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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 16, 2019 6:00am-8:32am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: it is six o'clock. it is monday morning. face to face talks: the prime minister meets european commission president later, and is set to reject any offer to delay brexit. boris johnson is set to reject any offer to delay brexit when he meets the european commission president for the first time as prime minister. calls for universities to be legally responsible for their students' mental health needs.
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good morning. what is the recipe for economic success? good morning. what is the recipe for economic success? food & drink is one of the biggest exports from the uk. but brexit uncertainty is taking its toll. i'm at a malt loaf maker in manchester to find out how manufacturing is faring. after three days of intense competition at gleneagles it all comes down to this — the final hole — and europe beat the usa to win back the solheim cup. and england beat australia in the final ashes test to draw the series and round off a remarkable summer of cricket. plus, i'm in holland park in west london, bringing you the latest on the weather. a cloudy, damp, start for england and wales. they will have the details on that and the rest of the week on breakfast. it's monday september the 16th. our top story. borisjohnson will hold his first face—to—face talks with the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, later this morning. the prime minister says he's "cautiously optimistic" ahead of the talks, but has made clear that he'll reject any offer to delay
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brexit further. the bbc‘s adam fleming is in luxemburg where the meeting will take place. good morning, adam. are we, i'm sure we have asked a few times, going to see some sort of britza breakthrough this week? i don't think we are going to see a brexit rate through today when boris johnson and jean—claude juncker have lunch today, when they will have snails and salmon and cheese —— brexit break through. we kind of know what borisjohnson is thinking when he goes into this meeting because he has written a column in the daily telegraph what he says he passionately believes there is the possibility of a revised brexit deal. he says if there is a break through in the next few days, a very short period of time, then he is prepared to go to the next summit of eu leaders in brussels on the 17th of october and finalise that agreement. if there is not going to
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bea agreement. if there is not going to be a new deal, though, he says he would reject any offer of an extension to the brexit process offered by the eu at that summit. although you talk to the eu side and they're not as optimistic the prime minister is. doctorjunker did an interview with german radio yesterday where he warned that time is running out and he wasn't sure there are any alternatives to the irish border bit of the current brexit deal —— jean—claude juncker. he is not as optimistic as boris johnson. plenty more from luxembourg throughout the programme. and we'll be speaking to the foreign secretary, dominic raab, about those talks just after eight o'clock. the former labour mp chuka umunna is expected to launch a savage attack onjeremy corbyn today in his first speech as the liberal democrats foreign affairs spokesman. mr umunna, who joined the lib dems injune, will criticise mr corbyn's handling of anti—semitism in the party, and call him an "apologist" for russia. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us from bournemouth where the conference is
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taking place. i cannot spick this morning. good morning to you. we do live in extraordinary times with so many people swapping parties stop what about the speech, will it be explosive? i think it will be an attempt to fire up the liberal democrats and by chuka umunna a recently came on board, as a former labourmp, to say recently came on board, as a former labour mp, to say to the liberal democratic party membership am one of you. because while it is great for the lib dems to be welcoming mps from various different parties coming on board to them at this time, as you say, of change at westminster, there are some awkward questions for them about the policies they have held with their previous parties in the past and whether they are the right fit for the liberal democrats. so i think it will be an attempt to reassure lib dems here that he is one of them, he will have some harsh words for jeremy corbyn, describing him as an apologist for a hard right russian government, and also the boris johnson, calling him a peddler of
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hate. we will talk about a new fault line in british politics with the liberal democrats' job to be that the heartbeat of the uk is liberal and internationalist, not nationalists and populace. that will go down very well in the hole. i'm sure there will be one or two sceptical members looking on to see whether chuka umunna is really a liberal democrat at heart. but, generally speaking, the lib dems are in good spirits at their party conference here in bournemouth. some size of their staunch anti—brexit m essa 9 es size of their staunch anti—brexit messages cutting through. yesterday decision to take that stance one step further and revoke article 50 if they were to win a majority government as a general election. 0k, government as a general election. ok, jonathan, thank you very much. we will be back with you later. universities should be legally responsible for students' mental health needs, according to a former health minister. sir norman lamb says lives are being put at risk because some universities are not keeping track of waiting lists for counselling. his comments come as an inquest opens into the death of ceara thacker, a student at liverpool university who took her own life last year. our education editor
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branwenjeffreys has more. ceara thacker was just 19 when she took her life. her death another tragedy raising questions about support for students. the inquest will hear about her attempts to get help. more students want support for mental health problems. new data suggests it could depend on where you study. iio universities responded with information to a campaigning mp. only 26 knew the average or longest waiting times for counselling. in some universities, cambridge would be a good example, students will find a university that is really focusing on the data, analysing the scale of the problem, making sure they have a real handle on it, whereas in other places they don't even know how much they are spending. they are not maintaining and monitoring data, not collecting the data, and in that way i think students' experience is
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completely different across the country. universities say they already plan a voluntary mental health charter and need the nhs to provide more effective care for students. liverpool university said it was deeply saddened by ceara's death, and is working with the health service on changes. branwen jeffreys, bra nwen jeffreys, bbc branwen jeffreys, bbc news. oil prices have jumped to a four—month high after drone strikes on two refineries in saudi arabia. the strikes knocked out 5% of the world's oil supply, but officials say they hope a third of the losses can be reversed today. houthi rebels have claimed responsibility for the attacks, in revenge for saudi involvement in the civil war in yemen, but the usa has claimed that iran is to blame. iran denies any involvement. a convicted murderer is fronting an information campaign to dissuade teenagers from carrying knives
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saddam essak—hill was 15 when he stabbed a man to death in birmingham five years ago. he's currently serving a life sentence and tells his story in a film produced by west midlands police to be shown in schools. ijust went i just went out there feeling that are needed to protect myself. and, obviously, one thing leads to another. and you never, ever think you are going to kill someone. when you are going to kill someone. when you actually think about it, you don't need that night. a lot of the time used to think i was protecting myself. —— knife. too many uk workers are missing out on basic employment rights such as the minimum wage and paid holidays, according to a report published today. the resolution foundation, which does research into low—income jobs, found that about one in ten workers does not even get a payslip. here's katie prescott. there are certain things we take for granted about working, the minimum wage, payslips, and, of course, holidays. they are part of the contract holidays. they are part of the co ntra ct we holidays. they are part of the contract we make with our employer. not getting them is against
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the law. the resolution foundation has found it is not as straightforward as that. one in ten people aren't getting a payslip stop one in 20 aren't receiving paid holiday. and 400,000 aren't being paid the minimum wage. and it's hotels and restau ra nts minimum wage. and it's hotels and restaurants that are the worst offenders, followed by childcare and security work. the government has spent money to clamp down on the issue, but it's difficult to tackle, often hidden in plain sight. and it's the vulnerable that's uppermost. katie prescott, bbc news. the guardian newspaper has been criticised for claiming that david cameron felt only "privileged pain" following the death of his six—year—old son, ivan. an editorial leader column, which has since been changed, questioned whether the former prime minister could fully understand the impact of his policies on nhs care, because ivan had been treated in a part of the system that was well funded. a 97—year—old second world war veteran has taken to the skies
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in a spitfire to mark battle of britain day. george dunn was inspired tojoin bomber command after watching dogfights between raf and luftwaffe planes from the ground as a teenager. his spitfire flight commemorates 79 years since a huge aerial battle over london and south—east england, which the raf won. it is ten past six. very good morning. you watching bbc breakfast. what a weekend of golf, sally! what a weekend of sport. she is into golf how. a weekend of sport. she is into golf now. i think you have dressed psych i ca lly now. i think you have dressed psychically with european team. now. i think you have dressed psychically with european teamlj was said last night in i thought a love that colour so i'd probably have. you are dramatic. it could have. you are dramatic. it could have come down to the final thing. patterson, who had taken time out of golf to have her baby, was a little bit rusty at the start, the first two days. one of the newspapers called her performance had rescued.
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they like that. gleneagles witnessed one of the most dramatic final days in solheim cup history, as europe beat the usa by 14.5 points to 13.5. it all came down to this putt, in the final match on the 18th green — wildcard pick suzann pettersen making it to win the trophy for europe, for the first time in six years. england's cricketers finished off their memorable summer in style, beating australia by 135 runs in the final ashes test. they already knew they couldn't win back the famous urn, but victory at the oval gave them a 2—2 draw in the series. in the premier league, despite two goals from pierre emerick aubamayang, arsenal could only manage a draw at viccarage road as watford fought back from two goals down. and great britain won four golds on the final night of action at the para—swimming world championships in london,
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alice tai taking her tally to seven. i love watching the golf. i am a big fan of the bobble hat as well. i love watching the golf. i am a big fan of the bobble hat as weltm was great. we will talk about it later. we are going to talk about it all morning. they have a special piece to show you at half past six. have we managed to wake one of the team members up? i am not promising that. fingers crossed. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. a brexit deal is within our grasp, according to the daily express. it leads on today's meeting between the prime minister, and european commission president jean—claude juncker in luxembourg. the paper also says we could be in for a two—week heatwave. the guardian has a different take on the upcoming talks. it claims that eu officials are ‘dismayed' at mrjohnson's comments — reported yesterday — that britain will break out of the ‘manacles' of the eu like the incredible hulk if a deal isn't struck. away from brexit, and the times leads on the escalating tensions between the us and iran, as iran says it is it is prepared
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for "fully—fledged war" after being accused by the us of attacking two oil facilities in saudi arabia. and finally, the mirror leads on the news that the singer rod stewart has been receiving treatment for cancer over the last three years — but he is now free of the disease. i was at iwas ata i was at a charity do where he was singing on saturday night. and he was amazing. i'd bet he was amazing. he was really, really good. ronnie wood was on guitar, kennyjones on drums. it was like some sort of... like a super bad? a supergroup. they have. —— super band. do either of you to watch picky blinders?” have. —— super band. do either of you to watch picky blinders? i am always behind on these things. you haven't seen it at all? i have seen
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it and they understand why. but they don't have time. you need to invest. they have done line of duty. don't have time. you need to invest. they have done line of dutylj don't have time. you need to invest. they have done line of duty. i got you into that. i have started to watch manifest. how he has time in his life i just watch manifest. how he has time in his life ijust don't know. i'd just slip attendant during travel times. not while i'm driving, by the way! on the train. what have you got for us on the train. what have you got for usi on the train. what have you got for us i don't love the story, but it is an extraordinary story about the blue that got stolen from blenheim palace. i million quid. blue that got stolen from blenheim palace. 1 million quid. they are now saying £4.8 million. no! i thought it was a mere million. 18 carat. they said it could have been melted down within 48 hours to be made into liquid gold. can ijust say something? go on. is this true? do you think it is actually not true.
