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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 9, 2019 6:00am-8:30am BST

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ago and it is not the most inspirational start t at 1e new ago and it is not the most inspirational start t at 1e r moment. what they have got at the moment. blue skies overhead for northern ireland, few games as a brightness towards mainland scotland but towards mainland scotland but towards shetland, a fine day here. the rain will still be there but not as heavy or persistent. rain into the evening in northern scotland, heavy bursts of rain toward south—west and wales. gusty winds good morning. for a time but that will ease down welcome to breakfast withjon key in westminster, and most of the rain will fade. as parliament begins another crucial week in the brexit process. patchy drizzle cannot be ruled out our headlines this morning: here and there and misty conditions into tomorrow morning. clear skies across western scotland and northern mps are to vote again today on holding a snap general election, with boris johnson facing a second defeat. ireland. tomorrow morning's rush—hour across scotland and northern ireland, much better than today, lots of sunshine to begin and a new law to delay brexit comes into force today — with but clouding over and turning but government ministers are looking windy and wet later. brightening up for a way around it. and this is louise to sunny spells and it will feel minchin in the studio. warmer tomorrow at around 15 to 19 also today, more than 120 firefighters are tackling a major degrees compared to 13 to 16 today. fire at a block of flats in south—west london. the wet and windy weather, the little mix'sjesy nelson reveals that online bullying re m na nts of the wet and windy weather, the following led her to try remnants of hurricane dorian passing to the north of us tuesday night to take her own life. into wednesday bringing heavy rain for scotland and northern ireland
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with widespread gales. wednesday, so many messages, nasty ones, but outbreaks of rain and drizzle coming and going to england and wales, the one that was at the top was from scotla nd and going to england and wales, scotland and northern ireland. bright and breezy with a few showers a random man, and he wasjust, like, in most places and most places will brighten up to the day. around 19 to saying how disgusting i am and that 21 celsius. back to louise. i don't deserve to be in the girl band and that i deserved to die. good morning. travel disruption for hundreds of thousands of british airways partners —— passages, as it's the start of another big pilots go on strike. week in westminster. it's the biggest strike jon is outside parliament in ba's history. for us this morning. i'll speak to ba's boss, and to the head of the pilots' we for us this morning. arejust we union. for us this morning. are just still not certain and that we are just still not certain and thatis we are just still not certain and that is something we keep saying, rafael nadal wins an epic us open. good morning? it's a 19th grand slam yes, whoever you speak to whatever title for the spaniard, and a fourth in new york side they are on and nobody has a after winning a five—set thriller. and weatherwise, not the ideal start clue where we are heading and how this will proceed. mps are arriving, to the week. lots of rain and it is rather cool today as well. but there they don't even know how many days will be signs of improvement. i will they don't even know how many days they will be working this week have the full forecast for you right because we know parliament will be here on breakfast. it's monday, the 9th of september. suspended or prorogued. it could we're live from westminster happen today, tomorrow, wednesday at the start of what is shaping up almost certainly by thursday. they to be another momentous week in british politics, don't know what they're working week and for borisjohnson's government. is looking like. what we do know is
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almost certainly, according to chris later today mps will vote mason, our political correspondent, for a second time on whether to hold the bill that is designed to stop an early general election. but no deal happening, that will become law today, it will be rubber in a moment, we'll hear from our political correspondent, stamped with royal assent. the only chris mason, but with things changing so quickly in our politics at the moment, let's just take you through what we can expect to happen next. the mps' bill forcing borisjohnson partly because 21 rebel tories back to it and they were then kicked out to ask for a brexit extension — of the party. david gauke, part of in order to avoid no deal — is set to become law later today. once that's happened, the so—called g—awkward squad joins us this morning. what you make of these claims the prime minister the government hopes to have a fresh might try and get round this legislation by writing another vote to force a snap general letter to the eu at the same time as election, on october 15th, although their bid the first letter saying, ignore the first letter? the bill will place a seems likely to fail. and then, possibly tomorrow but certainly by thursday, statutory duty on the prime minister parliament will be suspended or prorogued. to see an extension, assuming he chris, it is set to be another busy hasn't reached a deal or parliament week here in westminster. hasn't reached a deal or parliament has not supported a departure without a deal. they can make that
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what do we think is going to happen by the end of today? the key thing point, but nonetheless, the position that was meant to happen today, from of the government will be to see an the government's perspective, was extension because that is what the that royal assent would be given to statute requires them to do. this that royal assent would be given to that also block a no deal brexit by does not move things on much, the eu the end of next month. it would be are perfectly capable of following are perfectly capable of following are new stories and they know the rubberstamped, it would come back to position of the prime minister. parliament has made it clear that leaving on the of october, if it both houses and be sorted. and at that point labour would be keen on a does not consent to living without a general election, the numbers without up, and what would happen? deal and has not agreed to a deal, —— one would happen. what has changed is that the opposition it's not where we want the country parties are saying no. not only does to go. it might not be where this law have to be rubberstamped, parliament wants the country to go it has to be implemented. what it but there is the suggestion of this saysin it has to be implemented. what it says in the text has to actually loophole potentially, the prime happen, in other words, this idea of minister says i will write the a delay. so they will vote against letter. then he will write another wa nt to letter. then he will write another want to say ignore the first one. is tonight the government's idea of this something that you and other holding a general election in the middle of october. that means the conservatives will not get the two—thirds majority of mps they need rebel mps did not see? no, stat -- to make it happen, so it will not happen. not much we can be pretty certain about. everything from here statute will say the prime minister on in isa certain about. everything from here on in is a bit more guesswork. is writing to the european union seeking an extension. the european
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pretty certain! this bill but gets union can refuse that extension. i personally think they would not want to be blamed for a no—deal brexit royal assent today, but will force and they will agree to an extension, borisjohnson to go back to brussels and ask for another extension if you but the risk has not gone away cannot get a deal in the meantime. entirely. the mechanism thatjust a the papers this morning a full of all kinds of wire —— wild theories few days ago people were saying, there isn't anything parliament can about how we might get around that. do, nothing that will work, if there it is like some kind of children's is something mps will be scared away story, do you go under it, over it, threw it? every line of this text is from supporting it, that mechanism is now in place and i think the being looked at, this is what ministers say, to think —— to see if consensus in the legal world is it they can think of a way through it. is pretty watertight. the fact is, one of the ideas going around is, to leave without a deal on the 31st 0k, one of the ideas going around is, ok, they recognised that legally they have to ask the for an of october would be irresponsible, extension, borisjohnson will go to would cause enormous damage to the that summit and submit a letter saying, the law says we need an people of this country and extension. but then they can submit parliament has a responsibility to make an assessment to see if it is another one, saying, we don't really wa nt another one, saying, we don't really want one. the idea being, the right thing or not to do and it is clear what the view of parliament potentially, they would so an is. you were the justice secretary element of confusion in europe, and you know about upholding the which i am sure is confused enough law, when you heard dominic rab looking at what is going on right talking about testing to the limit, the law that goes to and doing what here in this postcode, so that they will not be inclined to give us an it will take, the premise of saying extension. because it takes both do ordie and
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sides to agree to grant an it will take, the premise of saying do or die and challenge it, what do extension. there have been noises you think about the situation and over the weekend from france that they might not be particularly keen on the idea of an extension. they the government's situation and the law, justice? i would draw a have said that before. they have. distinction between saying we will test the law and does it work? that overall, there is a few that if it isa comes to it, if the uk asks for an test the law and does it work? that is a legitimate thing to do. at some extension, the eu will be likely to of the briefing about they will defy grant one, not least because they know a general election is in the the law is completely unacceptable. offing, which is something they have government has a responsibility to a lwa ys offing, which is something they have always said would be one of the abide by the law. the british conditions. it gives you some insight into how in this postcode, around here, in rooms where lights government in particular has an will be flicking on in the next few international responsibility and governments from around the world hours, loads and loads of people in will look at what we do. any government are trying to find a way suggestion the government decides out of this spine. it would appear which laws it obeys is not how we do they had simply not anticipated being reversed into it. westminster things in this country. the rule of going on about honda. indeed. -- law is fundamental to what we are about. i am confident the prime minister would just simply defy the law, flout the law that he would westminster going on a bear hunt. borisjohnson will meet the irish follow legal advice and act prime minister leo varadkar in dublin this morning. appropriately. but even the the talks will focus on brexit, with the future of the border with northern ireland remaining suggestion, anonymous briefings into the biggest sticking point the newspapers, that somehow the law to striking a deal with the eu. will be defied is damaging to our here's our ireland reputation to the rule of law and i
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correspondent, chris page. think the government should be absolutely clear and unambiguous, you cannot see it, but it has been the law is the law and the the biggest obstacle to a brexit government will abide by it. boris deal. the border between northern johnson and his key advisers would ireland and the irish republic say, it is the most damaging thing doesn't have any chat once, and both the uk and the eu wants to keep it to the democracy, ignore the result of the referendum, not to uphold that way. —— checkpoints. but they what millions of people voted for?” don't agree on how to achieve that would make the point to some of aim. the centre of the dispute is those people, some of us voted three what is known as a backstop, times to leave the european union guarantee the frontier will remain and had we prevailed, we would have open under any circumstances. it will come into force only if there left the european union on the 29th is not a majorfree—trade deal which would remove the need for cheques. of march. but parliament has a borisjohnson would remove the need for cheques. boris johnson wants would remove the need for cheques. responsibility to find the right way borisjohnson wants the idea to be of implementing the referendum scrapped, because it would in effect keep britain in that you's customs result and that is what it should regime, and may northern ireland has do. but parliament also recognises to follow some european rules on that a no—deal brexit would be goods. but the irish government irresponsible, it would damage our argues the backstop is vital. prime constituents. if we have to step in, minister leo varadkar says he would however much it will be criticised consider any alternatives the uk comes up consider any alternatives the uk comes up with, but so far he says and whatever sacrifices we have to there have been none, and he is make in terms of our own personal concerned about deadlocked westminster. the prime minister -- careers, that is the right thing to do because it is in the national interest. what about you who have prime minister may, with the parliamentary majority, was unable
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to get a deal through the house of been suspended, you have amber rudd, commons. prime ministerjohnson does now 22 of you, but you all seem to not have a majority. so i will be wa nt now 22 of you, but you all seem to want different things. some of you wa nt to asking him how he can convince us, want different things. some of you want to stay in the party, some want ireland and the european union, that to be independent, some want to be he is actually capable or has the an independent conservative so you votes to get a deal through. leo have to get organised if you have varadkar has suggested that his government could accept a solution any chance of making a difference?” cannot speak for everybody, but most involving a backstop that applied only to northern ireland, and not of us wanted to continue as the whole of the uk. but make conservative mps. number were at the unionist politicians are strongly opposed to that idea. after many stage where they wanted to down months of talks, divisions and anyway, but we wanted to continue stand—offs, brexit is still hanging on the question of what happens to this border. being conservative mps. if the prime minister continues to adopt the strategy to reshape the party as so we will have full coverage this morning off boris johnson so we will have full coverage this morning off borisjohnson arriving in dublinfor being the vote leave party, he will morning off borisjohnson arriving in dublin for talks, and full drive people out of the party. do coverage of the talks going on here, you want to be in the party?” just to work out what on earth drive people out of the party. do you want to be in the party? i want to be, i have been part of the happens next. but as dawn breaks here in westminster, it is back to conservative party for 29 years and you. we will be back with you later, i want to continue to be a conservative mp. but i am afraid the thank you very much for that. let's tell you about the other news as conservative mp. but i am afraid the conservative party will be split and well. the biggest strike action
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in the history of british airways a split party is a weakened party got underway this morning, causing disruption for tens of thousands of passengers. and will be defeated. david gauke, the airline has told customers not we have to leave it there. that's it to turn up to airports, as pilots begin a two—day walkout over pay and conditions. from westminster for now, more our reporter simon later. louise. jones is at heathrow. simon, are there any signs of the disruption? simon, just tell us, what is expected today? well, the skies the pop singerjesy nelson, from little mix, says there needs to be tougher consequences for online trolls after she was bombarded with so many cruel above heathrow are expected to be comments that she tried to take her own life. she's been speaking to our entertainment much quieter than normal today. i correspondent chi chi izundu. the winner of the x have just been down to terminal 5 factor 2011 is... and normally at this time of the morning it would be bustling with it should have been a moment ofjoy. passengers heading off on holiday. it is like a ghost town. 80 members of staff, hardly any passengers. we ..little mix. reckon about 800 flights have been cancelled today, another 800 tomorrow, so 1600 in total over the two days. what is it all about? it is about pay. the union representing but, after the cameras had stopped rolling and the celebrations should have started, pilots have rejected a pay increase jesy nelson was reading messages online. of 11.5% over the next three years. there were so many messages, nasty ones. it is thought that on average pilot but the one that was at the top was from, like, a random man. owns about £100,000. the union says that in recent years, when ba was and yeah, he was just saying how disgusting i am,
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and that i don't deserve to be not doing very well, the pilots had in a girl band, and that to ta ke not doing very well, the pilots had to take the low average pay rises. i deserved to die. now the company is in a much better how do you feel when you post on instagram? jesy says she still gets abuse financial state and they feel that on social media, but four years ago, they should get a decent share of the comments affected her so much they should get a decent share of the profits. it is thought to strike she started missing work, action is going to cost british airways £40 million each day, but of fell into a depression, and attempted suicide. course the people caught between the now, when i look back on it, two sides are the passengers. many i can't believe i even did that. have had to make alternative but when you're in that state of mind, you just — arrangements with different airlines. others have had to change you don't think about, their holiday plans completely. the warning is, after these two days, like, what you're going to leave another strike is predicted for the end of the month. thank you. behind, or the people you're going to have an effect on. authorities in the bahamas have you just want to take insisted they acted as quickly that pain away. as possible in response to last that's all you care about. week's hurricane dorian. the documentary also highlights it follows fierce criticism how her attempt affected that the government failed the other band members. to provide assistance and prevent looting. at least 43 people are confirmed dead but that figure is expected to rise significantly, with tens because every single person should of thousands still missing. have been held accountable the head of a us aid agency compared the damage to that inflicted for making her feel like that. by a nuclear bomb. but bullying doesn't happen just to those in the public eye.
