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tv   BBC Newsroom Live  BBC News  September 16, 2019 11:00am-1:00pm BST

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you're watching bbc newsroom live — it's11am and these are the main stories this morning: borisjohnson is about to meet the european commission president the prime minister holds his first for the first time amid caution face to face meeting on both sides of any with the european commission swift agreement on brexit. president, jean claude juncker, saying he‘s cautiously optimistic about progress in the brexit talks. i don't think we'll get a deal today hello, this is bbc newsroom live. but i think we will make progress the headlines. borisjohnson says he still believes a deal can be done before the brexit today. the prime minister and steve borisjohnson meets backley the brexit secretary meeting the european commission president deadline but insists he is not for the first time — saying he's cautious willing to delay brexit jean—claude juncker today and i about prospects for the talks. beyond the end of october. backley the brexit secretary meeting jean—claudejuncker today and i am confident we can make progress and we‘ll have the latest get a deal before october 31. from luxembourg and westminster. oil prices surge after drone attacks on saudi arabian facilities also this lunchtime. we are trying to see what other knocked out five percent drone attacks on major possibilities to move if it is of global supply. saudi oilfacilities, the united states releases these possible and to do that we need to universities should be legally receive some new proposals. that is bound to provide mental health satellite images to back its claim support to students, according that iran was behind them. very difficult to say. oil prices surge after drone attacks to a former health minister. a climate scientist says he‘s scared on saudi arabian facilities knocked by the extreme weather events such out 5% of global supply. the uk should advance its climate targets by 10 years, as the melting of ice, according to a leading scientist. hurricanes and wildfires that are happening sooner than expected.
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universities should be legally bound to provide mental health universities have been criticised support to students, by a former health minister according to a former for being in the dark over student health minister. mental health needs. let's get more now, on the news that oil prices have risen sharply the uk should advance its climate targets by 10 years, as a result of saturday's attack according to a leading scientist. on two saudi arabian facilities, discount supermarket chain aldi which caused a big slow down in production. yesterday, president trump stopped short of directly accusing announces a 26% fall in profit. iran, but suggested possible military action once the perpetrator was known — saying the us was ‘locked and loaded.‘ iran denies any involvement in the attacks. our security correspondent frank good morning. welcome to bbc newsroom live. gardner is with me now. i'm joanna gosling. borisjohnson is about to hold obviously a very powerful target because of the impact globally that his first face—to—face it can have. what is the latest one who is behind it? the rebels in talks with the president of the european commission, jean—claude juncker. the prime minister said he was "cautiously optimistic" ahead of the talks, but has made clear yemen still say that they did it that he'll reject any offer that saudi arabia has been attacking to delay brexit further. trying to dislodge them. they took the meeting, in luxembourg, marks the start of a busy week over yemen five years ago and saudi for the prime minister. arabia has in carrying out a pretty
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on tuesday, all eyes will be on the supreme court as 11 justices intensive aerial bombardment of that examine whether the government's country trying to dislodge them. it suspension of parliament is lawful. has failed and they have been and then on wednesday, the european parliament in strasbourg will discuss brexit. stepping up their attacks, usually eu leaders are pressing firing ballistic missiles at saudi the prime minister to come cities but this attack is up with new proposals to achieve an agreement. arriving at a separate meeting in brussels, unprecedented. a number of the belgian and finnish foreign ministers, said the european union had limited room for manoeuvre. intelligence agencies including the germans and the french are examining the evidence carefully, with the saudis, to try and work out what we are trying to see what are the possibilities weapons were fired and by whom and to move if it's possible, and to do that, we need to receive some new proposals from london. from where because the americans do so without that, it is very not believe they were fired from difficult to say something. there is a european council yemen but a different direction, the on the 17th of october. north west. they already, mike there, we will see with michel barnier, what are the proposals for the new initiatives coming from london. pompeo, has accused iran of being we don't have the capacity behind this. either way, to take initiative. you know that there is a deal. pompeo, has accused iran of being behind this. eitherway, it pompeo, has accused iran of being behind this. either way, it is certainly an iranian, or iranian we are in favour of such a deal. is it possible to have some amendments without any proxy access that did it and it has difficulty with the red line of the european union, cause catastrophic damage. it is cut but without the backstop, in half the oil production of the it is very difficult. world's second largest oil producer, saudi arabia, which will take weeks
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we have to remain open and see to repair. in the short—term, the what happens in the domestic politics in the united kingdom. saudis committed up from reserve stocks but we will know in the next two months whether the damage is of course, the european union going to be lasting. in the last two is always ready to negotiate when a proper proposal from the united kingdom's side is presented. hours, there have been more attacks so far i haven't seen any proposal to come promised so it is ratcheted that would compensate the current backstop. up to come promised so it is ratcheted up the stakes for the saudis and the cost of this war for them. what is let's cross now to brussels and talk to our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. the likely retaliation and the effo rts the likely retaliation and the efforts to stop this happening ain? efforts to stop this happening again? nobody wants to expand the the first face—to—face meeting between boris johnson the first face—to—face meeting between borisjohnson and war in yemen into a real war between jean—claude juncker. between borisjohnson and jean-claude juncker. yes, and it's been quite a long time coming. it's saudi arabia and iran. there is a lot of chest beating going on, quite a few weeks, months since mr donald trump using the phrase locked johnson walked into number ten, now and loaded for the second time. iran sitting down over lunch in has said we have got the cells that luxembourg, they will be shortly. can hit every us installation, every jean—claude juncker arrived a short base, within 2000 kilometres. —— we time ago and he was just very brief on the way in, he just said he have missiles. the reality is that time ago and he was just very brief on the way in, hejust said he had patients and he was still waiting. if this ever turned into a real we know that mrjohnson apparently
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says that his message will be that shooting war, what we have seen so he wants a deal but if he doesn't far would be a foretaste because a get one, he's prepared to leave and will seek to leave on the 31st of rainier missiles would rain down on october. i thinkjean—claude desalination plants etc and the juncker‘s question will be, how will response from the native states with that happen? they do want to see devastating, it would bomb iran's what mrjohnson has to say because military back to the stone age. so the view from here, as you head from the view from here, as you head from the europe ministers and foreign it is not in either countries interest and the saudis who are ministers gathered here in brussels being consulted by the americans on how do you want us to respond are today... ministers gathered here in brussels today. . . we ministers gathered here in brussels today... we are just seeing pictures of the two of their meeting and saying let's hold on. let's examine shaking hands. yes, and the view this first and it is not entirely from the eu side is that the uk has clear who fired this and where the to present some written proposals weapons came from. where they really and table something in the drones or whether cruise missiles? negotiations. it is now something kuwait says it spotted a tone at like 25 days since borisjohnson met that time flying low over the palace in kuwait city before turning on its the german chancellor angela merkel and they discussed 30 days as a lights and flying towards saudi arabia. so there is a lot of mystery reasonable timeframe in which the uk going on about this. what is not a could present something and mr johnson said that was a blistering mystery is this enormous oil timetable he would accept. we have
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producing giant has been hit in the pulsing heart of its economy and just seen at michel barnier, the that has really hurt it. so the cost eu's chief negotiator who is of being involved in the war in continuing in that post, having been a tough negotiator throughout the yemen is really coming home for the deliberation so far throughout the saudis. what do you think are the three years and borisjohnson is likely next steps in this? what is alsojoined by his likely next steps in this? what is likely to happen? i think if the three years and borisjohnson is also joined by his team. three years and borisjohnson is alsojoined by his team. you'll be accompanied by the secretary steve americans can prove, and that is a barclay —— he will be accompanied big if, if they can improve with and by david frost. all the key players getting together here now intelligence which stands up to international scrutiny, that iran and effectively there is five days was nine this, then there will be to go until the 30 day timetable was moves in the us security council to condemn them, it will already be discussed. nothing formal with that discussed later today in the us. —— but it's all part of the picture of a very tight deadlines. yes, that 30 the us. the first thing that has to days, i think it was to be read as a happen is that united nations. the rough guideline, really, of what they could be aiming for. the two big targets which have been hit concern from the eu side is what will have to upgrade their defences. they have heard over the last few days and over the weekend, today, is they have air defences. i have seen the various concentric rings of from the prime minister, from security around defending against ministers in london, is optimism. land attacks. the happier defences
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they believe progress is being made, but not against the drones. the drones are tiny. they are the size a deal can be secured, but from the or can be. a drone can be eu side, nothing has been put forward. nothing that addresses all absolutely, it doesn't have to be of the eu's concerns and on the that big to carry an explosive crucial issue of the irish backstop, payload but these were much bigger. and what the eu says it needs, is it they have got long—range sophisticated ones the iranians help something if the uk side wants to them develop. so farfrom being prevent that provision in the current deal that achieves the same thing. on the one hand, there is bombed back to surrender, are actually upgrading designer concern about whether the uk is abilities a heart saudi arabia. —— going to come up with something. they hear from the uk site that may be it's still too early to do that because that might get knocked down, but the eu view is that has got to upgrading their abilities to heart saudi arabia. so i think the saudis come soon and patience is wearing a will respond by hitting targets they bit thin on some eu capitals. they have already hit several times or it really wa nt bit thin on some eu capitals. they really want a deal and they really wa nt to really want a deal and they really will intensify a push for peace want to amend to all of this talks. but peace talks up and going uncertainty —— really want an end to this uncertainty. there is a on intermittently for years and have keenness to find a deal but it's not achieved anything. the two sides gotta be something that are not yet exhausted. thank you fundamentally addresses those around the irish border. they would not be very much frank.