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it is not april. what is the point ofa it is not april. what is the point of a toilet you never use? it is not april. what is the point of a toilet you never use ?|j it is not april. what is the point of a toilet you never use? i don't know. the one in liverpool. the tiled toilets. the philharmonic. the king of spain has a personal toilet... at the bone about. is this not like a thing like the banksy thing where it got shredded. the police have been involved in everything. a 66—year—old man arrested. he is in custody. it wasn't a joke then. she has a story. what have you got for usjonny wilkinson has been talking ahead of the rugby world cup. your member when he retired he said he found solace in buddhism and how he struggled with his mental health was making was really open about it. now
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he says he has discovered, having studied buddhism for several years, he founded, where is it, he found it a little too fluffy. he said they wanted to know howl a little too fluffy. he said they wanted to know how i got from there to here, a little fluffy cloud. so how to here, a little fluffy cloud. so now he has turned to quantum physics. is studying quantum physics. is studying quantum physics. he says they don't want to call it studying because they enjoy too much. i'm just learning. call it studying because they enjoy too much. i'mjust learning. how amazing. he is keeping his brain busy. i have to redo this story. i have to redo this storylj i have to redo this story. i love this story. a group of tourists spent hours looking for a missing woman near a canyon in iceland only to found her —— only to find her in the search party. the group were travelling through iceland in a tour bus and stopped near a volcanic canyon. soon there was word of a missing passenger. the woman who had
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changed her clothes didn't recognise the description of herself and joined in the search. but the search was called off at about 3am when it became clear that the missing woman was in fact accounted for and searching for herself. (laughs) as a tour guide, don't you count? online, number of people have said, "that is what my mum would do. imagine if you just suddenly had the dawning realisation, oh, its me... have you ever searched for yourself? do tell us. ever searched for yourself? do tell us. day. this is a bit of a gruesome picture. on the weekend, he got more ofa picture. on the weekend, he got more of a battering than he was expecting. his dad has actually said it shouldn't have gone
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all the way to the very end. he is worried about him and wants him to sack his entire coaching team. he was partially blinded during the fight which went the distance. he was slightly underestimating his opponent and even when he took a battering. otto wallin. usa you are going to have chat with matt. -- you were saying. is there going to be a heatwave? iam in i am in holland iam in holland park. 55 i am in holland park. 55 acres of glorious parkland. it isjust gardens, really. things will get
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warmer. there is a sign that temperatures will build again but probably around the levels we have seenin probably around the levels we have seen in the weekend just gone. 25—26 like we had in parts of the south—east. yesterday we got to 27 in south—east england so it is almost a repeat of what we have just seen. today and through the working week, things will be a bit cooler. let's look at the details for today. a bit ofa let's look at the details for today. a bit of a mixture north to south. a lot more cloud in the south. it is here that we will see rain or drizzle at times. it is quite a mild start. averages around 16 or 17 degrees. bringing the cooler air southwards is that weather front. you can see it is just working its way south. that means for much of wales, central, southern england and east anglia, it is aced — make a good start. it
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will generally cloud over. writer north but it will bring in showers to the north of scotland and a bit of a stiff breeze. the winds not as strong they were. temperatures low— mid teens for many. still getting into the low 20s in southern parts of england and it will stay grey through much of the day. overnight, that thicker cloud and rain and drizzle will be confined to the likes of cornwall and the channel islands. most parts will remain clear and a fresh start to tuesday morning. temperatures widely down to single figures. might even widely down to single figures. might eve n wa ke widely down to single figures. might even wake up to a touch of frost on the cars as we start to the gay but it will be isolated — make as we start the day. ——as we start the ta bletop start the day. ——as we start the tabletop temperatures pushing low
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20s across the south which will feel pleasant. by the time we get to wednesday, more cloud across scotland. outbreaks of rain more widely. bit more cloud for northern ireland, northern england but must — make much will stay dry. ——. maybe not feeling quite as cool further north. staying dry for many into the weekend. temperatures back more widely into the 20s i saturday. there will be a bit of breeze with it. thank you very much. if you've ever complained that sorting out your rubbish from your recyclable waste is a bit of a chore, spare a thought for the 24 million residents of shanghai. authorities in the chinese city have just introduced a set of complex rulesfor household rubbish to make it easier to burn. the bbc‘s china correspondent
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robin brant. lunchis lunch is done at this house but now comes the sort. there is an array of leftovers on the table. we have plastic. not the shells? it is too big, too hard. these all need to get into the new categories from what gets thrown out from 24 million people. do you think china has a big enough problem with what goes into its air, that burning rubbish is not the answer? that is why we classify. if we put all together, burning, we will have pollution to the air. shanghai problems might problem is particularly acute. a local communist party official told to us about a garbage seizure. for years,
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the bin men would take everything away and sorting was mostly done by scavengers. most of it was then buried. but in the world's most populous nation, that is changing. because of this. on the very edge of shanghai, a man—made mountain of rubbish, potentially poisoning the land and water underneath. shanghai's big push to get people to sort their rubbish at home is aimed at achieving a couple of things. getting them to think a lot more about consuming less and getting them as well to think about throwing out fewer things that cannot be recycled. but there is one thing that china wants to use a lot more of and it is this. this is the biggest incinerator of rubbish in the world. the energy centre generate electricity by burning rubbish. 3 million tons of it a year. it
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it is the future for china, so says the government, but there has long been concerned about poisonous emissions. and on that plan to burn more, well, he does not think it is the answer. time is not something people living near the world's biggest incinerator have. a few miles away, a group of local men approached local men have. a few miles away, a group of local men approached us. they claim that cancer rates here are higher. the astounding thing was, they were on duty policeman. the fact they we re on duty policeman. the fact they were willing to talk to us shows how potent still china's battle against pollution is.
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interesting scheme going on in shanghai at the moment. coming up on breakfast this morning: ben's at a malt loaf factory to see how businesses are coping with the uncertainty over brexit. you would love it. it smells amazing. there was a production line going crazy so we had it everywhere. we arejust going crazy so we had it everywhere. we are just around the corner in manchester this morning because we we re manchester this morning because we were talking about food and drink exports. they have taken a hit because of the uncertainty related to brexit so firms like this are trying to work out where they still have a strong market and the fall in the pound has affected them. talking to tony, the
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operations manager. it looks impressive here, busy. how many do you make? we often bake around 600,000 a day. about 3 million loaves a week. in a year, probably about 350 million. and this place has been going quite a while. afamily affair? place has been going quite a while. a family affair? that is correct. my s011 a family affair? that is correct. my son is an apprentice engineer. and yourjobis son is an apprentice engineer. and yourjob is keeping this thing going to stop this line has to be running 24 hours a day. that is right, six days a week, six nights. and this place, to reports due out later today. one from the british chamber of commerce saying they are downgrading their forecasts for the year and next year and that is because about the concern about brexit and the uncertainty that goes with it. but
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also the organisation that represents manufacturers and they are really worried about the investment in the industry because all of this machinery, all of these pla nts all of this machinery, all of these plants around the country, really important for jobs and economic growth. they say with the uncertainty surrounding brexit and other concerns, it means that investment has been falling. what we would do over the course of this morning, meet some of the guys and getan morning, meet some of the guys and get an expert view on what it means for the wider economy. let's get the news, travel and weather wherever you are waking up this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. there are "no guarantees" that crossrail will be finished by march 2021 — that's according to transport bosses. the new railway had been due to open in december last year. the ongoing delays are having a big impact on people and businesses up and down the line. some firms
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say they may not survive. i am 22 —— catch—22. the rates are high because we have crossrail as an amenity. if it doesn't open by late 2020 or early 2021, my business is absolutely at risk. and you can see more on that story on inside out tonight on bbc one tonight at 7.30pm. or you can catch up on iplayer. three london hospital trusts are amongst the worst for errors so serious they should never have happened. so called ‘never events' include doctors operating on the wrong body parts, or leaving surgical tools inside patients. barts health nhs trust topped the table with 17 between april 2018 and july this year. the guy's and st thomas' and university college london trusts camejoint third. an nhs spokeperson said these events
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are extremely rare but more is being done to minimise human error. croydon's arts venue, farifield halls, re—opens today after a 30 million pound renovation. the building has hosted world class musicians and orchestras since the ‘60s. it's been closed since 2016 for the work. dame judi dench will formally open the theatre later. it's the first building to form part of a new cultural quarter in croydon. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads the piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town from piccadilly to knightsbridge for gas repairs. finally in lewisham: one lane is closed for gas works westbound on lee high road at thejunction with belmont hill. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it is a rather cloudy but mild start today. it is however going to feel cooler than yesterday and remain rather
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cloudy and rather damp. yesterday, 26.9dc in central london. today, not soda. —— not so. there is drizzle throughout the day s0 there is drizzle throughout the day so staying down and averages just about managing 20 celsius in central london. overnight tonight, that will continue to sink south, the cloud will break up and under clear skies, you might get a bit of mistiness in the light winds. minimum temperature not quite as mild as last night. from tomorrow onwards, plenty of fine, settled weather and lots of sunshine. temperatures warming up nicely as well as high—pressure continued to dominate was not as we headed through the next few days, temperatures in the low 20s by the end of the weekend. in the sunshine, we are looking at temperatures in the mid— 20s. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to dan and lou. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. please do not switch off your mobile. we'll hear why one classical orchestra is encouraging audience members to read their phones during the performance. # nobody else here, nobody but me. from brass in pocket to proms in the park, the singer—songwriter chrissie hynde will be on the sofa for a chat about her lengthy career and her latest jazz—inspired album. i like my pals, the guys on the force, they're not very social, they're married, of course. and it's curtains forjason manford — but in a good way. that's the title of the brand new musical he's starring in, along with the actor carley stenson and our former breakfast colleague ore oduba. they'll be giving us a peek
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behind the scenes later. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. borisjohnson will hold his first face—to—face talks with the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, later this morning. the prime minister says he's "cautiously optimistic" ahead of the talks, but has made clear that he'll reject any offer to delay brexit further. it comes after the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier called for "concrete proposals from downing street" to break the impasse. the former labour mp chuka umunna is expected to launch a savage attack onjeremy corbyn today — in his first speech as the liberal—democrats foreign affairs spokesman. mr umunna, who joined the lib—dems in june, will criticise mr corbyn's handling of anti—semitism in the party, and call him an "apologist" for russia. labour has said it's taking "decisive and robust action against anti—semitism". oil prices have jumped to a four—month high after drone
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strikes on two refineries in saudi arabia. the strikes knocked out five percent of the world's oil supply, but officials say they hope a third of the losses can be reversed today. houthi rebels have claimed responsibility for the attacks, in revenge for saudi involvement in the civil war in yemen, but the usa has claimed that iran is to blame. iran denies any involvement. universities should be legally responsible for students' mental health needs, according to a former health minister. sir norman lamb says lives are being put at risk because some universities are not keeping track of waiting lists for counselling. his comments come as an inquest opens into the death of ceara thacker, a student at liverpool university who took her own life last year. the university says it was deeply saddened by ceara's death and is working with the health services on changes. a convicted murderer is fronting an information campaign to dissuade teenagers from carrying knives saddam essak—hill was 15 when he stabbed a man
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to death in birmingham five years ago. he's currently serving a life sentence — and tells his story in a film produced by west midlands police to be shown in schools. i just went out there feeling that are needed to protect myself. and, obviously, one thing leads to another. and you never ever think you are going to kill someone. when you actually think about it, you don't need that knife. a lot of the time i used to think i was protecting myself. too many uk workers are missing out on basic employment rights such as the minimum wage and paid holidays, according to a report published today. a report by the think tank the resolution foundation, which does research into low—income jobs, claims workers in hotels and restaurants miss out more than others on legal workplace entitlements. the government says it's committed to tackling firms that break the rules. the guardian newspaper has been criticised for claiming that david cameron felt only "privileged pain" following the death of his six—year—old son, ivan.
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an editorial leader column, which has since been changed, questioned whether the former prime minister could fully understand the impact of his policies on nhs care, because ivan had been treated in a part of the system that was well funded. bbc news has approached the guardian for a response. for most people, swimming the english channel once is an incredible feat of perseverance and fitness. but once isn't enough for sarah thomas, from colorado. she is more than half way though her world—record attempt at crossing the channel four times, non—stop. the 37—year—old, who had treatment for breast cancer last year, began the 84—mile challenge early yesterday morning. just wow. really. that is really impressive. absolutely incredible. it is really very hard. are you a good swimmer? no. we
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have discussed this before. also the rules are really peculiar. you cannot swing in a wet suit. it is an incredible thing to do —— swing. a wet suit. it is an incredible thing to do -- swing. what can you do? get protection from jellyfish and stuff like that. i would be in the support boat. i am currently on a mini break. three days. in terms of top—level sport... a mini break. three days. in terms of top-level sport. .. where you even start? the cricket has been brilliant all summer. we are going to start with the golf. the finish yesterday was so dramatic. if you had written this as a film script people would have said it was too cheesy, to hollywood. look at that glorious shot. that is gleneagles,.
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the famous scottish course witnessed one of its most dramatic days of golf as europe narrowly beat the usa to lift the solheim cup. and it was a remarkable day for norway's suzann petersen, who's only just returned after having a baby. sarah mulkerrins watched the drama unfold. after three days of intense competition, it all came down to the final putt on the final hole for no way‘s suzann petersen. the putt putt that made history as europe wrestled back the solheim cup from the united states. the third when out of three on scottish soil with katrina matthew declaring of the finest achievement of her career. unbelievable. and four want to hold the winning part, we heard the cheer, and we could not believe it, to be honest. but from suzann petersen it was a final moment in professional golf. she announced retirement shortly afterwards, closing the book on a remarkable playing career that has spanned nine solheim cops. i always think these moments beat everything else. it is s0 moments beat everything else. it is so much about you and you play for
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your teammates and it is a team effort. today was absolutely a team effort. today was absolutely a team effort for us. the proof we can do it on sunday. earlier, in the major champion, georgia hall, won her fourth consecutive mat stop as the usa fought back they came to within a whisker of retaining the trophy. the solheim cup is now in european hands. sarah mulkerrins, bbc news. suzann petersen who we were talking about, she has retired now. this morning she will have retired. she said she wanted to go out on a high. she wanted to win, as a month. she has done that. it doesn't get better than that. there has been shut after this about how women's golf needs to catch up with other women sport. density football, cricket, that ball, particularly, having a huge amount of support and publicity at the moment —— you can see. perhaps golf could learn a thing or two and catch up a bit.