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so there are parts of abaco one in five 12—15—year—olds had experienced some and the bahamas that don't show kind of online bullying, a great deal of damage, and according to one charity, and then there are clusters a joint multi—agency response and communities that were devastated, almost as though nuclear bombs were dropped on them. is what is needed to combat it. that's how great the suffering this is not only about celebrities. this is about everyone, which is why we need a collective response. is and the devastation is. because we have young people who are unable to go to school, young people who are changing school, young people we recognize that there's a long who are missing out on education, road ahead but we're going to work who have long—term mental health impacts, because of bullying. closely with the prime minister and his government to make sure that we help provide immediate relief. jesy is now off some social media. pop singerjesy nelson says tougher she wants stronger consequences measures are needed to deal for those who send abuse, with online trolls, but hopes her candid admission after revealing they once drove her to try to about her suicide attempt will show take her own life. the harm cyber bullying can cause. the little mix star says she was deluged with cruel comments for her weight and apearance i feel like people that do troll after winning the x factor other people are people that eight years ago. she spoke about her suicide obviously are not happy attempt in a new bbc three within themselves, because ijust documentary about cyberbullying. can't understand why anyone would want to make someone feel bad for no apparent reason, especially when you don't even know them. but now, mentally, i know and i felt like how to deal with it. and ifelt like i had tried for so but back then i didn't. long to try to please other people, like, live up to what other people wa nted like, live up to what other people wanted me to look like, and then jesy‘s documentary is
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called ‘odd one out‘. obviously when i felt like i had got it's on bbc one at 9:00 on thursday, there it still didn't go away. like, and you can watch it people were still... even when i on the bbc iplayer. tried to style myself and lose weight, people still call me fat and had an opinion on my appearance. and if you have been affected by any of ijust thought, had an opinion on my appearance. and those issues, go to the bbc action i just thought, what's the had an opinion on my appearance. and ijust thought, what's the point? we will have more from that line. interview with jesy nelson, time now to get the news, later on breakfast this morning. travel and weather where you are. more on that breaking news from overnight. more than 100 firefighters have been tackling a major blaze at a block good morning. there is quite a of flats in london overnight. changeable week of weather this dean fowler and his family lived week. some heavy rain this morning, on the top floor of the four—storey building, in sutton, particularly across northern parts and were evacuated in the early hours of the morning. with this very slow moving weather hejoins us now by phone. system pushing eastward. you can see good morning, dean, and thank you from the satellite imagery, lots of for joining good morning, dean, and thank you forjoining us. good morning. tell cloud this morning. it is clearing us forjoining us. good morning. tell us when you knew something was from northern ireland. here there wrong? i woke up to somebody banging will be some sunshine. the rain will on the door, and they were alarmed, gradually peter out across scotland, northern parts of england, some patchy rain across eastern parts of england but in south wales, the andi on the door, and they were alarmed, and ijust on the door, and they were alarmed, and i just woke on the door, and they were alarmed, and ijust woke up, confused, didn't know what was going on, really. south—west of england, heavy and yeah. then what did you do? i heard thundery rain will continue through
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this afternoon. feeling quite cool, those temperatures below the average somebody screaming "there is a fire, for the time of year, 13 to 16 get out" and i got my boys, we went, degrees. tonight there was heavy and thundery showers across the we got down and we got out. yeah, it south—west will tend to clear and for most of us it will be a dry is kind of... sorry. it is all night. some patchy mist and fog developing. across wales and the south—west, and temperatures right, dean, icompletely understand, woken up in the middle of the night in a frightening overnight eight to 10 degrees. into situation. we are looking at tuesday, we have this ridge of high pictures of the fire right now. where did you live in the building? pressure just inserting itself across the uk. further north and i lived on the top floor, out the west, a weather system will slowly front of it. so the fire, i believe, push in and after a bright and sunny started at the back. so when i woke start in northern ireland and western scotland, clouding over, and up started at the back. so when i woke upi started at the back. so when i woke up i didn't see any smoke until i the rain moves in. elsewhere, got downstairs and got out. so, eastern and southern scotland, much yeah. it looks to me, i mean, of england and wales, patchy cloud moving east, for most, dry it with sunshine and it will feel warmer looking at the pictures, i don't know if you have seen them today, it than today. temperatures up to about looks like you and your family have 20 degrees. tuesday night into had quite a lucky escape. yeah, and to be honest with you, we haven't wednesday, this area of low pressure even lived there long, either. it toward iceland is remnants of was my third week there. it was kind ex—hurricane dorian. it will move gradually northwards and eastwards,
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of like, i've got everything up where the fence pushing to the south there, it is pretty much gone. it is and east. the spread of rain on just gone. so what can i do, i suppose? i am really sorry. but we wednesday across england and wales, gradually clearing from the northern are breeding, that is what matters, and western areas. a few showers we are alive and breathing and i am into the west of scotland. otherwise happy about that. i just want to say sunny spells for many going into the afternoon. again, turning a bit as well, thank you to all the neighbours and start that took us in warmer. temperatures up to about 17 and looked after us and made sure to 21 degrees. that's it from me. that we were ok and stuff. i am very goodbye. grateful for that and obviously the fire team as well, for trying their ha rd est. fire team as well, for trying their hardest. yeah, you sound, it is com pletely hardest. yeah, you sound, it is completely understandable, pretty shaken up by it. where are you now? are you safe now? yeah, we're all right for the time being, got a roof over our and my boys are all right. we'll just see what over our and my boys are all right. we'lljust see what happens, go from here. and move on, isuppose. this is business live from bbc news we'lljust see what happens, go from here. and move on, i suppose. dean, thank you for talking to us. with alice baxter and sally bundock. not so ready for take—off — obviously it is a very, very british airways pilots begin frightening experience for you. as a two—day strike over pay. we understand at the moment, there live from london, that's our top have been no reports, despite what story on monday the 9th of september we have seen in those pictures, of any injuries. we will keep you up—to—date with that, as well as everything else.
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here is matt with a look at this morning's weather. good morning. you may want to look british airways has grounded almost 100% of its flights today away if you want to know what is as pilots walk out over pay, happening today, if you have not but are they right to reject already looked out the window. this is what was hurricane dorian, the an 11.5% increase in their salaries? re m na nts of is what was hurricane dorian, the remnants of it, the swell of cloud has been pushing across eastern parts of canada through this also in the programme... weekend, bringing scenes like this at halifax in nova scotia. it has is the fire going out been rather wet and windy, lots of for china's dragon economy? damage around, i show you that because the remnants of hurricane dorian will actually be passing to the north of us in the middle parts of the week. but it will be nothing but wasn't out of place last week, and followed hot on its heels by what is left of tropical storm gabriel. but will bring wind and rain, buta gabriel. but will bring wind and rain, but a bit more gabriel. but will bring wind and rain, buta bit more humid. not humans this morning. a rather cool start across the country. i waterproof jacket start across the country. i waterproofjacket probably start across the country. i waterproof jacket probably needed. start across the country. i waterproofjacket probably needed. a pretty wet start. look at the radar chart. heavy, persistent rain, especially across southwest scotland into northwest england and north wales. this is where they will be
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lots of surface water. a few splashes of rain in the east to begin with. a lot of dry weather here, but it will turn right into the afternoon. have very —— happy and sundry downpours in the south—west. northern ireland should brighten up later. by the time we get to the school pickup and evening rush hour, still lively downpours in the channel islands in south—west england. rumbles of thunder could cause issues here. the winds could touch gale force around the likes of cornwall. also, still lots of cloud through england and wales, a bit more hit and miss by the end of the day. finishing the day with sunshine in northern ireland. still cloudy in scotland. the rain not as persistent as it was this morning in the west. but still there. some of the brightest conditions to be found through scotland throughout will be in the shetlands. temperatures 13—16 for many, much lower than we should be. tonight the sundry downpours in the south—west belize. easy in the south—west overnight. the risk of
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mist and fog, especially across parts of the midlands. another cool night with temperatures away from towns and city centres into single figures. south—east england, and northern ireland, probably the coolest. a bright start for northern ireland. cloud increasing through the day. elsewhere, england and wales, and largely dry start. brightening up nicely with some sunny spells developing and it will feel warmer than today. the temperatures will be 14— 20 degrees. finishing with rain in northern ireland in western scotland. that is the remnants of what was hurricane dorian, bringing a wet night to scotla nd dorian, bringing a wet night to scotland and northern ireland. when this year about 50—60 miles an hour. a blustery day on wednesday but really it is hit and miss rain across england and wales on wednesday, slowly brightening up from the north through the day. sunshine and showers, blustery winds from scotland and northern ireland. i think many will finish the day with at least a little bit of sunshine on wednesday, and temperatures still not bad, actually. 16—21. certainly feeling warmer than today.
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thank you very much indeed. let's take a look at today's papers. many of the front pages consider borisjohnson's next moves after mps and lords approved a bill to extend the brexit deadline and avoid no—deal. the metro features chancellor sajid javid's insistence that the government has a plan for a brexit deal. "we have a cunning plan," is the headline. it also has a picture of the english cricketer craig overton after australia retained the ashes yesterday. the daily telegraph reports that the prime minister plans to legally sabotage the brexit extension and believes that today's vote on calling a general election is the last chance to avert no—deal. the photo is of actor felicityjones at the premier of the aeronauts. we have been speaking to felicity and her co—star eddie redmayne. you can see that interview later in the programme. the guardian says the pm's trip to dublin is being overshadowed by fears of more resignations. the paper also reports that leading gps have called on the government to make mmr vaccinations compulsory before children start school. that photo is of england
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cricketer ben stokes at old trafford yesterday. and finally, little mix'sjesy nelson is on the front page of the sun. she has been talking about suffering relentless trolling on twitter about her appearance. we've been speaking to jesy about this. you can see that at 7:20am. good morning, both. do you want to start? yes, shall i? there is loads in the paper, lots about the ba strike on the front of lots of the papers. i will be speaking to ba's chief executive and the head of the pilots' union and try to get to the ci’ux pilots' union and try to get to the crux of what is at stake, because there is another strike looming at there is another strike looming at the end of september which they are
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trying to avoid. elsewhere, i'm more familiar tale on the high street, high street retailers seeking cost cuts after the latest footfall decline. the figures are familiar. down the bottom is a story which might explain why, one in 15 credit ca rd might explain why, one in 15 credit card purchases on thejon lewis website are done overnight, a 23% increase in people buying stuff between the hours of midnight and six a.m.. so maybe if you are awake at home in bed, looking for stuff to buy, it says unsurprisingly searches for duvet covers is the most popular item, may be are sat there thinking yours is rubbish. also things like headphones, maybe that is if you are next to someone who is snoring, but also flights and holidays, super popular to book between midnight and six a.m.. people not sleep anymore? maybe it is shift workers. you get a sense of a lot of it done on mobile. it used to be people would browse things on their mobile and wait until they got home to buy on a real computer. too easy now, isn't it?
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internet shopping, very dangerous. i don't do it myself! on the back page of the guardian, this is the actual moment that australia realised they had retained the ashes. ashes to ashes, according to the guardian. the back page of the mirror says it all. cold trafford. i was there last week and it was freezing. and jofra archer particularly said he was unhappy with the weather, with the cold. he said he wasn't as relaxed as he had been because it was so uncomfortable. but it is cold for the australians as well. we had to really warn him up in his interview, he had a hoodie on. we really did have to kind of look after him
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because he was struggling. how do you do that? i hugged him a lot. i reminded him a lot of his dog, that gave him a warm glow. and the rugby tea m gave him a warm glow. and the rugby team heading off to japan for the world cup, an11 team heading off to japan for the world cup, an 11 hourflight. i think they all have extra big c.|j don't feel that sorry for them. a couple of stories from the inside of the papers. this is in the telegraph, quite a lot of people talking about this online, and the young lady called amber davis who is 21. a pub has had to apologise for her. she has a stoma bag, and after ounces claimed her frequent trips to the loo were evidence she was taking drugs, she was very embarrassed about that. she was diagnosed with ulcerative colitis age 13, and they have offered her a gift card. it is quite an interesting point, for her.