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new research suggests that many british workers aren't getting wasting their time today if they basic employment rights. thought it was completely useless, the resolution foundation would they? so what do you think are found that some employers were ignoring their obligation to provide paid holiday, the best hopes of what might come the minimum wage and even payslips. out of this? of course not and the it wants the government to do more to enforce the law. here's katie prescott eu is absolutely clear, michel there are certain things we take for granted about working — the minimum wage, payslips, barnier, jean—claude juncker, eu and, of course, holidays. leaders and ministers that they are they're part of the contract we make with our employer. open to any suggestions that are put not getting them is against the law. forward and they are happy to sit on the other side of the table and wait but the resolution foundation to hear those so the trouble is that has found it is not as straightforward as that. they do need, whatever it is, needs one in ten people aren't getting a payslip. one in 20 aren't to be in the eu's language "legally receiving paid holiday. and 400,000 aren't being operable" which means watertight in paid the minimum wage. and it's hotels and restaurants that a legal sense and able to be drafted are the worst offenders, followed by childcare and security work. into a form that can be in working the government has spent money order if a deal is going to be done to clamp down on the issue, but it's difficult to tackle, by the end of october so they are often hidden in plain sight. keen to sit down and i think what and it's the vulnerable that's suffer most. katie prescott, bbc news. can be achieved today is probably some clear indication from the uk side of the way it thinks it can
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meet those concerns on the eu side and those concerns are keep the irish border open by having no new 4 million people have fled the political and economic infrastructure on the border, no crisis in venezuela. 40,000 of them made the short trip checks on the island of ireland, across the sea to the small caribbean islands of trinidad something that protects the peace and tobago — it'sjust a 7 milejourney. process and an overall fundamental trinidad has taken in more venezuela ns per capita than any other country, nature of how that works in ireland, but life isn't simple for those who arrive, the cooperation between north and and some locals have made it clear they're not welcome. south, all of the cross—border as part of a new series exploring the global migrant cooperation. all of those things are crisis, our correspondent, ashley john—ba ptiste, what the eu says any deal has to sent this report from the islands. preserve because that is the status chanting quo today and the eu's view is that these venezuelans are being sold is what has to continue into the false dreams and promises. anger on the streets of trinidad. future. some locals argue that the vast our assistant political editor, number of venezuela ns, norman smith, is in westminster. who have fled to the small island, are just here forjobs, not asylum. we keep hearing from the eu that we don't have housing in trinidad. we don't have proper health care. there have to be formal, concrete proposals and they need to be legally operable and we hear from this site about the talk of what they are just coming from one might form the foundation around disaster into another disaster. and with an election coming up next year, the message from the authorities is clear. northern ireland only agreements. what is your sense of how much there the venezuelan problem
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is for venezuelans. actually has been in the this little island cannot be the solution to millions conversations? the government insist or hundreds of thousands they have put forward proposals on a of migrants, leaving venezuela. bit of paper. they have certainly put forward plenty of ideas, they say, which the eu knows about and they say they are not going to put manuel romero was a judge in venezuela. anything down in black—and—white because they feel that in the after seeing colleagues jailed, for not following government negotiations, the eu willjust bank rulings, he fled with his wife them, reject them and demand more so and kids last summer. since arriving, he has we're not going to see any firm worked as a fisherman, proposals on a bit of paper until we a carpenter, and now, a security guard get very, very close indeed, until in a shopping centre. the october the 17th deadline and i think what we will get today is quite hard ball, actually, from borisjohnson. i quite hard ball, actually, from boris johnson. i don't quite hard ball, actually, from borisjohnson. i don't think he will doa borisjohnson. i don't think he will do a hulk and go on the rampage but trinidad and tobago has no laws i think it will be a tough message, for protecting asylum seekers, namely don't think no deal is out of so until recently, venezuelans had the occasion just because parliament has passed a law which they think no right to live or work. ties boris johnson's has passed a law which they think ties borisjohnson‘s hands. boris johnson's view is on october 31, if we don't have a deal, we will be there have been accusations
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from human rights groups leaving the eu come what may and the that the government has been deporting people with approved asylum claims reason he is pressing that message from the united nations refugee agency. very ha rd the government refused multiple reason he is pressing that message very hard is in part to put the requests for interview with the bbc, squeeze on the eu but also to put to address these concerns. in some attempt to manage the squeeze on mps here so they the crisis, the government created don't think that they can play for a registration period injune. for two weeks, any venezuelan time, there will be a bit more delay and they can just hold out for their could register for the right to live preferred option, which may be and work, but the centres allocated for processing were chaotic and confusing. another referendum, may be a revoking article 50, may be another deal, staying in the customs union single market, it is to concentrate how many people are waiting now, here, where we are? imean... minds, if you like. albeit, i think there's hundreds, if not thousands, there is a fair amount of caution there's so many people. yes. privately about the prospects for all i see is a mass of desperate humanity needing help. as we approached the deadline, securing an agreement. i was told by police blocked off the line. one of those close to mrjohnson the government declared that this morning it is a tough ask and all unregistered venezuela ns would return to illegal status. michael gove this morning was sounding confident but warning that there is not going to be a breakthrough today. there's this last—minute rush. and the desperation from these i don't think we will get a deal venezuelans is so palpable. you can see it here, today but i think we will make just people rushing to be able to get through and be registered. progress. the prime minister and panic, anxiety. steve barclay a meeting jean—claude look. juncker later today and i'm the government announced,
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confident we can make progress and in the following weeks, that 16,500 venezuelans get a deal before october 31. had been registered. that is a number significantly lower than the estimated number thought it seems to be that the british to be in the country. government has come up with loads of ideas and now it's time for the eu as it stands, the government refuses to and it's the eu, at least to reopen registration. according to the foreign secretary those who weren't registered dominic raab, that now needs to show are in limbo, but so are those some pragmatism and flexibility. families who made it through. what we really need now is political will, to get to that permits are limited to a year's work landing zone of a deal, allowance, and venezuelan children cannot attend school. and i think it's there to be done, so let's hope we have some manuel registered in time, but he is concerned for the future more constructive talks. of his 17 and five—year—old kids. if you were deported back we've got the october council after a year, do you know what would happen to you? within sight on the 17th and 18th of october and there is a deal to be done by the eu have got to want it, jail. jail, prison? the eu have got to move as well. yeah. if you leave venezuela, borisjohnson has said he has you are a traitor. identified a landing zone. i have to for now, a permit provides families, say, it looks like a narrow one with like manuel's, some sense of safety but as the crisis continues in venezuela, many continue potholes and traitors across the to flee their country. ru nway inevitably, this is only a temporary potholes and traitors across the runway because he seems to be suggesting an all ireland regime for solution to a problem that isn't going away. farm and food regulations but that ashley john—ba ptiste, only covers about 30% of all
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cross—border trade. the eu will want bbc news, trinidad. to know what happens with manufacturing goods, other goods which are transported across the if you've ever complained that sorting out your rubbish border, then that is the issue of from your recyclable waste is a chore, spare a thought the northern ireland assembly, the for the 24 million dup who seem to be insistent that residents of shanghai. they have to have some sort of lock, authorities in the chinese city have just introduced a set of complex at stormont lock, on any future rules for household rubbish — regulations. my impression is that to make it easier to burn. in brussels, they will want what is the bbc‘s china called dynamic alignment, which, correspondent robin brant. translated into english, means any lunch is done at chun wei's place. future regulations would have to be automatically adopted by belfast. now comes the big sort. there are five full stomachs around that would mean the northern ireland the table and an array assembly, if and when it is up and of leftovers on it. running, ceding control to brussels. so, i think we've got plastic. i don't think the dup will be on the mm—hmm. market for that so there are quite a kind of shellfish? mm—hmm. few hitches and glitches with the but not the bones, not the shells? current thinking. we are hearing yes, it's too big, it's too hard. from borisjohnson. all of this now needs to fit into shanghai's new categories for what gets thrown out from 24 million people. let's go to bournemouth now do you not think that china has where one of the new liberal a big enough problem democrat mps chuka umunna is due with what goes into its air, to deliver a speech that burning rubbish at the party conference, is not the answer?
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where he is expected to criticise the leader of his former that's why we classify! partyjeremy corbyn. consider what has happened since if we put all together, then burn it, then we will have conference gathered last year. i know i wasn't here. lots of youare. pollution to the air. black one for the dry. shanghai's problem is particularly acute. youare. if his travel ban wasn't a local communist party official talked to us about a garbage siege. for years, the bin men would take everything away. enough, we have watched donald trump sorting was mostly done telling for congress women of colour by scavengers, most to go home. that is racism, pure and of it was then buried. but in the world's most simple, and what a disgrace it is. populous nation, that's changing, because of this. on the very edge of shanghai, a man—made mountain of rubbish, —— four congress women. and abroad, potentially poisoning the land and water underneath. shanghai's big push to get people to sort their rubbish at home he is seeking to pull the us out of is aimed at achieving a couple of things — getting them to think the paris climate agreement, he is a lot more about consuming less. flouting wto rules in the pursuit of what he calls fair trade and he has pulled the us out of the iran getting them, as well, to think about throwing nuclear deal. then you look at out far fewer things that can't be recycled.
