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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 17, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: the uk's highest court begins hearings today to decide if boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament was legal. the nurses union warns staff shortages is putting patient safety at risk. an american woman is on the verge of making history, by becoming the first person to swim the english channel four times non—stop. could the biggest rising oil prices
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in15 could the biggest rising oil prices in 15 years could the biggest rising oil prices in15 years mean could the biggest rising oil prices in 15 years mean higher prices at the pumps and in shops? i will look at the impact. it's been 108 days since liverpool lifted the champions league in madrid and it all starts again tonight. the defending champions take on napoli in italy while frank lampard's chelsea host valencia. iam in i am in berkshire talking apples this morning. this year's harvest should be a high—quality one, but so much goes to waste. i will be looking at what more can be done. a bit of a chilly start this morning but plenty of sunshine overhead. it's tuesday the 17th of september. our top story: 11 judges in the uk's highest court will begin hearing two appeals today to decide whether borisjohnson‘s decision to suspend parliament in the run—up to brexit was legal. the suspension has so far been challenged in two separate cases, with each resulting in differentjudgements. here's our legal correspondent, clive coleman. constitutional law, dry and dusty? not a bit of it. a prime minister stands accused of misleading the monarch
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and undermining parliament. the supreme court will have to resolve two dramatically contradictoryjudgements. scotland's higher civil court ruled that the prime minister's advice to the queen to prorogue was motivated by the proper purpose of stymieing or frustrating parliament during critical weeks before brexit, but the high court in london ruled that proroguing was a political matter and there were no legal standards against which a court could judge it. so the supreme court will have to decide firstly whether proroguing or suspending parliament is a matter for the courts and if it is, they'll have to give a ruling as to whether that advice given by borisjohnson to the queen was unlawful or not, and that will determine whether parliament can sit again in the days leading up to the 14th of october when the suspension was due to be lifted and during that period, therefore, whether they can legislate and consider brexit matters. clive coleman, bbc news.
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borisjohnson has not committed himself to recalling parliament if the supreme court rules the suspension unlawful. our political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster. what's the prime minister been saying? i know we've been talking quite a bit on this issue, but what has borisjohnson been bit on this issue, but what has boris johnson been saying? bit on this issue, but what has boris johnson been saying? he has previously insisted the suspension of parliament is about suspending it in the run—up to a queen's speech to allow him to set out a new legislative agenda. today, that will be going to the highest court in the country. what will the government do if the supreme court agrees with the scottish court? that question was put by laura kuenssberg.” scottish court? that question was put by laura kuenssberg. i have the greatest respect for the judiciary and the independence of the judiciary. it is admired around the
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world. and i think the best thing i can say, having said that, is to wait and see what they say. would you be ready to recall parliament if that's what the court said you should do? i think the best thing i could do is wait and see what is said by the courts. no great commitment from the pm, but if the government were to be recalled, many mps would come back pretty determined to hold borisjohnson‘s feet to the fire over brexit. it could hugely impact the way boris johnson gets to run his government in the short few weeks ahead. meanwhile, you will have noticed many of the front pages carrying that moment of that empty podium yesterday in luxembourg. of course we know borisjohnson pulled out of the press conference after brexit books because of noisy protesters, but the luxembourg pm went ahead with the press conference, using the opportunity to lay into the
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government's approach to brexit. some will suggest it was grandstanding on xavier bettel‘s part, and others that it is alljust in the lead up to the deadline. if you want to know more about how the supreme court operates, clive coleman has filmed a short explanation, which you can find on the bbc news website. patient safety could be put at risk because of a shortage of nurses in england — that's according to the royal college of nursing. it's calling on the government to follow scotland and wales by introducing a new law to ensure safe staffing levels. here's our health reporter, katharine da costa. too many nursing posts in england are vacant. there's a shortfall of about 40,000 or 11%, a point the royal college of nursing wants to highlight with these cardboard cutouts. the rcn says it's a national crisis that's putting patients' safety in danger. this is a crisis that everybody knows exists but it is not
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being dealt with as though it is a crisis and there is a real urgency to it. and patients are not receiving the best that they deserve. and we want the public to be able to say that in safety in knowing that someone's going to listen to them. the number of nurses working in hospitals in england has increased by nearly 10,000 over the last five years but that figure is dwarfed in comparison to the number of admissions, up by1.5 million over the same period. that means admissions are rising nearly three times faster than the nurse workforce. the rcn is calling for england to follow scotland and wales in introducing a law on safe staff nursing levels but wants a national body to be created to plan for the future nursing needs and it's asking for £1 billion of investment to boost student nurse numbers. the government says nhs staffing is a key priority and that extra training places and investment will ensure high quality care. katharine da costa, bbc news. people convicted of stalking,
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harassment and child sexual offences in england and wales could see their sentences increase under changes announced by the government today. ministers are adding 1a offences to the "unduly lenient sentence" scheme, which allows anyone to ask for a review of a punishment if they think it should be tougher. around a hundred sentences were increased last year as a result of the scheme. energy suppliers have been given four more years to complete the roll out of smart meters. every uk home was supposed to get one by next year but companies will now have until 2024 and the cost of the rollout will rise from 11 billion to {13.5 billion. the government says smart meters are vital to ensure the uk's energy is greener in the future. a medicine used to treat men with enlarged prostates may also slow down the progress of parkinson's disease, according to researchers. terazosin relaxes the muscles of the prostate and bladder but scientists from the us and china say it also prevents bra i n cells from being destroyed.