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they have now apologised to her. interesting sometimes that illnesses and disabilities are not obvious immediately. that is exactly what he talks about, invisible illnesses, and that is exactly her point. and this is from the daily mail, restau ra nts a nd this is from the daily mail, restaurants and pubs being encouraged to cut portion sizes, use smaller plates and offer american style doggy bags for leftovers. they don't do that much in the uk. style doggy bags for leftovers. they don't do that much in the uki a lwa ys don't do that much in the uki always ask for a doggy bag, if you go anywhere with children, they eat a tiny bit, and you think there is quite a lot of good stuff there. why don't you just finish what is on your plate? sometimes it is too much! thank you for keeping me company throughout the morning. all eyes are on parliament this week, as brexit uncertainty continues and the possibility of a general election looms large. but what do people outside of the westminster bubble want to see next? breakfast‘s john maguire
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is in plymouth finding out. good morning. let's burst that bubble, move eyes from westminster and focus on plymouth. we are at the barbican, the son hasjust and focus on plymouth. we are at the barbican, the son has just come up. it isa barbican, the son has just come up. it is a fabulous place to be, next to the sea and dry. we are joined by a real brains trust, an economist, a farmer and businessmen to us about the mood in plymouth, and what is going to happen in the next couple of months. peter, stare into your crystal ball. what is going to happen here, do you think, over the next couple of weeks and months, if and when there is a general election. what will occur? well, plymouth has two very marginal seats, and there is a great deal of interest here as elsewhere in how we are going to resolve this impasse, which it is. i think the vote could easily go either way, whenever it is
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held, but there is no doubt it will have a pretty big impact on the economy of plymouth. an awful lot of manufacturing firms here on the industrial estate which were actually set up here to attack the european market, so they will be very heavily affected. there may be some marginal gains to the fishing industry or odd cases where there will be benefits, but in general i think you will find the great majority of economists think that the impact of brexit, especially no deal brexit, would be very deleterious in plymouth and elsewhere in the country as well. you have your ear to the ground, you area you have your ear to the ground, you are a farmer. what is the word on the farm? what are your colleagues telling you? i think we are where really worried about what is going to come down the line, especially if there is a no deal brexit. if we have to have a brexit, it needs to be in an orderly manner. the idea of leaving with no deal and all of the
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tariff implications that would affect our industry, they are huge. and i think the farming industry is bracing itself for quite dramatic shock. but we don't know how that will impact. we don't really know in a day—to—day basis how that will affect our trade. i suppose that is the problem, stuart, from the chamber of commerce. no—one knows exactly what is going on. what are theissues exactly what is going on. what are the issues that your members are concerned about? they must be asking you for advice? yes, and we give them the best information we can, bearing in mind we have the same information available through government, sometimes with a bit of a heads up. the biggest concern for businesses that they don't really know what to prepare for. there is a bit of a blame game know what to prepare for. there is a bit ofa blame game in know what to prepare for. there is a bit of a blame game in government, saying business has had two years to prepare. well, for what? we don't know what tariffs or customs will be in place. even if a business is able to do its own continuity planning and feel it is ready for brexit, it doesn't know about its supply chain. the smaller businesses haven't got
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the ability to see through their own supply chain, what is happening above and below them in that chain. and briefly, cathy, what is a best case scenario for the next couple of months as far as farming is concerned? we are in a long-term industry, so the crops they have on the ground now, we will be harvesting them all winter. what can ido harvesting them all winter. what can i do about them? they are in there. some certainty would be good, and alsojust that some certainty would be good, and also just that understanding of when we get a deal, if we get a deal, if we get a deal, if we get a deal, if we leave, what decisions am i going to need to make? i think what we wa nt to need to make? i think what we want from government is that reassurance that i don't know if they are in the position to give, that reassurance at the moment, because i don't think they are strong enough government. good to talk to all of you. that word certainty keeps ringing in my ears. that is what you hear, time and time again, when you talk to people outside the westminster bubble. it is almost the word certainty drowning out the noise of the seagulls this morning. almost but not quite, we did hear them. and it looks like a lovely day. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. a man who lost his sight in one eye after an acid attack 25 years ago has had it restored thanks to pioneering surgery at moorfield's eye hospital. james o'brien underwent stem cell treatment, and the success of the trial means the breakthrough surgery will now be available to others. what we do is we can take a small biopsy of about 1— two millimetres from the healthy eye, and we remove the scar tissue from the blind eye, and repopulated with a stem cell transplant. and you can find out more about the impact the surgery has had, on inside out london tonight at 7:30pm on bbc one. there is a major fire at a block of flats in south—west london. over 100 firefighters are at the scene after they were called
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to sherbrooke way worcester park overnight. the fire is said to have spread quickly to all four floors of the building. this is one of the residents. to be honest with you, it feels like it's a dream, but i know it's not. i'm just thinking we got the family out. all of us are. everyone is safe. whatever is in there, wejust have to get back, somehow, somewhere. but as long as we are safe, i suppose. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the central line is part suspended between woodford and epping and there are minor delays on the metropolitan line. what delays on the metropolitan line. has also popped l piccadilly what has also popped up as the piccadilly line, severe delays, that has just piccadilly line, severe delays, that hasjust come in in piccadilly line, severe delays, that has just come in in the last few seconds. on the roads, the a13 into town through the goresbrook interchange is looking busy. and in worcester park, sherborne way is closed in both directions due to the fire in a block of flats. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a rather grey and cloudy start out there this morning. with that, we can expect some outbreaks of rain through the course of today. and on top of all
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that, it's feeling pretty cool as well. the temperature below average for the time of year, especially by the end of the afternoon. now, these outbreaks of rain, maybe one or two heavier births, but it should start to break up as we had further through the afternoon. the temperature, as i mentioned, below average for the time of year. between 13 and 15 celsius. now, overnight still the chance of the odd spot of rain, but that becomes fewer, further between towards the end of the night. the cloud could break, if it does, particular towards the north, the home counties, you might get a bit of mist murk by tomorrow morning. a chilly night, between five and eight celsius the minimum temperature. as we had to tuesday, it is going to be a better day. there is more sunshine, and as a result of that, the temperature making a little bit ofa the temperature making a little bit of a max of around 20 celsius. the rain will clearfor of a max of around 20 celsius. the rain will clear for wednesday, it is quite a breezy day, though, on wednesday, and things turning a little bit humid as we had to thursday. before we go, let me tell you about a report you can see later on bbc london today on a woman from watford who spoke to us shortly
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before she died. former nurse lesley kinch felt so strongely about the funding shortages faced by hospices, she invited us to see the help they were giving her in herfinal days, and how staff kept her going. you can hear more from her on a programme at 6:30pm tonight. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin, and jon kay in westminster. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, little mix starjesy nelson tells how internet bullies caused her to attempt suicide. as the first ever strike by british airways pilots causes disruption for 300,000 passengers, we'll be asking the firm's chief executive alex cruz why he couldn't stop it. and from breakfast to the ballroom. mike and his dance
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partner katya jones, or ‘bush—kat‘ to their friends, will be giving us an update on their strictly training. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. mps will vote for a second time today on whether to hold an early general election. it's expected that borisjohnson's motion will be defeated, with the opposition parties all planning to vote against him. the prime minister's majority has disappeared after he sacked 21 tory rebels last week, and the resignation of work and pensions secretary amber rudd. borisjohnson will meet the irish prime minister leo varadkar in dublin this morning. the talks will focus on brexit, with the future of the border with northern ireland remaining the biggest sticking point to striking a deal with the eu.
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more than 100 firefighters have been tackling a major blaze at a block of flats in london overnight. the four—storey building, which was clad with wooden planks, was engulfed by flames in the early hours. our reporter greg mckenzie is at the scene in sutton. greg, what more can you tell us? well, good morning, louise. now, this fire took hold at 1:30am. the fire brigade say they had more than 29 calls to 999. many residents were sleeping at the time. fortunately all of them got out of this building. as you can see just behind me, it has been completely decimated, almost. completely gone, in fact. we are told many of the residents were taken to a nearby community centre where they spent the morning being comforted, really, by the salvation army. one has said it was his sun, who could not actually sleep, which led him to realising something was wrong. he
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said he could hear a crackling from the outside of the building. he went over his balcony to look and saw it was engulfed in flames. he grabbed his children and managed to get out before knocking on other doors to warn other residents to leave the building. the fire brigade have said there is no reports of any injuries. the fire has been going for some time, since1:30am. 120 the fire has been going for some time, since 1:30am. 120 firefighters in total here at this blaze, and the fire brigade say they will be here for some time. it is still going, just behind me, the white plumes of smoke. again, fortunately, no reports of any injuries. as you say, it looks like people had a lucky escape. thank you for bringing us up—to—date. the biggest strike action in the history of british airways got underway this morning, causing disruption for tens of thousands of passengers. the airline has told customers not to turn up to airports, as pilots begin a two—day walkout over pay and conditions. it's the first time ba pilots have walked out and the action could cost the firm up to £40 million a day.
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the head of a us aid agency has compared the damage caused by hurricane dorian in the bahamas to that inflicted by a nuclear bomb. at least 43 people are confirmed dead but that figure is expected to rise "significantly," with tens of thousands still missing and thousands more desperate to escape the devastation. pop singerjesy nelson says tougher measures are needed to deal with online trolls, after revealing they once drove her to try to take her own life. the little mix star says she was deluged with cruel comments for her weight and apearance after winning the x factor eight years ago. she spoke about her suicide attempt in a new bbc three documentary about cyberbullying. and ifelt like i had tried for so long to try to please other people, like, live up to what other people wanted me to look like, and then obviously when i felt like i had got there it still didn't go away. like, people were still... even when i tried to style myself and lose weight, people still called me fat
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and had an opinion on my appearance. and i just thought, what's the point? we will hear more from that interview later. sallyjoins us in the studio. it has been a really busy weekend of sport! everybody just waking up this morning, something significant has happened overnight. this is the news people are waking up to this morning. good morning, everyone. it's been billed as one of the greatest us open finals of all time. rafael nadal beat daniil medvedev to claim his fourth us open title. this match went on for nearly five hours in new york, but for a while it had looked like a routine win for nadal. he was two sets to love up when the russian medvedev started his comeback. he won the next two sets to level the match, but once it got to a decider, nadal hit back again. and this 19th grand slam title means he's nowjust one major win behind roger federer‘s
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all—time record of 20. these kinds of matches in the final ofa grand these kinds of matches in the final of a grand slam makes me much more special. —— makes the match more special. —— makes the match more special. the way the match became more dramatic at the end, it makes itan more dramatic at the end, it makes it an unforgettable moment, part of my history of the sport. australia retain the ashes, beating england by 185 runs in the fourth test at old trafford. england began the final day on 18—2 needing to bat all day to force a draw but not even ben stokes could summon a miracle this time and the wickets tumbled. england ninth—wicket pair craig overton and jack leach survived for 14 overs, delighting a partisan crowd. but the end was nigh and both were dimissed to give australia victory. england can draw the series
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by winning the final test, but as current holders australia keep the little urn. everyone is hugely disappointed. but you find yourself in a situation like today and you learn a lot about your team, like today and you learn a lot about yourteam, a like today and you learn a lot about your team, a lot about the guys around you, and i thought everyone showed a lot of courage, a lot of resilience, a lot of character, and eve ryo ne resilience, a lot of character, and everyone should be really proud of how we approached the day. i think we will look back at other points in the game and think, maybe we could have been better. charles leclerc gave ferrari their first win on home soil for nine years, with victory in the italian grand prix at monza. leclerc held off the mercedes of va ltteri bottas and championship leader lewis hamilton in an incident packed race, underlining his status as a new force in f1. 24,000 fans turned up at stamford bridge to watch chelsea beat tottenham in their first game of the new women's super league
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season. beth england, who made her england debut last week, scored with a stunning strike afterjust four minutes' play. arsenal began the defence of their title with a 2—1win over west ham, beth mead scoring their opener. there were also wins for everton and reading. england's paul casey won his first european tour title for five years, at the european open in hamburg. he closed with a six—under—par 66 to finish just one shot clear of a group including scotland's bob macintyre. pippa funnell won the burghley horse trials, her first major win for 14 years. the multiple olympic medallist led from start to finish on grafton street. she took one fence down in the final show—jumping phase but then stayed clear, to beat her british team mate piggy french byjust a tenth of a penalty point.