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china. in china, we are witnessing but there is one thing that violent and repressive scenes in china wants to use a lot more of and it is this. hong kong with the disproportionate this is the biggest incinerator use of force against the protesters, of rubbish in the world. laogang energy centre generates calling into question china's commitment to upholding hong kong's electricity by burning rubbish — way of life and the two systems, one country model which demands the rule 3 million tons of it a year. it's the future for china, of law, human rights and democracy so says the government. be observed. moved to russia. but there's long been concern about poisonous emissions. russia's president putin has claimed international liberalism is obsolete and when he made those comments, he also made remarks which amounted mounted thinly veiled homophobia and suggested that trump's racist rhetoric was justified, given and on that plan to burn more, well, "immigrants kill, plunder and rhetoric was justified, given "immigrants kill, plunderand rape he doesn't think it's the answer. with impunity". this, of course, is the man who went into another country, ukraine, and annex part of the crimea. in kashmir, the abolition of the region's special time is not something people living near the world's biggest incinerator say they have. status by the indian government and the arrest in human rights abuses we have seen subsequently in the area a few miles away, a group
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should be a cause of alarm around the world. in short, across the of local men approached us. world, nationalist populism, this they claim that cancer pernicious mantra that nations rates here are higher. should be homogenous and one people the astounding thing was, isa should be homogenous and one people is a superior over another, is they were on—duty policemen. making strides. savini dominates the fact they were willing to talk to us shows how potent still china's battle against pollution is. italian politics. public life has robin brant, bbc news, been distorted and hungary for on the outskirts of shanghai. power. ed turkey and brazil are the uk's former chief scientist, professor sir david king, says he's scared by the speed at which the climate is changing in response to global warming. speaking to the bbc, he's called for the uk undermining democracy. a battle is to advance its climate targets raging between democracy on one hand and a desiccated authoritarianism on by 10 years. the other. the liberal democrats are we never anticipated that the arctic the other. the liberal democrats are the only party that can get into office which is capable of meeting this challenge in britain today. cic would virtually have disappeared by 2018, 2019. the net result is
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massive challenges around the world. you see, you cannot defend a liberal extreme weather events rolling out rule is based order abroad if you so year after year with massive loss of openly flout the rules at home. that life. rising sea levels, changes in brings me to borisjohnson. boris weather patterns, affecting farmers johnson has facilitated the takeover and everybody. is this a scary of her majesty's government by the scenario? of course it is. and how re m na nts of of her majesty's government by the remnants of the vote to leave should we react as you and beings to campaign, an outfit that was not this scenario? we have to all pull only found guilty of lying during together and understand challenges the 2016 referendum in relation to its claims on the nhs by the and act to stop it —— human beings. statistics authority but was found his comment follow a warning guilty of found cheating and to parents from a group breaking the law by the electoral of psychologists at the university of bath that rising numbers of children are being treated commission. now, as he seeks to for ‘eco—anxiety.‘ they warn parents are ‘terrifying their youngsters with talk of climate catastrophe.‘ with me now is caroline force through this catastrophic hickman a psychologist from the university of bath. no—deal brexit, the prime minister has shut down parliament and he is threatening to break the law if necessary. the interesting thing about this is the tory right who have taken over that party, they is that real? parents terrifying like nothing more than to bang on designer youngsters about climate about incarcerating more and more change? i don't think it isjust
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people who break the law but strangely, they think they should be a different approach to their pa rents change? i don't think it isjust parents fighting themselves or causing fear in the children, i lawbreaking. as he seeks to force think the children are picking up the information from social media. the uk out of the european union, he and from the press and news reports will become ever reliant on his from the summer. the children are frightened because they are seeing friend president trump his political the amazon burning, health storms in playbook he now follows. president spain and the arctic running so they trump has always been clear, it will are picking up on it. what we are be america, not britain, first. interested in is who they can talk to about it. they are coming back beyond brexit, cosying up to from school talking about what they have been talking about in the president trump, what is the foreign playground with friends. so they need to be of the good places to policy of this government? what is theirforeign policy talk about these fears. when you say policy of this government? what is their foreign policy strategy? policy of this government? what is theirforeign policy strategy? who knows? i've got no clue. but what is they are frightened and the tent you coagis they are frightened and the tent you clear that we will not see the world coag is being used —— the term you leadership on the world stage required from the new occupant of number ten. he thinks of himself as a modern winston churchill. coag is being used —— the term you coagisis coag is being used —— the term you coag is is being used. fear of the churchill was the prime minister, of unknown is normal. being frightened course, who signed the atlantic and willing to talk to a therapist charter and played a really important role founding the liberal
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is on another level. how do you international order. what about borisjohnson? international order. what about boris johnson? he's been distinguish? that level of concern. international order. what about borisjohnson? he's been busy kicking out winston churchill's relatives from the tory party. this you‘re absolutely right. we all have fears anxieties and as soon you see the news it will cause some anxiety. brings me to her majesty's often those can be assured. so they opposition. i know a bit about the respond to reassurance and we feel better afterwards and anxiety goes opposition! the labour party like to down. the problem with this anxiety think of itself as a champion of is that it is going up because there liberal values at home and abroad clement attlee and ernest bevan are more world events which create played pivotal roles in the founding more anxiety. there is no end to it of nato but this is the party of and we do not know what will happen. and anxieties also shared globally. attlee and bevan, this isjeremy corbyn's labour. you cannot be a champion of liberalism if you are we have uncertainty with tipping a p pa re ntly champion of liberalism if you are apparently subject to a formal points and more information coming investigation by the equality and in. we have leaders in the human rights commission for institutional racism against jewish scientific world like the gentleman you had earlier and david people. you cannot be a champion of liberalism when your supporters think it is acceptable to abuse, attenborough, all of those things served to raise anxiety and alarm vilify and deselect anyone who dares
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question the leader, and you cannot people. that alarm and anxiety is claim to be liberal when the incremental but as a result of political editor of the bbc needs to environmental awareness and ecological awareness about the ta ke political editor of the bbc needs to take a bodyguard to your conference. climate crisis, i would not to say there is anything wrong with these children. otheranxieties there is anything wrong with these children. other anxieties may be the children. other anxieties may be the child is afraid of going to school. you would address the fear of going and then you look atjeremy corbyn's to school. it is a social anxiety. a foreign policy positions, acting as school phobia. but this ecological an apologist for a hard right anxiety is projected more widely. it russian government that thinks it is is an environmental fantasy or 0k to russian government that thinks it is ok to poison people on british soil, projection into the future. so lauding authoritarian regimes in imagining what is coming down the venezuela and iran, failing to road. has that not always happen? every generation has things to be frightened of whether it is war, support... attlee and bevan helped nuclear threat, terrorism, everyone found nato, jeremy corbyn and those around him want to abolish it and goes through it. you are absolutely what unites bothjohnson and corbyn right. those things tend to be localised. they don‘t tend to be is the fact they both want to leave widespread across the moral world. the european union, the biggest champion of liberalism in our part not necessarily, terrorism fears, of the global neighbourhood. to coin all of those have been, nuclear a phrase, jeremy corbyn would be
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fears, war, they are all big issues intensely relaxed about brexit. it's beyond understanding and obviously time for a change and someone who i at the time you are in it going back know that can provide the leadership to what you were saying about being this country needs, jo swinson. unable to soothe by saying everything will be all right, in any crisis you do not know how long it will go on for. that will always apply. yes, but war and terrorism underjo swinson's premiership, events and natural disasters tend to be localised. there are parts of the which kind of rolls off the tongue, world not involved in them. so it is i like that. underjo swinson's not completely global. the climate premiership, we can breathe a progressive breath of fresh air into emergency is absolutely global. so british politics. liberal democrats we may look at the window here and are internationalists. this is at the heart of who we are as a party. see london isn‘t flooded at the it flows through everything we do. moment, large parts of the we believe in tearing down walls, restau ra nt moment, large parts of the restaurant are and predictions are not building them. we believe in that london may be as well in the future. so there is no way to get working together through multilateral organisations, not away from it. what you say to these standing alone, and we believe that kids? first of all i say that they to tackle the biggest issues facing us make perfect sense and these to tackle the biggest issues facing us today from the climate emergency
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to terrorism, that the uk at the anxieties are perfectly reasonable. table achieving consensus i think you won‘t need to understand internationally is what we need to them and reassure them in that sense. you can‘t promise them that see. perhaps now more than ever, uk everything will be all right because foreign policy is yearning for a we have no guarantees. we have no clear liberal democrat values, a guarantees what will happen, one way or the other but what you need to liberal government, a liberal democrat government would not be see is that it is good to talk to us tied to outdated tropes or biases about it. that you need to feel but would be clear that the uk must safe, to talk to your family about continue to work with allies from it and your parents or at school. across the world, playing a leading and we will talk it through. but we role in the eu and other international institutions. withjo won‘t just give you and we will talk it through. but we won‘tjust give you facts and figures but how it feels as well, swinson as our prime minister, we and show you how to actually engage will revive our reputation on the with these frightening things that world stage and get on with helping we haven‘t quite got the answers for improve the lives of people across the world and here at home. as yet. but we need to work towards getting the answers together with liberal democrats, we got a duty to the children. part of the problem is do this, to defend the values of pa rents a re the children. part of the problem is parents are worried about seeing too much or too little and what is human rights, democracy and equality and as your liberal democrat shadow really important is that parents are talking to the children in ways that foreign secretary, i promise you i will do everything i can to stand up the child can understand. —— saying. for a truly global britain. thank you very much, conference. but also don‘t shield them from some of the global things going on. the david attenborough documentary was brilliant for that, i know children
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studio: shooker or not, the former and parents watch that together and labourmp studio: shooker or not, the former labour mp once heavily tipped as posit and talked about things happening elsewhere in the world. my being a leader of the labour party research into the children in the when he left earlier this year became an independent and now here mall leaves as well as the uk, and he is as liberal democrat mp and they are facing immediate threat. thank you very much. theirforeign he is as liberal democrat mp and their foreign spokesman —— he is as liberal democrat mp and theirforeign spokesman —— chuka ummuna. he was saying a strong if you‘ve been to a classical criticism ofjeremy corbyn, his music concert in recent years, you‘ll have heard the announcement asking you to "please turn off your mobile former party leader. he said you phone as the performance cannot defend liberal rules —based is about to start". but now the bbc philharmonic orchestra is encouraging its audiences to do the opposite. democracy is a board if you flout tim muffett went along them at home. he said labour cannot to find out more. bea a classical concert where phone use them at home. he said labour cannot be a champion of liberalism if you isn‘t frowned upon... are currently subject to a formal but welcomed... omg. investigation by the equality and german rights commission for institutional racism against jewish people —— equality and human rights we have whole generations of people now who expect, commission. when you deselect anyone for example, to watch the telly while having their phone on, who questions the leader, you cannot who have their phone on during conversations. claim to be pro—when the bbc and we want to embrace that. political editor need to take a bodyguard to your conference. —— you so, at this prom‘s concert
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cannot claim to be liberal. at london‘s royal albert hall, the audience hasn‘t been told to switch their phones off. far from it. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in bournemouth. we are encouraging people to have their phones on during the concert, on silent. and we‘re providing tweet—length it was pretty hard hitting. yes, but programme notes throughout i think this was a charm offensive the performance, to guide people through the music in real—time. addressing the liberal democrat conference as their foreign affairs it might say, you know, spokesman for the last time —— for tell you a little bit about the conductor or it might say the first time. he accepted there listen out for a beautiful clarinet solo just coming up. so it talks you through was scepticism that this was a move the different stages he made for his own political self of the performance, interests. that wasn't the case, he it's really helpful. wasn't trying to climb the greasy pole and it once one of the best is there an argument for leaving technology out of this? decisions he had ever made. he this is a classical music concert! i know, there's definitely an argument and i was curious about this myself, thanked them from the start for the because i wouldn't normally use a mobile phone. i would be very focused and i might welcome. he read from their be quite cross about somebody using a mobile phone! the bbc philharmonic plan to offer phone updates constitution, described himself as a at all their concerts this season. social democrat with liberal values, social democrat with liberal values, this prom is one of the first so going out of his way to convince the party membership eden times it‘s been trialled. i think it's disturbing a bit. bournemouth that he is one of them not distracting at all, for people trying to listen?