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they could have helped over the weekend by speed of play. it wasjust helped over the weekend by speed of play. it was just too slow. helped over the weekend by speed of play. it wasjust too slow. i think on saturday they played six hours and hadn't even finished the 18th hole. they were taking the jackets on and off because it was wet. the weather was bad. some of the time taken of the shots was ridiculous. you just can't. they need to do something about that. it is a spectator sport. is there a particular time you are allowed to... you up put on the clock. but referees will be watching you. you can be panelized. there are not enough penalties actually handed out —— penalised. it is not the shots you take the holes you win, should say you have taken too long, loss of hole. as soon as you start implementing the penalties everyone will speed up. speed up, more entertaining to watch, better for the spectators. crosstalk. we mentioned
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the cricket. england cricket captainjoe root declared it a "hugely successful" summer, after they beat australia in the final ashes test at the oval, to draw the series. australia were chasing an unlikely 399 to win — and when stuart broad took the key wicket of steve smith, it looked as though the match would be england's. matthew wade resisted for the aussies — he made 117 — with things getting a little bit fiery with bowlerjofra archer. but after wade fell, this stunning catch from root sealed the win by 135 runs, to round off a remarkable summer. that world cup was incredible. but to finish how some of the games in a comment made for fantastic viewing, not just the england comment made for fantastic viewing, notjust the england games but across the board, there was some fantastic contests. and to be backed up fantastic contests. and to be backed up by fantastic contests. and to be backed up by such an evenly matched ashes series, again, we were blessed with brilliant support throughout.
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but the cricket itself was pretty gripping. i think that is the understatement of the summer. quique sanchez flores will have been impressed with his side, in his first match back as watford manager. arsenal took a 2—0 lead — both goals from pierre—emerick aubamyang. but the gunners unravelled in the second half, and watford took full advantage — tom cleverly starting the fight back as they drew 2—2. every single match in premier league we know is different and will be tough. the most important thing now is we got some points, one point, against a very tough team. it is good for our confidence in the way we go is important. also the feelings, i think they really are positive for the future. england striker callum wilson was the star for bournemouth, as they got their first home win of the league season — he scored twice to help them to a 3—1victory over everton, which lifts them up to eighth in the table.
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everton's women made it two wins from two in the super league, beating bristol city 2—0. and manchester city did likewise, pauline bremer scoring both their goals in a 2—0 win over bristol city — she's now scored four times in two matches. there's more on all the weekend's games on the bbc sport website. great britain won four more gold medals on the final night of action at the para—swimming world championships in london, alice tai finishing as the most successful athlete with seven golds. her team—mate brock whiston beat her own world record to win the 100m breaststroke, before going on to win another gold in the freestyle relay alongside tai, steph millward and toni shaw. ronnie o'sullivan made it a hat—trick of titles at the shanghai masters snooker. the rocket came through a thrilling final against shaun murphy, eventually winning by 11 frames to nine. he takes home the 200 thousand pounds winner's cheque in what was his first tournament since his shock defeat at the world championship
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back in april. back on track, ronnie. thank you very much. there was a pause, because i was expecting a little bit more. but it didn't quite happen. we'll be getting it later. we are going to get suzann petersen with her gorgeous little boy. we love a baby picture, don't we? coming later. matt's in holland park in london this morning — how's the weather looking for the start of the week, good morning. iam in holland park. a beautiful part of the gardens. right in the heart of west london. this was a gift to the residents of chelsea and kensington back in 1991
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from the city of tiote injapan. just to represent the friendship that goes on betweenjapan and great britain. it is a beautiful site. lots of carpet in the pond behind me. and birds enjoying it too. down here at the moment it is a mild start to the day as in many southern areas, temperatures in the mid teens. fresher further areas, temperatures in the mid teens. fresherfurther north. temperatures a degree or two above freezing parts of scotland at the moment. if we look at the forecast, bea moment. if we look at the forecast, be a day that's with the country right into. loudest across the southern half of the uk. always that little bit brighter further north with ohnson at times —— cloudiest. if you look at the pressure charts, you can if you look at the pressure charts, you can see if you look at the pressure charts, you can see why. a cold front at the moment. outbreaks of rain and drizzle. sitting across parts of wales, the millers, and east anglia at the moment. here are the dampers conditions. across the southernmost of england you may get some greatness, but overall a rather dull and outdated come. we have
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sunshine out across other parts of northern england into eastern scotland. here the cellist of the weather. a bit of cloud western scotland and northern ireland. that will bring some rain during the day. the breeze is not as strong as throughout the weekend. sunny conditions will work further south into parts of wales, the midlands, and east anglia later. the far south will stay cloudy. temperatures up to 20. most places in the teens through today. for some that will be a drop on what we saw yesterday. 2070 high in south—east england. into tonight, we will see the cloud, rain, and drizzle become confined to the channel islands and through parts of cornwall. the skies elsewhere. a chilly night tonight. temperatures dropping down into single figures. maybe low enough or frost for morning commuters in sheltered rural parts. it will be a sunny start to tomorrow, even if it is cold for the journey to work. quickly warming up under the sunshine. cloud into the north and west of scotland later with the western isles seeing some outbreaks
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of rainfor western isles seeing some outbreaks of rain for the day. most will stay dry and sunny. temperatures mid teens to low 20s. it is on wednesday where the cloud because a further scotland. more rain around compared to tuesday. dry weather, too. much of northern ireland, england, wales stay dry —— much. temperatures again squeaking into the low 20s. through the rest of the week, most places will be fine. the breeze picks up through friday into saturday. louise and dan, by saturday we will see temperatures more widely across the country back into the low if not mid—20s. that is how your weather is looking. if you've been to a classical music concert in recent years, you'll have heard the announcement asking you to "please turn off your mobile phone as the performance is about to start". but now the bbc philharmonic orchestra is encouraging its audiences to do the opposite. tim muffett went along
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to find out more. a classical concert where phone use isn't frowned upon. but welcomed... omg. people who have their phone on during conversations. we want to embrace that. at this concert at royal albert hall, the audience hasn't been told to switch their phones off. far from hasn't been told to switch their phones off. farfrom it. hasn't been told to switch their phones off. far from it. we are encouraging people to have their phones on doing the concert, on silence. we are providing tweet length programme notes throughout the performance to guide people through the music in real—time. it say, you know, tell you a little bit about the conductor or it might say listen up for a beautiful clarinet solo just coming up. listen up for a beautiful clarinet solojust coming up. it
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listen up for a beautiful clarinet solo just coming up. it talks you through the different stages of the performance, it is really helpful. is there an argument for leaving it out of it? this is classical music! i would be very focused usually and imight be i would be very focused usually and i might be quite cross about somebody usual —— using a mobile phone. the bbc philharmonic plan to offer phone updates at all of their concerts this season. this time is one of the first time it has been trialed. i think it is disturbing. not distracting for people? no, no, i think it gives everyone a chance to enjoy it. i preferjust to let the music takeover rather than follow exactly what i am listening to. you see some people on their phones and you get a bit annoyed. to. you see some people on their phones and you get a bit annoyedlj phones and you get a bit annoyed.” think a lot of people are used to it now, just multitasking. so i think it isa now, just multitasking. so i think it is a good idea. what is it like asa
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it is a good idea. what is it like as a performer, knowing that the audience are being encouraged to use their phones? i mean, ithink it is great. sometimes classical music concerts can be a bit intimidating, especially from a big orchestra like the bbc philharmonic that i think maybe this encouraging might encourage people to come to the concerts. shouldn't we be keeping technology away from this? you respect people to go to the concert without their phone on. we respect people who want to listen to music without visual distractions but at the same time, we don't want to exclude people who expect to have a visual stimulation from their phone. annoying or enlightening? phones are set to become a more familiar sight at concerts like this. applause. that is a really interesting idea. it could catch on, couldn't it? did you remember if you went to a concert? the last one i went to was
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actually with you. that is why when you asked me if i had been to a concert recently, i couldn't remember because let's face it, it was really nerve racking. let's not remind ourselves. let's take a look at some of today's front pages. i know people in my household who are i know people in my household who a re really i know people in my household who are really scared of spiders. i won't show you the picture if you are scared of spiders. spiders are invading homes in bumper numbers during to the warm summer — make due to the warm summer. —— due to. a lush, green environment, idealfor more insect that spiders eat. it means that record numbers, they have done a twitter mining. they trawled social media to yield an ecological picture and it seems to them that early indications suggest this yea r‘s early indications suggest this year's spider season is busier
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than that of 2018. some clues, if you don't like spiders, keep your outdoor living and windows and doors closed. they like mass like piles of clothes to try and keep things tidy. also, there are so many facts in here, 7:35pm was when people are most likely to see them. do you know how many spiders across your face on average? i don't want to know it! i will look that up for you. seven or eight a year across your face while you are asleep. that is horrible. they may never sleep again. we have a jampacked programme for you today. you mentioned twitter. talking about online roles. a new call to
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try and stop giving trolls, to stop the spread of hate online. chrissie hynde is going to be in as well. we have jo swinson, hynde is going to be in as well. we havejo swinson, the leader of the liberal democrats, talking about their plan to revoke article 50. and dominic raab to talk about whether 01’ dominic raab to talk about whether or not there has been progress made in talks because borisjohnson is going to have talks about brexit today. dominic raab is coming in at 8:10. british businesses are getting worried about the brexit stalemate and a slowdown in the global economy, and have reduced their economic forecasts for the year. ben's at a malt loaf manufacturer with more
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on this. good morning. look at the speed! they make 3 million of those things every single week in this place. they have let me near this big red button and i am really tempted to pushit button and i am really tempted to push it but 3 million a week goes through here. they have very little time for any downtime but you are right, painting a picture of an economy that might be slowing and it has been described as a warning light on the dashboard of the economy. big questions about what places like this make of it because frankly, food and drink is one of our biggest export in this country and therefore, it is important it does well but with brexit, so much uncertainty about where they might sell this because they sell it all around the world and made here in manchester. talking to two people. mark is the managing director. also paul head of manufacturing. give me
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a sense of what you do here. you sell this stuff right around the world and it has to be pretty slick. when you hear these reports about the economy slowing and that accent makes it more difficult, do you feel it today? not personally for our business, we are having a big year and we're going to grow in 10% in sales this year and what we have is taken a traditional brand that is 81 yea rs old taken a traditional brand that is 81 years old and repurposed it as an energy snack company. i guess that means that we are focusing on new formats and trying to find new markets with that. the health market is key for our growth. that is the thing because most people will know those big lobes but we havejust looked at some of the smaller bars and that helps create a new market that didn't exist before. exactly. what you see other smaller bars and these are lunchbox loaves. this is a major source of growth in the last few years and as a kids healthy
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snack but more and more adults are eating it as well because people are worried about the sugar intake of snacks like this, less than half of the sugar of the average cake bar so we are benefiting from that. paul, give mea we are benefiting from that. paul, give me a sense of the uk in the world. there is a tendency to think that we don't make anything in this country anymore and that manufacturing died out in the 80s but that is not true? it is not true. the report out today shows that uk is the ninth biggest manufacturing nation in the world which for our population and our size is a fantastic achievement. not only that, the manufacturing sector, it is really the driving force behind the economy. it gives us £192 billion of value to the economy so it is pretty important. when we hear those reports today that suggest investment might be falling, people are wondering where their export
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markets might be. what do you tell the people that you work with? how do you advise them on what they should be doing right now?m do you advise them on what they should be doing right now? it is about understanding what their individual businesses are. we need to understand what businesses are looking to do, whether it is expand in the uk or internationally and then we work with them to find the new markets. there are loads of good new markets. there are loads of good new stories of manufacturing across the uk for businesses that have expanded across the globe. and we we re expanded across the globe. and we were talking earlier about how much money you have to invest because this process, the logs go at crazy speeds. that is making you confident about the future, isn't it? we started to pack the lunchbox loaves ina much started to pack the lunchbox loaves in a much grander way than we did today and to keep up with the demand, we have had to invest in automated wrapping which is the exciting bits you see in the
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factory today. it is literally to keep pace with demand. nice to see you both. we will talk more a little bit later. you have it. just trying to work out what next. clearly, the lots of uncertainty. they are just getting on with it. they want an idea of what they need to do and they said they will do it if they have a bit more clarity. plenty to come, welcome to a new week, it is monday morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tolu adeoye. there are no guarantees that crossrail will be finished by march 2021 — that's according to transport bosses. the new railway had been due to open in december last year. the ongoing delays are having a big impact on people and businesses up and down the line. some firms say they
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may not survive. iam in iamina i am in a catch—22 because for the landlord is putting the rent up based on the fact that crossrail should have been opened, the rates are high because we have resources close by such as crossrail as an amenity. if it doesn't open by late 2020 or early 2021 further up at bond street, by business is absolutely at risk. — my business. and you can see more on that story on inside out tonight on bbc1 tonight at 7.30pm. or you can catch up on iplayer. three london hospital trusts are amongst the worst for errors so serious they should never have happened. so called ‘never events' include doctors operating on the wrong body parts, or leaving surgical tools inside patients. barts health nhs trust topped the table with 17 between april 2018 and july this year. guy's and st thomas' and university college london trusts camejoint third. a spokeperson for the nhs said these events are extremely rare but more is being
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done to minimize human error. croydon's arts venue, fairfield halls, reopens today after a 30 million pound renovation. the building has hosted world class musicians and orchestras since the ‘60s. it's been closed since 2016. dame judi dench will formally open the theatre later. it‘s the first building to form part of a new ‘cultural quarter,‘ in croydon. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning on the roads the piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town from piccadilly to knightsbridge for gas repairs. in beckton: woolwich manor way is closed in both directions between frobisher road and peverel due to a burst water main. finally in lewisham: one lane is closed for gas works westbound on lee high road at thejunction with belmont hill. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s a rather cloudy but very mild start today.