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when i think of the length of time that it took me to win my championship, 14 years from when i started, i never thought it would ta ke started, i never thought it would take another 14 years to win a big one since my last one. so, my god. isn't that absolutely gorgeous? 14 yea rs isn't that absolutely gorgeous? 14 years since the last time! it is really something. aged 50, i believe. and i love the fact... i was watching it, and a big hug, as well. she was so excited. she was just in tears, she collapsed, she couldn't believe it. many congratulations to her. thank you very much. and thank you for keeping me company here as well, by the way. iam not me company here as well, by the way. i am not even sure if we can count how many times we have said this, sally. it is the start of another big week in westminster. sojohn ‘s outside parliament forest this morning, where it looks like... i don't know, a cloudy day, but is about as much as i can say about it,
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jon. cloudy and unclear. take from that what you will. i think we need a great big question mark hovering over parliament at the moment. what on earth happens next? everybody here, whatever side they are wrong, whichever party they are from, seems to be confused. nobody seems to know where we are going. anybody who thought we would have a relaxing weekend was sadly mistaken. we had a high—profile resignation of amber rudd from the government of the boris johnson's handling rudd from the government of the borisjohnson's handling of things. he is hold up at his country retreat, meeting with advisers and trying to plot away through this. what we do know, the one thing we do pretty much for sure, is that the bill to block a no—deal brexit should become law today. but government ministers have said they are prepared to test data law in order to push ahead with a plan to leave the eu, as they want to come on october 31, do or die. here is
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what the chancellor, sajid javid said, speaking to andrew marr on the bbc yesterday. we are going to continue to work towards exit on october 31. we believe in october 31. we will work for a deal, we will keep putting all our effort in that, and preparations for no dealjust in case that is the only way we can leave. the prime minister will go to the october council meeting on october 17 and 18, and he will try to strike a deal. he absolutely will not ask for an extension in a meeting. plaid cymru has come up with its own strategy to get the government to respect the new no—deal law. it says leaders of the opposition parties should be ready to try to impeach the prime minister if he ignores it. joining me now is the plaid's westminster leader, liz saville roberts. good morning, and thank you for joining us. good morning. is this a serious suggestion, impeaching him? well, we are hearing accounts the
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prime minister is prepared to disregard the law. even concerns by his own cabinet ministers. impeachment is a way of, not making the prime minister resigned, but holding him to account. and what is very interesting about this is that backin very interesting about this is that back in 2004, plaid cymru mp at the time, adam price, who is now the leader of plaid cymru, he led the charge to impeach tony blair with matters about the weapons of mass destruction in the water at the time. —— or stop and he was a co— signatory? none other than a member of parliament for henley, mr boris johnson, who said at the time but because tony blair, the prime minister, had shown contempt, and i am quoting him, to parliament and to the public, that was why he must be impeached. but that bed for impeachment didn't work. i mean, nobody has been impeached for 200 and something years, at least. it isn't going to happen. it is obsolete as practice, isn't it? we
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are all in as much confusion as we have ever been, possibly the worst confusion into hundred years or more. we are in a terrible state of play. the job of the more. we are in a terrible state of play. thejob of the prime more. we are in a terrible state of play. the job of the prime minister is to lead in the name of the law and to act according to the law. if we have a prime minister who is prepared to flout the law, what impeachment would do is bring him before parliament, which is bringing him before the people of the united kingdom as well, to explain why he would be prepared to flaunt the law. so you are adamant this is a serious suggestion? it is notjust headline grabbing by you as a party? in all honesty, if the prime minister is prepared to ignore the law, that is headline grabbing. in that case, parliament has to use whatever means are at its disposal. impeachment is to bring the prime minister, or whoever would be impeached, to the floor of the chamber of the house, to explain themselves as to why they have done that. the prime minister has a duty to explain to parliament and to the public. of course, what
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borisjohnson would say is, i have given you a very simple, quick, easy way of challenging me. you will have another chance today, probably, to vote for a general election. why don't you, plaid cymru and the opposition parties, take that opportunity and give him that election, challenge him out in the country, give us the votes? the prime minister is playing a game with us... aren't you also playing a game, talking about impeachment? the only thing the prime minister wants is his last chance saloon of pushing the uk and places like wales, which will suffer catastrophically, out of the eu without a deal. now, the simplicity of that is deeply misleading. my own party, we will do whatever it takes to stop no deal. which is the prime minister's only last card. now, in that respect, we believe that a general election, yes, when that threat is taken off the table, which is what this legislation does, which the prime minister wants to flaunt, one that is taken off the table, there may well be a general election. but in all honesty, a general election will
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be on all honesty, a general election will beona all honesty, a general election will be on a whole host of subjects. what we need to resolve the division in the uk, here and now, is a referendum on whether we should be leaving or not. or, what my party will be campaigning for as we have campaigned all along... but here we are, with just days to go, and you are, with just days to go, and you are talking about impeachment under referendums and general elections, so many options, and time is of the essence for anybody who wants to challenge this or try to stop it. that is part of the problem. there are so many options. you should yourselves and the foot by chasing too many dogs. and at the same time we have a prime minister who is prepared to do deep onto the economy, the communities i represent, and it is our duty to stop him in any way we can. thank you. we will be catching up a bit later with more politicians from all sides. is impeachment an option, do they think? first, let's get the
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weather from matt. how they think? first, let's get the weatherfrom matt. how is they think? first, let's get the weather from matt. how is the week looking? very good morning to you. it is looking a bit grey in london, some wetter weather on the way, and some wetter weather on the way, and some of you when you open the curtains may be wishing you could help back into bed, because a wet start for the vast majority. and for this stage in september a rather cool day. it doesn't set the store for the entire week. some pretty heavy rain around for parts of south—west scotland into north—west england, north—west midlands and north wales. outbreaks of rain across the rest of scotland down towards the south—west. flashes of rain down eastern england, many places dry and cloudy. overnight rain clearing, sunshine comes but for most the cloud will sit in place through the day. the rain will turn lighter and patio although to the south—west of the channel islands, some heavy and thundery downpours into the afternoon and across the west of cornwall, west wales, the wind is picking up and becoming quite gusty at times. further east, the winds will be light and while there will be some rain and drizzle
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at times, some drier moments, even if it stays on the dull and grey side. northern ireland one of the bright spots, set on the dull and grey side. northern ireland one of the bright spots, shetland saying fairly bright, but outbreaks of rain across northern and western areas, nowhere near as heavy as the rain we have this morning by the time we had to the evening rush hour. still happy downpours for the evening rush hour on the far south—west of england. rain on the north and north—east of scotland, and while there will be the odd spot of drizzle around here and there, many places becoming dry overnight. fairly cloudy but cool. where you have the clear skies across western scotla nd have the clear skies across western scotland and northern ireland, maybe even down towards the south—east, temperatures as low as five or six celsius to start tomorrow morning. so another cool start, but impaired today, a lot brighter. the cloud within an break, early morning mist and fog clearing as well. goodson expels developing for northern ireland it tends cloudy and wetter through the day, the same for the far western fringes of scotland. 13-16 far western fringes of scotland. 13—16 today, around 15—20 tomorrow. what comes into the west later on as the remnants of what was hurricane
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dorian, bringing us nothing more than a wet night across scotland and northern ireland and strong to gale force winds. we saw that last night, nothing untoward for the time of year. brightening up quite quickly on wednesday after a wet study northern england, north wales in the midlands. stays fairly cloudy through some southern counties of england, some outbreaks of rain and drizzle towards the end of the afternoon before it eventually clears. bridges on wednesday not doing too badly, around 16— 21 degrees. then to take us through wednesday night and into thursday, we got the remnants of a tropical storm, tropical storm gabrielle pushing its way in, pushing occasional rain to northern ireland and western scotland. a bit breezy, but again nowhere near as strong as we have seen of late. further south, many places across england and wales are staying dry through the bulk of the day. sunshine turning hazy and you will notice across the south—east corner it turns increasingly humid. temperature is around 23 and that is a big jump on the cool conditions we see today.
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are welcome one for some. thank you. british life is still dominated by class, and when it comes to getting high—quality jobs, it is often a case of who you know, not what you know. that is according to the tuc, which wants to make class discrimination illegal. its general secretary, frances o'grady, joins me now from brighton. we arejust we are just saying that everybody should get a fair chance in life. and we should treat class discrimination just and we should treat class discriminationjust in and we should treat class discrimination just in the same way we treat discrimination against women or on the grounds of race. ok, so how would people prove, i suppose, what class they come from?
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well, a number of good employers have already monitored family background to make sure that they have got fair and equal opportunities at work. so they look at the kind of family you come from, what your parents did, what your education was, because, for example, we still see that if you went to a public school or oxbridge you are much more likely to get a top job. do you think, in some ways, it is kind of invasive for people to be having to give that kind of information when they are going for ajob? information when they are going for a job? i think information when they are going for ajob? i think a lot information when they are going for a job? i think a lot of people are now used to filling in those anonymous questionnaires, and it is really just a way of anonymous questionnaires, and it is reallyjust a way of checking that employment procedures are fair, and that everybody is getting a fair chance. because the reality is, and all the evidence is, that if you come from a working—class family, evenif come from a working—class family, even if you get a top—class degree,
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you are going to end up in a lower paid job. you talk about anonymous, is that how you are suggesting it should be done? well, that is how we routinely... many employers will recognise that they do that in respect of other characteristics, like race and gender, and it is a way of checking, is everybody getting through? do we need to improve our recruitment and promotion procedures? what more can we do to make sure that our workforce looks like modern written? and you have talked about trying to make it illegal. how would you go about that? we would like to see people being able to take cases on the grounds of class discrimination, just like you can on race and gender, and what a big difference that has made to our workplaces. but we would also like to see a duty on public sector employers to promote equality right across the board. and
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i think thatjust makes for a healthy society, because believe you me, especially as we face brexit, we need the talents and skills of everybody in this country. and just very briefly, how soon are you looking for this to change? and i just want to pick up the point about work placements, as well. what do you want to change? there has been quite a lot of work around that. what do you want to change with regards to that? well, i think most people know that, if you don't live in london, if you don't come from a family who can how's you and sub you, it's very, very difficult for anybody from a working—class home to do an internship that is unpaid. we think all productive work should be paid. in fact, think all productive work should be paid. infact, it think all productive work should be paid. in fact, it should think all productive work should be paid. infact, it should be think all productive work should be paid. in fact, it should be paid at least the national minimum wage. it should be paid the rate for thejob. that is a way of making sure that people don't face that indirect discrimination, that unless you come
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from a well of family, you can't even think about going into some of those professions that will lead to a great career. thank you very much for joining a great career. thank you very much forjoining us this morning. if you have thoughts on that, whether you think it should be made illegal, whether you should be able to... discrimination against people on class, if you think that should be made illegal, let me know. if you don't, also do. 15 years ago, our colleague, the bbc‘s security correspondent frank gardner, was shot by al-qaeda gunmen while on assignment in saudi arabia. he has used a wheelchair ever since. a competent waterskier before his injury, the idea of ever doing it again seemed a challenge too far, until he heard of adaptive water skiing. take a look at how he got on. how do you waterski when you can't use your legs? i'm frank gardner, and i use a wheelchair because i got shot while on a bbc assignment in saudi arabia 15 years ago. i've done a lot of skiing, snow skiing. it's called adaptive skiing.
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i used to waterski before my injuries, but waterskiing has always just been that one challenge too far. i've avoided, i dodged it, i've ducked it all these years. there is a charity called access adventures that gets disabled people like myself into the water to give it a try. the first challenge is going to be struggling into the wetsuit, and that is a challenge in itself. i have just put my leg through the arm of the wetsuit. i feel like a kind of beached seal. ok, second challenge is getting into the actual kit that i'm going to ski in. so this is called an adaptive waterski, which, as you can see, it's got a kind of fixed seat attached to it, which i'm now going to get myself into. how does it feel to be back in the water?
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well, cold and wet. hit it! it's a big moment where you feel that tug on the rope and the boat accelerates in front of you. and suddenly you're up, surging out of the water, you've got spray all round you. you're skiing on the water, its unnatural. it is exhilarating, it's totally exhilarating. there is a definite "eureka" moment in this, where the instructors just peel away and suddenly you're on your own. when theyjudged i was ready for it, they allowed me to go over the wake, to ski over the wake, which is this — it's kind of a bump in the water. and it's a little scary at first. it's kind of like you're side—slipping over a little hillock made out of water, is the best way i can describe it. and of course, you're thinking, i'm going to fall on the other side. but you don't quite, you adjust.
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1, 2, 3! excellent, well done. that was so much fun. really enjoyed that. i hadn't done this for so many years, so to get out on the water and finding the limits of your body and your skills are, it's brilliant. if you spend pretty much all your waking day based in a wheelchair, which is endlessly tedious, i'll never sugarcoat it, that's a lovely independent feeling. that is our security correspondence, now waterskiing correspondent, frank gardner. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. hello, i'm asad ahmad. jesy nelson from the group little mix has revealed how online bullying following her appearance on x factor drove her to try to kill herself. the 28 year—old singer from romford admits comments made her so unhappy she wanted to die. she spoke candidly about the bullying to bbc three. from the moment i won x factor, i wasn't the same girl. i wasn'tjesy, the barmaid, the confident girl are used to be. i was this vulnerable nervous wreck the whole time. from the minute comments started, it became the worst time of my life. and you can hear more of whatjesy has to say on bbc breakfast in around half an hour's time. there's a major fire at a block of flats in south—west london. over 100 firefighters are at the scene
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after they were called to sherbrooke way in worcester park overnight. the fire is said to have spread quickly to all four floors of the building. there are no reports of injuries. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the central line has no service between loughton to epping because of a track fault. a signalfailure in acton is causing delays on the district and the piccadilly line. the dlr is part suspended between bank and tower gateway because of an incident. and more signalling issues are causing delays on the metropolitan line. on the roads, it's busy on the northern approach to the blackwall lane tunnel. and in worcester park, sherbrooke way is closed in both directions due to the fire in a block of flats. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a rather grey and cloudy start out there this morning. with that, we can expect some outbreaks of rain through the course of today, and on top of all that,
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it's feeling pretty cool as well. the temperature below average for the time of year, especially by the end of the afternoon. now, these outbreaks of rain, maybe one or two heavier bursts, but it should start to break up as we head further through the afternoon. the temperature, as i mentioned, below average for the time of year — between 13—15 celsius. now, overnight, still the chance of the odd spot of rain, but that becomes fewer, further between towards the end of the night. now, the cloud could break. if it does, particularly towards the north, the home counties, you might get a bit of mist and murk by tomorrow morning. quite a chilly night, as well — between 5—8 celsius the minimum temperature. now, as we head to tuesday, it is going to be a better day. there's more sunshine, and as a result of that, the temperature making a little bit of a recover. we're looking at a maximum of around 20 celsius. the rain will clear for wednesday. it's quite a breezy day, though, on wednesday, and things turning a little bit humid as we get into thursday. before we go, let me tell you about a report you can see later on bbc london on a former nurse
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from watford who spoke to us shortly before she died. lesley kinch felt so strongly about the funding shortages facing hospices, she invited us to see the help she was getting by staff in herfinal days. you can hear more from her on a programme at 6:30pm tonight. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay in westminster, as parliament begins another crucial day in the brexit process. our headlines this morning: mps are to vote again today on holding a snap general election, with boris johnson facing a second defeat. and a new law to delay brexit comes into force today, but government ministers are trying to find a way around it. and this is louise minchin in the studio. also this morning, more than 120 firefighters have spent the night tackling a major fire at a block
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of flats in south—west london. little mix'sjesy nelson reveals that online bullying led her to try to take her own life. so many messages, nasty ones, but the one at the top was from a random man, and he wasjust the one at the top was from a random man, and he was just saying the one at the top was from a random man, and he wasjust saying how disgusting i am and that i don't deserve to be in a girl band and that i deserve to die. good morning. travel disruption for hundreds of thousands of british airways passages, as pilots go on strike. it is the biggest walkout in ba's history. i will speak to the boss and the head of the pilots union. rafael nadal wins an epic us open. it's a 19th grand slam title for the spaniard and a fourth in new york after winning a five—set thriller against daniil medvedev. and it may not be the ideal start to be weak, with many places thoroughly wet and cool for much of today, but
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they will be bright moments this week, as i will tell you in the full forecast here on breakfast. it's monday, the 9th of september. we're live from westminster at the start of what is shaping up to be another momentous week in british politics, and for borisjohnson's government. later today, mps will vote for a second time on whether to hold an early general election. in a moment, we'll hear from our political correspondent, chris mason, but with things changing so quickly in our politics at the moment, let's just take you through what we can expect to happen next. the mps' bill forcing borisjohnson to ask for a brexit extension — in order to avoid no deal — is set to become law later today. once that's happened, the government hopes to have a fresh vote to force a snap general election, on october 15th, although their bid seems likely to fail.