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they plan to start clinical trials. current treatments for parkinson's only manage the symptoms but do not stop its progress. the uk's food supplies could be at risk because of a failure to act on climate change. that's the warning from mps in a report published today. the environmental audit committee also says that the nhs will need to prepare for a rise in health problems caused by our warming planet. charlotte gallagher reports. going to a supermarket and buying oui’ going to a supermarket and buying our food going to a supermarket and buying ourfood shopping is going to a supermarket and buying our food shopping is something going to a supermarket and buying ourfood shopping is something most of us take for granted. an almost endless choice and array of products from the uk and around the world. but now a group of mps say our food supplies could be at risk because of a failure to act on climate change. they say the government should be promoting more sustainable diets that are lower in meat and dairy. mps warned that rising temperatures could affect agriculture here and
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spread livestock diseases, as well as imports from other countries. we are used to a choice in the types of fruit and vegetables we buy, but these mps say nearly 20% come from countries at risk of what they call a climate breakdown, meaning that in the future are shopping baskets could look very different. in a statement, the department for environment, food and rural affairs said it recognises the threat climate change poses, adding that the uk already has a highly resilient supply chain, and that the national strategy is looking at the challenges of climate. the report also raises concerns that the nhs and pharmaceutical industry don't have enough resources to cope with environmental changes and the challenges they will bring. as global temperatures continue to rise, it is feared they will have more of an impact on our daily lives. around 80 firefighters were called to a blaze at a block of flats in east london overnight. london fire brigade say
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the situation in hackney is under control and no—one is thought to be injured. the cause of the fire is currently unknown. we will hopefully have some breaking news this morning. an american woman looks set to become the first person ever to swim the english channel four times without a break. sarah thomas started her swim on sunday morning. the route should have been 84 miles long, but strong currents mean that the 37—year—old, who had treatment for breast cancer last year, swam 120 miles. this is the live tracker. it is 84 miles if you go straight across, but it isn't possible to because of the currents. she has got a lot more than that. i'm sure we will get exactly how many miles she has one but you can see that little
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red dot at the top of the screen. maybe she can finally see the shore. fingers crossed she will make it in the next five minutes or so. as you say, the currents are quite something, so it is an incredible feat. absolutely incredible. we are hoping to speak to her. no wetsuit. that's the rules for an official swim. what have you done for the last two days? not that! don't pick on me, what have you done?” last two days? not that! don't pick on me, what have you done? i was using the collective we! you did a swim on sunday, a race on sunday. yes, it involved a swim. i have a very small feeling about what it might be like, and you can't see where you are going because of the waves. fingers crossed we will
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speak to her or someone from her tea m speak to her or someone from her team if she is unable to speak to us. team if she is unable to speak to us. i'm team if she is unable to speak to us. i'm very excited about the champions league. is that because of the theme tune? once you have heard it sung to lasagne at the end, you will never hear it again! he has ruined it for everybody now. it doesn't seem that long since the final. we have had a ridiculously good summer of sport. it has been bonkers. liverpool play napoli, and it is really tricky place to go. it was all bit hot and sweaty yesterday in the press conference. jurgen klopp was talking like a champion,
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basically. they lost to napoli in the group stages last year, jurgen klopp was definitely in a very bullish mood. chelsea return to the competition against valencia at stamford bridge. tensions boiled over in aston villa's premier league match against west ham. not between the two teams but between team—mates tyrone mings and anwar el ghazi, who clashed on the pitch. the game finished goalless at villa park. in the wsl champions arsenal have started the season with two wins out of two. they beat manchester united 1—0 last night. danielle van de donk with the only goal in that one. and with three days to go until the start of the 2019 rugby world cup, the teams are making their final preparations in japan. wales have pulled in the biggest crowd so far, with thousands of locals watching their open training session in kitakyushu. they were singing, joining in. they sang the welsh national anthem,
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didn't they? incredible, it takes a lot of practice. even if you are welsh! i think it's my favourite national anthem. my mother 's wealth, so... i know, iwas testing. matt is out in an orchard for us this morning. matt's at an orchard for the start of the apple harvest. is the weather feeling autumnal as well, matt? good morning. yes, we are out this morning. a bit chilly here, but as louisa said, it's the start of the apple harvest and the nfu said because our apple harvest and the nfu said because oui’ summer apple harvest and the nfu said because our summer has been so variable in terms of temperature, rainfall as well, it could be a particularly high quality harvest. but did you know that around 90% of apples found in private gardens go to waste ? apples found in private gardens go to waste? this morning, we've come to waste? this morning, we've come toa to waste? this morning, we've come to a commercial company in berks called my apple juice
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to a commercial company in berks called my applejuice and they attempt to take your apples, they bring them in and they convert them into applejuice bring them in and they convert them into apple juice for you to use or sell as a community project to raise muqqy sell as a community project to raise muggy for localfunds. sell as a community project to raise muggy for local funds. a fantastic project and all these apples will be juiced at some point through today, and once they are juiced, the apple juice will be pasteurised and it will last for around 18 months. certainly a fantastic project and we'll find out more through the morning but a bit chilly this morning, as it is for many, let's look at the forecast. a cracking day for the vast majority. you might need something slightly warmerfor your majority. you might need something slightly warmer for your journey to work but by the afternoon, you will be in work but by the afternoon, you will beina work but by the afternoon, you will be in a position of wondering weather to cast it aside or not because lots of sunshine to come. the reason dry and sunny weather is dominating is that area of high pressure is pushing its way in. we've got a bit of a breeze in the far north—east of scotland and the likes of shetland... you can see a
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weather front bringing in slightly cloudier and damp conditions by the overnight period. for most, a dry start and it will stay that way. some cloud in the english channel, especially the channel islands and cornwall, couldn't rule out a spot of drizzle but it will be short—lived. varying amounts of cloud elsewhere but good rates developing. hazy sunshine in central parts of the uk but sunny spells for the vast majority into the afternoon, temperatures 15—20, 21, not far from where we should be for the time of year but with light winds, feeling pleasant. quite cool again in the even an overnight period through the southern half of the country, with clear skies, but in scotland, rain and drizzle to end the evening across lewis and harris, spreading through northern scotland through the night with heavy bursts, keeping temperatures up. single figures elsewhere through tomorrow morning. fresh start, if you mist and fog patches but in england and wales, more sunshine and more cloud
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in northern ireland and the cloud brea ks in northern ireland and the cloud breaks up in northern ireland to allow sunny spells. more cloud in scotland, outbreaks of rain at times, but not as strong wind as it has been with similar temperatures to today. word and rain in northern scotla nd to today. word and rain in northern scotland shifts shifts away for thursday morning. high pressure firmly in charge, keeping things dry uk wide. mist and fog patches to start the day, especially southern scotla nd start the day, especially southern scotland and the far north of england, but for gloriously sunny on thursday and temperatures starting to rise a degree or so up each day. feeling warmer by thursday, and feeling warmer still through friday and into saturday too. that's how your weather's looking. i know you'll like your apple fax, dan and lou ease, this is your first. there are 13,000 varieties and over 7500 worldwide —— 3000. that beats the two i had when i was
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a kid, golden delicious and granny smith. what is your top apple? probably too. what about you? smith. what is your top apple? probably too. what about you ?|j would say pink lady —— probably gala. probably £9 more expensive and the rest stop either a r always wrapped into much plastic —— probably £9 more expensive than the rest stop they are always wrapped in too much plastic —— than the rest. let's take a look at today's papers. many of them, including the daily telegraph, feature a picture of the luxembourg prime minister, xavier bettel, alongside an empty podium after borisjohnson pulled out of a joint press conference yesterday. the guardian has the same picture and claims that mr bettel mocked mrjohnson's suggestion that there has been good progress in brexit negotiations.
