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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  September 12, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me, annita mcveigh. the headlines: the government says its already taken measures to address possible hold—ups at ports, disruption to supplies of fresh food and medicines, and the potentialfor an increase in public disorder. over the course of the last six weeks this government has taken considerable steps in order to ensure that if there is no deal scenario that we can leave the safest a nd scenario that we can leave the safest and smoothest possible way. meanwhile, labour calls for parliament to be recalled after the no—deal brexit papers are released. the number of people investigated for rape who go on to be convicted falls to its lowest level since records were first compiled, more than a decade ago. new figures reveal
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cancer survival rates in the uk are on the up, but still lag behind other high—income countries. a call for tighter regulation for gaming and for so—called "loot boxes" where players pay real money for virtual goods not be sold to children. in sport, england have dropped batsman jason roy for the final test match against australia, but they're only playing for pride with the ashes already gone. also coming up — why the currest spate of australia bushfires are expected to be hotter and more intense than ever before. good morning, and welcome to the bbc news at 9.
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the government has insisted that steps have been taken to mitigate the effect of a no—deal brexit. it follows the publication of operation yellowhammer, which outlines the worst case scenario of a no—deal exit from the european union. the document warns that there could be a decrease in the supply of certain types of food. food and fuel prices could go up which would have a disproportionate affect on lower income families. there would be disruption to medicines and medical supplies lasting up to six months. two—day waits for lorries to cross the english channel. the document also says that refusing to put up a border on the island of ireland in a no—deal scenario would be ‘unsustainable‘. in response, labour say it's more important than ever that parliament is recalled. our political correspondent chris mason reports. parliament forced the government to publish this document which,
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until now, was categorised as "official, sensitive". ministers insist it's not a prediction but what they call a reasonable worst—case scenario, a deliberately stretching context to ensure that we are prepared, and they insist we are now vastly better prepared. but make no mistake, this is stark stuff. certain types of fresh food supply will decrease, it says, which will cut choice and put up prices. it also suggests there could be riots. protests a nd cou nter— protests will take place across the uk, it says. lorries could have to wait more than two days to cross the channel. passengers could be delayed on the eurostar at st pancras in london. some businesses will go bust. there'll be a growth in the black market. some providers of adult social care could fail because it says the sector is already fragile and there could be an increase in staff and supply costs.
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it is extraordinary that these are consequences that could flow from the government's own policy. normally when you're protecting against something like this, it's natural disaster, the action of others you don't control. it is government policy if no agreement is reached with the eu to inflict a no—deal brexit, and this is what the government says could happen. the document does, though, say demand for energy will be met, and there'll be no disruption to electricity or gas supplies. the key thing now is the extent to which this shapes or changes public attitudes to the prospect of a no—deal brexit. chris mason, bbc news. with me now is our assistant political editor, norman smith. norman, the dover calais crossing and the border on the island of ireland are two key areas of concern asa ireland are two key areas of concern as a result of the publication of these documents. to what extent will
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that put pressure on borisjohnson, on the government, to recall parliament? and also how much pressure does it put on boris johnson to avoid a no—deal brexit?” think it dramatically hardens up the opposition to no deal at westminster because already there is a clear majority of mps who do not want no deal and once they have seen this paper they will just be deal and once they have seen this paper they willjust be reinforced in their view that the british government should consider in any circumstances and what arms impact to the paper is that it is relatively current government thinking. it is dated august to the second so it is not some paper from the dim and distant past. it's only last month, this government thinking, so therefore it cannot be dismissed as an episode in project fear. it was published during boris
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johnson's time as prime minister so it cannot be cast to one side as i remaina it cannot be cast to one side as i remain a plot. the government will say that it's ok, but it's a worst—case scenario. say that it's ok, but it's a worst—case scenario. they don't say this is what will happen and if nothing was done, then yes, all of these possibilities could happen and they insist they can put in place a number of measures that will significantly mitigate many of the outcomes and that was the tone we got from the no deal minister michael gove when he emerged from his house this morning. the yellowhammer documents are a worst—case scenario and they are there so the government can take steps to mitigate those consequences. steps to mitigate those consequences. over the course of the la st consequences. over the course of the last six weeks this government has taken considerable steps to ensure that if there is no deal scenario that if there is no deal scenario that we can leave in the safest and