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and then, possibly tomorrow but certainly by thursday, parliament will be suspended, or prorogued. good morning, chris. should we talk about this no deal bill, the bill that aims to stop no deal happening? the papers are full of theories about how borisjohnson might try to get around that. this new act will soon be exactly that. it will be the law of the land. it will receive royal assent and have the rubber stamp of approval. and the government is trying to work out what on earth to do. because boris johnson has said he does not want to have to go to brussels and asked for an extension, which on the face of it is what the law says he should do. but he says he does not want to break the law either. so what we haveis break the law either. so what we have is the political equivalent of that children's books, we are all going on about hunt. we are not
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scared! uh—oh, a new law. we can't go over it, we can't go under it, we will have to go through it. so the government is looking to see if there is any kind of rental which will allow them to stay within the law but not actually ask for an extension. certainly those who devised the law say there are no wrinkles and attended a check that out before they started the whole process. so that is where we are at politically, at a point where the government is trying to figure out if it can find a way out. meanwhile the opposition parties there are also trying to find a way out of this on their terms, aren't they? all sorts of suggestions from them, including impeachment this morning, as suggested by plaid cymru. including impeachment this morning, as suggested by plaid cymrum including impeachment this morning, as suggested by plaid cymru. it is incredible we have got to the point in politics where words like that are being used. over the weekend people were talking about the prospect of borisjohnson going to prison if he was to break the law. this all sounds ludicrous, but suddenly the ludicrous seems possible in uk politics. those in government emphasised they will not break the law. a guest at the bottom line ina break the law. a guest at the bottom line in a country like ours is that you have to obey the law. —— they
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get that the bottom line. but does not mean that you cannot look at every nuance unit, with the prospect is relevant being challenged in the courts. and the private arguments from some conservatives is that this look awkward for them right now, but if there is a battle in the end in a general election about fulfilling brexit or not, if borisjohnson has been seen to stretch every possible angle to try to get what he wants, which is brexit come what may, if it isa which is brexit come what may, if it is a battle with parliament or a battle with the courts, when you eventually get onto the field of a general election campaign, the argument from some is that that could play very well. and the polling still looks quite good for him. it does. chris, thank you. borisjohnson will meet the irish prime minister leo varadkar in dublin this morning. the talks will focus on brexit, with the future of the border with northern ireland remaining the biggest sticking point to striking a deal with the eu. here's our ireland correspondent chris page.
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you cannot see it, but it has been the biggest obstacle to a brexit deal. the border between northern ireland and the irish republic doesn't have any checkpoints, and both the uk and the eu want to keep it that way. but they don't agree on how to achieve that aim. the centre of the dispute is what is known as the backstop, a guarantee the frontier will remain open under any circumstances. it will come into force only if there is not a majorfree—trade deal which would remove the need for checks. borisjohnson wants the idea scrapped, because it would in effect keep britain in the eu's customs regime, and mean northern ireland has to follow some european rules on goods. but the irish government argues the backstop is vital. prime minister leo varadkar says he would consider any alternatives the uk comes up with, but so far he says there have been none, and he is concerned about a deadlocked westminster. prime minister may, with a parliamentary majority,
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was unable to get a deal through the house of commons. prime ministerjohnson does not have a majority. so i will be asking him how he can convince us, ireland and the european union, that he is actually capable or has the votes to get a deal through. mr varadkar has suggested that his government could accept a solution involving a backstop that applied only to northern ireland, and not the whole of the uk. but unionist politicians are strongly opposed to that idea. after many months of talks, divisions and stand—offs, brexit is still hanging on the question of what happens to this border. so always will be on dublin today, and of course all eyes on westminster as well. what's more to talk about this morning, but for now, back to louise. thank you, john. i cannot believe the word impeachment is being used, and i understand the last word it —— last time it was used was 1806! you have been as —— been on google as well,
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hey? fire crews are dealing with a major blaze in sutton, in south—west london, after being called out in the early hours of the morning. the ambulance service says no injuries have been reported so far. the fire brigade says crews will be at the scene for several more hours. fire crews were faced with a well and intense fire, which resulted in the incident being quickly escalated for additional fire engines. currently, london fire brigade have got 20 fire engines and 125 firefighters on the scene, dealing with the fire. there are also surrounding fire crews from surrey fire and rescue service, who are supporting london fire brigade at this instant. —— incident. because of the fire is currently under investigation and london fire brigade received 29 calls over this incident. the biggest strike action in the history of british airways started this morning, causing disruption for tens of thousands of passengers. the airline has told customers not to turn up to airports, as pilots begin a two—day walkout over pay and conditions. our reporter simon jones is at heathrow.
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simon, are there any signs of the disruption? this is likely to cause quite a lot of disruption, isn't it? yes, and in the past hour british airways have issued a statement. they say they understand the frustration of outages and they are extremely sorry it has come to this. —— frustration of passengers. i was down at terminal 5 this morning, it should be bustling at this time of day with people heading off on holidays or business trips, but it was like a ghost town. we believe about 800 flights have been cancelled today and another 800 tomorrow on day two of the strike, so 1600 flights affected in total. what is it all about? pay. the unions representing pilots have rejected a payoff of 11.596 pilots have rejected a payoff of 11.5% over the next three years. —— pay offer. they say they want a bigger share of the company's big profits. as for the company, it is accusing the pilots of being greedy, saying they are already getting world —class saying they are already getting world—class salaries. the strike is expected to cost ba £40 million for
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each day of the strike. of course, caught at the sharp end of the study passengers. many have had to change their travelling arrangements, travelling on a different day or going with a different airline or perhaps cancelling the holidays altogether. we are expecting another strike date at the end of the month, if there is no further contact between the two sides. thank you. here on breakfast we will be speaking to the ceo of british airways and also the head of balpa. the head of a us aid agency has compared the damage caused by hurricane dorian in the bahamas to that inflicted by a nuclear bomb. at least 43 people are confirmed dead but that figure is expected to rise "significantly," with tens of thousands still missing and thousands more desperate to escape the devastation. so, you up—to—date with all the latest political news. we will be back withjon latest political news. we will be back with jon at westminster to keep you up—to—date with all the
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political developers there. eddie redmayne says it's "absolutely wonderful" to be working again with felicityjones, in their new film the aeronauts. their last movie together — the theory of everything — won redmayne an oscar. the aeronauts had its premiere at the toronto film festival last night. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba was there. i'm a really good error north. five yea rs i'm a really good error north. five years after the oscar—winning theory of everything, felicity jones years after the oscar—winning theory of everything, felicityjones is reunited with her co—star eddie redmayne. i need to make studies of vr. i am not a coach man for hire. you are the only person who could fly us higher than anyone has ever been. this time he plays a scientist very different from stephen hawking, while she plays an adventurer, and they both embark on a terrifyingly dangerous balloon flight. we had the most intense and extraordinary experience making theory of everything, and when we were offered to tells that slight nervousness of, you know, do we go back? but we
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enjoyed that experience so much that it was, we both called each other up, and said, i will do it if you do it. who said yes first? you or him? we both said yes together! we were both sent the script separately. the fa ct both sent the script separately. the fact that there was such two brilliant characters, that is what clinched it. ithink brilliant characters, that is what clinched it. i think had one character not been so good the other person wouldn't have wanted to take part. but there was so much register for both of us. this is a festival but has a reputation for showcasing potential oscar winners. —— but has a reputation. so expectation is growing but this could well fly extremely high during award season. so it begins. it's the start of another big week in westminster. jon is outside parliament for us this morning. iam going i am going to try to count how many times i have said that, but it must be into the dozens now. morning. what can you tell us? i can tell you it is said to be another momentous
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week for boris johnson's government here in westminster. as we know, that bill to avoid a no deal brexit, that bill to avoid a no deal brexit, thatis that bill to avoid a no deal brexit, that is expected to be rubberstamped today, become law. and then later this week, parliament will be formally suspended for five weeks. but it is what happens in between and what happens beyond those five weeks but we really need to think about. so we thought we would just summarise things now. get your diaries out. this is what you can expect if you want to follow brexit fully. on october 17, all eyes will be on an eu summit in brussels, whether government says it hopes to agree a new brexit deal. and then get permission from parliament to leave on the 31st of october. they say that is their dream scenario. but if there is no new deal, than by october 19, a new legal deadline kicks in. it has been imposed on borisjohnson kicks in. it has been imposed on boris johnson because kicks in. it has been imposed on borisjohnson because of kicks in. it has been imposed on boris johnson because of that kicks in. it has been imposed on borisjohnson because of that new law we have been talking about which has been pushed through parliament. and that means it requires the prime minister either to persuade mps to leave with no deal, at the end of
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october, which seems very unlikely, because parliament seems dead set against it, or it says it has got to go back to the eu and asked to delay brexit. but that is something he has insisted he will never do. what did he say the other day? he would rather die in a ditch. where does this leave us? i am joined now by joelle grogan, a lecturer in the uk and eu law. and we talk about impeachment? we were speaking to the leader of plaid cymru, and she rings that parliament could impeach the prime minister. is that true? could that happen? i got a call about this la st that happen? i got a call about this last night, impeachment. iwas astonished. i thought it came from an american news network. it is so alien to us here in the uk. yes, because we are about bill clinton or donald trump being impeached. can it happen here? i did what all legal researchers should do and looked into parliamentary legislation on this. now, the most recent guidelines that we can find on this
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are from the 18605, i think. it is all from the 18005. what is important to remember and this is that no prime minister in british hi5tory that no prime minister in british history has ever been impeached. so what we can say, in terms of impeachment, i5 what we can say, in terms of impeachment, is that while it is legally possible, the house of commons can do almost anything it want5, commons can do almost anything it wants, it is entirely implausible, and, well, completely unprecedented. if you want to remove a prime mini5ter, if you want to remove a prime minister, the established way that we have to do that is through the 2011 act to have a motion of no confidence. but is how you remove a prime minister, not through impeachment. are you expecting a no—confidence vote, one way or another, to come forward in the next few days? can that happen before the parliament is prorogued and suspended? that happen before the parliament is prorogued and 5u5pended7|j that happen before the parliament is prorogued and suspended? i have learned not to rule anything out, but it will trigger a lot of
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timeline5 that could be very complicated. at two week period to try and find an alternative government, and then failing that, a five week period before another election. considering we are due to leave with no deal on 31 october, unless it is extended under the soon to be act, i think it is unlikely we could see a vote of no—confidence in the few days, before prorogation. so impeachment is a non— runner, a no—confidence vote, a non— runner, a p pa re ntly no—confidence vote, a non— runner, apparently a general election vote, not a runner, so it is hard to imagine how this goes. we heard from dominic raab in the news yesterday that the government will test to the limit this bill that is being rubberstamp today and try and see if there were any little loopholes they could get around so they don't have to ask for a brexit extension. is that a —goer? can you see any loopholes? you have read this act
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back—to—back. loopholes? you have read this act back-to-back. i have read it a couple of times. i can't see any loopholes that wouldn't frustrate the intention of the statute. to simply explain that, i cannot see a way of not doing what the act says without breaking it, without breaking the law. but that is the question. is the question here, isn't is boris johnson question. is the question here, isn't is borisjohnson prepared to break the law? there have been all sorts of wild suggestions he could go to prison, he might be prepared to become a brexit martyr in all of this. did you everforesee to become a brexit martyr in all of this. did you ever foresee this sort of moment when you were studying law and politics, and how this might work with the constitution? so all of my research is the rule of law as the foundation of the constitution, the foundation of the constitution, the foundation of democratic legal systems, but never once in all of my research did i i will be talking about the concept of the value of
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the rule of law in the uk constitution. i never thought i would have to justify it. i constitution. i never thought i would have tojustify it. i never thought i would have to say the words... the most basic idea of the rule of law is that no man, no government and no prime minister is above the law. but in all things brexit, everything is unprecedented. so nothing is impossible, but we don't know what is possible. thank you very much indeed. i am sure we will speak again. let's see what is possible with the weather in the next few days. maybe we will get more clarity from matt. good morning, and it is going to be a week of ups and downs as far as the weather is concerned, because we start on a little bit of a downer if you are about to head out to work. lots of rain around, lots of surface water as well, and feeling rather cool for this stage in september. if we show you the radar chart, we have
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seen an inch of rain in south—west scotland. into north wales, where some of the heaviest bursts of rain are at the moment, a few splashes further east. some dry weather at times but the rain pushing its way eastwards throughout. easing a little bit, turning a little bit lighter and patchy aware it is heaviest at the moment. remaining heavy at times in south—west england and south wales, where we could have rumbles of thunder, flashes of lightning with it, and on the far west of south wales and towards cornwall, pembrokeshire and cornwall, pembrokeshire and cornwall, we could see winds almost close to gale force. elsewhere the winds will be lighter. it says grey and dull, some patchy rain and drizzle. northern ireland one of the brightest spots. sunshine developing, especially across western areas. shetland staying fairly right. central and western areas will stick to rain on and off, but nowhere near as heavy as it will have been this morning. to the evening rush hour, some heavy burst of rain in the south—west in the far north of scotland, most of that
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eases. some patchy rain and drizzle can't be ruled out, but most places become dry. clear skies here and there could lead to the rest of —— mist and fog. scotland and northern ireland will see clear skies, could see temperatures as low as five or six degrees. tomorrow morning a much brighter start, the sunshine out for your early morning commute. rush hour across england and wales, cloudy and misty in a few spots with the odd spot of drizzle. most places will be dry, brightening up, most dry with some sunny spells and feeling warmer than today, 15 or 20 degrees. western scotland and northern ireland turning wetter, also india, and that is a sign of what was hurricane dorian starting to push towards our shores. nothing u ntowa rd for to push towards our shores. nothing untoward for us, just some wet and windy weather overnight to take us into wednesday. on wednesday the rain clears to sunny spells. that is how it is looking. back to louise in sa lfo rd. it is an historic day for british airways today, but one the airline would rather forget, as its pilots go on strike for the first time. let's get the latest on that with ben. good morning. yes, that's right. ba pilots began their 48—hour strike at midnight, meaning thousands of flights have been cancelled.