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match of the day presenter gary lineker has volunteered to take a pay cut, according to the daily mirror. it says the bbc‘s highest—paid star, who earned £1.75 million last year, is currently in talks over a new contract. and the daily mail reports that the rollout of smart meters has been delayed by four years. the papers says that only half of homes will have one of the meters by the original deadline of 2020. great stuff from the liverpool press conference in napoli, the papers are saying: i'm not sure it was a warcry yesterday if listen to his press conference, he was talking about being champions and starting again. asked if he thinks he can wind it
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again, he said he didn't know but he will have another go. —— when it. that would be seven european titles —— win it. the back page of the express, cloud nine. klopp, this is his agent suggesting he might leave liverpool at the end of his current contract because he doesn't like the weather and club responded by saying it was a joke. —— klopp responded. it's probably rainier where he was born than it is in the north of england. you've probably seen lots of celebrations at the end of the ashes series between england and australia. they got together in the dressing room to have a beer. steve smith, he has plagued england through the summer, with jack leach. jack leach famously wears glasses and contact lenses but had to keep cleaning his glasses to ensure his
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vision was good and steve smith put ona pairof vision was good and steve smith put on a pair of glasses supposedly to poke fun at him, but obviously it was all very good—natu red poke fun at him, but obviously it was all very good—natured because they are sharing a beer. i like jack leach, chatted to him last week at 0ld leach, chatted to him last week at old trafford. a good man. the essence of britishness when he cleaned his glasses and stubbornly refused to get out. patients, didn't ca re refused to get out. patients, didn't care what was happening. look at this picture, rugby world cup, getting excited about that. we will speak to sam warburton later. just after 8:30am. i like sam warburton's face —— 0wen farrell's face, saying i'm not sure what's going on but it is bonkers! i want to talk about the rules for swimming the english channel. go on! it is very strict, isn't it? they are serious rules, unless you bathe them, you won't be registered. —— obey. you are allowed
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a nose clip and a hat and goggles stop either had to should not offer thermal protection or buoyancy. the observer should have to improve the costume and the cap, obviously, it should be approved before starting and if not the swimmer won't be recognised. for multiple crossing to be officially recognised, the swimmer must, as soon as their feet touch the ground, land as directly as possible and then must return immediately to the water, where they can stand all set for up to ten minutes and during this time they must not be touched by any person but may be handed food, grease, medicines or swimming apparel. would you like some grease?|j medicines or swimming apparel. would you like some grease? i know what you like some grease? i know what you would go for! so they have two rest only in the water? it must the freezing! then they must, in agreement with the observer, make the most direct and reasonable way into the water to commence swimming.
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amazing! sorry, i'm so excited! can you tell? i am trying to do my serious face. during the swim no physical contact to the swimmer should be made by any person. can't get in the boat, can't be touched... could you give them a oar and hold it. can i do this story? no! hurry i it. can i do this story? no! hurry he it. can i do this story? no! hurry up! she is it. can i do this story? no! hurry he is going it. can i do this story? no! hurry up! she is going to land soon and we will speak to her. she has done it! a p pa re ntly will speak to her. she has done it! apparently she has touched land. where you talking to fill the gap? some live tracker action... wait for it... wait for it! oh, oh! there was a bit of it. that's what we've been told. can you tell me who has confirmed that in the last couple of minutes? hi live tracker drama. 54 hours and ten minutes of swimming, and she has swum across it for times. the first person to do so.
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wow! hopefully when she's had a feed we will chat to her. sarah thomas, do you think she will be able to talk after that? a hot chocolate first i think. incredible. sarah thomas, congratulations. i know you can't hear us, but well done! now time for your story. i was going to show you a yorkshire putting that looks like a dog but we are out of time. it doesn't look like a dog! great news, great swimming news, this morning! i will show it to you later! it's estimated that the number of rough sleepers in england has more than doubled since 2010. on one day last year, more than 4,000 people spent the night on the streets. it's a worldwide problem and next year the united nations will hold its first ever debate on the issue. breakfast‘s jayne mccubbin has been speaking to people in one shelter in central london. this place is a sanctuary in inner city london. for people like mick,
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who's been homeless for half of his life. 26 years. 26 years! at19, life. 26 years. 26 years! at 19, jade is new to this. she's on the streets after leaving care. do you feel like you've got anybody in your corner? not really. the state, as her guardian, gives jade extra housing benefit to try to find a place to live, but she can't find a place to live, but she can't find a place to live, but she can't find a landlord willing to rent to her. does it feel like there's no hope? no, i reckon i'll get there. yeah? staying positive at the moment. that's what you need, positivity. you'd be forgiven for thinking positivity‘s in short supply here, but it isn't. even robert, with a childhood of trauma in eastern europe, says there's hope. even todayit europe, says there's hope. even today it doesn't come, sunshine, i still believe one day it will. that day has just arrived for gary.|j
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have a couple more weeks and then i'll be going to my own flat. eight. yeah. that's brilliant. it is a good day. i'm in a race for success, i'm going to do my best and i'm going to put an s on my chest. that's a freestyle. good luck. but behind gary, there's many more needing help, with a 150% increase in rough sleeping since 2010. the underlying thing, the biggest thing we see is people who have experienced a load of trauma. trauma leading up to being homeless, the horrendous trauma of being homeless and after that, you know, there's so many barriers in the system that make it so much harder to get stable. this charity offers a sanctuary for those who choose to come inside. but for those who don't, or won't, or can't, like john, for those who don't, or won't, or can't, likejohn, rebecca and louise are here with outreach. if i could go with my dog i would go into a
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hospital. you ask a couple together their dogs and go in a bed—and—brea kfast, they have their dogs and go in a bed—and—breakfast, they have rights in this country. everyone has their own reasons. i became homeless through stupidity, breakup of relationships, not being a good boy, breaking the law. i have no—one to blame but myself. the truth is, there is no easy fix for any of the very, many reasons why anyone finds themselves sleeping rough on the streets. jayne mccubbin, bbc news. we will talk about that in more detail on bbc breakfast. get in contact with us about that on bbb bbc breakfast this morning. numbers? that is very retro! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. ican i can remember the numberfor going
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live. can you remember that? good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. around 80 firefighters have been tackling a fire at a block of flats in east london. crews were called to the block in claptonjust before 11pm last night. the fire is now under control. 15 residents were evacuated and one woman was rescued but no—one was injured. an investigation into the cause is 110w an investigation into the cause is now under way. there's been a huge reduction in the number of older vehicles being driven into central london since the introduction of the ulez. that's the zone in which drivers of more polluting vehicles have to pay to enter. a report by transport for london looking at the four months after it was introduced in april, found a drop of around 12,000 non—compliant vehicles. big the musical gets its west end premiere tonight, and one young fan has had a behind the scenes look at how it's put together. 10—year—old khayam has been given the chance to interview the cast and go backstage
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ahead of opening night. it's all down to a charity which grants life changing wishes to young people with serious illnesses. i was diagnosed with... for a month, so i was diagnosed with... for a month, soi i was diagnosed with... for a month, so i was treated immediately and i was rushed in and out of hospital. my was rushed in and out of hospital. my mum and dad then famous charity, which is called make—a—wish. now my wishes being extended so i can the in big the musical. let's take a look at the travel situation now. severe delays on the entire circle and district lines due to a signal failure at south kensington. minor delays on the hammersmith & city line due to signal problems. all other lines are good at the moment. 0n the roads, the a4 is closed due
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to gas repairs. now the weather with kate kinsella. today the sunshine returns. high pressure 110w today the sunshine returns. high pressure now starts to build into oui’ pressure now starts to build into our weather and will continue to or the next few days, so dry and settled with plenty of sunshine. there's a bit of cloud around but it's fairly patchy, coming and going. the spells of sunshine really quite pleasant. through the afternoon, temperatures are likely to reach around 20 celsius. quite a nicene evening in the sunshine and overnight, still a bit of cloud but clear spells as well and under the clear spells as well and under the clear skies, the temperature will feel quite, quite chilly in the suburbs with a minimum of five. tomorrow the high pressure still very much in place, so squeezes away the cloud. plenty of sunshine, plenty of blue sky. the wind is light, and noticed the temperature as we go through the week. lots of dry, fine and settled weather in the
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forecast and gradually temperatures getting higher. by the end of the week we drag in a southerly south—easterly flow and temperatures by saturday getting to 24 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning: the former wales and british lions captain sam warburtonjoins us for a look ahead to the rugby world cup and a chat about his incredible achievements in a sport which he loved, but sometimes hated. as the former doctor who star christopher eccleston reveals that he's suffered anorexia for decades, we'll be asking why so many men go undiagnosed.