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smoothest possible way, but it's important to stress that we are fighting hard for a deal on the prime minister has been making diplomatic progress this week and we are on our way diplomatic progress this week and we are on our way to getting a better deal. the implication from mr gove and other cabinet ministers is that after theresa may there has been a dramatic stepping up in no deal planning. privately, some brexiteers by suggesting that mrs may took her foot off the gas with no deal planning as she had no interest in leaving without an agreement and we heard from the outgoing parliamentary secretary for exiting the european union yesterday, he said that simply wasn't the case and that actually they had put in an awful lot of measures under theresa may, and i suppose the concern of many mps will be that even though you managed to mitigate and get round some of the difficulties, if even a proportion of the yellowhammer productions come to pass then they will be profoundly damaging and that was an argument
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put by amber rudd who resigned from the borisjohnson put by amber rudd who resigned from the boris johnson government put by amber rudd who resigned from the borisjohnson government in protest at the lack of preparations for no deal and forgetting some sort ofan for no deal and forgetting some sort of an agreement. there have been extensive preparations put in place and a lot of planning has been going around security, where police might need to be moved to, changes with freight, particularly with medicine and i know the department of health has been making extensive preparations to ensure we can, we hope, get all of our medicine. so those are very serious preparations taking place. i would just observe that those mitigations are constantly being put in place but they are never going to be entirely mitigating of all the issues. we have to still remember that no deal will be bad for our economy, bad for our security and for our union, but it's about making it less bad. it's worth stressing the documents were forced out of the
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government, they were not voluntarily put in the public domain and only released after the mps passed a motion calling on the government to release them. i think that will play into the whole argument of whether parliament needs to be recalled, because many mps have been arguing overnight that so serious and significant are the consequences of no deal that they need a chance to debate those consequences in parliament and that is another reason, on top of yesterday's court case, why boris johnson should now recall parliament immediately. norman, thank you for that. we saw the judges in parliament in scotland ruled that thejudgment was parliament in scotland ruled that the judgment was unlawful, but the legal challenge argues that the government brexit strategy will damage the northern ireland peace process. belfast‘s high court
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is considering three joined cases against boris johnson's handling of the uk's exit from the eu. the challenges contend that a no—deal brexit next month would undermine agreements between the uk and irish governments struck during the peace process. staying with brexit, the eu chief negotiator michel barnier will update the european parliament's president and political groups‘ on the state of play in the brexit process. our brussels correspondent, adam fleming sent this update from the european parliament. the eu chief negotiator, michel barnier, is going to be here and he will be briefing senior members of the european parliament, the leaders of the big groups of european political parties, about the latest in the brexit process and there is a process. the uk's chief negotiator, david frost, was here in brussels yesterday talking about making changes to the brexit deal, particularly around the bit of the deal that deals with the irish border and they were talking about
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things like streamlined customs and how you would manage a situation where the rules for manufactured goodsin where the rules for manufactured goods in northern ireland, which would be in the uk, would be one thing and they will be different in ireland on the other side of the border which is still going to be the eu. the eu has lots of questions about the detail of those proposals and the feasibility of them and whether they will live up to the eu's red lines and has concerns about protecting the single market and the irish peace process but there are also interested in whether there are also interested in whether the uk is serious about negotiating or whether this is a bit of a tactic intended for consumption back home in the uk and further down the line they wonder if there's any changes to the brexit they ever be palatable to the brexit they ever be palatable to the brexit they ever be palatable to the british parliament. and meps here have drawn up a new resolution about brexit which they will table and vote on when they have an official sitting in the french city official sitting in the french city of strasbourg next week.
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the number of people investigated for rape, and were subsequently convicted, has fallen to its lowest level since the compilation of records began more than a decade ago. there were 1,925 convictions in 2018/19, a 27% drop compared with more than 2,500 the year before. this was in spite of allegations of rape reaching a high of 58,000. our home affairs correspondent, june kelly reports. phone messages and social media have become a big part of rape enquiries. complainants are being asked to hand over their phones as the police search for digital evidence stop a so a huge change in investigations, but there's also been a significant drop in rape prosecutions. new figures show that last year in rape investigations in england and wales, under 1,800 cases resulted in charges. the smallest number for more than a decade. atjust over 1,900, convictions
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were also down to record low levels. meanwhile, rape complaints recorded by the police went up to 58,000, an all—time high. so, hard evidence that fewer suspects are being brought to court by the crown prosecution service. campaigners are accusing prosecutors of screening out the tougher cases. there's a huge justice gap for complainants of rape, and what that also says is that if you're a rapist, you can continue your offending with impunity because the likelihood of you being held to account in the courts is minuscule. it is centres like this which help complainants when they first come forward. the crown prosecution service denies a change of approach in dealing with rape cases. june kelly, bbc news. new figures show cancer survival rates in the uk are improving but still remain below those of other wealthy countries.