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and he had criticism forjeremy no, no, i think it gives everyone corbyn, describing him as an a chance to enjoy it. apologist for a far right russian i preferjust to let government and laying into the prime the music take over, minister as well, saying the rather than follow exactly government had been taken over by the remnants of the vote leave what i'm listening to. campaign. on broader policy issues you think some people see in his role as foreign affairs people on their phones and get a bit annoyed? spokesman, talking about internationalism and liberalism i think a lot of people are used to it now, just multitasking. being the heartbeat of the united so, i think it‘s a good idea. what‘s it like then, as a performer, kingdom, not populism and knowing that the audience nationalism and right towards the end they are talking about is actually being encouraged membership of the eu and nato and to use their phones? other international organisations i mean, i think it's great. which he is the lib dems —— he is sometimes classical music concerts can be a bit intimidating, especially from a huge orchestra like the bbc philharmonic, but maybe this is encouraging, the lib dems foreign affairs might attract different people spokesman claims the uk should play a part in. he is nowa to come to the concerts. spokesman claims the uk should play a part in. he is now a star turn for the liberal democrats, as far as the this is classical music, shouldn‘t we be keeping technology membership is concerned. the danger away from it? it‘s a place to escape with these mps coming on board from from the modern world, surely? the tories and labour is that we respect people who want to go to a concert perhaps some may feel the party's without their phone on. we respect people who want to be identity is being diluted, but able listen to music without visual distractions, certainly lib dems members here in but at the same time,
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we don‘t want to exclude people who expect to have a visual bournemouth are welcome to chuka stimulation from their phone. annoying or enlightening? umunna and seems to enjoy his speech phones are set to become this morning. a lot of positioning a more familiar sight at concerts like this. applause. and repositioning taking place at individual and party level, the new pledge that where the liberal democrats to be elected as a government with a majority, they would just revoke article 50 without coming up, sophie raworth will be a referendum. what is the ongoing here with the bbc news at one, now it‘s time for a look at the weather with louise lear. reaction to that? there has been criticism that the liberal democrats are putting themselves in a position ofan are putting themselves in a position of an undeliverable promise. yes, a relatively quiet start to our there has been criticism of that working week but contrasting weather policy and there was a bit of unease reflected in the debate before the conditions out there particularly in vote when the party officially england and wales, courtesy of this adopted that policy yesterday from slow—moving weather front. england and wales, courtesy of this slow-moving weather front. week affair but producing more cloud than some members. former member simon we have seen and the odd spot or two hughes was one of the people who said it would accuse the lib dems of of light drizzling rain, not enough for the gardens but it will continue taking an extreme position and that to meander its way slowly behind it greater compromises needed and the lib dem mp norman lamb who is out of quite a good clearance of cloud breaking up some sunshine coming
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step with the party leadership on through. a few scattered showers, brexit has been talking this chiefly to the north—west of the morning, saying that a greater need great glen in scotland and northern for compromises needed and that the party is in danger of playing with ireland. still pretty windy and not fire. we are going to such an as one with 13—15, further south, extreme position as he believes they have, but it was overwhelmingly 16-20dc. not accepted as a party policy to as one with 13—15, further south, 16—20dc. not as warm as the weekend. campaign ina the week weather front pushing its accepted as a party policy to campaign in a general election to revoke article 50 without another way south, sky is clear through the night and temperatures likely to fall away. staying windy in the far referendum if, crucially, the liberal democrats are able to form a north—east of scotland in majority government. where that particular. we will see overnight leaves them after an election if lows on the chilly side. low single they don't find themselves in power figures for many spots as you can isa they don't find themselves in power is a matter for see quite clearly, 6—11d in towns they don't find themselves in power is a matterforjo they don't find themselves in power is a matter forjo swinson and the party to decide later but chuka umunna addressed that in his speech and city centres. some early morning and said, for too long the liberal mist and fog patches perhaps but democrats had had to apologise for being pro—europe and backing remain. there will be some sunny spells around through tuesday. a relatively thank you, jonathan. quiet story, the wind more of a future in the north of scotland and oil prices have risen sharply by the end of the afternoon some as a result of saturday's attack on two saudi arabian facilities, cloud aesthetic thickening and which caused a big slow down in production. patchy rain threatening the far at the opening of the asian markets overnight, brent crude north—west. at weather front will topple across that high pressure and
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introduce some patchy rain that most of us under the high pressure. there initially rose by nearly 20%. tweeting on sunday, will be outlets of rain in the far president donald trump stopped short of directly accusing iran, but suggested possible north, elsewhere lighter winds military action once the perpetrator was known — around and clearer skies. saying the us was "locked and loaded." iran denies any temperatures can at around 20 involvement in the attacks. degrees. not quite as warm in the our business correspondent dominic o'connell has far north in the cloud and rain, been explaining just what saudi arabia have been 13-15 the far north in the cloud and rain, 13—15 the difference. as we move out saying since the attack. of wednesday, into thursday, the height is still with us and the weather front starts to drift away. asi weather front starts to drift away. as i said, a good deal of quiet they haven't actually named iran as the perpetrator, but they do talk weather in the forecast. largely about the houthi rebels fine and dry through thursday and in the yemen. in terms of restoring production, they will have about a third backed into friday. indications of it they will have about a third back getting a little bit warmer, particularly in the south as we go by the end of today, towards the end of the week and into which is much quicker than what people were talking about, the weekend. as a summary, largely but we don't know yet about the restoration of full dry week i had with chilly nights 00:27:47,713 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 and some rain in the north. production, so half of saudi arabia is oil production has been disrupted and it appears most most oil analysts think it will be a couple of weeks, maybe a bit longer before that is completely restored. that's why you had such a big spike in the oil prices. it's come back down now. brent crude had been
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up to $71 overnight. it's now back down to $67 and to put this in some kind of historic context, the number of barrels taking out of the oil market is bigger than gulf war i or if you go back to 1979, the iranian revolution when iran was still a big supplier to the west, it's bigger than that, too, and also if you look at the map, the facility that was attacked was the obvious one to attack, something like 46 different pipelines run into it. it's the key staging post and they call it a stabilisation post for the whole of the saudi oil industry so it's an obvious one to attack and it is heavily guarded. lots of western workers here live in gated compounds. it is an obvious target for somebody who would want to go after saudi arabia and its oil production, so there will be questions asked as to how well protected is it and how well protected can it be in the future, given a lot of these pipelines just run across the desert and are very, very difficult to protect at all? now it's time for a look at the weather with simon.
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the rain is moving southwards and we got sunny spells forming. we will see brighter spells across southern and eastern parts of scotland and across northern ireland. the patchy rain just across northern ireland. the patchy rainjust continuing for across northern ireland. the patchy rain just continuing for a time across the far south but it will get across the far south but it will get a bit brighter across wales and the midlands this afternoon. maximum temperature is 15 to 18 celsius, not as warm as yesterday, those temperatures in the south down by about seven to eight celsius. tonight, they will be some patchy mist, maybe one or two fog patches developing into tuesday morning. quite a chilly start to tuesday, temperatures for many in single figures but for tuesday and the rest of the week is looking largely dry. there will be a bit of rain across northern parts but also some chilly nights, but it will get warmer later in the week, especially on saturday.
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hello this is bbc newsroom live. the headlines. boris johnson is meeting the european commission president for the first time, amid caution on both sides of any swift agreement on brexit i don't think we'll get a deal today, but i do think we'll make progress today. the prime minister and steve barclay, the brexit secretary, are meeting jean—claude juncker later today. and i'm confident that we can make progress and we can get a deal before october 31st.
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of course, the european union is always ready to negotiate with a proper proposal from the united kingdom side is presenting. so far, i haven't seen any proposal that would compensate the current backstop. oil prices surge, after drone attacks on saudi arabian facilities knocked out 5% of global supply. universities should be legally bound to provide mental health support to students, according to a former—health minister. sport now and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's olly foster. good morning. europe's solheim cup captain catriona matthew says their stunning victory at gleneagles, against the usa, can be a boost for the women's game. the norwegian veteran and wildcard pick, suzann pettersen, clinched the win on the 18th, in the final singles match. it was their first win over the usa in 6 years.