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i still remember them and i miss them. remembering the battle of arnhem, 75 years on. veteran glider pilotjim hooper recalls the courage and comradeship of the men who were sent "a bridge too far". good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. elevenjudges in the uk's highest court will begin hearing two appeals today to decide whether boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament in the run—up to brexit was legal. the suspension has so far been challenged in two separate cases, with each resulting in differentjudgements. the hearing is scheduled to last until thursday. patient safety could be put at risk because of a shortage of nurses in england — that's according to the royal college of nursing. it's calling on the government to follow scotland and wales by introducing a new law to ensure safe staffing levels.
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the government says nhs staffing is a key priority, and that extra training places and investment will ensure high quality care. people convicted of stalking, harassment and child sexual offences in england and wales could see their sentences increase under changes announced by the government today. ministers are adding 14 offences to the "unduly lenient sentence" scheme, which allows anyone to ask for a review of a punishment if they think it should be tougher. around a hundred sentences were increased last year, as a result of the scheme. energy suppliers have been given four more years to complete the roll out of smart meters. every uk home was supposed to get one by next year but companies will now have until 2024, and the cost of the rollout will rise from 11 billion to £13.5 billion. the government says smart meters are vital to ensure the uk's energy
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is greener in the future. a medicine used to treat men with enlarged prostates may also slow down the progress of parkinson's disease, according to researchers. terazosin relaxes the muscles of the prostate and bladder but scientists from the us and china say it also prevents bra i n cells from being destroyed. they plan to start clinical trials. current treatments for parkinson's only manage the symptoms but do not stop its progress. the uk's food supplies could be at risk because of a failure to act on climate change. that's the warning from mps in a report published today. the environmental audit committee also says the nhs will need to prepare for a rise in health problems caused by our warming planet. the government says it recognises the threat posed by climate change and is holding a review to address the challenges to the food supply chain. in the last few minutes, an american woman has become the first person to swim the english channel four times without a break.
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sarah thomas, from colorado, completed the challenge in an unofficial time of 54 hours and ten minutes. it should have been 84 miles but strong currents meant she actually swam 130 miles. i think the tracker says 133.9 miles. sarah, who is 37, was treated for breast cancer last year. i have just seen a tweet. she is currently on land, celebrating with champagne and m&ms! what an amazing thing to do. hopefully she or someone from her support crew will be able to speak to usa support crew will be able to speak to us a bit later. i imagine she is understandably shattered after that. it is unimaginable to be able to just keep moving for that long. it is unimaginable to be able to just keep moving for that longm you can't imagine it, and you are pretty good in any body of water... ican pretty good in any body of water... i can barely manage a length in a pool! length of the channel! we will
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talk to her a bit later. and also, all the rules — she can't be touched while she swimming, she has to wear a particular outfit, amazing. while she swimming, she has to wear a particular outfit, amazinglj a particular outfit, amazing.” remember you read them out for about an hour! i'll read some more later. i couldn't show you my dog that looked like a yorkshire pudding, because of that. i'll do it at the end of your sport. can you believe we are already talking about the champions league ain? now, it'sjust over a hundred days since liverpool beat tottenham to win the champions league but tonight they'll begin the defence of their title. jurgen klopp's side take on napoli in italy. frank lampard will manage in the champions league for the first time when his chelsea side take on valencia. austin halewood looks ahead. tottenham's dramatic comeback against ajax. psg being stunned in
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france. liverpool coming back from the dead against barcelona on their way to lifting the title. after three months away the champions league is back and the holders are ready to go again. we want to be as consistent at least as last year, but play this year. last year we we re but play this year. last year we were really good. i'm not sure whether the best team in europe but we we re whether the best team in europe but we were really good in the right moments. liveable's title defence begins against napoli, a familiar foe. they beat them in the last group stage, but with five wins from five so far this season, jurgen klopp's team are filled with confidence. chelsea's start has been a mixed one, still mourning the loss of eden hazard, they have brought back a club legend as manager. rank lampard back a club legend as manager. rank lampa rd has back a club legend as manager. rank lampard has been there and done it before. he is the ultimate in football. there is something like nights at stamford bridge, the champions league music. something that i am here as chelsea people,
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andi that i am here as chelsea people, and i want to experience it on the side of the fence at. because of an embargo, kelsey had to promote from within. tammy abraham and mason mount have already done well in the premier league, but now we will see if they can do it on the big stage. it was goalless in last night's premier league match between aston villa and west ham. no goals but a bust—up between villa teammates tyrone mings and anwar el ghazi. the pair got into a heated exchange trying to keep a west ham attack at bay. the video assistant referee looked at it to see whether either should be punished, but decided not to. the wsl champions, arsenal, have started the season with two wins out of two. they beat manchester united 1—0 last night. it took 85 minutes but they finally got the goal they deserved through danielle van de donk. united have lost both of their opening matches in the top division. well there's only three days to go now until the rugby world cup kicks—off in japan.