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a study in lancet oncology found rates were worse than australia, canada, denmark, ireland, new zealand and norway. here's our health correspondent, dominic hughes for some years now, the uk has lagged behind other developed countries when it comes to treating cancer. the gap is closing, with definite signs of improvement. but the latest research shows there is no room for complacency. we don't have enough radiologists, endoscopist and pathologists that read the tests, so we have somewhat of a bottleneck in the nhs to get people through the system and this can make our gps somewhat more reluctant to refer at the earliest possible opportunity when there is this bottleneck in the system. the latest data looks at survival rates for seven of the most common cancers in seven high—income countries with similar healthcare systems. the uk was at the foot of the league in five of the seven cancers,
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including pancreatic cancer, where less than 8% survived five years after diagnosis. in australia, the five—year survival rate was close to 15%. the government points to significant increases in survival rates over the past 20 years. faster diagnosis and swifter treatment are the key to better results. cancer charities say to achieve that, more staff specialising in cancer care are needed right across the nhs. dominic hughes, bbc news. with me now is sara hiom, who we just heard from in the vt, sara is the director of early diagnosis & cancer intelligence from cancer research. first of the news that survival rates are up. give us your take on why that is. it's great news with survival rates up on all the cancers we looked at and continuing to increase. we've definitely seen improvements in consolidation of
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care, so specialised teams coming together in specialist hospitals and we are improving late diagnosis rates but we need to do better. let me pick up on that point before we see why the uk lags behind some countries and perhaps they are connected, i don't know. what can individuals do to make sure there is a good outcome if they are concerned about something that something turns out be cancer? individuals can really be aware of their bodies because if they spot signs or symptoms or anything that is unusual for them, we urge them to come forward to see their gp and have it checked out. the chances are it will not be cancer, but if it is it is better to have it checked out and diagnosed at an earlier stage. we also have screening programmes for three types of cancer, breast cancer, cervical cancer and bowel cancer, cervical cancer and bowel cancer, so do take up your screening information of this is right for you and that will pick up the disease earlier. on the evidence is that
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your chances of surviving improve all the time but why is the uk lagging behind some of the countries we mentioned in the introduction? we think one of the bottlenecks is the diagnostic capacity in the nhs and that's why we have been calling on the government to invest properly in a fully funded plan for the nhs so we need more radiologists to read scans, more endoscopist and more pathologists to read the test and this is acting as a bottleneck because we don't have enough gps as well to get the people into the system and get them diagnosed and through to the treatments we have. you are saying to me as we watch the bt that the nhs is really listening to what is needed and has some really good plans and ambitions but clearly the system needs more of the right kind of people, with the right training and more money, effectively. yes, and for diagnostic kit, and it's great to see the long—term plan and ambition that the
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nhs has to improve early diagnosis rates and improve survival, and with that investment, we stand every chance of being amongst the best the world. thank you very much. -- best in the world. the headlines on bbc news: the government says its already taken measures to address possible hold—ups at ports, disruption to supplies of fresh food and medicines, and the potentialfor an increase in public disorder in the event of a no—deal brexit. the number of people investigated for rape, who go on to be convicted, falls to its lowest level since records were first compiled more than a decade ago. new figures reveal cancer survival rates in the uk remain below those of other high income countries. sam curran and chris woakes come in for the final test at the oval as joe root plans for the future. great britain won three more gold medals
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at the swimming world championships in london. and there was a bad night for hibernian in the women's champions league as they were beaten 4—1 by salah via prague stop glasgow city wonderfirst salah via prague stop glasgow city wonder first leg, winning salah via prague stop glasgow city wonderfirst leg, winning 1—0 in moscow —— 11—0. children should be banned from buying video game extras under measures unveiled by mps today. there are concerns so—called loot boxes encourage gambling with some gamers spending up to £1,000 a year chasing mystery virtual items, as our technology correspondent rory cellanjones reports. three quarters of 5 to 15—year—olds play online games, and mps say the companies behind them depend profits for their profits on keeping those players glued to their screens. they're calling on firms to protect players from the harm caused by excessive time and
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money spent on games. for video games in particular, there's been a big switch so that a lot of games people play are free to play but then you are encouraged to purchase things as you play the games. a particular concern is loot boxes, where players spend real money on virtual goods, such as packs of star footballers in fifa. one player told the committee they spent up to £1,000 a year on the game. the mps want loot boxes regulated under the gambling act, and say they shouldn't be sold to children where there's an element of chance involved. the mps say the companies behind games like fifa and fortnite hadn't even done any research into the potential harm they might cause. they said it was unacceptable that companies with millions of users, many of them children, should be so ill—equipped to discuss the impact of their products. but the games industry insists
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it hives responsibly. —— but the games industry insists it behaves responsibly. we want players to play safely, we want them to play in a balanced way. we provide technical settings, technical measures. we provide education, robust age ratings and guidance and information sources. the mps say e—sports, where games players compete in professional competitions, is a fast—growing business in the uk, but they call for the same duty of care to protect players as applies in other sports. rory cellan—jones, bbc news. with me now is the labour mp carolyn harris who chairs the all—party parliamentary group on gambling harm. thank you for coming along to talk to us. these loot boxes, the add—ons children can buy as they play a game, how big a problem are they in causing addiction in the first place? growing increasingly, day on day. for me, it's amazing that anybody would put real money into a