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it is however going to feel noticably cooler than yesterday and remain rather cloudy and rather damp. yesterday, 26.9dc in central london. today, not so. this front is moving south. there is drizzle throughout the day so staying down and averages just about managing 20 celsius in central london. overnight tonight, that will continue to sink south, the cloud will break up and under clear skies, you might get a bit of mistiness in the light winds. minimum temperature not quite as mild as last night. between nine and 11 celsius. from tomorrow onwards, plenty of fine, settled weather and lots of sunshine. temperatures warming up nicely as well as high—pressure continues to dominate. as we headed through the next few days, temperatures in the low 20s by the end of the weekend. in the sunshine, we are looking at temperatures in the mid— 20s. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc londonin half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it‘s back to lousie and dan. bye for now.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: face to face talks: the prime minister meets the european commission president later, and is set to reject any offer to delay brexit. boris johnson is set to reject any offer to delay brexit when he meets the european commission president for the first time as prime minister. a sharp rise in oil prices after drone attacks on two processing plants in saudi arabia. what is the recipe for economic success ? what is the recipe for economic success? food and drink is one. brexit has said this. i‘m at a manufacturing plant in manchester this morning to find out what businesses are doing to repair. —— prepare. what a weekend of sport we‘ve had. three days of intense competition at the solheim cup comes down to this — the final hole — europe just edge the usa to win back the trophy. and england beat australia
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in the final ashes test to draw the series and round off a remarkable summer of cricket. and i am in holland park, west london, where it is a cloudy start of the new week, as it is for many, rain and drizzle around. might be colder further north. what does the rest of the week holden store? they will have the details right here on brea kfast. will have the details right here on breakfast. —— hold in store. good morning. it‘s monday september the 16th. borisjohnson will hold his first face—to—face talks with the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, later this morning. the prime minister says he‘s "cautiously optimistic" ahead of the talks, but has made clear that he‘ll reject any offer to delay brexit further. the bbc‘s adam fleming is in luxembourg where the meeting will take place. good morning to you adam, once again. i know you happy man u for us for lunch, but in terms of the talks, what sort of thing might we see in the next three days? —— have
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the man u. we know what is on the menu. snails and cheese. the reason it is happening here isjean—claude juncker lives here. it is where he spent his weekend. as far as what they will discussing, we have an idea because boris johnson they will discussing, we have an idea because borisjohnson has written an article in the daily telegraph like he did every money before he was prime minister. he says he passionately believes there will be a revised brexit dl —— every monday. he will go to the summit on the 17th of october to finalise the deal. if there is a lot of work done in the next couple of days, he is suggesting a big burst of activity, think, this week, but he says if that new deal does not materialise he will not sign up to any brexit extension that was offered by the eu. lots of optimism on the uk side, cautious optimism, but that is not shared on the other side of the lunch table. jean—claude juncker, the president of the
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european commission, did an interview with german radio yesterday where he said time is out and he is not optimistic that there are any alternatives to the bit of the withdrawal agreement about ireland that is so controversial in the uk. talk to people who have been involved in the talks between uk negotiators and brussels negotiators and they say the progress the british are talking about, they are not really experiencing it around the negotiating table. it will be interesting to see where we are by the end of the day. has it been taken the end of the day. has it been ta ken forward the end of the day. has it been taken forward or are we in this holding pattern? adam, good to talk to you. and we‘ll be speaking to the foreign secretary, dominic raab, about those talks just after eight o‘clock. we will indeed. the former labour mp chuka umunna is expected to launch a savage attack onjeremy corbyn today — in his first speech as the liberal democrats foreign affairs spokesman. mr umunna, who joined the lib dems injune, will criticise mr corbyn‘s handling of anti—semitism in the party, and call him an "apologist" for russia. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us from bournemouth where the conference is taking place.
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jonathan, it‘s been an eventful conference so far for the lib dems. we live in such interesting times. he will now make a speech as a liberal democrat. we know what he will say? yes, chuka umunna will have a message for the lib dems when he makes that beach. it will be simply, trust me, a one of you. while there is great for the party to have former conservative and mps coming on board, they want to make sure that they actually believe the same thing is that the lib dems believe and they‘re notjust looking for some sort of political safe house, because they won‘t co mforta ble house, because they won‘t comfortable with their previous party. just as the lib dems have a lwa ys party. just as the lib dems have always tried to carve a path down the middle between the tories on the rise and labour on the left, chuka umunna will have a bit of a pop at both sides. he will have some stinging criticism for his former boss, labour‘s jeremy stinging criticism for his former boss, labour‘sjeremy corbyn, who will ——he will describes an apologist for a hard right russian government and who is
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someone who vilified as anyone who dare to disagree with him. he will talk of borisjohnson as a padlock of hate and division. he will say it is the job of the liberal democrats to make sure the country‘s heartbeat is liberalist and internationalist, not nationalist and populist. that is the new fault line, he says, in british politics, and we know where we stand. the party knows where it stands on brexit. it has adopted a policy of revoking article 50 alt—right and cancelling brexit without a further referendum if it wins general election —— alt—right. that is a big if. if brexit happens anyway, it will have to find a new policy and fast. thank you very much. universities should be legally responsible for students‘ mental health needs, according to a former health minister. sir norman lamb says lives are being put at risk because some universities are not keeping track of waiting lists for counselling. his comments come as an inquest opens into the death of ceara thacker, a student
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at liverpool university who took her own life last year. our education editor branwenjeffreys has more. ceara thacker was just 19 when she took her life. her death another tragedy raising questions about support for students. the inquest will hear about her attempts to get help. more students want support for mental health problems. new data suggests it could depend on where you study. 110 universities responded with information to a campaigning mp. only 26 knew the average or longest waiting times for counselling. in some universities, cambridge would be a good example, students will find a university that is really focusing on the data, analysing the scale of the problem, making sure they have a real handle on it, whereas in other places they don‘t even know how much they are spending. they are not maintaining and monitoring data, not collecting the data, and in that way i think students‘ experience
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is completely different across the country. universities say they already plan a voluntary mental health charter and need the nhs to provide more effective care for students. liverpool university said it was deeply saddened by ceara‘s death, and is working with the health service on changes. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. oil prices are up to a four—month high following drone strikes on two saudi arabian refineries. it‘s thought the strikes knocked out around 5% of the world‘s oil supply. houthi rebels have claimed responsibility in revenge for saudi involvement in the yemeni civil war. ben has more for us on this. excuse me! excuse me. bless you.
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a significant story developing this morning. when you talk about 5% of global oil supplies it does not sound like much. this is usually significant because of the impact it has right around the world. we know that saudi arabia, the world‘s biggest oil producer, before taking a5% of biggest oil producer, before taking a 5% of world supplies has a knock—on effect. in all sorts of different things, notjust knock—on effect. in all sorts of different things, not just that the price we pay for fuel at the pump, but also for the cost of things in the shops, because of oil prices go up, fuel prices go up, it means shipping things around the country also costs more. we are likely to see an impact on what is known as imported inflation, basically prices going up for reasons we cannot control. two attacks on saturday in saudi arabia, the world‘s biggest oil producer, geopolitical concerns about that and the implications it has for security in future. the us has for security in future. the us has said it will release some reserves , has said it will release some reserves, which means there is much more supply, oil supply coming onto
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the market, which will help ease fears for now, but the real worry is whether that can continue. a significant impact, all prices rising by around 10%. america is saying it will release more reserves , saying it will release more reserves, but big implications for future reserves. saudi arabia says it has enough supplies and is releasing some. the concern is about the nature of the attack on how seemingly easy it was to take a 5% of the world‘s also play in two drone attacks in saudi arabia is of great concern. it is this sort of thing we will see through higher prices at the pump and potentially in the shops. thank you very much. too many uk workers are missing out on basic employment rights such as the minimum wage and paid holidays, according to a report published today. a report by the think tank the resolution foundation, which does research into low—income jobs, claims workers in hotels and restaurants miss out more than others on legal workplace entitlements. the government says it‘s committed to tackling firms that break the rules.
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the guardian newspaper has been criticised for claiming that david cameron felt only "privileged pain" following the death of his six—year—old son, ivan. an editorial leader column, which has since been changed, questioned whether the former prime minister could fully understand the impact of his policies on nhs care, because ivan had been treated in a part of the system that was well funded. bbc news has approached the guardian for a response. a 97—year—old second world war veteran has taken to the skies in a spitfire to mark battle of britain day. george dunn was inspired tojoin bomber command after watching dogfights between raf and luftwaffe planes from the ground as a teenager. his spitfire flight commemorates 79 years since a huge aerial battle over london and south—east england, which the raf won. just beautiful shots. it is.
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absolutely wonderful. for most people, swimming the english channel once is an incredible feat of perseverance and fitness. but once isn‘t enough for sarah thomas, from colorado. she is more than half way though her world—record attempt at crossing the channel 4 times, non—stop. the 37—year—old, who had treatment for breast cancer last year, began the 84—mile challenge early yesterday morning. that is a serious swim. we need to... we do need to follow-up. very good luck to her. that is one tough challenge. it is 12 minutes past seven. let‘s return to our top story now, and the prime minister borisjohnson says he‘s "cautiously optimistic" of getting a deal with the eu ahead of crucial talks in luxembourg later. that‘s a more positive view than that of the eu‘s chief brexit negotiator, michel barnier,
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who has said he does not have "reasons to be optimistic" about the talks. so, can the two sides reach a compromise this week? let‘s speak tojennifer baker, an eu affairs journalist based in brussels. good morning to you, jennifer. good to talk to you this morning. you are based in brussels. we have heard from adam fleming this morning about what might happen this week. from your point of view, how productive make this meeting be today? well, i would never rule anything out 100%, there could be a breakthrough, but that doesn‘t seem to be where you would put your smart money. one of two other options is much more likely, either nonevent or absolute disaster. what we‘re hearing people in brussels, contrary to what boris johnson is telling people, there has not been much movement on those negotiations. in terms of the move from the comedy prime ministerial move, theresa may‘s team gone and boris johnson‘s team coming move, theresa may‘s team gone and borisjohnson‘s team coming in, how was that viewed from the other side? i think there was a lot of sympathy, perhaps not great deal of respect
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was then for theresa may. at that sympathy is not therefore boris johnson. the rhetoric coming out with and the headlines in the papers, we guess for domestic consumption, but everyone on the side of the channel is reading them. it is not washing well, particularly with esther barnier and mr yong. comments about the incredible hulk —— michel barnier, and jean—claude juncker. is it political posturing or is it met with eye rolling? is if viewed as something which is serious orjust a joke before they sit down for what will be an important meeting today? i think it is probably quite, it is viewed that the situation is quite serious. when you hear boris johnson the situation is quite serious. when you hear borisjohnson saying these things, although there is eye rolling, and it has been described as trumpian and infantile, and that he was largely shared across
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the eu institutions in brussels, whether they will discuss the incredible hulk or avengers movies over lunch, i doubt. jean—claude juncker has hulk or avengers movies over lunch, i doubt. jean—claudejuncker has a quirky sense of humour, so you would not be surprised if he brings it up. for real substantive stuff, it is a sideline, destruction, michel barnier is very serious and will wa nt to barnier is very serious and will want to get down to brass tacks. in terms of the logistics of this, they have this meeting today, jean—claude juncker and boris johnson together, how does that then get disseminated around the rest of the 27, because obviously everyone will be interested in what is discussed, what comes from both sides, and what will happen with regards to the first of october. well, i mean, there will be the usual source of press i’u ns there will be the usual source of press runs and discussions. jean—claude juncker will say what he wa nts to jean—claude juncker will say what he wants to say mrjohnson will they what he wants to say. in terms of the negotiations and how they get communicated, that is michel barnier‘s job, communicated, that is michel barnier‘sjob, he was back communicated, that is michel barnier‘s job, he was back to the eu ambassadors and those who do the
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heavy lifting, they then go back to the ambassadors who inform their capitals. there are all these bilateral vocals that i‘m sure will be happening afterwards. it will not be happening afterwards. it will not bea be happening afterwards. it will not be a surprise to see that mr yorker has several phone calls schedule ——mrjoko. the big deadline date as far as the eu site is concerned is the summit in october. if nothing is agreed by then there won‘t be time to get it done. do you think there is confidence from an eu perspective that there is, i wouldn‘t say there would be a breakthrough, but a breakthrough looks different depending on which side of the bay you are coming —— debate. depending on which side of the bay you are coming -- debate. the sides seem you are coming -- debate. the sides seem to be very far apart at the moment. there has been a huge erosion of trust. the issue of the backstop was supposed to be an insurance policy against unilateral decisions that would disrupt the eu's decisions that would disrupt the eu‘s functioning in the common market and so on. now the backstop has become as massive political
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foot all, it is not an insurance policy anymore, it become the debate. the eu isn‘t going to move on as red lines. there seem to be a lot of assumptions in westminster that do you always is a deal at the last minute. yes, it often does, but only when it is in the eu‘s interests. there is an awful lot of brexit fatigue at the moment. a lot of leaders in the various capitals starting to feel like no more extensions, sick of this, out is out. in terms of what has been happening back here, has the series of votes that boris johnson happening back here, has the series of votes that borisjohnson has been losing a parliament, he is talking about the threat of no deal in the negotiations, has that been seen to wea ken negotiations, has that been seen to weaken his position that he cannot get anything through and been defeated 70 times already? in that he is very similar to theresa may who was defeated several times as well. this is becoming a feature of these discussions. no deal from the eu side is a matter of law here as well. if nothing happens no deal is
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a default, it is not something asked for granted or given. the question is whether any extension, the extension that boris says he won‘t ask for, will be given if he asked for it had to ask for it because he was forced by parliament. in that case the air you will need to see something concrete. it will need to see something like a referendum, an election, serious happening in the talks that shall barnier can point to and say something is possibly moving here —— michel barnier. what is worth remembering asjean—claude juncker, a very savvy politician. if there is something that is sort of agreed or sort of a fudge, he is good at windowdressing. if itjust needs cosmetic changes to make it work, he will be happy to help boris do that rather than crush us without a deal. but, you know, it will be michel barnier saying the words are not enough, we need to see something concrete. ok, look forward to seeing what they will say once they leave the meeting today. jennifer baker, thank you very much. interesting insight. we heard from adam about
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the menu in luxembourg. on the lunch today it was salmon, snails and cheese. let us know what you think about that. matt‘s in holland park in london. there are some rather beautiful... you can tell us what they are. i don‘t really know... i can see koi carpet. and some birds. good morning. —— carp. there are some hens. we are in holland park. a really beautiful surround, lovely garden. just the perfect place for a bit of relaxation, contemplation and a bit of calm on your monday morning. holland park is in the west of london. kyoto garden was a
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gift to the people of great britain, built in 1991. with a waterfall behind me, it is a lovely sense of karma this morning. let me see if i can keep the calm going with the forecast. looking at the details, a bit cloudy. temperatures a few degrees above freezing. a few showers coming and going throughout the day. the cloud we have across england, the —— wales. patchy rain and drizzle will work its way through southern counties. northern england continues to see sunshine throughout as does eastern parts of scotland. the far north will
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continue to see showers go through ona continue to see showers go through on a stiff breeze. the breeze nowhere near as strong on a stiff breeze. the breeze nowhere near 3s strong 3s on a stiff breeze. the breeze nowhere near as strong as it was. temperatures could just hit low 20s across some southern parts of england. into this evening and overnight, the cloud will become confined to the child —— channel islands. it will be a colder night more widely. a chilly start to tuesday but will be a lovely bright sunny one for the vast majority. any patchy mist and fog will clear. a bit more cloud into western scotland and northern ireland later and for the western isles, some rain to enter the afternoon. temperatures 15-20 enter the afternoon. temperatures 15—20 one quarter similar temperatures on wednesday. more cloud across scotland and a greater chance of seeing rain or drizzle at times. some will stay completely dry. northern ireland, england and wales, another dry day.