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all of the teams are making their final preparations and some have gone down exceptionally well with the locals, particularly wales. they've been based in the city of kitakyushu, where more than 15,000 locals turned out for a training session. some were even signing welsh hymns in the stands! listen to this. my favourite bit so far. and as a thank you, the welsh team sang one back to them after. welsh national anthem.m welsh national anthem. it is wonderful, that. we only had a little snippet. a little burst to lifting on this tuesday morning.
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special advice for anyone travelling tojapan, special advice for anyone travelling to japan, very important, don't make me laugh... very important advice... this is how to use a toilet. helpful advice posted on twitter by our south east asia correspondence. all of those little sections are, spray, gentle spray, bidet, and dry. very important to know about the big and small at the bottom. i knew you would say that! i think i need to see it again to understand it. have you ever been to japan? no. 20 toilet are very hard to navigate. now we all know! things i never thought i would see in a sport bulletin. i'm happy to help!
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if brexit has divided the nation, you might argue it has also split ourjudiciary. last week a court in scotland said the government had no right to suspend parliament simply to get brexit done. but the high court in london had previously said that was a matter for politicians, not judges. today, the highest court in the land, the supreme court, will start to decide which one was right. let's cut through the legal jargon withjoelle grogan, a senior lecturer in constitutional law from middlesex university. thank you for coming on and hopefully being able to answer some of these questions and explain a bit about what's going on. process, let's start there. what is happening in the supreme court today? what we are beginning with today is the hearing of the appeals, so the submissions from both sides of the appeals coming from england and scotland. the barristers will come and present arguments for why or why
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not boris johnson's decision and present arguments for why or why not borisjohnson's decision to give advice to the queen to prorogue was law. this showing that british democracy is breaking point, or struggling under the strain of the moment? as with everything in brexit, we are in uncharted and unprecedented times. it is true that in the questions that have come to the court, it is something that is really at the strain of the separation of powers. we have four different fundamental powers that tell us how the british legal system works. parliament, government, the court and the queen. with all the questions we have been seeing over the last few years, we are seeing a strain as to what power can do what, and what power should do what. this is essentially the core question. is it only a matter of politics for
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borisjohnson to give advice to the queen to prorogue parliament, or is ita queen to prorogue parliament, or is it a legal question that can be decided in the courts? does that involve the protection of parliament? if we were in the supreme court in the next few days, what happens if a judgement comes down from the supreme court, and then as we have been asking members of the government for quite a few days, whether they decide to stick to that legislation, or as they were sort of saying, push the boundaries and test that legislation? who then makes a judgement on that? does it go back to the supreme court or somewhere else? there are almost two different issues. first, there is the act from last week, an act of parliament that says you must go to the european council and request a further amount of time for brexit. that is a law, and if you break the law, then a lot of quite serious things could happen. you could see people going to court and saying,
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you must have in order court directing borisjohnson to you must have in order court directing boris johnson to follow the law. the other issue is, and this is the big question that will be coming in the supreme court, is whether or not his decision was lawful or unlawful, to give advice to the queen. just as a side point, you cannot question the queen in court, her power, but that is why the focus is on the advice of boris johnson. if the supreme court says that was unlawful advice, that is an unbinding decision. the challenge would be what the court then orders, if the advice is considered lawful. we could see a situation in which the supreme court would say, well parliament must be recalled, government must recall parliament to either continue the session or renew
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the session. that is again difficult. this comes back to what i said earlier about the separation of powers. each power in the british constitution has its own responsibilities and it would be very difficult for one power to order any of the other institutions to do something. but if the supreme court finds that the advice was breaking fundamental principles in the uk, then we will see the court having to make the decision, and ultimately having to make that order to do something. some very significant questions to find an a nswer significant questions to find an answer to. that was very skilfully navigated, thank you very much. maybe some answers to some of the questions over what will happen in the supreme court over the next few days. and other questions that we don't know the answer to. matt's at an orchard for the start of the apple harvest. is the weather feeling autumnal as well, matt?
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how autumnal as well, matt? are the apples tasting?e morning. how are the apples tasting? good morning. i will show you how to convert these apples from private and community gardens and orchards into good old applejuice, but we will do that in a second. in berkshire at the moment, a bit chilly, as it is for many, but not a bad day ahead with most places staying dry and a fair bit of sunshine around as well. the reason we have things on the dry side at the moment, high pressure moving in off the atlantic. rain clouds from building up by and large. around the top of that high pressure, weather fronts will close in to northern scotland later, you can see them to the west of scotland at the moment, so a breeze across the far north—east but that will ease gradually through the day. still cloud left over from last night in the english channel, so grey to begin within the channel islands and parts of cornwall variable cloud elsewhere, that will come and go and most will see sunshine, some will be hazy
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especially in northern ireland and northern england, and later thickening up in northern scotland with lewis and harris are seeing patchy rain by the end of the day. after early showers, most will be dry throughout with sunshine and blue skies overhead and not especially warm after a chilly start but pleasant enough for the time of year, 15—21, and with light winds, feeling pleasant. this evening overnight with clear skies, temperatures dropping quickly once again, single figures widely. could lead to mist and fog patches apart from the far north of scotland, where we will see cloud and outbreaks of rain becoming heavy and persistent in the highlands and islands into tomorrow morning. grey in central and northern scotland tomorrow with outbreaks of rain and drizzle and the odd heavy burst, but south of that variable amounts of cloud for northern england and northern ireland but sunshine further south. another pleasant day with light winds and temperatures similar today, roughly where they should be for the time of year. into thursday, the cloud in northern
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scotla nd thursday, the cloud in northern scotland will push away at long last and most places will be dry yet again. mistand and most places will be dry yet again. mist and fog in southern scotla nd again. mist and fog in southern scotland and in parts of northern england to begin with and that will ta ke england to begin with and that will take a few hours to shift. then blue skies for the vast majority all the way through, very little cloud on the charts. if anything, it starts to get that bit warmer temperatures more widely into the high teens and low 20s. some pretty warm weather ahead. a bit variable, and if you look at the scene at the moment in berkshire, it is a beautiful start. blue skies overhead at the moment, a bit of a chilly start but according to the nfu, the variability of conditions in the summer has meant an almost perfect and ideal, high—quality apple crop. did you know around 90% of apples in private gardens actually go to waste? we've come to my applejuice in berkshire to find out what gets done with
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them. apples from local gardens and community projects, they are cleaned and sorted and the bad ones are taken out and then they go into this machine, very noisy one... and then... it is called a scratting machine. then it goes into the juicer and outcomes all of the apple juice. i had a sneaky taste and its tasting lovely. some of the baking apples have that lovely sharp taste. then thejuice comes apples have that lovely sharp taste. then the juice comes out. i will ta ke then the juice comes out. i will take you next door, where they are quickly pulled and then caps are put on and then they are put into this thing just behind me, which is where they are pasteurised and outcomes