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virtual whatever it is that they are buying. it is farcical. but what it does is it normalises gambling summit brings children into a world where speculation on what you will get for your money, which is exactly what gambling is, is normalised. by the time they reach the age of being able to gamble legally, they see nothing wrong with continuing that and it turns into a really serious addiction and can cause huge problems. how is the video games industry engaging with you on this? is it engaging meaningfully? it's taken a long time to get the bookmakers to engage, so i think the gaming industry thinks it is not a gambling issue but that is the issue for us, that we need to get them to come in and engage with us and i am not on the committee so i never had the opportunity of speaking to them there but the committee which i chair, we will hopefully be getting other companies to talk to them about the consequences of these loot
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boxes. for me, we are seeking a mandatory levy and i believe that loot boxes should come under that. what do you mean by that? a mandatory levy? what we see in gambling is that the companies problems, they should continue to the —— contribute to the recovery and the process of making things better. so we could put money into the gambling clinics, money into recovery, these gaming companies need to understand the harm they are causing to very often young children who have been exposed to these loot boxes and it will damage them in later life, so they too should be included in the mandatory levy, so my argument would be that these sections of this area which cause most damage should pay more money, andi most damage should pay more money, and i think loot boxes are up there with online gambling. the dcms report says that around 25,00011 up
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to 16—year—olds are already categorised as problem gamblers, which is really shocking. what is your message to parents because they have a big role to play here. u nfortu nately, pa rents have a big role to play here. unfortunately, parents cannot be with their children 2a — seven and anybody who has teenagers like i have, they think the kids are safe in their bedroom playing on the computer but now we only realise the consequences of that, and not what we would like them to be doing. with a lot of these games it is compulsory that you have to add a debit or credit card when you join up. we now know why so kids are able to press a button and money gets taken away automatically. we need to look at that and see that whilst pa rents look at that and see that whilst parents should be more responsible, they are not always able to be in they are not always able to be in the same room when those transactions are happening. carolyn harris, thank you very much for your time. police are continuing to question a 22—year—old man following the death of baby boy
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who was pulled out of a river in greater manchester yesterday. the boy, believed to be almost 12 months old, was recovered from the water by firefighters who attended the scene but died later in hospital. our reporter, yunus mulla has this report. flowers have been left here and candles have been lit after what officers describe as an incredibly tragic incident in which an innocent baby boy has died. officers were called here along with emergency services after reports that a child was in the water. that baby boy, said to be around 12 months old, was taken to hospital in a critical condition but later died in hospital. now, we don't know for sure how that baby ended up in the water. detectives say they've launched a murder investigation. they are supporting the baby boy's family at this unimaginably difficult time. a 22—year—old man was arrested at the scene.
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he remains in police custody for questioning on suspicion of murder. the police say they are keen to hear from anyone who might have that vital piece of information that could help them with their investigation. in a moment the weather, but first let's here's victoria derbyshire with what she's got coming up in her programme at 10. coming up on this morning's programme — the lure of loot boxes, a form of gambling where children can buy virtual packs as part of a game without knowing the contents. mps want children to be banned from buying these we speak to a mum who's son spent three thousand pounds on gaming. and as new figures out today show the extent of how those fleeing domestic violence are at serious risk of homelessness we meet a mother and her son who've been forced to live in a single room for over two years. it is not really hygienic to have a party next to the stove or the
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kitchen cupboard or having to run downstairs to go in use the toilet. it's just difficult. join downstairs to go in use the toilet. it'sjust difficult. join us live at ten p m. —— 10am. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king. we have some rain today, but generally for the next few days thing become more settled and many of us will see warm sunshine going into the weekend. today though some rainfor into the weekend. today though some rain for northern ireland and through central and southern parts of scotla nd through central and southern parts of scotland which will edge its way further south into northern england and north wales and there could be sunny spells developing behind it and some sunny spells towards the south—east. quite gusty winds again today but perhaps not as strong as they were yesterday. temperatures, bit of a contrast, 15 to 18 and really quite humid for england and wales. through the night we will see the rain move southwards and a bit warm across southern areas with temperatures in double figures but
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temperatures in double figures but temperatures down...
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: the government says its already taken measures
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to address possible hold—ups at ports, disruption to supplies of fresh food and medicines, and the potentialfor an increase in public disorder, in the event of a no—deal brexit. over the course of the last six weeks, this government has taken considerable steps in order to ensure that if there is a no deal scenario, that we will leave in the safest a nd scenario, that we will leave in the safest and smoothest possible way. the number of people investigated for rape who go on to be convicted falls to its lowest level since records were first compiled, more than a decade ago. new figures reveal cancer survival rates in the uk remain below those of other high income countries. mps are calling for in—game spending to be regulated by gambling laws and so—called loot boxes banned entirely for children. and coming up, why the current spate of australia bushfires are expected to be hotter and more intense than ever before.
