. harry kane scored a hat—trick as they cruised to a 4—0 win over bulgaria. he was set up by raheem sterling for his first goal before adding two penalties. and then he returned the favour, getting sterling's name under score sheet too. they showed off the very
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impressive partnership. there are more details on the bbc sport website. that is it for now. wish thousands of pro—democracy activists have marched to the us consulate in hong kong to urge america to support their bid for political reform. some of them carried the us flag — the stars and stripes — and called for president trump to "liberate" the territory. china claims the united states is orchestrating the protests, which have been going on for three months. our correspondent in hong kong, steve mcdonell, is following developments. today's protest in hong kong threatens to drive something of a diplomatic wedge in between beijing and washington. that is because, in their tens and thousands, demonstrators have come out calling on washington to take a tougher stance on their city.
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they want congress to pass a bill which would mean that, in order for hong kong to enjoy this special trading status, the special trading privileges from the united states, they would have to pass an annual human rights test. now, this has bipartisan support, so there is some chance that such a bill is going to pass in washington. butjust to make sure, in their thousands, activists are marching to the united states consulate. it is somewhat of a risky strategy, because imagine if hong kong does not pass this annual human rights test, and loses it special trading status in north america, it would drive the economy down and that could lead to an even bigger crackdown from beijing. it is something of a risky strategy.
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however, in the minds of the pro—democracy movement, they believe it is worth leveraging some of this momentum that they have and some of the concern being generated in washington, as people have seen this political crisis and have wondered whether or not the government in hong kong really enjoys the political autonomy it is supposed to have. the other thing we are seeing here today — "five demands, not one less", they are calling out. itjust shows even though carrie lam's administration has now officially canned this much—hated extradition bill, which would have allowed people to be sent to mainland chinese courts, controlled by the communist party, that is not enough. they say one is gone, four more to go. if the government in hong kong hoped that by taking the bill off
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the table there would be no more large protests here, as you can see, that is not the case. these are the latest pictures from hong kong — you could see journalists and photographers set in front of some of their police with their riot shields. another day of protest in this long—running crisis now in hong kong. president trump says he's called off peace negotiations with the taliban — after an attack that killed 12 people, including a us soldier, in the afghan capital, kabul on thursday. the announcement via twitter comes just days after the american envoy to afghanistan reached a draft peace deal with the group. mr trump said a previously secret meeting with taliban leaders and the afghan president, ashraf ghani, due to take place at the president's camp david retreat on sunday has been cancelled. our chief international correspondent lyce doucet has been following the story. stunning, in so many ways.
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it is the middle of the night in the united states and if officials had been tipped off about these tweets, they would be scrambling, i think, as people here in afghanistan are scrabbling to make sense of this. the prize of our prize, inviting the taliban to the presidential retreat, camp david, before they've even signed a deal with the united states, which is said to be a deal in principle, before they have proven their commitment to peace. it is absolutely astonishing. so the big question now is, the secret summit has been cancelled, according to president trump's tweets. what happens to this painstaking process of negotiation? nearly a year of talks between the us envoy and his team and taliban negotiators in the gulf state of qatar. they were making progress but the feeling everywhere here from the presidential palace to impoverished afghan villages is, why was there so much talk of peace?
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is there even more war? that is killing our hopes of peace. british airways pilots begin a two—day strike at midnight in their dispute about pay and conditions. passengers are being advised not to go to airports and ba. says most customers have made alternative arrangements. here's our business correspondent, katie prescott. for the first time in the company's history, british airways pilots are refusing to fly. the pilots' union say after working with ba through lean times, they now want a greater share of the company profits. it made £2 billion last year. they have rejected an offer of an 11.5% payrise over the next few years, but british airways says it is a generous offer and that their pilots already get world—class salaries. of course, in the middle of all of this are the customers. they were warned about these strikes weeks ago, and the company says most have been rebooked, but for many that journey
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has not been smooth. i got a text message out of the blue stating that my flight was cancelled, and it didn't give any explanation whatsoever. itjust gave a telephone number to call, which i did do. i couldn't get through on the phone, spent basically all evening, didn't sleep very well because i thought my holiday was in ruins. any passengers affected by the strike are entitled to a refund or a rebooking with ba or another airline. the company is advising them not to turn up at the airport tomorrow. if the two sides don't come to an agreement, a further day of strikes are planned for the seventh of september. katie prescott, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah. blue sky across the country. it will be dry everywhere. rain moving into
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the north—west. cloud across northern ireland and the western half of scotland with a little patchy rain later in the day. the chance of an isolated shower app across the far east coast of east anglia. elsewhere, dry sunny weather with temperatures up to 1a to 19 degrees. a decent day for the north run. this evening and tonight, dry weather for the first half of the night but later on this rain moves in from the west so a soggy static monday morning across northern and western areas. the eastern half of england should be dry. monday will be dominated by this band of rain moving from west to east. patchy in nature but underneath a cloud with the rain and increasing breeze, it won't feel particularly one with temperatures of 1a to 17 celsius. hello again, you are watching bbc news with me, ben brown. the
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headline s. after her resignation from the cabinet and the conservative whip in parliament — amber rudd attacks borisjohnson's handling of brexit. it's the combination of the fact that there is not enough work going into actually getting a deal, which is not what the prime minister signed up to try to do, and secondly the expulsion of 21 of my colleagues, who are good, moderate conservatives. she'll be replaced as work and pensions secretary by therese coffey, mp for suffolk coastal. business secretary, andrea leadsom, says the conservatives will break with precedent and field a candidate against the commons speaker, john bercow, at the next election. peace talks between the taliban and the us are called off — president trump blames a deadly attack in the afghan capital, kabul. ships and aircraft evacuate thousands of people from islands in the bahamas worst hit by hurricane dorian — aid agencies say the situation is ‘desperate'.
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those are the headlines. now, it is time for dateline london with carrie gracie. hello. welcome to dateline london, i'm carrie gracie. this week: borisjohnson's promise that he would do—or—die to deliver brexit by october the 31st has become do—or—die in a ditch. despite a full house of parliamentary defeats, nothing else changed in his message stop either doing or dying is still defiantly scheduled for october the 31st, so our question today: is the british prime minister digging himself a ditch in which to die or demonstrating exactly the determination that will do in the end? my guests, italian writer
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and film—maker annalisa piras. iain martin of the times.

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