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applejuice you they are pasteurised and outcomes apple juice you can they are pasteurised and outcomes applejuice you can have they are pasteurised and outcomes apple juice you can have for the next year and a half. this one from a community project locally. that's how you can get garden apples into something that lasts for 18 months when pasteurised. amazing, thanks very much indeed! i brought you a view apples from my tree that i planted earlier this year. they aren't very big but they are quite tasty. promise! you can haveit are quite tasty. promise! you can have it later! —— a few. it is quite sharp, isn't it? crude oil prices saw their sharpest rise in 30 years yesterday, following drone attacks on two saudi arabian refineries at the weekend. we mentioned it earlier this week. how is it going? it's all right! ben's at a petrol station in stockport to assess how this could affect us all. morning, ben. good morning and welcome to stockport. you're right, a significant change yesterday, the attack on the oil facilities in saudi arabia and significant with regards to the oil price, it led to a 15% increase. saudi arabia is the
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biggest oil producer in the world and those two attacks took out 5% of the world's oil supply, so inevitably attention has turned to the impact on world markets and what we pay at places like this. it's added about 4p to the price of a litre of ulreich now, and often what we see in this case is prices go up quickly and they come down more slowly —— of fuel. the us said it will pump in more supply, and saudi arabia says it has reserves in return, but implications about how easy it was to attack these facilities and take out a significant proportion of that supply. the biggest rise in prices in15 supply. the biggest rise in prices in 15 years. let's look at what it means for us, what we pay not only here but in the shops. steve owen and steve swindon are with me. steve irwin, you are from portland, we
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talk about saudi arabia as the world's biggest oil provider but an attack like this is significant, a 15% rise in global oil prices? absolutely. 5 million barrels of oil a day taken off the market over a weekend. totally unprecedented and unexpected. but people shouldn't panic, we won't run out of stocks of oil and fuel at the pumps. that's the first thing to say. when you heard of these two separate attacks, seems relatively easy to take out 5% of global production. give me a sense of how vulnerable the facilities were? the main gas facility processes 7 million barrels a day of crude oil and they make it safe for transport. it feeds into ships that take it around the world, as well as the internal refineries in saudi arabia 's. so it was a significant attack. —— saudi arabia. it was very co—ordinated and
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targeted. it's taken some kind of preparation to carry this out. steve, can i bring you in, you are from harbour freight international, you must see this more than most. we talk about 4p on a litre, you have a lot of trucks doing a lot of miles, you must feel the impact? lot of trucks doing a lot of miles, you must feelthe impact? you can imagine that's thousands of pounds per day for a large fuel bill for an average size haulage company. we have the highest excise duty in europe aside from the fuel price, so it's a massive impact on us. can you pass this onto your customers? to a certain degree. we made a decision to absorb the cost for the last few months but we've had to pass on a fuel surcharge to our customers. we can't absorb the costs any more. fascinating and good to talk to you. we will talk more later about the impacts. for business trying to deal with all of this, it has serious
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implications. a few pence here and there, for all of us a few p on a litre might not make a massive difference but it's often the case that prices go up quickly and come down more slowly. we will talk about that later. more from me after 7am. we will be back to you on the forecourt, ben, later on. returning to the breaking news this morning. just after 6am and american woman became the first person to swim the channel 4 times without a break. sarah thomas, 37, completed the challenge in an unofficial... she has done it. kevin murphy was on the boat as one of the official observers. doesn't count unless he's official —— it's official. he has won the channel many times himself. good morning. how is she doing and how was this wim? -- this wind.
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she's remarkable. —— the swim. she came out and didn't even feel cold. absolutely amazing after that time. we've got a bit of trouble hearing you, kevin, but i'm going to... who are we looking at now, kevin? that's better! you were looking at the lady, suzanne, who is holding the phone! ok, we're going to carry on. tell us about conditions. this is historic, what she's done, isn't it? it's a triumph really. fees tested the limits of endurance beyond all measure ‘— the limits of endurance beyond all measure —— fees tested. 54 hours of non—stop swimming —— she's tested. she started early sunday morning and now she has finished back here after four laps of the channel. it's actually unbelievable. not just
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four laps of the channel. it's actually unbelievable. notjust for the time that she spent in there and the time that she spent in there and the distance she covered but the speed at which she did it. there was never any fault. she kept hers/ rate at about 62 all the way. the first crossing was... —— her/. amazing. to watch it is inspirational and at the end we were very emotional. you have swu m end we were very emotional. you have swum the channel over 30 times yourself. give us an idea, i read the rules today. no—one is allowed to touch them. what are the rules and regulations are there wesley you start with no water beyond and you start with no water beyond and you start on the beach with no water beyond —— what are the rules and regulations? they have ten minutes to start swimming once they get back in the water after each turn. again,
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at the finish, nobody was allowed to touch sarah until she had cleared the water and that is the swim completed. is it officials he has done it, kevin? it would be official ifi done it, kevin? it would be official if i could hear you —— is it official she has done it, kevin? it has to be ratified by a committee, they read all the reports of the swim and the details. i'm here, i am secretary of the channel swimming association, and as far as i'm concerned, she's done it. great to talk to you despite the technical difficulties. good on her! thank you for suzanne for holding the phone. we will speak to sarah later. fingers crossed! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. around 80 firefighters have been tackling a fire at a block of flats in east london. crews were called to the block in claptonjust before 11pm last night. the fire is now under control. 15 residents were evacuated and one woman was rescued but no—one was injured. an investigation into the cause is now under way. there's been a huge reduction in the number of older vehicles being driven into central london since the introduction of the ulez. that's the zone in which drivers of more polluting vehicles have to pay to enter. a report by transport for london looking at the four months after it was introduced in april, found a drop of around 12,000 non—compliant vehicles. a group of teenagers who fled the taliban in afghanistan have found a sense of belonging through cricket. their coach, amran malikfrom luton, has dedicated his life to the sport, introducing it to hard to reach communities. a year ago, he set up
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luton blue tigers with no facilities and no equipment, but now they're winning games and gaining confidence. these young kids are in the same position where i was once upon a time, and if i can help them ove rco m e time, and if i can help them overcome and face these challenges and give them a pathway, then i would have thought i've done a good job. we didn't have nothing but now he's making, like, teams and matches for us to go and play cricket. cricket changed my life. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, there are severe delays on the entire district line due to a signal failure at south kensington. also, minor delays on the circle and the hammersmith & city line. all and the hammersmith & city line. other lines are ! moment. on the roads, the a4 piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town from piccadilly to knightsbridge for gas repairs. in lewisham, on the a20 westbound, one lane closed for gas works
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at the junction with belmont hill. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. today, the sunshine returns. high pressure now starts to build into our weather and will continue to for the next few days, so dry and settled with plenty of sunshine. now, there is a bit of cloud around but it's fairly patchy, coming and going. these spells of sunshine really quite pleasant. through the afternoon, temperatures likely to reach around 20 celsius. quite a nice evening in the sunshine, and overnight, still have a little bit of cloud but clear spells as well and under the clear skies, the temperature will feel quite, quite chilly in the suburbs with a minimum of five celsius. tomorrow the high pressure still very much in place, so squeezes away the cloud. plenty of sunshine, plenty of blue sky. the wind is light, and notice the temperatures as we head through this week.