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time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. the most—read story on bbc news online is the growing calls for parliament to be recalled after the release of no—deal brexit papers. operation yellowhammer suggests there could be hold—ups at ports, disruption to supplies of fresh food and medicines, price rises and increased public disorder. the cabinet minister ben wallace, told radio 4's today programme that much of this morning's media reporting forgets that these are just working assumptions and that the government is planning to mitigate against worst case scenarios. the thing about yellowhammer, looks, it isa the thing about yellowhammer, looks, it is a planning assumption but the bit that needs to be added is, "and if the government didn't do anything about it", because, when we were going through the process of, what could happen if there was a no—deal brexit, and of course we don't want that, we are trying to get a deal, but if there is, what is the worst
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case or even normal scenarios, and then what do we do about it. every day, meetings in government, has beenin day, meetings in government, has been in months, four, ok, let's paint the worst case scenario, let's paint the worst case scenario, let's painta paint the worst case scenario, let's paint a normal scenario which we think is likely, and then do something about it. that is the bit that seems to be missing from some of the reporting that says, if we sit back and accept it. except, it does say, looking at the document, it does say," hmg, reasonable worst case planning assumptions. so, it is not saying if catastrophe strikes, this is a reasonable assumption to make" of what is going to happen. this is a reasonable assumption to make" of what is going to happenlj don't make" of what is going to happen.” don't disagree with that but it is the assumption that you paint the scenario, and then, if you didn't do anything about it. that is why we are doing things about it, the chancellor open the cheque—book, spending money on doing lots of things to mitigate those assumptions, you start with a document that says, paint me the
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worst case scenario, then let's do something about it. that is what we are doing. everyday we find everything from whether we will need to alternative suppliers, whether we need to go to the private sector to charter things, whether we need to plan using the army, the police forces, in certain scenarios. whether we search more people, i remember, in the home office, we have employed an extra 700 people in borderforce to ensure have employed an extra 700 people in border force to ensure borders get better controls. the most—watched video on bbc news online is a report on the australia bushfires, which are becoming more fierce. it's only the start of the fire season down under, but more than 140 bushfires are already raging across queensland and new south wales. experts say they expect the fires this season to be hotter and more intense and there's a reason behind the trend. this is crazy... this is my house, on the corner... and a massive fire.
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what we are seeing now is, fires starting in august, september, which is still effectively winter, here. they are hotter and more intense and more fast moving. and burning into areas that we would not expect them to. the edges of the rainforest as well. as we go into spring and summer, those conditions are going to be exacerbated by the increased temperatures, the drier atmospheres
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at those times, which will mean that at those times, which will mean that a lot of those areas, it will not ta ke a lot of those areas, it will not take much for a fire to start, and once it starts, it will be very difficult to control. another story widely covered across the bbc and social media is that the number of people investigated for rape who were later convicted of a sexual offence has dropped to its lowest level since records began more than a decade ago. official figures show there were fewer than 2,000 convictions across england and wales in the 12 months to the end of march a decline of more than a—quarter on the previous year. the absolute dramatic fall in the prosecution and conviction rate by the cps cannot be explained by other explanations they give on its own, it is such a huge drop, and what we have managed to document, is that the cps, who had introduced an approach called the merits based approach, specifically to guard
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against the influence of myths and stereotypes in decision—making, they have specifically deleted reference to it in all their training material, from their website, and have instructed prosecutors not to make reference to it. why would they do that? they have called it something else, they say. they have always had a code for crown prosecutors, but under... when the rate of prosecution started going up, this followed, what followed was a period in which the cps deliberately introduced a merits —based approach and introduced additional guidance and training for prosecutors. now, that has been removed. they say they are getting fewer referrals from the police. and the reason, we believe, they are getting fewer referrals, and we believe this from evidence we are hearing from women, and from all the rape crisis organisations working with women, and also from speaking to some police officers, is that
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they are now referring less cases to they are now referring less cases to the cps because they know that they are taking a harsher approach. in your case, the police did refer it, and that is when a decision was made not to proceed with the case. i want to ask you about another issue which is really important to you, you wa nted is really important to you, you wanted to speak to a counsellor or therapist about what happened to you, as the police were investigating. what advice were you given? i was told, investigating. what advice were you given? iwas told, and investigating. what advice were you given? i was told, and this is from the rape crisis centres, that i was not allowed counselling, i was only allowed pre—trial therapy, pre—trial therapy is described as limited counselling. you are not actually allowed to talk about what you say happen to you? you are not allowed to include anything in your police notes, which is what happened to me, because the therapist can be seen to because the therapist can be seen to be coaching you are guiding you if