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though the struggling ladies european tour failed to capitalise on their previous victory matthew hopes this will be different. i think it is one of the biggest women's sporting events in the world. obviously the women's world cup was huge but like the ryder cup, this has just grown cup was huge but like the ryder cup, this hasjust grown hugely cup was huge but like the ryder cup, this has just grown hugely over the last 30 years since its first started and it is such a spectacle of women's golf. the americans played great and for it to come down to that last game, the crowd, you cannot get anything more exciting. england cricket captain, joe root, says their main focus will now be the tour to australia in 2 years time and winning the the ashes back. england cricket captain, joe root, says their main focus will now be the tour to australia in 2 years time and winning the the ashes back. they won the final test at the oval to at least level the series. 2-2. australia had already retained the urn and were chasing an unlikely 399 to win
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and when stuart broad took the key wicket of steve smith, that looked even more remote for the tourists. matthew wade resisted for the aussies — he made 117 — his duel withjofra archer was one of the highlights of the day. but he was one of two wickets forjoe root and the skipper also took the winning catch, victory by 135 runs rounding off a very satisfying summer in which they also became one—day world champions. that world cup was incredible. for it to finish it dead, some of the games within it made for fantastic viewing, not just the games within it made for fantastic viewing, notjust the england games but across—the—board there were some fantastic contests. and to be backed up fantastic contests. and to be backed up by fantastic contests. and to be backed up by such an evenly matched ashes series, we were blessed with brilliant support throughout, but the cricket itself was pretty gripping. quique sanchez flores' second spell in charge of watford started with a draw at home to arsenal, they were 2—0 down at the break
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to two pierre—emerick aubamyang goals but the gunners threw it away in the second half, tom cleverly starting the fight back. the arsenal midfielder granit xhaka said they were scared of watford. england striker, callum wilson, scored twice as bournemouth won at home for the first time in the league this season. they beat everton 3—1 and are up to 8th. better news for everton's women, they made it two wins from two in the super league, beating bristol city 2-0. manchester city also have a 100% record, pauline bremer scoring both their goals in a 2—0 win over reading. she's now scored four in two matches. manchester united take on arsenal tonight. the leicester and scotland rugby union forward david denton has had to retire at the age of 29 because of concussion. he is still feeling the effects of a head injury sustained playing for his club, 11 months ago and doctors have advised him to quit the sport. he was capped 42 times by his country, scotlands head coach gregor townsend release a stameent and said denton still had
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a lot to offer the game. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the london fire brigade has been interviewed under caution by police investigating the grenfell tower fire. the fire service said it had been questioned as a corporate body as part of the metropolitan police's investigation into the blaze, which killed 72 people in 2017. london fire commissioner dany cotton said she recognised that survivors and the bereaved "need answers" and that the fire service was committed to assisting investigators. with me now is our home affairs correspondent tom symonds. what can you tell us about what the questioning was around? this is part ofa questioning was around? this is part of a very big investigation undergoing by the metropolitan police. it was under caution which means the evidence can be used in a court prosecution, any prosecution down the line. the london fire
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brigade said that it is entirely correct that it was interviewed, it was voluntary. they would not give more detail, other than saying that the potential offences they were questioned about where under the health and safety at work act. i should extremist because the health and safety at work act says you have to protect your employees against breaches of health and safety but also memos of the public. and we know from previous briefings by the police that they are looking at whether the state put policy in particular was properly applied —— stay put. that is the policy that told residents to stay in the flat, which is one they are investigating. what about the wider investigation? that is going more slowly, 17 people have been questioned and i can tell you that almost certainly covers people in the local government area,
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in housing, the police will only say at this stage they are looking at corporate manslaughter, a company or body being prosecuted for manslaughter, individual manslaughter, individual manslaughter, and also these health and safety charges. they had previously said that the council and the management organisation that ran its property, there is a case for looking at whether they were involved in corporate manslaughter. but there is a public enquiry going on and the met has said it would be at the end of 2021 at least before it could send files to the crown prosecution service and charges could be considered. the uk's former chief scientist, professor sir david king, says he's scared by the speed at which the climate is changing in response to global warming. speaking to the bbc, he's called for the uk to advance its climate targets by 10 years. our environment correspondent roger harrabin gave his reaction to sir david king's comments. if you look at the projections for the arctic warming, what has actually happened is right at the top end of the expected
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range, and as we were reporting a couple of weeks ago, scientists in the arctic are really alarmed and astonished by how fast the ice melt has gone. that's one factor that influences a lot of weather, particularly in europe, but other factors at play. for instance, professor king mentions hurricane dorian which moved at two miles an hour against, normally it would move at ten to 15 miles an hour, which meant it dumped loads water more than it previously would have done. can we prove that is climate change related? no, we can't yet. is that part of the issue, that the scientific certainty around these things takes years? that is the problem. professor king is saying scientists always demand certainty. this is their stock in trade, is certainty. when you look at how these events happening together it would be foolish, in his view, to think that the climate change was not involved so he will also mention the antarctic sea ice. very high levels, much higher than projected. in france, where there was an extraordinary heatwave in the summer,
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where temperatures were broken, record temperatures were broken by two celsius when normally they would be broken by 0.1 celsius or 0.2 celsius. meteorologists were astonished by that. then the wildfires all across the southern hemisphere because, partly, in some places the land is so dry, freakishly dry, scientists are saying, so there is really an awful lot of factors stacked up. you speak to scientists about this all the time. are you generally seeing a change in language? because i see another side saying there is a numbing inevitability to climate change. professor king saying it is a scary. these are not normally phrases you hear from scientists. is there a kind of change in the language? no, one of the scientists we contacted referred to having predicted climate change over the past a0 years and seen it coming like a slow motion train crash, waving his arms and nobody taking notice. this is very emotive stuff. on the other hand, you have other sciences to say, no, if we want to be taken credibly,
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we have to stick very closely to scientific language, absolutely what we know, and the head of the world meteorological organisation has told us that he fears that demonstration by groups like extinction rebellion who are saying it could be the end of the world as we know it, are hyping the issue, which is already serious enough, without that sort of language and really very dubious about using words like "scared" or "scary" because they say it is making a whole generation of young people depressed and anxious and may be paralysed as to whether they should do anything. or it is shocking us into action. well, that is greta thunberg's point of view, the young climate activist. she says, we have to be scared. if we are not scared, we won't have any action, but, honestly, there has been a lot of publicity about that and this day next week, next monday, we are going to see the un climate summit in new york and the un is desperately pleading for world leaders to come forward with better
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offers than they've got at the moment and, in many places, those pleas are falling on deaf ears so one does wonder whether or not politicians are taking it seriously. a man has appeared in court via videolink, accused of murdering his 11—month—old son. zakari bennett—eko was pulled out of the river irwell in radcliffe, greater manchester, by firefighters on wednesday. he was taken to hospital but died a short time later. a trial date for zak bennett—eko has been set for march the 9th 4 million people have fled the political and economic crisis in venezuela. 40,000 of them made the short trip across the sea, to the small caribbean islands of trinidad and tobago, just a 7 milejourney. trinidad has taken in more venezuela ns, per capita, than any other country, but life isn't simple for those who arrive and some locals have made it clear they're not welcome. as part of a new series exploring the global migrant crisis, our correspondent, ashley john—ba ptiste, sent this report from the islands.
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chanting these venezuelans are being sold false dreams and promises. anger on the streets of trinidad. some locals argue that the vast number of venezuela ns, who have fled to the small island, are just here forjobs, not asylum. we don't have housing in trinidad. we don't have proper health care. they are just coming from one disaster into another disaster. and with an election coming up next year, the message from the authorities is clear. the venezuelan problem is for venezuelans. this little island cannot be the solution to millions or hundreds of thousands of migrants, leaving venezuela. manuel romero was a judge in venezuela. after seeing colleagues jailed, for not following government rulings, he fled with his wife and kids last summer.
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since arriving, he has worked as a fisherman, a carpenter, and now, a security guard in a shopping centre. trinidad and tobago has no laws for protecting asylum seekers, so until recently, venezuelans had no right to live or work. there have been accusations from human rights groups that the government has been deporting people with approved asylum claims from the united nations refugee agency. the government refused multiple requests for interview with the bbc, to address these concerns. in some attempt to manage the crisis, the government created a registration period injune. for two weeks, any venezuelan could register for the right to live and work, but the centres allocated for processing were chaotic and confusing. how many people are waiting now come here, where we are?
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imean... there's hundreds, if not thousands, there's so many people. yes. all i see is a mass of desperate humanity needing help. as we approached the deadline, police blocked off the line. the government declared that all unregistered venezuela ns would return to illegal status. there's this last—minute rush. and the desperation from these venezuelans is so palpable. you can see it here, just people rushing to be able to get through and be registered. panic, anxiety. look. the government announced, in the following weeks, that 16,500 venezuelans had been registered. that is a number significantly lower than the estimated number thought to be in the country. as it stands, the government refuses to reopen registration. those who weren't registered are in limbo, but so are those families who made it through. permits are limited to a year's work allowance, and venezuelan children cannot attend school.
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manuel registered in time, but he is concerned for the future of his 17 and five—year—old kids. if you were deported back after a year, do you know what would happen to you? jail. jail, prison? yeah. if you leave venezuela, you are a traitor. for now, a permit provides families, like manuel's, some sense of safety but as the crisis continues in venezuela, many continue to flee their country. inevitably, this is only a temporary solution to a problem that isn't going away. ashley john—ba ptiste, bbc news, trinidad. a former health minister is calling for universities to be given a legal duty to provide support to students with mental health problems. norman lamb says figures he collected from more than 100 universities suggest that demand for help has gone up, but that some institutions are not spending significantly more.