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lots of dry, fine and settled weather in the forecast and gradually the temperatures getting higher. by the end of the week, we drag in a southerly south—easterly flow. temperatures by saturday getting to 24 celsius. some lovely weather on the way. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. our headlines today: the uk's highest court begins hearings, to decide if boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament was legal. the nurses union warns staff shortages are putting patient safety at risk. an american woman sets a new world record by swimming the english channel four times non—stop.
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the four times non—stop. biggest rising oil prices in yea rs. the biggest rising oil prices in years. will it mean higher prices at the pumps and at the shops? the champions league returns tonight. te holders, liverpool, begin the defence of their title away to italian side napoli. and it is the start of the apple harvest. did you know that with the summer weather, we are expecting a high quality this year. what can you do with all those that you don't use in yourgarden? do with all those that you don't use in your garden? also, a bit ofa chilly start but lots of sunshine today. it's tuesday the 17th of september. our top story: elevenjudges in the uk's highest court will begin hearing two appeals today to decide whether boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament in the run—up to brexit was legal. the suspension has so far been challenged in two separate cases, with each resulting in differentjudgements. here's our legal affairs correspondent, clive coleman.
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constitutional law, dry and dusty? not a bit of it. a prime minister stands accused of misleading the monarch and undermining parliament. the supreme court will have to resolve two dramatically contradictoryjudgements. scotland's higher civil court ruled that the prime minister's advice to the queen to prorogue was motivated by the proper purpose of stymieing or frustrating parliament during critical weeks before brexit, but the high court in london ruled that proroguing was a political matter and there were no legal standards against which a court could judge it. so the supreme court will have to decide firstly whether proroguing or suspending parliament is a matter for the courts and if it is, they'll have to give a ruling as to whether that advice given by borisjohnson to the queen was unlawful or not, and that will determine whether parliament can sit again in the days leading up to the 14th of october when the suspension
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was due to be lifted and during that period, therefore, whether they can legislate and consider brexit matters. clive coleman, bbc news. borisjohnson has not committed himself to recalling parliament if the supreme court rules the suspension unlawful. our political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster. what's the prime minister been saying? good morning. of course, boris johnson has long insisted that the suspension of parliament is all about facilitating a queen's speech so he can set out a new legislative agenda. that has been somewhat disputed and now the matter will from today go to the highest court in the land. but what will the government do if the supreme court agrees with the court of session in scotland? agrees with the court of session in scotland ? well, agrees with the court of session in scotland? well, it's a question that has been put to the pm by our political editor, laura kuenssberg. obviously i have the greatest respect for the judiciary and the independence of the judiciary is one
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of the glories of the uk and of our constitution and is one of the things that is admired around the world. the best thing i can say having said that is to wait and see what they will say. would you be ready to recall parliament if that is what it said you had to do?” think the best thing i can do is wait and see what the judges say. not wait and see what the judges say. n ot exa ctly wait and see what the judges say. not exactly a crystal—clear commitment. i think what is clear is that if he was forced to recall parliament huge questions would hang over the decision to prorogue the commons over a five—week period, and a lot of mps would return westminster pretty determined to hold the government's feet to the fire over brexit strategy. and speaking of that, xavier bettel, the luxembourg pm, carried off that empty podium moment yesterday, where borisjohnson, after empty podium moment yesterday, where boris johnson, after brexit empty podium moment yesterday, where borisjohnson, after brexit talks, decided not to take part in a press conference because of a group of noisy protesters. downing street tried to get it moved inside, but xavier bettel did take to the stage,
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gesturing to the empty podium, and laying into borisjohnson's brexit strategy. some will suggest that this was grandstanding on the part of the luxembourg pm, but others will say it shows tensions are running high as the clock ticks down to october 31. if you want to know more about how the supreme court operates, clive coleman has filmed a short explanation, which you can find on the bbc news website. patient safety could be put at risk because of a shortage of nurses in england — that's according to the royal college of nursing. it's calling on the government to follow scotland and wales by introducing a new law to ensure safe staffing levels. here's our health reporter katharine da costa. too many nursing posts in england are vacant. there's a shortfall of about 40,000 or 11%, a point the royal college of nursing wants to highlight with these cardboard cutouts. the rcn says it's a national crisis that's putting patients' safety in danger.
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this is a crisis that everybody knows exists but it is not being dealt with as though it is a crisis and there is a real urgency to it. and patients are not receiving the best that they deserve. and we want the public to be able to say that in safety in knowing that someone's going to listen to them. the number of nurses working in hospitals in england has increased by nearly 10,000 over the last five years but that figure is dwarfed in comparison to the number of admissions, up by1.5 million over the same period. that means admissions are rising nearly three times faster than the nurse workforce. the rcn is calling for england to follow scotland and wales in introducing a law on safe staff nursing levels but wants a national body to be created to plan for the future nursing needs and it's asking for £1 billion of investment to boost student nurse numbers. the government says nhs staffing is a key priority and that extra training places and investment will ensure high quality care.