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esther the sunshine on wednesday will be southernmost areas. — make the sunshine. we will see the temperatures rise as we go through the rest of the week. —— the sunshine. clearer conditions on saturday. and ringing in something a bit more humid and temperatures into the mid— 20s more widely. thank you for being with us today. around 700,000 students will be starting their first year of university in the next couple of weeks. for most of them it‘s the beginning of a great adventure. but the former health minister, sir norman lamb, is warning that some students‘ lives are being put at risk because universities are not spending enough on mental health. he‘s now calling for a minimum standard to be enforced by law. let‘s talk to two people who can tell us more about this issue. megan campbell struggled with depression while studying
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at university. and professor steve west is the mental health lead for universities uk — he joins us from bristol. megan, what was it like for you? what we‘re going through? megan, what was it like for you? what we're going through?” megan, what was it like for you? what we're going through? i had had an psyche beforehand, previous to studying. —— i had had anxiety. i went to study mental health nursing and injune, went to study mental health nursing and in june, sadly, went to study mental health nursing and injune, sadly, my dad passed away so it was very challenging on top of the normal challenges of university life. it is probably difficult to say but it is a really anxious time anyway but didn't increase the impact and how did it you feel? the main thing that comes to mind is you are hoping to make friends at university, you are
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hoping to achieve your goals, but where i was at the time, i started to segregate myself from friends that i had made because i didn‘t wa nt to that i had made because i didn‘t want to bring the mood down. it is meant to be a happy time at university, i didn‘t want to bring it down. and then you are worried about the impact you are having on others. when it makes you think about the way you are acting even more. we will come back to you in a second. let's talk about other attitudes. professor steve west. what they are saying is there is not enough help. is that something you would agree with? we see variation across the system. every university is focusing on this but we need to
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do it in partnership with nhs and third sector. we need to work out how to effectively engage with schools and colleges to make sure that we understand the needs of stu d e nts that we understand the needs of students as they arrive at university. we were just speaking to megan and she talks about not wanting to open up to her friends. where is the first port of call for stu d e nts where is the first port of call for students who might be feeling like this? it is often their friends. if they have friends within the university beyond the university. that very quickly, we need them to engage with either the academic tutors or professional services. all of whom are focusing on the student needs. it is the number one thing that we want our students to let us know. megan is nodding along. when
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you see other people talking and going through these things, do you see other people going through it? and is not just see other people going through it? and is notjust from bereavement. there is a precious of deadlines, assignments, but the best thing i did was sought help for the university and it has good health and good services available and they are reaching out to students. i would tell any student that if they are feeling anything other than their own norm, go and seek help. there are services in the universities, especially. lets pick up universities, especially. lets pick up another thought if i could with professor steve west. norman lamb is saying that universities have a legal need to meet students at‘ mental health needs. would you agree thatitis mental health needs. would you agree that it is a legal need? we already have a legal requirement to ensure that we support our students through
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health and safety. there is a lot of work going on at the moment around student charter, a mental health charter. that is being designed in partnership between universities uk and student lines and that will set the framework, i think, to allow universities to identify a whole syste m universities to identify a whole system approach, a whole community approach, to supporting mental health and well— being. approach, to supporting mental health and well—being. the universities have been working on this for quite a while and i am sure it will make a difference. just trying to put that point of putting it in law back to you. you said you we re it in law back to you. you said you were fortu nate it in law back to you. you said you were fortunate enough to go where there was that help. do you think if you had to have that sort of support, it would support more students? definitely. if it was actual legislation, it should be, in my opinion, have happened already at the fact is this happening now, that is great. i think it will really help. mental health services need to improve in general but that is a
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really good step forward for universities and students to get the right support, definitely. thank you very much indeed and we know that a lot of students will be going to university at the moment. good luck to all of them. details of organisations offering information and support around mental health are available on the bbc website. or you can call forfree, at any time, to hear recorded information. lots of information on that and lots of other things. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i‘m tolu adeoye. there are "no guarantees" crossrail will be finished by march 2021 — that‘s according to transport bosses. the new railway had been due to open in december last year and the ongoing delays are having a big impact on people and businesses up and down the line. some firms say they
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may not survive. i‘m in a catch—22 because for the landlords are putting the rents up based on the fact that crossrail should have been opened. the rates are high because we have resources close by such as crossrail as an amenity. if it doesn‘t open by late 2020 or early 2021 further up at bond street, my business is absolutely at risk. and you can see more on that story on inside out tonight on bbc1 at 7.30pm. or you can catch up on iplayer. three london hospital trusts are amongst the worst for errors so serious they should never have happened. so called ‘never events‘ include doctors operating on the wrong body parts, or leaving surgical tools inside patients. barts health nhs trust topped the table with 17 between april 2018 and july this year. guy‘s and st thomas‘ and university college london trusts camejoint third. a spokeperson for the nhs says the events are extremely rare but more is being done to minimize human error.
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croydon‘s arts venue, fairfield halls, reopens today after a 30 million pound renovation. the building has hosted world class musicians and orchestras since the ‘60s. it‘s been closed since 2016. dame judi dench will formally open the theatre later. it‘s the first building to form part of a new ‘cultural quarter,‘ in croydon. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads the piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town from piccadilly to knightsbridge for gas repairs. in beckton: woolwich manor way is closed in both directions between frobisher road and peverel due to a burst water main. finally in lewisham: one lane is closed for gas works westbound on lee high road at thejunction with belmont hill. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s a rather cloudy but very mild start today. it is, however, going to feel noticeably cooler than yesterday and remain rather cloudy and rather damp. yesterday in central london, 26.9dc. today, not so. we have this front moving south, bringing with it
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some light, patchy rain, some drizzle, throughout the day. so staying rather damp and temperatures just about managing 20 celsius in central london itself. overnight tonight, that will continue to sink south, the cloud will break up and under some clearer skies, you might get a bit of mistiness in the light winds. minimum temperature not quite as mild as last night, between nine and 11 celsius. from tomorrow onwards, plenty of fine, settled weather in the forecast, lots of sunshine. temperatures warming up nicely as well as high—pressure continued to dominate. so as we head through the next few days, temperatures in the low 20s. by the end of the weekend, in the sunshine, we‘re looking at temperatures in the mid—20s. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc londonin half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. it has just it hasjust gone it has just gone 730. borisjohnson will hold his first face—to—face talks with the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, later this morning. the prime minister says he‘s "cautiously optimistic" ahead of the talks, but has made clear that he‘ll reject any offer to delay brexit further. it comes after the eu‘s chief negotiator, michel barnier called for "concrete proposals from downing street" to break the impasse. the former labour mp chuka umunna is expected to launch a savage attack onjeremy corbyn today — in his first speech as the liberal—democrats foreign affairs spokesman. mr umunna, who joined the lib—dems in june, will criticise mr corbyn‘s handling of anti—semitism in the party, and call him an "apologist" for russia. labour has said it‘s taking "decisive and robust action against anti—semitism". oil prices have jumped to a four—month high after drone strikes on two refineries in saudi arabia. the strikes knocked out 5% of the world‘s oil supply,
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but officials say they hope a third of the losses can be reversed today. houthi rebels have claimed responsibility for the attacks, in revenge for saudi involvement in the civil war in yemen, but the usa has claimed that iran is to blame. iran denies any involvement. universities should be legally responsible for students‘ mental health needs, according to a former health minister. sir norman lamb says lives are being put at risk because some universities are not keeping track of waiting lists for counselling. his comments come as an inquest opens into the death of ceara thacker, a student at liverpool university who took her own life last year. the university says it was deeply saddened by ceara‘s death and is working with the health services on changes. the guardian newspaper has been criticised for claiming that david cameron felt only "privileged pain" following the death of his six—year—old son, ivan. an editorial leader column, which has since been changed, questioned whether the former prime minister could fully understand the impact of his policies on nhs care, because ivan had been treated in a part of the system
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that was well funded. bbc news has approached the guardian for a response. those the guardian for a response. are some of the main this those are some of the main story this morning. coming up on the programme, matt will have the weather in around ten minutes. and we will be speaking to the liberal democrat leaderjo swinson. dominic raab is coming in as well. dominic raab is coming in as well. do you have time for me? chrissie hynde is in later. i love her. it is a packed show today. i think you have dressed psychically this morning. european blue.” have dressed psychically this morning. european blue. iwas watching it last night. incredible drama at gleneagles. we are starting there. the famous scottish course witnessed one of its most dramatic days of golf as europe narrowly beat the usa to lift the solheim cup. and it was a remarkable day for norway‘s suzann petersen,
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who‘s only just returned after having a baby. sarah mulkerrins watched the drama unfold. after three days of intense competition, it all came down to the final putt on the final hole for norway‘s suzann petersen. the putt that made history as europe wrestled back the solheim cup from the united states. the third win out of three on scottish soil with captain catriona matthew declaring of the finest achievement of her career. unbelievable. and for suzann to hole the winning putt — just... we heard the cheerjust before she putted to know that bronte had won. no, just cannot believe it, to be honest. but from pettersen it was herfinal moment in professional golf. she announced retirement shortly afterwards, closing the book on a remarkable playing career that has spanned nine solheim cups. i always think solheim moments beat everything else. it is so much about you and you play for your teammates and it is a team effort. today was absolutely a team effort for us and win the singles and prove we can do it on sunday. earlier, england‘s major champion georgia hall maintained her suburb form to win her fourth consecutive match, but as the usa fought back
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they came to within a whisker of retaining the trophy. but, after two straight defeats, the solheim cup is now in european hands. sarah mulkerrins, bbc news. i don‘t know if you heard, but she then retired. decided last night. a very classy way to end. england cricket captainjoe root declared it a "hugely successful" summer, after they beat australia in the final ashes test at the oval, to draw the series. australia were chasing an unlikely 399 to win — and when stuart broad took the key wicket of steve smith, it looked as though the match would be england‘s. matthew wade resisted for the aussies — he made 117 — with things getting a little bit fiery with bowlerjofra archer. but after wade fell, this stunning catch from root sealed the win by 135
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runs, to round off a remarkable summer. that world cup was incredible. for it to finish how it did, some of the games in it made for fantastic viewing, notjust the england games but across the board, there was some fantastic contests. and to be backed up by such an evenly matched ashes series, again, we were blessed with brilliant support throughout. but the cricket itself was pretty gripping. quique sanchez flores will have been impressed with his side, in his first match back as watford manager. arsenal took a 2—0 lead — both goals from pierre—emerick aubamyang. but the gunners unravelled in the second half, and watford took full advantage — tom cleverly starting the fight back as they drew 2—2. england striker callum wilson was the star for bournemouth, as they got their first home win
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of the league season — he scored twice to help them to a 3—1victory over everton, which lifts them up to eighth in the table. everton‘s women made it two wins from two in the super league, beating bristol city 2—0. and manchester city did likewise, pauline bremer scoring both their goals in a 2—0 win over bristol city — she‘s now scored four times in two matches. there‘s more on all the weekend‘s games on the bbc sport website. great britain won four more gold medals on the final night of action at the para—swimming world championships in london, alice tai finishing as the most successful athlete with seven golds. her team—mate brock whiston beat her own world record to win the 100m breaststroke, before going on to win another gold in the freestyle relay alongside tai, steph millward, and toni shaw. we promised you more on suzann pettersen and her baby son, after she sank the putt that won the solheim cup for europe.