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so how did we get here? back injuly, british airways offered its cabin crew, ground staff, engineers and pilots an 11.5% pay increase over the next three years. the deal was accepted by the unite and gmb unions, but rejected by balpa, which represents pilots. the union says its members took big pay cuts when the airline was struggling, but now ba is making around £2 billion in profit, pilots should benefit. it is thought the walkout could cost the airline £40 million a day in lost business, compensation and disruption. let's speak to boss of british airways. alex cruzjoins me from our studio in central london. good morning to you. good morning. as we said in the introduction, this is the first pilots' strike in ba's history, pilots clearly not taking
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this action lightly. how did we get to this position? well, i am really sorry that the cynical actions of the pilots' union have put us in this position. it is by all accounts an own goal. it is going to punish customers, it will punish our brand, it will punish the rest of the colleagues, as you mentioned. over 90% have already accepted the 11.5% deal. and it will also punish those pilots who want to come to work every day at british airways to make it the best airline in the world. you call it a cynical action by those pilots, but ba made a profit of nearly £2 billion last year. all these pilots are asking for is to share in the success of the airline. they took a pay cut when the airline was not doing well. now it is, they say give us a bit more. and indeed, 11.5%, way above inflation, reflects the fact that ba has been doing better. never before has british
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airways offered such a deal. i was at british airways all those times, all those years ago, i do know that british airways was losing a lot of money. actually more than... nearly 4000 people lost theirjobs, and eve ryo ne 4000 people lost theirjobs, and everyone at british airways took pay cuts and sacrifices, notjust pilots. the company recognises that, and this is why this 11.5% deal, way above inflation, with an extra 1% for 2019, has unfortunately been rejected, and we believe it is a very, very rejected, and we believe it is a very, very generous rejected, and we believe it is a very, very generous deal. pilots currently get about £167,000, plus allowa nces currently get about £167,000, plus allowances on top of that. by no means is that a bad salary, by any strain. but what they are saying is you get £1.3 million, nearly seven times as much as a pilot. they say thatis times as much as a pilot. they say that is not fair. you are rewarded for the success of the airline and they should be as well. indeed, my salary package is a matter of public record. £167,000 is the average for our pilots, as you mentioned. by the end of this deal, injust
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our pilots, as you mentioned. by the end of this deal, in just over two yea rs, end of this deal, in just over two years, when you include the allowa nces, years, when you include the allowances, it will be £202,000. the ba pilots are the best pilots in the world, there is no doubt about it, and they need to have remuneration thatis and they need to have remuneration that is best, absolutely. we believe this deal will take them into that position. this is notjust about pay, though, is it? the strike has been called on the issue of pay, but the head of the pilots' union says a cost—cutting regime has reduced the quality of the service that pilots wa nt to quality of the service that pilots want to give. that is a damning verdict on your leadership. well, on one side this deal is about pay. all the papers filed, the strike itself, is only about pay, and this 11.5% plus 1% deal reflects what we believe is a generous deal. but beyond that, at the same time, british airways has never embarked on such an investment programme as it is right now. £6.5 billion in new seats, new catering, new devices for
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our crew, new training, new lounges, this is ongoing at the moment. unprecedented investment times, as well. clearly lots of chaos for passengers today, not made any easier by the fact that your handling of this was chaotic as well. you sent e—mails to people telling them to rebook when they didn't need to. people that did need to rebook didn't get the e—mails. why can't you get the basics right? la maxwell, just over 2.5 weeks, indeed, as soon as we found out about the strikes, we began to communicate with our customers. our number one priority was to make sure that we offered them as many options as possible stop and as of this moment, the vast majority of those passengers have already been re— accommodated in other airlines. nearly 50 airlines operate in a network, as well as british airways flights right before and right after. that is the focus right now. making sure that every passenger who wa nted
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making sure that every passenger who wanted to travel today has had a solution. we believe the vast majority of them do have those solutions already computed. it is good to talk to you, thank you very much indeed. and bear in mind, as well, there is another strike due on 27 september. if it is going to go ahead, they have to let us know about this by thursday, so clearly a lot of work to do around that and the disruption and cost that goes with it. i will speak to the boss of the pilots' union in about 25 minutes on breakfast. the pop singerjesy nelson from little mix says there needs to be tougher consequences for online trolls, after she was bombarded with so many cruel comments that she tried to take her own life. she has been speaking to our entertainment correspondent chi chi izundu. the winner of the x factor 2011 is... it should have been a moment of joy. little is... it should have been a moment ofjoy. little mix. but, after the
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cameras had stopped rolling in the celebrations should have started, jesy celebrations should have started, jesy nelson was reading messages online. there were so many messages, nasty ones. but the one that was at the top was from, black, random man. and yes, he was just saying how disgusting i am and that i don't deserve to be in a girl band, and that i deserved to die. how do you feel when you post on instagram jesy says she still gets abuse and social media, but four years ago, the comments affected her so much she started missing work, fell into a depression and attempted suicide. now, when i look back on it, i can't believe i even did that. but when you are in that state of mind, you just — you don't think about, like, what you are going to leave behind, or the people you are going to have an effect on. you just want to take that pain away. that's all you care about. the documentary also
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highlights how her attempt affected the other band members. because every single person should have been held accountable for making her feel like that. but bullying doesn't happenjust to like that. but bullying doesn't happen just to those in the public eye. one in 512—15 —year—olds had experienced some kind of online bullying. and according to one charity, a joint multiagency response is what is needed to combat it. this is not only about celebrities. this is about everyone, which is why we need a collective response, because we have young people who are unable to go to school, young people who are changing school, young people who are missing out on education, who have long—term mental health impacts, because of bullying. jesy is now off some social media. she wa nts a is now off some social media. she wants a stronger consequences for those who sent abuse, but hopes her candid admission about her suicide attempt will show the harm cyber bullying can cause. i feel like people that do troll other people
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are people that obviously are not happy within themselves, because i just can't understand why anyone would want to make someone feel bad for no apparent reason, especially when you don't even know them. but now, mentally, i —— i know how to deal with it, but back then i didn't. jesy‘s documentary is called odd one out. it is on bbc one at 9:00pm on thursday, and you can watch it on the bbc iplayer. if you have been affected by these issues you can go to bbc action line as well. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, i'm asad ahmad. london fire brigade say a majorfire which broke out at a block of flats in south—west london is now under control. over 100 firefighters are at the scene after being called to sherbrooke way in worcester park. the fire is said to have spread quickly to all four floors of the building. there are no reports of injuries, and this is one of the residents. to be honest with you,
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it feels like it's a dream, but i know it's not. i'm just thankful we got the family out. all of us are, everyone's safe. whatever‘s in there, we'll have to just get back, somehow, somewhere. but as long as we're safe, i suppose. a former nurse from watford who felt so strongly about financial difficulties faced by hospices spoke to bbc london about the issue shortly before she died. lesley kinch was receiving care herself until she passed away, and she told us days before she died how staff at the hospice kept her going during good and bad days. there have been days where you would get a bit tearful and have a bit of a cry, but i wouldn't dwell on those. i would just think, yes, a cry, but i wouldn't dwell on those. iwould just think, yes, ok, todayis those. iwould just think, yes, ok, today is not so good. tomorrow is another day. get on with it.
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two of london's trees have been shortlisted by the woodland trust to be the best in england. an oak on the north circular close to chingford, thought to be 100 years old, and a tree which has been blown over in richmond park are among ten special trees nominated. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the central line has no service between loughton to epping because of a track fault. a signalfailure in acton is causing delays on the district and the piccadilly line. and a faulty train on the hammersmith & city line is causing minor delays. on the roads, it is busy on the northern approach to the blackwall lane tunnel. and in worcester park, sherbrooke way is closed in both directions due to the fire in a block of flats. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather grey and cloudy start out there this morning. with that, we can expect some outbreaks of rain through the course of today, and on top of all that, it's feeling pretty cool as well. the temperature below average for the time of year, especially by the end of the afternoon. now, these outbreaks of rain,
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maybe one or two heavier bursts, but it should start to break up as we head further through the afternoon. the temperature, as i mentioned, below average for the time of year — between 13—15 celsius. now, overnight, still the chance of the odd spot of rain, but that becomes fewer, further between towards the end of the night. now, the cloud could break. if it does, particularly towards the north, the home counties, you might get a bit of mist and murk by tomorrow morning. quite a chilly night, as well — between 5—8 celsius the minimum temperature. now, as we head through tuesday, it is going to be a better day. there's more sunshine, and as a result of that, the temperature making a little bit of a recovery. we're looking at a maximum of around 20 celsius. the rain will clear for wednesday. it is quite a breezy day, though, on wednesday, and things turning a little bit humid as we get into thursday. iam back i am back later. hello, this is breakfast with louise minchin.
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mps will vote for a second time today on whether to hold an early general election. it's expected that borisjohnson's motion will be defeated, with the opposition parties all planning to vote against him. the prime minister's majority has disappeared after he sacked 21 tory rebels last week, and the resignation of work and pensions secretary amber rudd. borisjohnson will meet the irish prime minister leo varadkar in dublin this morning. the talks will focus on brexit, with the future of the border with northern ireland remaining the biggest sticking point to striking a deal with the eu. more than 100 firefighters have been tackling a major blaze at a block of flats in london overnight. the four—storey building, which was clad with wooden planks, was engulfed by flames in the early hours. our reporter greg mckenzie is at the scene in sutton. greg, what more can you tell us? very good morning to you, and we can
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see that this is an ongoing situation. what more can you tell us? good morning, louise. yes, the fire brigade were called here at 1:30am. they said they had more than 25 residents who called them to report this fire. they got here and as you can see behind me it is a sheu as you can see behind me it is a shell of a building, really. we believe there were 23 flats there. everybody did get out. many residents have told me how they were knocking doors, warning people, lots of people, their children, come out of people, their children, come out of the flat. they have been taken to a nearby community centre run by the salvation army, given tea and coffee and sleeping bags. many of those residents have come back here this morning to see the property. many are inconsolable. they have pretty much lost everything. just at the back there you can see the shell of the building, really, and you are hearing explosions, we believe gas cookers and washing machines and other items that are in the flats.
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fortu nately, other items that are in the flats. fortunately, nobody injured thus far, and earlier i spoke to one resident, darren, who said hejust had to get his two boys out. woke up to the sound of sort of crackling, i we nt to the sound of sort of crackling, i went to my back door, opened the curtains, saw the flames, got myself and my family out. i suppose that was about1:30am. i and my family out. i suppose that was about 1:30am. i am just thankful because the family out, all of out. everyone is safe. whatever is in doubt we will have to just get back somehow, someway. as long as we are safe, i suppose. somehow, someway. as long as we are safe, isuppose. —— somehow, someway. as long as we are safe, i suppose. —— whatever is in there. so many are coming back here this morning, too upset to talk to us. ultimately the fire brigade are here, they are investigating, and it will take some time to really determine the exact cause of the fire here in south—west london. determine the exact cause of the fire here in south-west london. we can see, it looks absolutely devastating. thanks for bringing us up devastating. thanks for bringing us up to date. the biggest strike action in the history of british airways got under way this morning, causing disruption for tens of thousands of passengers.