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it does then later go to court. the reason why the rape crisis centres are telling us this information, is because it is in the cps guidance notes that you are not allowed it, only allowed pre—trial therapy. notes that you are not allowed it, only allowed pre-trial therapy. what effect does only having, as you put it, only having pre—trial therapy have on someone like yourself, as opposed to counselling as we would know it. i mean, i was opposed to counselling as we would know it. i mean, iwas going opposed to counselling as we would know it. i mean, i was going to therapy about a trauma that happened to me and i was not allowed to speak about the trauma, it is really confusing, because, legally, they could not stop me, but, when you are surrounded by these professionals and you are in that situation, you will not question them and fight them on it to talk about that. you can see more of those interviews on the victoria derbyshire programme, coming up at10am. us first lady, melania trump, was trending on twitter after the president said "she's got a son", before quickly interjecting
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that they had their son "together". it was all in the context of vaping and a potential ban on flavoured vaping products. it comes as a sixth person was reported to have died of serious lung disease related to vaping in america. president trump said the first lady has become concerned over the impact of vaping on young people. we have a problem in our country, it isa we have a problem in our country, it is a new problem, it is a problem nobody really thought about too much a few years ago, it is called vaping. especially vaping as it pertains to innocent children. we can't allow people to get sick and we can't have our youth be so affected. and i am hearing it, that is how the first lady involved, she has got a son, together,, a beautiful young man, and she feels very, very strongly about it. we have seen it, we are both reading it, a lot of people reading it. people are dying who are vaping and so we are looking at it very
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closely. a lot of coverage of that on twitter, this is what you are reading and watching on the bbc news app, number one, politics, the recall of parliament, being urged, after the no—deal brexit papers are released, operation yellowhammer, which we have been telling you about. australian bushfire story now at number two on the most watched, and at number one, a report from quentin somerville, middle east correspondent, who is visiting a hospital in a secret location in idlib, in syria, and, iam hospital in a secret location in idlib, in syria, and, i am seeing the pictures... yes, the pictures are of their... basically, he is reporting about air strikes, targeting hospitals in the rebel held province, in contravention of international law, and we will have that report for you after the sports bulletin. that is it for today's morning briefing. let's head straight to sport, let's get a full round—up.
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fifth and final ashes test. england captainjoe root is already looking to the future, he says they need to start building now, for the next ashes. the urn is on its way to australia, with england nowjust hoping for the win that would level the series. sam curran and chris woakes come into the side, with jason roy and craig overton dropped. and whatever the result, captainjoe root insists that after winning the world cup, this should be seen as a successful summer for england. to win the first 50 over world cup isa to win the first 50 over world cup is a huge achievement for english cricket, so, absolutely, it should be seen as a successful year. we have a chance to level the series and make it slightly better than it looks right now. that is the full focus of the group. we have got to make sure we win this game.
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australia lead the five match series 2—1, so a win would see them win the ashes outright. and that, they say, is their number one goal. we came here to win the ashes, not just retain them. we have spoken about it a lot as a group, last week's result was brilliant, we played very well, but all the guys are fully aware that this test match is bigger than that one, this is the grand final, we want this testjust as much as we want any other test we are fighting in this series. and of course you can follow the action on test match special, on 5 live sports extra from 10.25. there's a great picture of jason roy on the back of the times this morning. they've captured him in the midst of what looks like a teenage strop. the guardian shows captainjoe root in training, with the headline "fully focused". and the express is one of the papers reporting discussions in the england squad about walking off the pitch if they receive any racial abuse, "no more" the headline there.
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andy murray has signed up to play three tournaments in three weeks in china. he's accepted a wildcard for the shanghai masters, which starts on the 5th of october, having already agreed to play in zuhai and beijing in the preceding two weeks. murray returned to singles action last month but he's yet to win a match on the main tour. maisie summers—newton thanked her family for their support, after winning herfirst world pa ra—swimming title. she smashed her own world record to take gold in the 200m individual medley, at the championships in london, adding to the two european titles she won last year. that was one of three golds for great britain on the third day of competition. by this time tomorrow, the solheim cup will be underway at gleneagles. it's one of the biggest events on the women's golf calendar. the opening foursomes go off at 10 past 8, as europe take on the usa in a ryder—cup style format. they're hoping to win the trophy for the first time in six years.