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only 26 universities could answer questions about the average or longest waiting times for counselling. mr lamb is calling for new minimum standards which can be legally enforced. our education editor branwenjeffreys has more. ceara thacker was just 19 when she took her life. her death another tragedy raising questions about support for students. the inquest will hear about her attempts to get help. more students want support for mental health problems. new data suggests it could depend on where you study. 110 universities responded with information to a campaigning mp. only 26 knew the average, or longest, waiting times for counselling. in some universities, cambridge would be a good example, students will find a university that is really focusing on the data, analysing the scale of the problem, making sure they have a real handle on it, whereas in other places they don't even know how
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much they are spending. they are not maintaining and monitoring data, not collecting the data, and in that way i think students' experience is completely different across the country. universities say they already plan a voluntary mental health charter and need the nhs to provide more effective care for students. liverpool university said it was deeply saddened by ceara's death, and is working with the health service on changes. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. if you've been to a classical music concert in recent years, you'll have heard the announcement asking you to "please turn off your mobile phone as the performance is about to start". but now, the bbc philharmonic orchestra is encouraging its audiences to do the opposite. tim muffett went along to find out more. a classical concert where phone use isn't frowned upon...
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but welcomed... omg. we have whole generations of people now who expect, for example, to watch the telly while having their phone on, who have their phone on during conversations. and we want to embrace that. so, at this prom's concert at london's royal albert hall, the audience hasn't been told to switch their phones off. far from it. we are encouraging people to have their phones on during the concert, on silent. and we're providing tweet—length programme notes throughout the performance, to guide people through the music in real—time. it might say, you know, tell you a little bit about the conductor or it might say listen out for a beautiful clarinet solo just coming up. so it talks you through the different stages of the performance, it's really helpful. is there an argument for leaving technology out of this? this is a classical music concert! i know, there's definitely
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an argument and i was curious about this myself, because i wouldn't normally use a mobile phone. i would be very focused and i might be quite cross about somebody using a mobile phone! the bbc philharmonic plan to offer phone updates at all their concerts this season. this prom is one of the first times it's been trialled. i think it's disturbing a bit. not distracting at all, for people trying to listen? no, no, i think it gives everyone a chance to enjoy it. i preferjust to let the music take over, rather than follow exactly what i'm listening to. you think some people see people on their phones and get a bit annoyed? i think a lot of people are used to it now, just multitasking. so, i think it's a good idea. what's it like then, as a performer, knowing that the audience is actually being encouraged to use their phones? i mean, i think it's great. sometimes classical music concerts
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can be a bit intimidating, especially from a huge orchestra like the bbc philharmonic, but maybe this is encouraging, might attract different people to come to the concerts. this is classical music, shouldn't we be keeping technology away from it? it's a place to escape from the modern world, surely? we respect people who want to go to a concert without their phone on. we respect people who want to be able listen to music without visual distractions, but at the same time, we don't want to exclude people who expect to have a visual stimulation from their phone. annoying or enlightening? phones are set to become a more familiar sight at concerts like this. applause. in a moment we'll have all the business news, but first the headlines on bbc news. boris johnson is meeting the european commission president for the first time, amid caution on both sides of any swift agreement on brexit. oil prices surge after drone attacks on saudi arabian facilities
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knocked out five percent of global supply. universities should be legally bound to provide mental health support to students, according to a former health minister. in the business news. discount supermarket, aldi, says it plans to open a new shop every week, on average, in the uk, over the next two years. that's what boss, giles hurley, has told the bbc. he said £1 billion would be invested, to achieve this aim. aldi's pledge came as it reported a sales rise for last year, but saw profits fall sharply. us drug—maker, purdue pharma, has filed for bankruptcy. it comes as part of wider efforts to deal with more than 2000 lawsuits, accusing the firm of fuelling the us opioid crisis through sale of painkillers like oxycontin. the company's board approved the chapter 11 filing
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about1 in 20 workers does not get paid holidays, while1 in 10 does not get a payslip — that's according to a report by the resolution foundation think tank. it found workers over the age of 65 are most likely to not have paid holidays, despite a legal entitlement to 28 days a year, or pro—rota for part—timers. the report says its findings reveal the extent of illegal labour practices. the big story moving markets today has been the price of oil, because it surged by nearly 20%, after two attacks on saudi arabian facilities on saturday. these facilities have knocked out more than 5% of the world's supply. brent crude, the international benchmark used by oil traders, jumped to nearly $72 dollars a barrel at one point. us oil prices also spiked, but both trimmed gains as president donald trump authorised the release of us reserves. the strike, which the us blames on iran, has sparked fears of increased risk to energy supplies in the region.
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joining me now is amrita sen, chief oil anaylst from energy aspects. knocking 5% of the global crude output in one fells work speaks to the vulnerability, of this fa ntastically the vulnerability, of this fantastically important site? absolutely. taking out 5% of global supply and i think particularly because it is saudi arabia who a lwa ys because it is saudi arabia who always talks about how secure their oil infrastructure is and prayed itself to be the secure supplier of oil to the world, i think that is why it is even more important. and the market had become extremely complacent with the rise or share production and generally slower economic growth. no one was paying attention to be escalating tensions in the region and you can see exactly why prices jumped as much as it did overnight. so we do not know
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how long this outage of saudi arabia's oil output could be. how sustained it will be. what do we think is going to happen to the oil price? do we think we're going to cdm crease for a long time or order other reserves? the main thing we need to hear from other reserves? the main thing we need to hearfrom saudi arabia is how long this will last. from what we understand, potentially half the output count could come back fairly quickly. they also have some spare spare capacity. but the rest of the 50% could take weeks or possibly months. that is a big outage. we have some spare capacity in other countries but of the 5.7 which is off—line, only a certain amount of the capacity can be spared. so you will still be short good to percent of global supplies, if not more. briefly comment donald trump has been on twitter saying the us is ready to stand in with oil?m
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been on twitter saying the us is ready to stand in with oil? if this is prolonged you would expect to see strategic petroleum reserves released by the us and the ie as well to negate any negative impact on consumers. thank you very much. the price of brent crude is currently up about 9.23% thomas cook amid rescue deal reports/ currencies — the dollar fell while safe havens and currencies of oil—producing countries rallied on monday. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon king.
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a bit of rain and drizzle but it is clearing. clear skies across northern england, a bit of sunshine across eastern and southern scotland and northern ireland. gradually, this cloud across much of england and wales will continue to move south. north wales, the north midlands, hopeful to get something brighter during this afternoon. further south will stay cloudy with a chance of some patchy rain and not as warm as it was yesterday. temperatures only getting to about 20, 20 temperatures only getting to about 20,201 temperatures only getting to about 20, 201 degrees. further north, 15 or 16. a few showers across the north—west of scotland. through tonight, the cloud in the south will clear and with clear skies there is a chance of some patchy mist and fog. the main thing is it is chilly tonight. temperatures down to single figures for many others into tuesday morning. the mist and fog will clear and for most of us it is a dry sunny day on tuesday. a bit more cloud spreading its way into scotland and
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northern ireland, upper level higher cloud. temperatures on tuesday around 15, 16 degrees, maybe 20 in the south. generally speaking, high pressure in charge of our weather as we go into wednesday. a one front in the final. and will bring a bit of rainfor the final. and will bring a bit of rain for northern scotland. that cloud extending further south into northern parts of vineland but for most of england and wales on wednesday it is another sunny afternoon. temperatures around 17-20dc. for afternoon. temperatures around 17—20dc. for the end of the week, high pressure still there. weather fronts scratching around the top of that looking dry on thursday again with some light winds. a bit of cloud floating beneath that are so we might be chasing that cloud around. there will be some brighter skies and a bit of sunshine to come on thursday. temperatures again in this market around the mid to high
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teens, perhaps touching 20 celsius. as we go into the end of the week, particularly by saturday, temperatures rise up. up into the mid 20s as we go through the start of the week, by sunday about the cloud around, the chance of some showers, may the odd thundery downpour on sunday. friday and saturday certainly lots of dry and sunny weather to come. goodbye.
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you're watching bbc newsroom live. it's midday and these are the main stories this morning: borisjohnson meets the european commission president for the first time, saying he's cautious about prospects for the talks. oil prices surge after drone attacks on saudi arabian facilities knocked out 5% of global supply. universities should be legally bound to provide mental health support to students, according to a former health minister. the uks former chief scientist says recent extreme weather events are "scary" and the government should advance its climate targets by ten years. and as part of a new series exploring the global migrant crisis, we'll look at the 40,000 people who have fled venezuela for the small islands of trinidad and tobago.