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here she is with herman — in his team colours — he‘s clearly a bit puzzled by all the excitement. let us look at the second one. i love this one. look at her face! isn‘t that brilliant? she is a woman who has fulfilled all her ambitions now. she said she wanted to win as a mum and fulfilled her professional career. i love that one. an incredible weekend for them. thank you. coming up, if you have been to a classical music concert in recent yea rs a classical music concert in recent years you will have heard the announcement to please turn off your mobile phone as the performance is about to start. the bbc philharmonic orchestra are encouraging audiences to do exactly the opposite. we have been finding
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out why. a classical concert where phone uses and frowned upon but welcome. we have whole generations of people now expect, for example, to watch the telly, who have their phone on during conversations, and we want to embrace that. so at this proms concert at the royal albert hall, the audience hasn‘t been told to switch their phones off, far from it. we are encouraging people to have the phones on during the concert, on silence, and we are providing sweet length programme notes throughout the performance to guide people through the music in real—time. —— tweet length. it might tell you about the conductor also listen out for a clarinet solo coming up. it talks you through the different stages of the performance. it is quite helpful. is there an argument for leaving technology out of this? there is
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an argument. i was curious myself because they wouldn't normally use a mobile phone. i would be very focused and might be cross about somebody using a mobile phone. the bbc philharmonic plan to offer phone updates at all their concerts this season. this prom is one of the first times it has been trialed.” think it is disturbing a bit. not distracting at all for people trying to listen? no, i think distracting at all for people trying to listen? no, ithink you distracting at all for people trying to listen? no, i think you gives everyone a chance to enjoy it. i'd preferjust to let the music ta ke over preferjust to let the music takeover rather than follow what i'm listening to. some people see people and their phones and get annoyed.” think people are used to an hour. just multitasking. i think it is a good idea. what is it like, as a performer, knowing that the audience are being encouraged to use their phones? i mean, i think
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are being encouraged to use their phones? i mean, ithink it's great. sometimes classical music concerts can bea sometimes classical music concerts can be a bit intimidating, especially from a huge orchestra like the bbc philharmonic. this is encouraging and might attract different people. should we be keeping technology away from classical music? we respect people who want to go to a concert without the phone, we respect people who wa nt to the phone, we respect people who want to listen to music without visual distractions. at the same time, we don‘t want to exclude people who expect to have a visual stimulation from their phone. annoying or enlightening, phones are set to become a more familiar sight at concerts like this. we‘ve had months of parliamentary debates on whether the uk should leave the eu with or without a deal. but this weekend the liberal democrats decided to offer they‘re now deemed the "stop brexit party" after a pledge to revoke article 50 if they come to power
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at the next general election. whenever that might be. lib dem leaderjo swinsonjoins us from bournemouth. good morning, thank you very much for coming on. really trying to get to the bottom of this new policy. yesterday, as we said, the party voted to cancel brexit if you get into power. how do you justify that two people? those watching this morning and many others who voted to leave. well, to be clear, we continue to argue for the people to have the final say on the brexit deal ina have the final say on the brexit deal in a people‘s vote. and we will continue arguing for that is the best way out of the mess we find ourselves in. because, frankly, whether you were remain or leave think we can all agree that we are currently gridlock and in a mess of exit. crosstalk. what does that say to the millions of people who say they have already made the decision and that was
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based on what they felt at the time, and that‘s fine, now they are still feeling that now? when you say they did not know what they were voting for at the time and accuse them of ignorance, that is the height of political arrogance. you are putting words in my mouth. i am saying i disagree with them and they can respectfully disagree with them while still believing anything is that i stand for and arguing for what i think is going to be in the national interest. it is entirely open to others to argue the opposite point. if we find ourselves in a general election in the next few weeks, as many seem general election in the next few weeks, as many seem to think is likely, then i think it is important that those who are standing for elected office should be clear about what they would do to resolve brexit. and as liberal democrats we believe that our best future is as members of the european union. that this brexit has been a mess over the last three and a half years, and
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that the best thing to do is to stop that the best thing to do is to stop that chaos by revoking article 50. and we have said, if we get a majority lib dem government, that we will then do what we have set out in the election campaign. so that is a democratic choice for people in this country. we are making sure that people have that choice to stop brexit in a general election. people have voted for us to do that. there will be the legitimacy to enact that policy. in fact, if you imagine the other scenario that we go into an election campaign and we say we want to stop brexit and revoked article 50. a liberal democrat majority government is
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elected then people would take a dim view if we did not revoke article 50 in those circumstances. what about past promises? i know you were reminded of this regularly. those promises of tuition fees from liberal democrats years ago and you com pletely liberal democrats years ago and you completely went back on that. how can people trust you on issues like this now, if they do want to vote few ina this now, if they do want to vote few in a general election, if there have been empty promises in the past? look, you make a fair point, what i would say is that vote on tuition fees, nine years ago, is one which was a mistake. we shouldn‘t have done it. we said we won‘t going to do it. all i can say is i have really learned from that experience. that is one of the reasons why we have been, because we believe in internationalism, in working with other countries for tackling problems like the climate emergency. we have been very firm, very clear on our position on
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stopping brexit. and i am setting out, with absolute honesty, what our position will be only ——in an election, particularly with the previous experience. we will stick to our word, you elect a liberal democrat majority government and we will leave —— remain. liberal democrat majority government and we will leave -- remain. you have got senior limb dam norman lamb saying your plan to revoke article 50 will leave half the country angry and feeling that the social contract is broken. sam gyimah, the last time we interviewed him on the programme, he was running for the tory leadership campaign. these aren‘t real liberal democrats, are they? you are trying to bring this party together and get people to vote for you when in actual fact you are made up you when in actual fact you are made up of people have joined you because they don‘t feel at home in our own party. well, i think what is happening is a really exciting moments in our country, because
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our political system has been broken. those tired two old vic parties have failed and people are flocking to the liberal democrats —— old parties. they are coming to join the lib dems and thousands of members up and down the country, since may 40,000 people havejoined the liberal democrats, we beat the conservatives and the labour party in the european elections a couple of months ago. the liberal democrats are becoming that rallying point for liberal values and becoming a wider movement that can turn them into reality. my vision is for a society thatis reality. my vision is for a society that is open, fair, and inclusive. that is one reason i want to stop brexit, because staying in the european union gives us the best chance of building that society and people are coming together around the liberal democrats to deliver that. and this is a moment of huge change in our politics and,
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my goodness, does our politics need to change. ok, jo swinson, it will be interesting to know what our viewers think of that. thank you for coming on. jo swinson, the leader of the liberal democrat party. matt‘s in holland park in london this morning — how‘s the weather looking for the start of the week, matt? a bit ofa a bit of a mixed start. i am in holland park. the kyoto garden in particular. a lovely sense of calm and relaxation before we have. a bit ofa and relaxation before we have. a bit of a top tail start in the fact that southern areas at the moment for the journey to work. temperatures around the mid— teens. only a degree or so above freezing. eastern scotland, northern ireland is chile. the cold front for england and wales. rain
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or drizzle through the midlands, wales and east anglia in particular. that will push its way southwards only slowly as we go through the day. the rain and drizzle a bit hit and miss. the midlands are seeing some sunshine by the end of the day. a few showers in the far north and a bit more cloud western scotland, northern ireland. we may still get around 20 degrees with grey skies in place. this evening and overnight, cloud across southern areas will become confined to the channel islands and commonwealth. elsewhere, clear skies, light winds. islands and commonwealth. elsewhere, clearskies, light winds. it islands and commonwealth. elsewhere, clear skies, light winds. it will be a chilly night compared to last night. only one or two spots a few degrees above freezing. a call start to tomorrow morning cosmicjourney to tomorrow morning cosmicjourney to work but a sunny
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one for the vast majority. —— morning‘s journey. to work but a sunny one for the vast majority. —— morning‘sjourney. in the western isles, patchy rain to enter the day. temperatures as they should be around this time of year. two bridges again on wednesday. —— temperatures. scotland will see more rain. particularly towards other parts of wales and england. into the low 20s for one or two, teens for the vast majority. temperatures back into the 20s more widely later in the week. this morning, ben is looking at businesses and brexit and the economy through the medium of
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multi— life. please explain. this is what 600,000 more loaves look like. they make 3 million a week. 150 million every year. we are talking about places like this because food and drink is one of our biggest exports from the uk. right now contending with lots of things and not least the uncertainty of the accident. two reports up—to—date suggest the warning light is on and businesses are nervous about what happens next. let‘s talk to the boss. he had a pretty impressive setup. talk about what you feel when you come out and meet your customers and other suppliers. how does the economy feel right now? one report suggests it is pretty tough but you
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don‘t feel that? suggests it is pretty tough but you don't feel that? i know you are talking about some of the reports about how tough it is to come by but we are forecasted to grow by 10% this year and what we have done is positioned our business and being baked in the uk for 81 years and we have repositioned as a healthy energy snack company. that involves launching small for blacks like our lunchbox. so you are focusing on the business. we are able to sell direct to nurseries and schools because our nutrition value is so good. the new markets have been key to
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our growth. a lot of money on this. we have a tendency to think that the uk doesn‘t make anything anymore but we couldn‘t be more wrong. why are we such a good place to manufacture and why is there a misconception that we don‘t make anything in this country? the reports today indicate that we make an awful lot of things. we are night in the world in terms of global manufacturing and manufacturing in the uk delivers £192 billion into our economy. it is crucial. the food and drink sector is one of the biggest out there. couldn‘t be further from the truth. mark isn‘t worried. it is about getting on. food and drink is
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susceptible because of exports and imports. it relies on stock, raw materials coming in and the finished product being sound outside. brexit isa product being sound outside. brexit is a factor and will impact different sectors in different ways and food and drink is one of those. what we are hearing around the uk from manufacturers is they are prepared for brexit as they want the uncertainty to and. there are also a lot of great opportunities out there. ——to end. lot of great opportunities out there. --to end. you advise people and what they can be doing but it is not quite so easy to say, yes, just create a new market and sell a smaller product. what do people need to think about? we need to find out what the business is about and where they want to expand. whether it is uk or internationally. then we help them internationalise.
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we help british manufacturers get into those new markets. as to my point earlier, products that uk makes are still in demand around the world. this place is fast and they have been doing multi— loaf since 1938 was not some of the rejects are here so we will be tasting a few of them a little later. i may have done so already. how have they been rejected? they look good to me, ben? still more to come for you this morning. let us know about any interviews we have. we have chrissie hynde coming up.