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the airline has told customers not to turn up to our pots as pilots begina to turn up to our pots as pilots begin a two day walk out over pay and conditions. it is the first time british airways pilots have ever walked out. the action could cost the firm up to £40 million a day, and we will be speaking to their union shortly on breakfast. the head of the usaid agency has compared the damage caused by hurricane dorian in the bahamas to that inflicted by nuclear bomb. at least 43 people are confirmed to have died, but that figure is expected to rise significantly with tens of thousands still missing and thousands more desperate to escape the devastation. a new report suggests malaria could be completely eradicated within a generation. the disease affects more than 200 million people each year and kills mostly young children. the a nalyst and kills mostly young children. the analyst —— analysis, published in the journal the lancet, analyst —— analysis, published in thejournal the lancet, says that a world free of malaria could be within reach. coming up on the
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programme, matt will have all the weather. and we will be back with jon kay in westminster. i have lost count of the crosses to westminster we have done, but it continues. count of the crosses to westminster we have done, but it continueslj we have done, but it continues.” think tomorrow will be another momentous day. keep watching, everybody. yes, keep watching. we will try to guide you through it. that is pretty much all we can do at the moment. anyway, have a look at this chap behind you.” the moment. anyway, have a look at this chap behind you. i love it! i don't know if you can see this at home, everybody, but look at the sticking plaster is over his fingers. he does like to do that. he has a few little foibles, rafael nadal. all those little ticks before he serves. he is a creature of habit. i tell you what, it is working for him. it's been billed as one of the greatest us open finals of all time. rafael nadal beat daniil medvedev to claim his fourth us open title. this match went on for nearly five hours in new york, but for a while it had looked like a routine win for nadal. he was two sets to love up when the russian medvedev started his comeback. he won the next two sets to level the match, but once it got
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to a decider, nadal hit back again. and this 19th grand slam title means he's nowjust one major win behind roger federer‘s all—time record of 20. these kinds of matches in the final of a grand slam makes the match more special. the way the match became more dramatic at the end... it makes it an unforgettable moment, part of my history of the sport. so, nadal closes within one of roger federer‘s record of 20 grand slams. he has four at the us open, 12 have come at the french open, where he will be the favourite again next year. djokovic is there in third place with 16 slams. he will be favourite at the next one in australia. australia retained the ashes after victory in the fourth test at old trafford. england needed to bat out the last
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day to salvage a draw which would have seen the series settled in the fifth and final match at the oval in london. andy swiss reports. with just two wickets left, craig overton and jack leach went on for more than an hour, delighting the home crowd. leanne was nigh. both we re home crowd. leanne was nigh. both were dismissed to give australia the win. —— the and was nigh. australia can draw the series by winning the final test, but as the current holders, australia cape town. everyone's hugely disappointed. but you find yourself in a situation like today and you learn a lot about your team, a lot about the guys around you, and i thought everyone showed a lot of courage, a lot of resilience, a lot of character, and everyone should be really proud of how we approached the day. i think we will look back at other points in the game and think,
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maybe we could have been better. in terms of what we have been able to achieve as a group it is pretty satisfying to this point, from where we have come from in the last 18 months. i think it shows great character, great people we have got. lam character, great people we have got. i am really proud to be in the position i am in, we turned up here and did ourjobs good cricket teams good sports teams do. charles leclerc gave ferrari their first win on home soil for nine years, with victory in the italian grand prix at monza. leclerc held off the mercedes of va ltteri bottas and championship leader lewis hamilton in an incident packed race, underlining his status as a new force in f1. pippa funnell won the burghley horse trials, her first major win for 14 years. the multiple olympic medallist led from start to finish on grafton street. she took one fence down in the final show—jumping phase but then stayed clear, to beat her british teammate piggy french byjust a tenth of a penalty point. when i think of the length of time that it took me
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to win my championship, 14 years from when i started, i never thought it would take another 14 years to win a big one since my last one. oh, my god! that is what you need! it makes me laugh every time i see it. it is not very often the gas tugs the presenter, but that was rather lovely, wasn't it? brilliant for her. there was lots of shouting going on in my household about it. i wasn't sure what it was about, and i found out too late. well done to her. today, we have sentjon kay to go stand outside westminster for us. good morning again.” go stand outside westminster for us. good morning again. i am keeping your seat warm for you, louise. you we re your seat warm for you, louise. you were talking about the overuse of the word momentous. i was looking it up the word momentous. i was looking it up on our thesaurus year, some alternatives. instead of managers we could have decisive, portentous,
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epoch—making or apocalyptic. take your choice. what is going to happen to brexit this week? as we know comedy built to avoid no deal brexit is expected to become law today. later this week, maybe today, parliament will be formally suspended or probed for five weeks. here to talk us through it and explain what is happening is maddy thimontjack, brexit explain what is happening is maddy thimont jack, brexit researcher who never been busier. that's true! thank spoke coming back in talking to us. we will start with today. this bill to stop by no deal, but will get rubberstamped? exactly. we expect that to become law. as a reminderof expect that to become law. as a reminder of what it says, it says that if mp5 are not approved either a deal or no deal by october 19, the prime minister must go to brussels and ask foran prime minister must go to brussels and ask for an extension to the article 50 process. we are expecting that to become law today so the pressure is now on borisjohnson to try to get some kind of deal
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approved before that point so he doesn't have to ask for an extension. there is all the speculation here, and in the papers this morning, about how it doesn't necessarily mean that no deal can't happen. well, i mean, basically, you cannot completely take no deal off the table, because you need the agreement of all other eu member states, all 27 member states must agree to an extension to stop no deal on october 31. you are also technicallyjust delaying the prospect of no deal, even if you do get an extension, because you still need to agree to some kind of deal to ensure that that is how we leave the eu. i mean, there is some speculation about what the government is going to try to do to get around to be because johnson really doesn't want to go and ask foran really doesn't want to go and ask for an extension. but i think the people who have drafted it think it is pretty watertight. there isn't much clarity at about what the government actually thinks it can do. they have said they are going to obey the law, so we are not sure how they will get around it yet. one of they will get around it yet. one of the suggestions swirling around westminster, it might just the suggestions swirling around westminster, it mightjust be a rumour, we haven't had it confirmed, is that borisjohnson could say, ok,
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here is the letter i have to write according to this new law, saying i wa nt according to this new law, saying i wantan according to this new law, saying i want an extension from the eu. but alongside it he could write another letter which says, actually, i don't wa nt letter which says, actually, i don't want you to take notice of the first letter. we don't really want to extend it. and we could leave it up to the eu. but is an extraordinary situation, isn't it? technically he probably could do that, but it is worth saying that the bill also says that if all 27 other member states agreed to an extension on the 315t of october, until january agreed to an extension on the 315t of october, untiljanuary 31, chris johnson must accept it. so if he writes that second letter, if the eu believe it still makes more sense for the believe it still makes more sense forthe uk, given that believe it still makes more sense for the uk, given that they know the will of parliament is to have an extension, they might agree to the first letter, ignoring the second one, and he would still be compelled to agree. i don't know how that would play out at this stage. you could write one first on the envelope, openness on second. meanwhile, they could be another vote today for a general election. it looks like that won't get
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through. then parliament is set to be prorated or suspended. basically this building shuts down? be prorated or suspended. basically this building shuts down7m be prorated or suspended. basically this building shuts down? it is pretty extraordinary. we still do not know where we are at with the brexiter process, but parliament will not be sitting for nearly five weeks. and we don't yet know what day they are going to wrap it all up. it will be between either today or thursday. what is really important is that during that period of prorating, parliament does not do anything. —— proroguing. i mean, select committees could still set, parliamentary questions could still be heard... so the lights would still be on. exactly, more things would be ticking on behind the scenes, where is actually nothing happens basically for five weeks. the government is going to be trying to negotiate a new deal. they are going to be preparing for a no deal brexit. and there is going to be no scrutiny whatsoever of what government ministers and officials are doing. so there is quite a big question about, you know, but sounds quite problematic if you are trying to get the country ready for something, and we still don't know what that something is, and parliament is not able to scrutinise
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anything. and that is what so many opposition mps are angry about stop thank you forjoining us this morning. that is the situation here in westminster, everybody talking brexit. how does this actually reflecting the rest of the country, where we still have to make packed lunches for the kids and we are still putting the bins out every morning. does it feel like a political crisis outside this postcode? find out from john macguire, who is in plymouth. how does it feel there? does it feel like we're the middle of a crisis? who knows? as you know, it is the uncertainty causing so many problems at the moment. it isjust uncertainty causing so many problems at the moment. it is just starting to rain, we are at the barbican, sutton harbour behind me, just yards away from the steps where the mayflower departed from almost 400 yea rs mayflower departed from almost 400 years ago. we will celebrate that birthday next year. it feels like simpler times in many regards. we have assembled some auspicious guest, a professor from have assembled some auspicious guest, a professorfrom the
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university of plymouth, and a brother and sister, labour and conservative voter, a leave and remainer. the absolute valhalla for broadcasting. what would we expect to see in plymouth in the next few weeks? well, plymouth has two very marginal seats and they often change hands. there was a poll done by the local newspaper about one year ago which suggested a lot of people now wish they had voted remain, and the other interesting thing is the student vote, a lot of students will be badly affected by brexit and they will pick up the tab in terms of lost opportunities and rescuing the situation. and also, of course, limit has got lots manufacturing firms on the outskirts, trading estates very dependent on the european market. they were set up to actually get into the european market, so plymouth is likely to ta ke market, so plymouth is likely to take a big hit, irrespective of whether there is a deal or no deal.
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alex, labour voter, remain. whether there is a deal or no deal. alex, labourvoter, remain. what do the next couple of months look like for you? optimistic, pessimistic the next couple of months look like foryou? optimistic, pessimistic and what do you think? well, i think anyone who says they know what is going to happen is a full, really. parliament, the law comes into effect of no deal being taken off the table, but the opposition have come together to say they won't allow a general election because they know that boris johnson allow a general election because they know that borisjohnson is already trying to find a way around the law. so we will be heading towards a general, but god only knows when. we have to get their oktoberfest. a week is a long time in politics, we say that over and over again. jason, a conservative and leave voter. how do you see the next couple of months panning out? again, who but what is the ideal scenario for you? i think we should
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grasp the opportunity. boris should go with the flow and deliver what the people want, and that is to get out. that is what was asked for. 31 october was the deadline that was set, and we should stick to that by whatever means necessary within the law. that is what i say. basically we should look at this as an opportunity at the end of the day. i think we have squandered the last three years with all the political meanderings that have gone on and all the people trying to outdo the deal and move things in the opposite direction. i think really we should be looking at the opportunities that we've got and we should be —— should have been preparing for this are not wasting the opportunity. fantastic to hear from different perspectives, andi to hear from different perspectives, and i am sure you at home will have families or at least no families where people are divided and split. so thank you for not squabbling, or at least being civil for us this morning, although i know you always are. as! morning, although i know you always are. as i was saying, a bit rainy outside the window in plymouth this morning. matt, what have we got to look forward to, or not? corner looking particularly grey, and that rain will get heavier at times. not
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the ideal start to the working week. good morning to you well. most places seeing some rain at times, and it will actually be quite cool for this stage in september. the week will not be a washout by any means. week will not be a washout by any m ea ns. lots week will not be a washout by any means. lots of surface water and spray on the roads, especially across scotland, the western half of england and wales. south—west scotland, england and northern wales have the heaviest rain at the moment, and developing towards the south—west as we go through mid morning onwards. the rain will put its way eastwards, a few splashes across eastern england at present, and some dry weather throughout during the day. parts eastern scotla nd during the day. parts eastern scotland staying dry. some heavy bursts of rain and rumbles of thunder even towards the school pick up thunder even towards the school pick up an evening rush hour in parts of the south—west, channel islands, parts of wales as well. elsewhere, the rain and particularly north—west england not as heavy as it will be over the next few hours. northern ireland seeing the sun shines through the afternoon. aberdeenshire, certainly the case to shetland. much of scotland says quiet, cloudy with further rain at times. lighter and patchy are compared with what you have at the moment. still damp rush hour, heavy bursts of rain towards the
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south—west and the channel islands, and quitea south—west and the channel islands, and quite a breeze blowing through parts of wales and south—west england to start the night. most places becoming dry, only a little bit of patchy and light rain and drizzle, especially through central and eastern parts. clear skies here and eastern parts. clear skies here and there could lead to mist and fog patches, and parts of scotland, northern ireland, the far south—east and east anglia could be a chilly started tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning, scotland and northern ireland vastly improving. cutting over with rain later on. england and wales plenty of cloud, a bit misty to begin with, but brightening up here. sunny spells for most tomorrow afternoon and it will feel a bit warmer as well. 15— 20 degrees compared to the 13— 16 celsius we will see through the day. finishing the day with rain and strengthening winds across scotland and northern ireland. this area of low pressure is the remnants of what was hurricane dorian. it has gone across a cold atlantic, not bringing us anything untoward. widespread gales, maybe 50 mph gusts for some. a breezy day for wednesday and england and wales, outbreaks of rain becoming confined to the south—east
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during the afternoon. most places seeing some sunshine. one or two showers around and temperature still not doing too badly, 16— 21 degrees despite that morning rain. enter wednesday night and thursday we see another ex— tropical system, ex— tropical storm gabrielle bringing wet weather for scotland and northern ireland, nothing untoward, nothing too breezy. a generally blustery day. england and wales, away from the north and west, many will stay dry and quite a humid day away from the south—east corner. 2324 the high, compared with just 12 or 13 2324 the high, compared with just 12 or13 in 2324 the high, compared with just 12 or 13 in northern scotland. a to psy—tu rvy or 13 in northern scotland. a topsy—turvy week, i think that sums up topsy—turvy week, i think that sums up most things at the moment.” think you are absolutely right. thank you for reminding us. see you later. if you were planning to fly somewhere with british airways today or tomorrow, there is a good chance your plans have been disrupted by the airline's first ever pilots' strike. ben can tell us more. ba pilots began their 48—hour strike
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at midnight and around 1,600 flights have been cancelled, affecting hundreds of thousands of passengers. it's all in a dispute over pay. the balpa union has rejected ba's offer of an 11.5% salary increase over the next three years, saying the airline's profits, £2 billion last year, mean pilots deserve more than that. but the boss of british airways told us the salary they are being offered already represents a fair share. £167,000 is the average for our pilots, as you mentioned. and by the end of this deal, injust over two years, when you include the allowances, it will be £202,000. the ba pilots are the best pilots in the world, there's no doubt about it, and they need to have a remuneration that is best, absolutely. and we believe this deal will actually take them into that position. let's put that point to the union. brian strutton, balpa general secretary, joins me
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from heathrow airport now. you heard from the boss of ba that £202,000 is what pilots are being offered. you say that is not enough. well, it is not what is being offered in most pilots and a lot less tha n offered in most pilots and a lot less than what mist cruz is saying. but the question he has to answer is not telling everyone in the programme what the offer is worth, but working out why pilots have voted to go on strike. if it is so good, as mist cruz says, then why are they out on strike? the fact is the pilots do not recognise what he is saying stop the pilots have said british airways is going through some good times, we want to share in
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those profits just as we shared the pain in the bad times. and i put that point to you earlier, and this response was, yes, absolutely. 11.5% increase in salary is a representation of that share you get in the success of the airline. equally he would say you have to carry the can if the airline doesn't do well. would your members be prepared to accept a pay cut if the fortu nes prepared to accept a pay cut if the fortunes reversed for ba? well, that's exactly what a profit—sharing scheme is. in one year you might own a basic salary of £100,000 and profit sharing of £20,000. the next year you have a bad time, you get your basic salary and your profit sharing falls, and you have suffered a pay cut year—on—year. that is exactly how profit—sharing works, thatis exactly how profit—sharing works, that is is exactly what the pilots have said. if mist cruz thinks it is a good idea, why hasn't he agreed it now? so most people watching this programme will have struggled to have any pay rise at all over the last few years, some will be on 1% or2%, and an11.5% last few years, some will be on 1% or 2%, and an 11.5% pay rise is not going to get you any sympathy from the public. and particularly those people who are affected today who
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can't get where they want to get to. well, let me say a few things about that. anybody that is not getting a decent pay rise should. i know many occupations have had their pay down. that is not a good thing. but equally it is not a good reason to say that other people shouldn't get the pay rise that they deserve. pilots are looking for an inflation proof deal, and that's pretty much on the table from british airways, and we haven't been arguing about that part of the deal. as i said just now, it is profit—sharing that pilots have sought, and it is that pa rt pilots have sought, and it is that part of this has led to the dispute. and the dispute itself, i know, is very disruptive for passengers. we regret that. it is british airways' decision not to fly an operation at all today. they could have had pilots flying if they wanted to. they have shut the airline down. so thatis they have shut the airline down. so
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that is regrettable and we have accepted our part in that. on that point, they say you didn't give enough notice about which pilots would be out and therefore which plates they would have to cancel. but i want to come onto whether this is self—defeating. costing nearly £100 million to the airline, the fa ct £100 million to the airline, the fact that your pilots are out on strike, that is self—defeating, isn't it? that the fortunes of the airline is worse, and therefore you would see the page to the pilots go down. i would be very interested in mr cruz‘s logic on that point. i said to him, i met him a week or so ago and said to his face the difference between us is a few million. it is hardly a dot on the accounta nt‘s chart for million. it is hardly a dot on the accountant‘s chart for british airways, and yet the cost to the airline will be more than the £100 million over the next couple of days, but it will be terrible industrial relations for years to come. it is completely illogical that mr cruz isn't sitting down and negotiating with us on this. i have
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said we're not going to and instead we have all of this disruption. said we're not going to and instead we have all of this disruptionm is good to talk to you, brian, general secretary of balpa. there is another strike planned for the end of the month. they have to tell us about that by thursday. so watch this space. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. hello, i'm asad ahmad. london fire brigade say a majorfire which broke out at a block of flats in south—west london is now under control. over 100 firefighters are at the scene after being called to sherbrooke way in worcester park. the fire is said to have spread quickly to all four floors of the building. there are no reports of injuries. a former nurse from watford who felt so strongly about financial difficulties faced by hospices spoke to bbc london about the issue shortly before she died. lesley kinch was receiving care until she passed away, and she told us days before she died
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how staff at the hospice kept her going through good and bad days. there have been days where you would get a bit tearful and have a bit of a cry, but i wouldn't dwell on those. i would just think, yeah, ok, today is not so good. tomorrow is another day — get on with it. two trees in london have been shortlisted by the woodland trust to be the best in england. an oak on the north circular road close to chingford, is one of them, and a tree which was blown over in richmond park is the other. people can vote for the winner online. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube board, the central line has no service between loughton to epping because of a track fault. a signalfailure in acton is causing delays on the district
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and the piccadilly line. and a faulty train on the hammersmith & city line is causing minor delays. on the roads, in lewisham, the a20 lee high road at the junction with belmont hill has a a closed westbound for gas mains work. and in worcester park, sherbrooke way is closed in both directions due to the fire in a block of flats. now the weather, with kate kinsella. good morning. it's a rather grey and cloudy start out there this morning. with that, we can expect some outbreaks of rain through the course of today, and on top of all that, it's feeling pretty cool as well. the temperature below average for the time of year, especially by the end of the afternoon. now, these outbreaks of rain, maybe one or two heavier bursts, but it should start to break up as we head further through the afternoon. the temperature, as i mentioned, below average for the time of year — between 13—15 celsius. now, overnight, still the chance of the odd spot of rain, but that becomes fewer, further between towards the end of the night.