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good afternoon. welcome to bbc newsroom live. i'm joanna gosling. boris johnson is holding his first face—to—face talks with the president of the european commission, asked if he was feeling optimstic ahead of the talks the prime minister told reporters he was feeling "cautious". he's made it clear that he'll reject any offer to delay brexit further. with less than seven weeks to go until britain is due an agreement with brussels. eu leaders are pressing the prime minister to come up with new proposals to achieve an agreement. arriving at a separate meeting in brussels, the belgian and finnish foreign
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ministers, said the european union had limited room for manoeuvre. we are trying to see what are the possibilities, to move, if it's possible. to do that, we need to receive some new proposals from london. so without that, it's very difficult to say something. we don't have the capacity to take initiative. there is a deal, we are in favour of such a deal. it is impossible, possible to have amendments. i'm not bothered about the backstop, it's very difficult. we have to remain open and see what happens in domestic politics in the united kingdom and the european union is always ready to negotiate when a proper proposal from the united kingdom's site is presented. so far, i haven't seen any proposal
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that would compensate the current backstop. let's cross now to brussels and talk to our europe correspondent damian grammaticas. it's not just boris it's notjust borisjohnson and jean—claude juncker, there is it's notjust borisjohnson and jean—claudejuncker, there is also a tea m jean—claudejuncker, there is also a team around him and michel barnier, the eu brexit negotiator, so all the key figures in a room. is there likely to be a breakthrough? no, no sign there will be a breakthrough at this meeting. you had borisjohnson say on his way in that he was cautious, which is different to the m essa 9 es cautious, which is different to the messages coming out over the weekend from the uk side. from the eu side, equally a one word, basically summing upfrom equally a one word, basically summing up from jean—claude juncker when he said he was patient and he is waiting for the uk's side to table something so jean—claude juncker had said he was waiting for british alternatives to the backstop, that's what he said over
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the weekend. he wants a deal, the eu wa nts a the weekend. he wants a deal, the eu wants a deal, mrjean—claudejuncker said toa wants a deal, mrjean—claudejuncker said to a newspaper over the weekend that a no—deal brexit would create a hopeless mess that would take years to sort out so he is keen to avoid that. he thinks people on the uk side would be keen to avoid that. this meeting is going to be a chance for both sides, the eu particularly, to see whether they really think that boris johnson to see whether they really think that borisjohnson is keen and thinks that there is a real possibility of a deal and the eu will be saying, how is that going to happen? how is the uk crucially going to address the issue that borisjohnson going to address the issue that boris johnson wants to going to address the issue that borisjohnson wants to address which is the irish border? the eu point is, what is mrjohnson's workable proposal to change it? because there hasn't been one put on the table so far. how powerful is the line from borisjohnson in brussels that we will leave come watch me on the 31st of october when obviously they know
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what has happened in parliament around that? exactly, the eu watches very closely all the twists and turns in uk politics and they know that mps have legislated to prevent ano that mps have legislated to prevent a no deal at forced the prime minister to ask for an extension so one question may well be, if mr johnson wants to leave by the 31st, how is that going to happen? the only real route, it appears, is to agree a deal of some sort, otherwise, unless he wishes to break the law, he would be forced to write a letter to us for an extension. so how does he see a deal being achieved and how crucially the eu will say is he going to guarantee to keep the irish border open to ensure no infrastructure or no new checks are instituted on the island of ireland to disrupt economic activity and the peace process? the idea is the uk has tabled so far only
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address a tiny portion of what the eu believes needs to be confronted. that's the uk talking about food and agriculture checks, the safety of food turning up at an exterior border in the eu has to be checked, health checks on animals in food products, the eu is talking about addressing that but not the rest of things which is customs, checks, vat, all that sort of stuff. the eu isa vat, all that sort of stuff. the eu is a saying, where are the ideas on that? that'll be the hajj discussion happening now over lunch. our assistant political editor, norman smith, is in westminster. foreign secretary dominic raab has claimed the eu is dragging its feet as tactical posturing in any negotiation and they are well aware of the position. he said there have been lots of talks at political level. what sense are you getting if
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there is any progress actually behind—the—scenes?” there is any progress actually behind-the-scenes? i think the two sides are actually still quite far apartand sides are actually still quite far apart and although we have heard from mrjohnson and others over the weekend striking a pretty optimistic outlook, i think privately there's a lot of fingers crossed behind backs because the proposals which have come from britain so far have not taken the form of any specific plan, more ideas being kicked around it seems, and time is now getting pretty short and i do think it is striking that when we were briefed ahead of the prime minister's visit, it was very much the no deal message which the prime minister seems to wa nt to which the prime minister seems to want to emphasise withjean—claude juncker to say, if you don't budge on the backstop, we are absolutely, definitely leaving on october the 3ist definitely leaving on october the 31st without any form of agreement and to those who say, hang on, i
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thought parliament had passed a law to ensure you couldn't do that, the response from the likes of the foreign secretary dominic raab and others has been to say, actually, we think that law is a bit flaky and we think that law is a bit flaky and we think it is contestable. we are not sure it's actually legally quite as solid as the people behind it think. in other words, they clearly think they can challenge the law, which means the door would be open to leaving without any agreement on october the 31st. that does suggest to me that they are beginning to calculate that just maybe to me that they are beginning to calculate thatjust maybe they are not going to be able to crunch this into some sort of agreement in the very tight time left, even though thatis very tight time left, even though that is what they would prefer. just listening to ministers this morning, michael gove just cautioning to be wa ry michael gove just cautioning to be wary of any imminent breakthrough. i don't think we'll get a deal today but i think we will make progress today. the prime minister and steve barclay, the brexit secretary, are meeting jean—claude juncker today and i am confident we can
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make progress and get a deal before october 31. and clearly the emphasis on putting pressure on the eu but also designed to put pressure on mps here who might be thinking that delay will come if there is no agreement by october 31 and will give them more time to argue for their particular brexit outcome by taking that option off the table, the argument that it heaps more pressure on mps to sign up heaps more pressure on mps to sign up to heaps more pressure on mps to sign uptoa heaps more pressure on mps to sign up to a deal but it's clear that the view in team johnson's camp is that the eu has got to shift on the backstop the eu has got to shift on the ba cksto p if the eu has got to shift on the backstop if there is going to be in agreement and that was the message we got from the foreign secretary this morning. the liberal democrat party conference continues today. yesterday delegates voted to unilaterally revoke brexit should they get into government.
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their liberal democrat spokesperson for foreign affairs chuka ummuna accused both the government and the opposition of failing to uphold liberal british values. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in bournemouth. this time last year took cut was at the labour party conference. how did his speech go down today? the labour party conference. how did his speech go down today7m the labour party conference. how did his speech go down today? it went down well and he was on the charm offensive to the liberal democrats this morning here in bournemouth because whilst it is great news for the lib dems to have mps coming on board from the labour party or conservative party, the party faithful want to know and want to be convinced that they are now happy to be card—carrying convinced that they are now happy to be ca rd—carrying liberal convinced that they are now happy to be card—carrying liberal democrats and share their values so check umunna went out of his way to convince party members of that in his speech as foreign affairs spokesman as he is now for the lib dems, and he said that he had decided tojoin the dems, and he said that he had decided to join the liberal democrats for political, not necessarily personal, reasons.
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the labour party like to think of itself as a champion of liberal the decision tojoin the decision to join was not the decision tojoin was not made out of crude self interest. if that is your goal, i would not recommend following my example this year. the truth is, all the incredibly difficult decisions i've made on thisjourney were rooted in my values and principles. luciana berger is here, angela is here, sarah is here, it's the same for them. ijoined sarah is here, it's the same for them. i joined this sarah is here, it's the same for them. ijoined this party out of conviction. as you know, i am a remainerandl conviction. as you know, i am a remainerand i am conviction. as you know, i am a remainer and i am proud conviction. as you know, i am a remainerand i am proud of conviction. as you know, i am a remainer and i am proud of it, conviction. as you know, i am a remainerand i am proud of it, i think we spent too long apologising for being pro—european in this country. because you cannot be pro—britain and put our national interests first without seeking to put britain at the heart of europe. that's the fact of it.
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what about the wider policy issue that has emerged over this conference that the liberal democrats now say that where they to wina democrats now say that where they to win a general election with the majority, they wouldn't worry about another referendum, they would just revoke article 50? how is that going down? it's a big decision that has been made here by the liberal democrats in bournemouth and chuka umunna reflected on that. for too long, people in the uk have had to apologise for being pro—europe so he was again setting out his credentials on brexit. it's a policy that he appears to be comfortable with on the basis that it will be one that the liberal democrats have going into a general election campaign in the general election campaign in the general election campaign only. if they were to win a majority in government, they would revoke article 50, thereby stopping brexit outright without holding a further referendum but it hasn't gone down well with absolutely
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everybody here in bournemouth. some are worried that it puts the liberal democrats and a bit of an extreme position and may be a bit of a millstone around their neck when after a general election they have to refer back to prioritising campaigning for another referendum asa campaigning for another referendum as a way to reverse the brexit decision. but it is clear now that thatis decision. but it is clear now that that is the message the lib dems will have going into a general election campaign. maybe you could look at it as a sort of core vote strategy and it might well limit their appeal to people who might wa nt to their appeal to people who might want to see the result of the referendum respected or reversed with another one, but it was overwhelmingly accepted by the party membership yesterday. the guardian newspaper has been criticised for publishing an editorial in which david cameron was accused of only ever feeling "privileged pain". yesterday extracts of mr cameron's autobiography were published in which he praised the care his disabled son ivan received in the nhs before his death in 2009, aged six.
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the leader column, which has now been changed, said that if mr cameron had been trying to get help for a dying parent, rather than a dying child, he might have understood some of the damage his policies had done. we say goodbye to viewers on bbc two right now. the headlines on bbc news: borisjohnson meets the european commission president for the first time — saying he's cautious about prospects for the talks. oil prices surge after drone attacks on saudi arabian facilities knocked out 5% of global supply. universities should be legally bound to provide mental health support to students, according to a former health minister. sport now. europe's solheim cup captain
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catriona matthew says their stunning victory at gleneagles against the usa can be a boost for the women's game. the norwegian veteran and wild card pick suzann pettersen clinched the win on the 18th hole in the final singles match. it was their first win over the usa in six years. though the struggling ladies european tour has failed to capitalise on previous victories matthew hopes this will be different. i think it is one of the biggest is women's sporting events in the world. obviously the women's world cup is huge but this, like the ryder cup, hasjust cup is huge but this, like the ryder cup, has just grown cup is huge but this, like the ryder cup, hasjust grown hugely cup is huge but this, like the ryder cup, has just grown hugely over the last 30 years since it first started and it's such a spectacle of women's golf. the americans played great as well and for it to come down to that last game, you just count —— can't get anything more exciting. england cricket captainjoe root says their main focus will now be the tour to australia in two years'
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time and winning the ashes back. they won the final test at the oval to level the series at 2—2 to round off a very satisfying summer in which they also became one—day world champions. that world cup was incredible. for it to finish how it did and some of the games within it made for fantastic viewing, not just the england games but across the board there were some fantastic contests to be backed up by such an equally matched as —— ashes series. we were blessed with support but the cricket itself is pretty gripping. the leicester and scotland rugby union forward david denton has retired at the age of 29 because of concussion. he is still feeling the effects of a head injury sustained playing for his club 11 months ago and doctors have advised him to quit the sport. the number 8 was capped 42 times by his country and played at the last world cup. scotland's head coach gregor townsend says he will be missed. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour.