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we also have cognitive diversity coming up. but we agree that we disagree about that. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. but we are friends. wherever you are disagreeing this morning. good morning from bbc london, i‘m tolu adeoye. there are "no guarantees" crossrail will be finished by march 2021 — that‘s according to transport bosses. the new railway had been due to open in december last year and the ongoing delays are having a big impact on people and businesses up and down the line. some firms say they may not survive. i‘m in a catch—22 because for the landlords are putting the rents up based on the fact that crossrail should have been opened. the rates are high because we have resources close by such as crossrail as an amenity. if it doesn‘t open by late 2020 or early 2021 further up at bond street,
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my business is absolutely at risk. and you can see more on that story on inside out tonight on bbc1 at 7.30pm. or you can catch up on iplayer. three london hospital trusts are amongst the worst for errors so serious they should never have happened. so called ‘never events‘ include doctors operating on the wrong body parts, or leaving surgical tools inside patients. barts nhs health trust topped the table with 17 between april 2018 and july this year. guy‘s and st thomas‘ and university college london trusts camejoint third. a spokeperson for the nhs says the events are extremely rare but more is being done to minimize human error. croydon‘s arts venue, fairfield halls, reopens today after a 30 million pound renovation. the building has hosted world class musicians and orchestras since the ‘60s. it‘s been closed since 2016. dame judi dench will formally open the theatre later. it‘s the first building to form part of a new ‘cultural quarter,‘
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in croydon. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning. on the roads the piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town from piccadilly to knightsbridge for gas repairs. in beckton: woolwich manor way is closed in both directions between frobisher road and peverel due to a burst water main. finally in lewisham: one lane is closed for gas works westbound on lee high road at thejunction with belmont hill. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. it‘s a rather cloudy but very mild start today. it is, however, going to feel noticeably cooler than yesterday and remain rather cloudy and rather damp. yesterday in central london, 26.9dc. today, not so.
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we have this front moving south, bringing with it some light, patchy rain, some drizzle, throughout the day. so staying rather damp and temperatures just about managing 20 celsius in central london itself. overnight tonight, that will continue to sink south, the cloud will break up and under some clearer skies, you might get a bit of mistiness in the light winds. minimum temperature not quite as mild as last night, between nine and 11 celsius. from tomorrow onwards, plenty of fine, settled weather in the forecast, lots of sunshine. temperatures warming up nicely as well as high—pressure continued to dominate. so as we head through the next few days, temperatures in the low 20s. by the end of the weekend, in the sunshine, we‘re looking at temperatures in the mid—20s. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today. face to face talks: the prime minister meets the european commission president later, and is set to reject any offer to delay brexit. a sharp rise in oil prices after drone attacks on two processing plants in saudi arabia. calls for universities to be legally responsible for their students‘ mental health needs. what is a recipe for economic success ? what is a recipe for economic success? food and drink is one of our biggest exports in the uk and big questions about investment as a result of brexit. i am at this firm
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in manchester looking how business is preparing. what a weekend of sport we‘ve had. three days of intense competition at the solheim cup comes down to this, the final hole, europe just edge the usa to win back the trophy. and england beat australia in the final ashes test to draw the series and round off a remarkable summer of cricket. the last test may have been wind macro under sunny skies but grey conditions for england and wales, patchy rain or drizzle in the south, much brighterfurther patchy rain or drizzle in the south, much brighter further north patchy rain or drizzle in the south, much brighterfurther north but it feels a bit fresher and a cold night on the way tonight. all the details right here on breakfast. it‘s monday september the 16th. our top story. borisjohnson will hold his first face—to—face talks with the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker, later this morning. the prime minister says he‘s "cautiously optimistic" ahead of the talks, but has made clear that he‘ll reject any offer to delay brexit further. the bbc‘s adam fleming is in luxembourg where the meeting will take place. we know what is on the menu
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but not necessarily if there will be a breakthrough. good morning. hello, yes, the menu is snails, salmon and cheese. not sure about that myself. in terms of what they are discussing, of course, it is all about brexit. borisjohnson gave us an idea of his thinking in his column in the daily telegraph newspaper this morning, saying he passionately believes there is a new brexit deal to be had and if there is progress in the next few days, a very tight timescale, then he will go to brussels for the next summit of eu leaders on the 17th of october to finalise it. one thing he will not do if that deal does not materialise, he will reject any extension to the brexit process beyond the 31st of october. you talk to the eu side and they are much less optimistic. jean—claude juncker, his lunch companion, did an interview with german radio yesterday, saying time is running out and he is not optimistic that there are alternatives to the withdrawal agreement, to the bit of the deal about the irish border. he
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also said that no patriotically to a person would want to embrace a no—deal brexit because it would leave the country in a mess. but i suppose we will find out in a couple of hours when they finish their desert whether they have got anywhere. we will wait and see. thank you. the former labour mp chuka umunna is expected to launch a savage attack onjeremy corbyn today, in his first speech as the liberal democrat foreign affairs spokesman. mr umunna, who joined the lib dems injune, will criticise mr corbyn‘s handling of anti—semitism in the party, and call him an "apologist" for russia. our political correspondent jonathan blake joins us from bournemouth where the conference is taking place. it‘s been an eventful conference so farfor the lib dems. we have spoken to the leaderjo swinson on the programme this morning. is this going to be an explosive speech today? not necessarily but chuka umunna, like all of the mps that have come on board to the liberal democrats in recent weeks, has a bit of a job to do. while they have been welcomed
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into the fold, broadly speaking, they need to reassure lib dems members that they are one of them. that will be the message we hear from chuka umunna. "trust me, i‘m a lib dems now". just as the party has we try to carve a pass between labour on the left and the conservatives on the right, he will have a pop at both sides. his former boss, labour leaderjeremy corbyn, he will say as an apologist for the afar right he will say as an apologist for the a far right russian government and his supporters vilify and abuse anyone who dares to disagree with him and he will describe boris johnson as somebody who peddles hate and division. he will talk about the liberal democrats representing internationalism and liberalism, not nationalism and populism. he will say that is the new fault line in british politics and "we know where we stand". interesting to hear him speaking at the liberal democrats foreign affairs spokesman. the party now knows where it stands on brexit after adopting the policy yesterday to revoke article 50 if they win a general election even without a further referendum. thank you for
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joining us. jonathan blake in bournemouth. oil prices have jumped to a four—month high after drone strikes on two refineries in saudi arabia. the strikes knocked out 5% of the world‘s oil supply, but officials say they hope a third of the losses can be reversed today. houthi rebels have claimed responsibility for the attacks, in revenge for saudi involvement in the civil war in yemen, but the usa has claimed that iran is to blame. iran denies any involvement. universities should be legally responsible for students‘ mental health needs, according to a former health minister. sir norman lamb says lives are being put at risk because some universities are not keeping track of waiting lists for counselling. his comments come as an inquest opens into the death of ceara thacker, a student at liverpool university who took her own life last year. the university says it was deeply saddened by ceara‘s death and is working with the health services on changes. the discount supermarket chain aldi has announced a £40 million slide in profits this morning, despite sales rising by
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10%. it says plans to open more than 100 new stores across the uk over the next two years. sales topped the £11 billion mark but the firm is also embarking on a major building spree. it plans to more than 100 new stores across the uk over the next two years. chief executive giles hurley also said there were concerns about the impact of brexit on the supply chain. i can‘t guarantee the availability of any single product in the event of a disorderly brexit, but actually, that‘s no different from anyone else in the industry. i don‘t believe anybody can guarantee that. what we will do and are seeking to do is shield our customers from any ripple effects as possible. that means working very closely with the suppliers, seeking to increase our stock levels where that‘s possible and appropriate. have you ever considered swimming the english channel? i know you thought about it but said no. for most people, swimming the english channel once
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is impressive. but doing it for micro times. sarah thomas from colorado is more than half way though her world—record attempt at crossing the channel four times, non—stop. the 37—year—old, who had treatment for breast cancer last year, began the 84—mile challenge early yesterday morning. all the best. very good luck. we will be following her progress. back to our main story at seven minutes past eight on bbc breakfast. "we will be leaving on october 31st — no ifs, no buts." that‘s the warning from number ten ahead of brexit talks between the prime minister borisjohnson and the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker. the government hopes the threat of a no—deal brexit will force both sides to come to an agreement, but mps say leaving without a deal on october the 31st would break the law. let‘s speak now to the foreign secretary, dominic raab, who is in westminster. good morning. thank you forjoining us. good morning. thank you forjoining us. michel barnier has said he wants concrete proposals from downing street. have you got them? we have been very clear on the approach and the prime minister will reaffirm
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those with jean—claude juncker and michel barnier today, which is we wa nt to michel barnier today, which is we want to remove the anti—democratic backstop. we have set forward a range of technical proposals as to how we would do that. and our long term future relationship should be governed by a best in—class trade agreement with security cooperation and other areas of cooperation but with the uk behaving and free to act as an autonomous, self—governing third party. we will go through all the detail but led‘s be clear about this because i know we often echo the eu charge that none of the detail has been set out, of course they try to prise out as much detail that can either be criticised or picked off but what really need now is political will to get to that landing zone of a deal. i think it is there to be done. let‘s hope we have some more constructive talks. we have got the october council insight, on the 17th and 18th of october and there is a deal to be done by the eu have got to want it and move as well. if we could go back and i‘ve asked you this before, tell us about the details as you
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can, about the technical details to do with the backstop, what has changed? as you will remember, the withdrawal agreement had us signing up withdrawal agreement had us signing up to withdrawal agreement had us signing uptoa withdrawal agreement had us signing up to a whole suite of regulations and rules from economic policy, customs declarations and policy, right the way through to tax and social policy without any means to have any say of that and no means of exit. that will have to go. there will be alternative arrangements and a transition to a best in class free—trade agreement and we are confident that in that envelope, that strategic envelope, whilst there would need to be some checks, none of them would need to be at the border with northern ireland. that is the right way through, to respect the good friday agreement and the referendum. there is a workable solution for both sides. what is needed now is political will and some movement from the eu. what about the political will on the half of the db as well? are they signed up of the db as well? are they signed up to your suggestions? yes, the dup has been supportive, we continue to talk with them regularly and they wa nt to talk with them regularly and they want to be updated as the negotiations progress. but...