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now, the cloud could break. if it does, particularly towards the north, the home counties, you mightjust get a bit of mist and murk by tomorrow morning. quite a chilly night, as well — between 5—8 celsius the minimum temperature. now, as we head through tuesday, it is going to be a better day. there's more sunshine, and as a result of that, the temperature making a little bit of a recovery. we're looking at a maximum of around 20 celsius. the rain will clear for wednesday. it is quite a breezy day, though, on wednesday, and things turning a little bit more humid as we get into thursday. that's it for me. i will be back in half—an—hour. vanessa phelps is on bbc radio london. bye for now. good morning welcome to breakfast withjon kay in westminster, as parliament begins another crucial day in the brexit process. our headlines this morning: mps are to vote again today
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on holding a snap general election with boris johnson facing a second defeat. and a new law to delay brexit comes into force today but government ministers are trying to find a way around it. also this morning... more than 120 firefighters have spent the night tackling a major fire at a block of flats in south west london. little mix'sjesy nelson reveals that online bullying led her to try to take her own life. so many messages, nasty ones but the one that was at the top was from like a random man. yeah, he was just like saying how disgusting i am and that i don't deserve to be in the girl band and i deserve to die. travel disruption for hundreds of thousands of british airways passengers, as pilots go on strike. it's the biggest walk—out in ba's history. i'll speak to the boss and the head of the pilots union. rafael nadal wins an epic us open. it's a 19th grand slam
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title for the spaniard and a fourth in new york, after winning a five set thriller against daniil medvedev. a lot of rain around today, surface water if you are on the move and rather cool. but it does not set the scene for the whole week, as i will show you. i will have the full fourth cast here on breakfast. it's monday the 9th of september. another date which could end up in the history books with brexit. we're live from westminster at the start of what is shaping up to be another momentous week in british politics and for borisjohnson's government. later today, mps will vote for a second time on whether to hold an early general election. in a moment, we'll hear from our political correspondent, chris mason, but with things changing so quickly in our politics
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at the moment, let's just take you through what we can expect to happen next. the mps' bill forcing borisjohnson to ask for a brexit extension, in order to avoid no deal, is set to become law later today. it will be rubber—stamped. once that's happened, the government hopes to have a fresh vote to force a snap general election, on october 15th, although their bid seems likely to fail. and then, possibly tomorrow but certainly by thursday, parliament will be suspended, or prorogued. iam i am reluctant to use the word certainly, about anything at the moment. good morning, chris. we can hear the crowds gathering and tensions are rising, but let's start with today, what could we expect to happen. possibly it is the word you
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need. we can be relatively certain about what is going to happen, which is this plan to block a no—deal brexit will become law and that will put the government in a bind because it wants to deliver brexit by the end of next month come what may. we can be certain, i think, the government will want a vote tonight in parliament about a general election and we can be fairly certain they will not get their way because the opposition parties will say no. what is the government's strategy right now given this conundrum they are in? it is the anxiety, the blushing reality of a teenager going on dates, writing a letter to your boyfriend or girlfriend and saying, i don't want to go out with you, but i don't want to go out with you, but i don't want to dump you either. that is what they are contemplating with this idea of having to go to the summit in brussels next month and say, we are obliged to ask for an extension,
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but we don't really want one. that seems to be where they are. the opponents of the government say we have drafted this law very carefully. you might say that and that might be accurate, but you will still have to get an extension because that is what the law of the land will say. the government are looking at every little element of this soon—to—be law to see if there is any way around it and at the moment, there doesn't seem to be. borisjohnson is moment, there doesn't seem to be. boris johnson is not moment, there doesn't seem to be. borisjohnson is not here this morning, he is going to dublin to meet the irish taoiseach, because that backstop issue with northern ireland, that is so fundamental to what happens next? absolute crucial. the irish prime minister is a central player in this. the government has said it wants to rip up government has said it wants to rip up this backstop, this insurance policy to make sure there is no border on the island of ireland. they have suggested that various elements of the deal theresa may dead are ripped out of their
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withdrawal agreement. but the eu and ireland in particular, say there has to be some guarantee that the border stays the same, regardless of what might happen in the future. that has been the stumbling block as we know, and there doesn't seem to be any solution to it yet. we can expect to see borisjohnson solution to it yet. we can expect to see boris johnson in solution to it yet. we can expect to see borisjohnson in ireland shortly and then he will come back here no doubt and try to use whatever happened in those talks and persuade mps happened in those talks and persuade mp5 on all sides to try and back it. let's get the latest on those talks in dublin and how things might proceed from chris page. you cannot see it, but it has been the biggest obstacle to a brexit deal. the border between northern ireland and the irish republic doesn't have any checkpoints, and both the uk and the eu want to keep it that way. but they don't agree on how to achieve that aim. the centre of the dispute is what is known as the backstop, a guarantee the frontier will remain open under any circumstances. it will come into force only if there is not a major free—trade deal which would remove the need for checks.
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borisjohnson wants the idea scrapped, because it would in effect keep britain in the eu's customs regime, and mean northern ireland has to follow some european rules on goods. but the irish government argues the backstop is vital. prime minister leo varadkar says he would consider any alternatives the uk comes up with, but so far he says there have been none, and he is concerned about a deadlocked westminster. prime minister may, with a parliamentary majority, was unable to get a deal through the house of commons. prime ministerjohnson does not have a majority. so i will be asking him how he can convince us, ireland and the european union, that he is actually capable or has the votes to get a deal through. mr varadkar has suggested that his government could accept a solution involving a backstop that applied only to northern ireland, and not the whole of the uk. but unionist politicians are strongly opposed to that idea. after many months of talks, divisions and stand—offs, brexit is still hanging
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on the question of what happens to this border. chris page, bbc news. inafew in a few minutes we will be joined by david gauke, the formerjustice secretary but now a tory rebel and it will be interesting to hear what he thinks about the various ways borisjohnson he thinks about the various ways boris johnson might try he thinks about the various ways borisjohnson might try to get around this new law aimed at stopping a new deal. but let's go back to louise and the rest of the day's news. studio: thank you. fire crews are dealing with a major blaze in sutton in south west london after being called out in the early hours of the morning. the fire quickly spread to all four floors of the building in the early hours. the cause of the fire is not known and no injuries have been reported as yet. woke up to the sound of crackling.
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went to my back door and opened the curtains, saw the flames and got myself and my family up. that was about 1:30am myself and my family up. that was about1:30ami myself and my family up. that was about 1:30am i suppose. myself and my family up. that was about1:30am i suppose. i myself and my family up. that was about 1:30am i suppose. i am thankful we got everybody out, we are all safe. whatever is in there we'll get back somehow, some way but as long as we are i suppose. the biggest strike action in the history of british airways started this morning, causing disruption for tens of thousands of passengers. the airline has told customers not to turn up to airports, as pilots begin a two—day walkout over pay and conditions. our reporter simon jones is at heathrow. simon, are there any signs of the disruption? good morning, we have been speaking to the airline and the union and there seems to be no way through this at the moment? yes, the war of words has continued this morning. british airways management has accused the pilot union of staging a cynical strike. the union has accused management of being fat cats. i was at terminal five and earlier and it should be bustling at
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this time of day with people jetting off on holidays or people going on business trips. it was practically empty, like a ghost town, just a handful of passengers. what is this all about? it is about pay. we reckon 800 flights have been cancelled today and 800 tomorrow as well so 1600 in total. the unions have rejected a pay increase offer of 11.5% over three years. they say they want a bigger share of the company's they want a bigger share of the compa ny‘s growing profits. they want a bigger share of the company's growing profits. the strike is predicted to cost ba £40 million for each day goes on. at the sharp end of this of course, the passengers. 195,000, we are told, are being affected. some have booked alternative flights, some have cancelled their flights for a different day and some have cancelled their holidays altogether. ba have apologised to them and the unions have apologised to the
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passengers, saying their dispute is with management. but the both sides seem very with management. but the both sides seem very far apart and say they are both willing to talk but no talks are planned. they say after these two days, a further strike day is planned for the end of the month and the union is not ruling out many more strike days to come if this dispute is not resolved. feeling strong on both sides here. you do get a sense of that this morning. thank you very much, thank you. the head of a us aid agency has compared the damage caused by hurricane dorian in the bahamas to that inflicted by a nuclear bomb. at least 43 people are confirmed dead but that figure is expected to rise "significantly" with tens of thousands still missing and thousands more desperate to escape the devastation. a new report suggests that malaria could be completely eradicated within a generation. the disease affects more than 200 million people each year, and kills mostly young children. the analysis, published in the lancet, suggests that with an increase in effort a world free of malaria could be within reach.
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you are up—to—date with the latest news. good morning, you are watching brea kfast. eddie redmayne says it's "absolutely wonderful" to be working again with felicityjones, in their new film the aeronauts. their last movie together, the theory of everything, won redmayne an oscar. the aeronauts had its premiere at the toronto film festival last night. our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba was there. i'm a really good aeronaut. five years after the oscar—winning the theory of everything, felicityjones is reunited with her co—star eddie redmayne. i need to make studies of the air. i am not a coachman for hire. you are the only person who could fly us higher than anyone has ever been. this time he plays a scientist very different from stephen hawking, while she plays an adventurer, and they both embark on a terrifyingly dangerous balloon flight. we had the most intense and extraordinary experience making theory of everything,
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and when we were offered this script there was that slight nervousness of, you know, do we go back? but we enjoyed that experience so much that it was, we both called each other up, and said, "i'll do it if you do it." who said yes first? you or him? we both said yes together! we were both sent the script separately. the fact that they were two such two brilliant characters, that's what clinched it. i think had one character not been so good the other person wouldn't have wanted to take the part. but there was so much rich stuff there for both of us. this is a festival that has a reputation for showcasing potential oscar winners. so expectation is growing that this could well fly extremely high during award season. so it begins. lizo mzimba, bbc news, toronto film festival. we get the weather soon, and you are
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still looking at what is going on with hurricane dorian? yes, no longer hurricane but it swept yes, no longer hurricane but it swe pt a cross yes, no longer hurricane but it swept across pa rt yes, no longer hurricane but it swept across part of canada and abroad disrupted scenes to halifax on the coast in nova scotia. it is heading our way but it is about to hit the cold, atlantic sea and will wea ken hit the cold, atlantic sea and will weaken and nothing more than an air of low pressure. then into thursday, re m na nts of of low pressure. then into thursday, remnants of an ex tropical store, gabrielle will push across bringing something humid. not humid out there today because it is a chilly start, thatis today because it is a chilly start, that is fort william a short while ago and it is not the most 02:15:45,831 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 inspirational start to the new
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