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oil prices have risen sharply as a result of saturday's attack on two saudi arabian facilities, which caused a big slow down in production. at the opening of the asian markets overnight, brent crude initially rose by nearly 20%. tweeting on sunday, president donald trump stopped short of directly accusing iran, but suggested possible military action once the perpetrator was known, saying the us was "locked and loaded". iran denies any involvement in the attacks. let's talk to simon william from the motoring service provider the rac. obviously the question is, will it at some point filter through to petrol supplies and prices for consumers? what is your expectation? the situation is interesting at the moment because there is actually a big cushion in the wholesale price of petrol which is about 7p a litre too expensive at the moment. the
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retailer moved on friday by cutting 3pa retailer moved on friday by cutting 3p a litre off and were starting to see that through so really, the price shouldn't be affected for some time but we have a sustained impact through the saudi arabia situation so we could see prices increase. the exchange rate is also part of this. we are also at a price that helps with the wholesale price of petrol and diesel. currently the price of brent crude is around $65 and a suggestion by analysts is that if this goes on for six weeks, prices could go above $75 an barrel. what impact could this have on prices for consumers? at the moment, we are paying a price which is equivalent to having an oil price of about $72 and that's because retailers haven't passed on those savings to as
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motorists. they are being transparent with motorists, it would only add a couple of pence per litre to the average price which is 1.28 for petrol and 1.31 for diesel at the moment. would you expect that to happen in practice? not really. it should do and that's why we are co nsta ntly should do and that's why we are constantly calling or rac retailers to reflect the wholesale price more accurately. it's 7p per litre to a deed at the moment and the 3p per litre will help but it's only beginning to filter through —— 7p to dear. whenever there is concern about prices going up, people might decide that they want to try to make sure that they are well stocked when the prices are lower. if people do that in fuel supplies, what impact can it have? the market is well
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catered for in these ups and downs and so there shouldn't be any impact. you're probably better off waiting a couple of days waiting to buy fuel. retailers will obviously hesitate because of what has happened on the wholesale market. they will not carry on passing on those savings. simon, thank you. a former health minister is calling for universities to be given a legal duty to provide support to students with mental health problems. norman lamb says figures he collected from more than 100 universities suggest that demand for help has gone up, but that some institutions are not spending significantly more. only 26 universities could answer questions about the average or longest waiting times for counselling. mr lamb is calling for new minimum standards which can be legally enforced. our education editor branwenjeffreys has more. ceara thacker was just 19 when she took her life.
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her death another tragedy raising questions about support for students. the inquest will hear about her attempts to get help. more students want support for mental health problems. new data suggests it could depend on where you study. 110 universities responded with information to a campaigning mp. only 26 knew the average or longest waiting times for counselling. in some universities, cambridge would be a good example, students will find a university that is really focusing on the data, analysing the scale of the problem, making sure they have a real handle on it, whereas in other places they don't even know how much they're spending. they are not maintaining and monitoring data, not collecting the data, and in that way i think students'
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experience is completely inconsistent across the country. universities say they already plan a voluntary mental health charter and need the nhs to provide more effective care for students. liverpool university said it was deeply saddened by ceara's death, and is working with the health service on changes. branwen jeffreys, bbc news. the london fire brigade has been interviewed under caution by police investigating the grenfell tower fire. the fire service said it had been questioned as a corporate body as part of the metropolitan police's investigation into the blaze, which killed 72 people in 2017. london fire commissioner dany cotton said she recognised that survivors and the bereaved "need answers" and that the fire service was committed to assisting investigators. earlier i spoke to our home affairs crrespondent tom symonds about the questioning. it was an interview under caution which means the evidence can be used in any court prosecution down the line and the london fire brigade
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said that it is entirely correct that it was interviewed, it was a volu nta ry that it was interviewed, it was a voluntary interview, but they would not give more details other than saying that the potential offences they were questioned about where under the health and safety at work act. i should explain this because the health and safety at work act says you have to protect your employees against breaches of health and safety but also members of the public and we know from previous briefings that police have been given that they are looking at whether to stay put policy in particular was properly applied, that's the policy that told residents to stay inside their flats despite the fire outside. that is the line of inquiry the police have said in the past and when they are clearly investigating. what about the wider investigation? that's going slowly. the police have said this morning that 17 people have been questioned under caution so far which is under the wider investigation. that almost certainly cove rs investigation. that almost certainly covers people in local government area, and housing, the police will only say at this stage that they are
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looking at corporate manslaughter so that's a company or body being prosecuted for manslaughter, individual manslaughter and also these health and safety charges. they have previously said that the council and the management that ran its property that there is a case for looking at whether they were involved in corporate manslaughter. a 17—year—old boy has pleaded guilty to murdering a newcastle lawyer with a screwdriver. peter duncan was stabbed while walking through a shopping centre on his way home from work last month. the teenager — who can't be named because of his age — has also admitted stealing a screwdriver and carrying an offensive weapon. we can cross to newcastle and speak to our north of england correspondent fiona trott. what was heard in court this morning? we have heard that this was a chance encounter, that's how it was described previously, that peter duncan was simply on the wrong place at the wrong time to stop what we understand is that he was coming home from work and was going through
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the shopping centre, a busy shopping centre in the centre of newcastle city centre. he raised his arm at a doorway to let the teenager go past. the teenager took exception to this, there was a struggle. the lawyer managed to push him off but then the 17—year—old stabbed him in the chest with a screwdriver. we also heard previously that he had actually stolen screwdrivers from a shop in the teenager was actually looking for somebody that he'd had an argument with about cigarettes. the court hearing was today, the first crown court hearing. the 17—year—old pleaded guilty to murder. it was a hearing that lasted less than ten minutes. he also admitted stealing screwdrivers from a poundland store in newcastle and possessing an offensive weapon. when this happened, because it was in the shopping mall, there were cctv cameras everywhere so police were able to track the teenager. that is how they followed him and he was arrested. peter duncan was a lawyer
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in the city centre, a 52—year—old man, a lawyer for a in the city centre, a 52—year—old man, a lawyerfor a multinational maritime firm. we had at the time of his murder. his family described him asa his murder. his family described him as a kind and caring man who was a lwa ys as a kind and caring man who was always first to help others, a devoted father and husband. words can't quite describe what life will be like without him. the 17—year—old who admitted murder todayis the 17—year—old who admitted murder today is due to appear later for sentencing. we think that will probably be in decemberfollowing psychiatric and psychological assessments but had a previous hearing, we heard that the 17—year—old had convictions for 31 offences between 2017 and 2019 and at the time of this murder last month he was actually on for a —— affray. the supermarket aldi says it plans
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to open a new store a week over the next two years. the discount chain has announced a £40 million fall in profits today although its sales are up 10% to over £11 billion. our business correspondent emma simpson has been speaking to aldi's chief executive, who told her last year saw record number of customers shopping there. last year was a year of growth and investment. we just prices across a third of a range last year. customers have voted with their feet so last year we generated an additional £1 billion of sales. you've got record sales but your profits are down. are prophets did suffer as a result of the investments we made. we take a very long—term view of our business and the focus is very much on our sales, our customers and our store numbers and not on short—term profitability. is your strategy sustainable? and not on short—term profitability. is your strategy sustainable ?|j think is your strategy sustainable?” think the announcement i'm making today that over the next two years we are going to invest a further £1 billion in the uk shows very much out intent and the fact that our
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business is extremely sustainable. we are planning to open, on average, a store every week for the next two yea rs, a store every week for the next two years, bringing our offers to more customers across the uk. that will probably deliver around 5000 new jobs over the next two years as well. and brexit isn't going to alter your expansion plans? we are committed to being in the uk for the long term. we are watching brexit developments with interest like the rest of the industry and we would welcome more certainty and clarity over what our future trading relationship with the eu would be. if there is a disorderly no—deal brexit, can you see some shortages on the shelves? i can't guarantee the availability of any single product in the event of a disorderly brexit, but that's no different from anyone else in the industry. i don't believe anyone can guarantee that. what we are seeking to do is shield our customers from any ripple effects as much as possible which means working closely with the supply base, seeking to increase our
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supply base, seeking to increase our supply base, seeking to increase our supply base where possible and stock levels and taking some solace from the fact that so much of what we saw comes from british—based manufacturers and producers. can you absorb all the extra increase in costs if there is a no—deal brexit or will some have to be passed on to the shopper? i cannot commit that prices won't go up but i don't think i'm alone in the industry on that. what i can commit to is that customers will always pay the lowest grocery prices when they come to aldi. now it's time for a look at the weather. a lot of cloud across england and wales and the odd spot of light, drizzly rain. still rather windy or breezy across the far northwest of scotla nd breezy across the far northwest of scotland and that is producing a few scattered showers into the northern
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isles and northwest of the grey glen this afternoon. spells of sunshine continue across scotland, northern ireland and northern england but that cloud lingers further south. it isa that cloud lingers further south. it is a weak weather front is going to drift its way south and as it does so skies will clear so it's going to bea so skies will clear so it's going to be a chilly start to our tuesday morning but a required theme of weather is set to continue. overnight lows widely into single figures but with high pressure building on from the west, things will stay relatively dry, relatively quiet. chilly nights can become more ofa quiet. chilly nights can become more of a feature, particularly tuesday night into wednesday with some patchy rain around in the far north 01:30:36,905 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 of the country.
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