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the unity we have in the team is something that is really good, eve ryo ne something that is really good, everyone is really supportive of each other, which is really the best kind of situation you can be in, in terms of team golf. everyone is getting along really well. the team room has plenty of banter, everyone is having a great time. golf correspondent ian carter will be presenting a preview of the solheim cup on radio five live tonight, 8:30pm. —— iain carter. rory mcilroy has been named the golfer of the year by the american pga tour, beating world no1 brooks koepka to the award. mcilroy‘s fellow—professionals voted for him, despite the fact that he failed to challenge
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for a major this season. he said it spoke volumes about what pga tour players feel is important. women's super league champions arsenal are in champions league action tonight, against fiorentina, with manchester city facing swiss side lugano. but last night, hibernian were comfortably beaten by slavia prague in the first leg. hibs had actually gone ahead early on but they eventually lost 4—1. glasgow city beat chertanovo 1—0. former manchester city captain vincent kompany was back at the etihad last night, as a city legends side took on a team of premier league all—stars with the proceeds going to kompany‘s homeless charity. it ended in a 2—2 draw, kompany is injured, so he wasn't playing — but there were many more former stars in action. delighted to be asked, really, so many players turned up, that shows how highly regarded he is. players from all, a lot of manchester united players playing, so competitive. great turnout, thoroughly deserved, and a lot of money will be raised.
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following football can be a frustrating affair, and fans of fort william fc have endured the worst of times. but, after 29 months, that's 882 days, without a win in the highland league, they beat clachnacuddin 1—0 last night. you can imagine the roar that greeted jack brown's goal. there was a documentary on bbc scotland last month, calling them "britain's worst football team", but they won a cup game shortly afterwards, and now this league game, so they're definintely on the up. that's all the sport for now. if you don't succeed, try, try again. and it works! let's recap the headlines for you. the government says its already
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taken measures to address possible hold—ups at ports, disruption to supplies of fresh food and medicines, and the potentialfor an increase in public disorder in the event of a no—deal brexit. the number of people investigated for rape, who go on to be convicted, falls to its lowest level since records were first compiled more than a decade ago. new figures reveal cancer survival rates in the uk remain below those of other high income countries. now to the story that is the most read on the bbc news app, currently. the un says us airstrikes in syria have killed a number of civilians because required precautions were ignored. it also blames the syrian government and allied russian warplanes of conducting a deadly campaign that appears to target medical facilities. our correspondent quentin sommerville has more on how people in and around idlib are coping in this conflict.
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this is a war that is against everything that matters to the people of idlib, schools, hospitals, all attacks, this hospital, lasted two weeks ago. there is destruction, but also, just look around. this is the only building that was targeted here. targeting civilians is a war crime, but it is also very effective. because here, now, for miles around, there is no one, they have all fled. the strikes have been precise... deadly, and relentless. this hospital is at a secret location, they have had to dig down, deep into they have had to dig down, deep into the solid wood. —— solid ground. since april, a0 hospitals have been
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targeted, that is a war crime, but this is not just targeted, that is a war crime, but this is notjust a warfrom targeted, that is a war crime, but this is notjust a war from the air, it is from the ground. troops getting closer here. if they advance another few kilometres, then this hospital will be lost too. we dug down here —— they dug down here two yea rs down here —— they dug down here two years ago, despite the advance of the regime, this hospital is still operating. the rest in the —— the last in the area. they will keep treating the war wounded and the sick until they are in range of government shelves. why have you had to build this hospital underground. translation: it is because of repeated russian and syrian air strikes. they have repeatedly targeted us, and life around us in general. they have targeted schools and clinics. we could not treat
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people out in the open anymore. they we re people out in the open anymore. they were not secure, and our patients we re were not secure, and our patients were not secure, and our patients were not so. this is a charity hospital, they are doing an incredible job hospital, they are doing an incrediblejob here, both a hospital, they are doing an incredible job here, both a field hospital and a general hospital, and it sees up to 1000 patients every single day, and it does that with only 12 doctors. the attacks on hospitals all across it live mean that places like this are under more pressure than ever before. and it comes at a time when this war is over eight years old, and the international community is losing interest. in idlib's most desperate hour of need, its people are being left wanting. the prime minister of the bahamas has called hurricane dorian "an historic tragedy", saying no words are sufficient to describe it.
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during a televised national address, hubert minnis spoke of the grief his country was going through. ten days after the hurricane, officials say 2,500 people people have been registered as missing. gareth barlow reports. hurricane goring devastated these islands, thousands are still missing, day by day, rescue teams work to find those killed and the government works to ascertain the true government works to ascertain the tru e exte nt government works to ascertain the true extent of the disaster. mankind was no match for the power of mother nature, now, this community is counting the cost. we recognise the depth of the devastation, we will not speculate on numbers. we understand people are disturbed and so are we. around 5000 people have been evacuated from the hardest—hit people have been evacuated from the ha rdest—hit island groups. people have been evacuated from the hardest—hit island groups. thousands are still in urgent need of help, in an address to the nation, the prime minister of the bahamas, detailed the destruction in the worst hit
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areas. much of the islands as we knew it is decimated, and no longer exists. floodwaters in the streets made them appear like the ocean. concrete structures were turned to dust. as if a massive bomb had exploded with atomic force. while international teams have rushed to help the bahamas, the trump administration has said it will not allow people from the islands currently living in the us to live and work there until it is safe for them to return. first, there is still the unanswered question of how many people died, and will never come home. being in a loving relationship is something that enriches many people's lives, for those with learning disabilities, finding that special someone can be challenging. earlier this year, care providers were given guidance on how to best
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support them to find love. now there are calls for this to become mandatory, as jayne mccubbin reports. he was joanne's first love. this is lee. he's handsome. yeah. he loved running. they ran 10k is together, but being together was never easy as lee stayed in a supported living care home with rules and a curfew. if i went around the house and visit, i wasn't allowed to stay. you were never allowed to stay overnight? no. this photo was taken at a family wedding, the first and only night they spent together. this was taken two days later, the last 10 k they ran together. the next day, please rang joanne to say her fiance had died suddenly in his sleep. so the police knew to tell you he passed away? he passed away.