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and it is worth reminding ourselves that the previous withdrawal agreement put at risk the good friday agreement because it would have envisaged changing the status of northern ireland without the consent of the parties. the advantage of our proposals is that it will avoid that. let's talk about deadlines because you talk about the time is getting closer and borisjohnson has said over and over again and even today again that the uk is going to leave by the deadline whatever happens. if there is no deal and you say you are close to a deal and there is room for a deal, but if there is room for a deal, but if there is room for a deal, but if there is no deal, what is the plan then? i didn't quite say we were close to a deal, i think there is a deal to be done and i think boris johnson use the language cautiously optimistic but we need the eu side to move as well and he has been very clear with our international partners that the arm of friendship is extended. we want them to reciprocate and reach out. but if they are not able to do that, that is their politics and their considerations, then we will be leaving at the end of october, come what may. we are not going
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to be delaying or extending. we need some finality to this process. we need certainty for businesses and we need it for those that feel the trust in our democracy is being undermined. that goes directly against what parliament has said it wants and is now legislation. i don't think so, we will look very carefully at the legal in plications. this government will always comply with the law. equally, that was a very shoddy piece of legislation. what we have called the surrender bill which would effectively envisage multiple delays, conditions imposed which we could not resist from the eu, no matter how harsh or punitive and we would be paying £250 million per week gross for every week that we extended. i don‘t think that is in the interests of this country. just to be clear, are you saying you would ignore what parliament has laid down? to be very clear, we will comply with the law but we are going to look at a very forensic way what
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the implications of the legislation are and what they require and don‘t require in practice. we will look at that very carefully but i will give you an assurance that the government will always comply is the law, —— comply with the law, it goes without saying. so how would you do that? you say you are going to look very carefully at it. people watching might think, is it not clear? parliament has laid it down as legislation. i don't think the legislation. i don't think the legislation is entirely clear because there are all sorts of implications and variables involved. what i am assuring you is that we will comply with the law, we will be meticulous about that and we will look at all the different options we have under the legislation. but the prime minister wants this message above all, that there is a deal to be done. we are confident it can be done if there is well on both sides but we can‘t have any more delay and we will leave at the end of october, prefera bly we will leave at the end of october, preferably with a deal but if not, in any event. can i ask you about these comments from borisjohnson, comparing breaking free like the incredible hulk. we have heard from the european parliament brexit coordinator, describing those
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comments as infantile. what is your response? you always get this tittle tattle on the other side. the problem with these negotiations is you will always get people that don‘t want to deal or don‘t want us to succeed in this, commenting on either side. but what the prime minister is explaining is that we are going to break free from the shackles are going to break free from the s ha ckles of are going to break free from the shackles of not just are going to break free from the shackles of notjust the eu but the previous withdrawal agreement which would have effectively left us locked in the prison of a backstop with no democratic means of controlling or having a say over the rules that would apply to us, no means of exit. i think the prime minister is right to be absolutely clear that we are not going to accept that approach. and compare himself to the incredible hulk? you know... look, the reality is he is making a point about the shackles, the tighter they get, the more clear we are that we are going to resist and break free from them and i think thatis and break free from them and i think that is a good metaphor. thank you for joining that is a good metaphor. thank you forjoining us. chowy find out what is
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happening in the weather? matt is in holland park this morning —— should we find out. he has got a heron. good morning to the both of you. good morning, dan. ithink he the both of you. good morning, dan. i think he is eyeing up his breakfast, lots of koi carp in the pond. we are in holland park this morning in the west of london. glorious surroundings, this is the kyoto garden, a little space of contemplation and relaxation. it was a gift of the people of great britain from japan. holland park itself stretches back all the way to the 1600s, surrounding a jacobean mansion called coke castle initially, renamed after the earl of holland, whose wife, a little fun fa ct holland, whose wife, a little fun fact for you, was the first person in the uk to be able to grow dahlias so now you in the uk to be able to grow dahlias so now you know. a lovely start to the day in the surroundings, grey skies overhead at the moment. if we ta ke skies overhead at the moment. if we take a look at the forecast, in southern areas today, you are likely
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to see the grey conditions dominate throughout with some patchy rain or drizzle. much brighter with some sunshine further north, one or two showers in northern scotland. today, a bit ofa showers in northern scotland. today, a bit of a north—south split in temperatures as well, southern counties of england, 16 or 17 at the moment whereas in eastern scotland, only one or two celsius the north of the cold front you can see, much cooler air. from that cold front which is producing the cloud in wales, the midlands, east anglia and southern england, some outbreaks of rain or drizzle. nothing desperately heavy but it will come and go through the morning. parts of north wales, the north midlands and norfolk will brighten up later. a lovely, sunny day for many northern england and parts of eastern scotla nd england and parts of eastern scotland but elsewhere, more clout in western scotland and northern ireland and northern scotland, one or two showers pushing through on a fresh breeze although nowhere near as strong as what we saw in shetland through the weekend. temperatures today around 12—15 in the northern half of the uk whereas we could still hit 20 in the south. that is because we still have the mild air just about in play. that is
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swept away tonight, the cold front clears forjust away tonight, the cold front clears for just about all but we held onto the cloud in the channel islands and across cornwall, with patchy rain or drizzle here and there. with clear skies elsewhere, a cold night, temperatures may be as low as one or two in sheltered spots. a chilly commute tomorrow morning but lots of sunshine overhead. it will be a lovely, bright start for many with the sunny start and most will stay dry and sunny throughout. more cloud into scotland and northern ireland data and the western isles could see some rain. temperatures up a touch perhaps across scotland and northern ireland. but really the levels we should have all the time of year. into wednesday, clouds thickening up further in central and northern scotla nd further in central and northern scotland and a greater chance of rain. elsewhere, most is staying dry with a bit more cloud edging southwards through the day. the best of the sunshine the further south and west you are. temperatures on wednesday again roundabout where we should be for the time of year, mid teens to low 20s. through the rest of the week, high pressure just about holding on, to the east of us which will drag up the southerly wind so as well as increasing
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sunshine towards the end of the week and weekend, we will see temperatures left as well. we could see temperatures widely into the 20s by saturday. that is how your weather is looking in the glorious surroundings at holland park. back to you both in salford. 20 sounds lovely, thank you very much. i will take that. until a few years ago, any threat posed by "trolls" was limited to characters in fairy stories. remember them? those kind of trials? now that‘s the term for people who use social media to send hurtful and hateful comments — often to people in the public eye. today a new report has been published, offering advice on how best to deal with them. it‘s called don‘t feed the trolls and it was co—authored by the psychologist linda papadopoulos, whojoins us now along with the labour mp lucy powell, who is frequently targeted by trolls. good morning. thank you so much for joining us. lucy powell, let‘s start with you. tell us a bit about your own experience and how bad things have been. like any
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woman, especially women, in the public eye, in politics, or pop stars, as we have seen this week we get a huge amount of abuse online. death threats, you know, nasty comments, all the time. it depends what the topic is that if you hit a nerve, it can be absolutely inundating. i have taken the view for quite a long time, iam really taken the view for quite a long time, i am really glad to see this report today because what they are recommending is what i have practised for a while, which is blocked, mute, ignore, don‘t engage. i have very much started to use social media as a broadcast output mode, not as an input mode. i think, you know, that has helped but there are people around me, my star often, who manage my social media as well as me, so they will be looking at it, my family. so although i am quite resilient to it now, those around you can still get deeply affected bite. some of the stuff on there is truly horrible, threats to
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you and your family, there is truly horrible, threats to you and yourfamily, it is there is truly horrible, threats to you and your family, it is vile. there is truly horrible, threats to you and yourfamily, it is vile. do you and yourfamily, it is vile. do you think that people actually that angry or is it something that is projected through that medium particularly but would not happen if you met them in the street?” particularly but would not happen if you met them in the street? i mean, i think you met them in the street? i mean, ithinka you met them in the street? i mean, i think a bit now it is becoming off—line, too, some of the behaviour has become normalised online so it has become normalised online so it has given people a bit more confidence off—line. but i think definitely most of the people that send you horrible tweets and posts on social media would not dare say that to your face and if they did, you wouldn‘t then tell the whole world they had done it, you would probably just walk past them in world they had done it, you would probablyjust walk past them in the street and ignore them. i think we should operate the same kind of thing online that we would do off—line. thing online that we would do off-line. linda, from a psychologist‘s point of view, what is going on here? why is there this need to say horrible things? we have got some research on this now. there's a few things happening. i think generally, the anonymity takes down some of the barriers that you would have when you see
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somebody face—to—face. secondly, we have not had years of evolving so we can communicate from so far away that we don't see each other's faces and we are not able to empathise. the minute i would say something and see your action, that would moderate me but online you don't see that. thirdly, because we are so distant, it is kind of like you know when you are ina it is kind of like you know when you are in a car and you are more likely to shout at someone if they cut you up to shout at someone if they cut you up than if you are walking, why's that? that distance promotes this sense of, "i can feel my anger and i am safe vent", sol sense of, "i can feel my anger and i am safe vent", so i think that is happens to everybody but we know there is also a subset of people that have something that is called negative social potency which basically refers to the idea that they enjoy causing discord and disharmony. this is what trolls do, they come into a conversation, they throughout this vitriol and they sit back and they want to see what happens. we know they are attracted to this kind of discord. for this to work, you need to give it oxygen. how do you do that? you say it
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upset you and, " look how do you do that? you say it upset you and, "look at how do you do that? you say it upset you and, " look at what you are doing". you need to remember as well from a psychological point of view, attention is very validating, whether it is positive or negative, interestingly enough. it is like you are saying, anybody looking at it and engaging with itjust amplifies it. the real issue for me is, we are also giving these people a voice. backin also giving these people a voice. back in the day, i could rant at the tv and shout and say whatever i wanted but now if i speak to an mp and they retweet my vitriol, i now have that grandiosity, that feeling of being important. i think that is a big issue in our political system. lucy, have you ever thought... you obviously deal with it well and you can ignore it but have you thought, "i don‘t want this, i‘m out of this, i‘m going to go and do something else where i don‘t get attacked for everything i say on any issue"? all the time, yes! look, politics is particularly divided and divisive and emotional at the moment, you
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know, with the sort of brexit debate having shoehorned this huge divide into families, communities, and that is online as well. so yes, it is pretty grim. i think this is a challenge for us because it is going to put off normal people entering into politics and i think it is particularly putting off women because we get more of the abuse, if you are from a minority, a black and ethnic minority background, you get more abuse but i think women worry more abuse but i think women worry more about the impact on our families as well than may be men in these situations. lucy mentioned earlier about ignoring, so that is the point of your report, isn‘t it? what is your advice to people who are receiving nasty messages from trolls, what should you do? the first thing you need to do is ignore, the spec —— second thing you do is block and a third thing is ta ke do is block and a third thing is take care of your own mental health, 0k? take care of your own mental health, ok? this affects you, so speak to somebody about it, whether it is somebody about it, whether it is somebody at home or... make sure you
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are able to connect like that. if it is something that is sustained, then ta ke is something that is sustained, then take a screenshot and report it. there's organisations like the cc dh but in some cases, you need to get lawyers involved because it can escalate. the other point is, it is like human nature, 100 nice messages, one gnostic in which one will you remember? think of it like this, if you are walking down the street and some random person shouted something horrible at you, you would not engage them and say, "that's interesting, you think that about me? " you "that's interesting, you think that about me?" you would keep on walking and ignore them. it is the same thing, rubbish written on a bathroom wall, treat it as such. the mute button is my best friend. because they are then just shouting into outer space and i‘ve got no idea. the truth is away some of the mirror, the people who love you and the people who hate you, it is often to ignore both, and listen to those closest to you, they are normally the best. absolutely and i think in politics we are perhaps a bit more resilient because we face elections
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and that kind of thing so we take the good with the bad but seeing jesse nelson this week and the impact ona jesse nelson this week and the impact on a young woman, of sudden fame, and all the abuse that goes with that. take people taking their own lives. you don't have to be famous for its to happen. not at all, you don't i'd be famous, i do a lot of work with cyber billing which affects young people and parents. it is something that stays with you. —— cyber bullying. you guys have to remember that social media is new, it isa remember that social media is new, it is a child, a teenager itself so we are playing catch up on one of the best things we can do is take ca re of the best things we can do is take care of a mental health and ignore it and get the support we need. and that goes for everybody who is watching. thank you forjoining us. and jesy nelson‘s programme is available on the iplayer. coming up on breakfast this morning. ben‘s at a malt loaf factory in manchester to see how businesses are coping with the uncertainty over brexit. good morning. good morning. i‘m good morning. i‘m fascinated good morning. i‘m fascinated by good morning. i‘m fascinated by a good morning. i‘m fascinated by a of good morning. i‘m fascinated by a of i‘m fascinatel the good morning. i‘m fascinated by a of the machines down here. we are in trafford park just
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the machines down here. we are in trafford parkjust outside manchester, and fascinating to see how they do this. automation is a key pa rt how they do this. automation is a key part of what they do but they make 600,000 of these things every day, nearly 3 million a week, 150 million a year. today, there are two different reports out looking at the state of the economy. we are here because food and drink is one of our biggest exports. it is fascinating to see this stuff being sold right around the world but made here in manchester. let me introduce you to tony, the operations manager. good morning. i will go this way. you have been involved in this for quite a long time, you have been making it since 1938 caminati but you‘ve been here more than 20 years, it is family affair. yes, it is a family affair, even my daughter and my son we re affair, even my daughter and my son were ca re. affair, even my daughter and my son were care. my son is an apprentice engineer and my daughter is a line leader. i imagine you have seen a place change quite a lot with a lot of automation and machinery to make it more efficient. that's right, it isa it more efficient. that's right, it is a blend of robots and manual people working on the lines as well. give mea people working on the lines as well.
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give me a sense of what you make every day, it is staggering. probably around 600,000 a day, around 3 million a week and roughly around 3 million a week and roughly around 150 million a year. you have your work cut out, tony, thank you to —— thanks very much. that gives you a sense of the scale of the place. there is so much they are contending with right now, lots of uncertainty, not least because of brexit but this place says, "we are dealing with it, we can cope with it, just let us know what is happening". i will introduce you to the boss a bit later but now, the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. very warm weather across southern areas during sunday, not quite as warm as that for much of the week but mostly dry with a bit of rain in
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northern parts. some chilly nights but getting warmer by the end of the week, particularly into saturday. today, patchy light rain and drizzle moving southward in southern england. a bit of rain and showers in the far north—west. elsewhere, brighter skies developing in north wales, through northern england and full some in northern ireland. maximum temperature 15—18 in the north, 21 in the south. cooler than it was yesterday. the patchy rain not helping the situation. through the night, a few mist and fog patches into tuesday morning, it could turn a bit chilly. temperatures for many of us getting into single figures. on tuesday, for most, the mist and fog clearing away and there will be plenty of sunshine. cloud increasing across scotla nd sunshine. cloud increasing across scotland and northern ireland later on. with those sunny spells it will still feel fairly pleasant. temperatures getting up
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to 20 degrees. high pressure is largely in charge of the weather. that week weather system across the north bringing outbreaks of rain across scotland, northern ireland and a bit of cloud across the north of england. some sunshine on wednesday, temperature is very similar at about 17-20. temperature is very similar at about 17—20. high pressure is still there into thursday. the weather fronts getting the way to the north, so with that influencing things it will be dry again on friday and some sunshine for the end of the week. getting warmer, especially on saturday. goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news with alice baxter and sally bundock. price spike — markets see a huge surge in the price of oil after attacks at oil refineries in saudi live from london, that‘s our top story on monday the 16th of september. brent crude initially surged almost 20% following the attacks — and president trump has now authorised the release of strategic
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us oil reserves. also in the programme. industrial output in china grows at its weakest pace in more than 17 years — as it faces rising tariffs from the us. and both those factors have meant european stocks start the week on the backfoot. and going meatless — we‘ll be talking to one firm taking advantage of the plant—based revolution. today we want to know if you thought you were being called into a redudancy meeting who would you take as your emotional support person? a man in new zealand chose a clown. let us know — just use the hashtag #bbcbizlive.

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