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but as his fiancee, you were never allowed to stay with him. no. that must break your heart looking back at the time you missed. i know. it does. it's wrong. because you're entitled to a relationship. but there are so many barriers to relationships for people with learning disabilities. this date night is all about trying to smash through them. i shouldn't have said that, but he's the best boyfriend i got in the world. andrew and eileen have found what everyone here wants, love. joe is still looking. how is it going? amazing. i'm loving it. butjoe's search is more difficult now that his support hours with gareth have been cut. i used to get 2a, but now only seven. only seven hours a week? oh, my goodness. that is a big drop. i do miss all my friends. because you can't see them? that is right. emma says she would love to find her prince, but she has been hurt before.
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some people are... some people let me down. it's difficult to find someone to trust. yeah. this is the fine line support workers must tread. many are risk averse because the risks can be great. it is a tricky situation, yeah. you've had training? yeah! the laugh speaks volumes. really good training does exist in lancashire. you feel sad and frightened with your partner, do you think that is good or bad? this summer, the cqc issued the first—ever guidance for staff, but training isn't mandatory. a £1 million boost to social care was recently welcomed but councils say it isn't enough. i couldn't live without him. and the cost, i am told, is the opposite of what andrew and eileen have, barren lives lived without love and without hope. to have a relationship, you aren't lonely anymore,
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and that's what kills people. being lonely. so having a good relationship is important. it's everything. it's everything, yeah! a little glitch with the weather at 9:30am, but now, we are back, hopefully, the unabridged version... we could hear you, but the picture froze, so hopefully, that will not happen this time! not quite cold enough yet for me to be frozen...! we have some tropical warmth on the way, all courtesy of an ex tropical storm, gabrielle, just the remnants, moving in the united kingdom, putting it on the weather fronts, we should say, that is the ex tropical storm, we have a south—westerly wind
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here, bringing in warm and humid conditions, particularly for england and wales, bringing some rain in, through much of scotland, it is going to sink south, while there is patchy rain across my mac about wales and northern england, brighter skies coming through in the north—west. some sunshine in the south—west of income, gusty wind wherever you are today, perhaps 30, as mph, but, warm and humid for england and wales, 20 to 24 45 mph, but, warm and humid for england and wales, 20 to 24 degrees, not for scotland and northern ireland, here, a bit fresher, is, 16 celsius. through tonight, the band of cloud and rain will move to the south, four northern parts, temperatures will be dropping into single figures, but further south, still holding on to some of the warmth and humidity, temperature is in double figures, but that will clear, as fresh air extends to all parts, a week weather system moving its way into scotland, for most, it is high pressured dominating things,
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lots of sunshine expected on friday, there will be a bit of cloud and some showers, weather front across the north of scotland. elsewhere, sunshine, feeling fresher compared to today. 16 to 21 degrees. into the weekend, sticking there or thereabouts, in the north, the isobars are close together, bringing outbreaks of rain. for most of the weekend, plenty of sunshine, warm as well, particularly by sunday, but, i mentioned the rain, mainly affecting the far north—west of scotland, perhaps that can edge into northern ireland, elsewhere, blue skies, lots of sunshine, temperatures 20,20 ireland, elsewhere, blue skies, lots of sunshine, temperatures 20, 20 two celsius, just nudging up a touch, and those temperatures will be even higher by sunday, a bit more cloud around, dry for most of us, cloud towards northern parts, and temperatures, 15, 16 degrees in the
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north, but further south, as i mentioned, temperatures will be getting up into the 205. so, tropical warmth through today, little bit of rain around, overall, looking very promising, with dry and sunny weather.
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are hello, it's thurday 12th september, it's 10 o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire. why are reports of rape going up while the number of people investigated has not only gone down, but has fallen to its lowest level since figures started being recorded, more than a decade ago. my mental health really suffered, it suffered throughout the entire police case. it was devastating that i have gone through all of that and thenit i have gone through all of that and then it has been dropped. we will hear from the director of public prosecutions. of a no deal brexit — that's what's included
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in yellowhammer which were they were forced to

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