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katharine da costa, bbc news. people convicted of stalking, harassment and child sexual offences in england and wales could see their sentences increase under changes announced by the government today. ministers are adding 14 offences to the unduly lenient sentence scheme, which allows anyone to ask for a review of a punishment if they think it should be tougher. around a hundred sentences were increased last year, as a result of the scheme. energy suppliers have been given four more years to complete the roll inafew in a few minutes will be speaking to the justice secretary about that and other things as well. energy suppliers have been given four more years to complete the roll out of smart meters. every uk home was supposed to get one by next year but companies will now have until 2024 — and the cost of the rollout will rise from £11 billion to £13.5 billion. the government says smart meters are vital to ensure the uk's energy is greener in the future. hong kong's chief executive has
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called for an end to violence following more clashes between police and protestors this week. carrie lam said talks with different sections of the community will be held next week and that they would be as open as possible. several people were injured in violence between pro—democracy and pro—china demonstrators yesterday, with police firing tear gas and water cannons. a medicine used to treat men with enlarged prostates may also slow down the progress of parkinson's disease, according to researchers. terazosin relaxes the muscles of the prostate and bladder but scientists from the us and china say it also prevents brain cells from being destroyed. they plan to start clinical trials. current treatments for parkinson's only manage the symptoms but do not stop its progress. the uk's food supplies could be at risk because of a failure to act on climate change, that's the warning from mps in a report published today. the environmental audit committee also says the nhs will need to prepare for a rise
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in health problems caused by our warming planet. the government says it recognises the threat posed by climate change and is holding a review to address the challenges to the food supply chain. around 80 firefighters were called to a blaze at a block of flats in east london overnight. london fire brigade say the situation in hackney is under control and no—one is thought to be injured. the cause of the fire is currently unknown. an american woman has just become the first person ever to swim the english channel four times without a break. sarah thomas started her swim on sunday morning. the route should have been 84 miles long but strong currents mean the 37—year—old, who had treatment for breast cancer last year, swam more than 130 miles. her unofficial time was 54 hours and 10 minutes. absolutely brilliant news, and fingers crossed we will be able to speak to her later, or at least one
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of her support team. so many congratulations to her. history in the making. she has been guzzling champagne and eating chocolate as well. good morning to you. we are here until 9:15am. as we've been hearing this morning, the list of crimes for which a "soft" punishment might be upgraded is about to get longer. 14 offences, including stalking and harassment, are being added to the unduly lenient sentence scheme, which allows anyone to ask for a review of a judicial punishment if they think it should be tougher. we're joined from westminster by the justice secretary, robert buckland. thank you forjoining us. is this a sign that sentences in your view are not tough enough? no, it's a sign that we want to make sure that the system is as responsive and robust as possible. the scheme itself has been going for a number of years now, but i feel strongly that there we re now, but i feel strongly that there were offences that ought to be in
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the scheme that were causing some confusion, and members of the public we re confusion, and members of the public were e—mailing in asking about them. tomorrow we have the opportunity to set out a greater consistency of approach, particularly with regard to sexual offences that concern a great deal about. if someone thinks it is not tough enough, they ask for it is not tough enough, they ask for it to be reviewed? that's right. there is a webpage, and you e—mail into the attorney general‘s office, who are responsible for the scheme, and ask for a particular case to be looked at. after that, the attorney or solicitor general look at it and apply legal tests to determine whether or not they think it was unduly lenient or way too low. then thatis unduly lenient or way too low. then that is sent to the court of appeal to decide whether or not that is the case. why do you think this is necessary in the first place? it strikes me that the sentences should be right in the first place. in the
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majority of cases ourjudges are applying the guidelines and the law appropriately. sometimes things go wrong. having a safety valve like this has proved i think invaluable over the years. i have been solicitor general for five years and idid many solicitor general for five years and i did many of these cases myself. i met many victims of crime who felt that a higher degree ofjustice has been delivered as a result of the change. that's why i think extending the scheme in this measured way is a sensible approach. can i obviously also ask you, because you are an expert in the field, about what is going on in the supreme court today. judges will be deciding whether the decision by boris johnson judges will be deciding whether the decision by borisjohnson to baroque parliament was legal —— prorogue. government will be arguing over the next few days that it was an entirely proper course to take. i wa nt to entirely proper course to take. i want to say this about ourjudges —
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they are world—class and world leading and we must allow them to do theirjob. i leading and we must allow them to do their job. i want leading and we must allow them to do theirjob. i want to make sure that whatever the decision of the supreme court is, that we respect the robust decision of ourjudiciary. so, we don't know what it is going to be but we should respect the outcome, is that what you are saying? yes, and we don't know what that decision will mean, and respecting those decisions runs right through our system and we must do that. boris johnson is saying he will wait and see what the judges are saying. i know we are entering the realms of speculation, but if they rule it is not legal, then when would parliament have to be recalled? are not able to go into the why‘s and wherefores of that, but there will
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bea wherefores of that, but there will be a requirement to abide by the rule of law. so it would have to be recalled, is that what you are saying? i'm not going to get into the details of what might happen after the ruling. it would be wrong of me to anticipate what their lordships might say. let's let them get on with the job, let's see what the ruling is and deal with it when the ruling is and deal with it when the time comes. dominic raab yesterday was talking about the legislation to stop no deal. he said the government would test the law to the government would test the law to the limit. people might think the law is the law, why do they need to test it. what do they mean?” law is the law, why do they need to test it. what do they mean? i think what he's talking about is the way in which that particular piece of legislation will be used and interpreted, because it hasn't been used yet. we haven't got to that stage. that stage won't be reached until mid to late october. i think rather than me speculating about what might happen, it is better as
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lord chancellor and secretary to remind everybody that the rule of law is one of our underlying principles in our country, and that is what we are for, it is what this government represents, and respecting that plus the independence of the judiciary is a cornerstone of ourjudiciary. thank you very much. thanks for your time. matt's at an orchard for the start of the apple harvest. he has the weather for today and the next few days. that looks nice. he's in hungerford this morning. hello, matthew! good morning. a lovely start, crisp and clear. it is the start, crisp and clear. it is the start of the apple orchard and the apple harvest season. ware into the middle of september and we expect a high quality apple in the uk this year —— where into. we had a variable summer where we saw rain full at times. regular rainfall gives the juiciness to the apple. we
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saw cooler nights in the summer, that provides the crispiness and of course the british summer, a bit of british sunshine, that adds the distinct british flavour to apples. all coming into ripeness and harvest at the moment but a lot go to waste in ourown at the moment but a lot go to waste in our own gardens. as you will find out later, i'm aiming to turn some of that waste into usable bottles of glorious applejuice of that waste into usable bottles of glorious apple juice and they've been tasting lovely indeed. a bit fresh in the orchard. looking at the forecast for temperatures quite widely into single figures, across southern counties of england still in the teens at the moment, because we have a bit more cloud. otherwise, lots of sunshine overhead foremost. we have an area of high pressure pushing across the atlantic at the moment. dry weather, with one or two showers across the far north,
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which will bring rain later in the day. a windy day in the far north—east, still blustery at the moment. some drizzly rain to take us into the evening. lots of sunny spells and feeling quite pleasant, temperatures of 21 degrees. across the northern half of scotland, we see rain developing a bit more widely. in the highlands and islands we saw heavy bursts of rain. the odd mist and fog patch but the vast majority. a westerly wind to go with
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the breeze. further south you are, sunnier it will be, and temperatures similarto sunnier it will be, and temperatures similar to today, mid—teens to low 20s. by thursday, the cloud in scotla nd 20s. by thursday, the cloud in scotland will have pushed itself away and early rain in shetland will clear and virtually everyone will have a dry day on thursday. barely a cloud in the sky, early fog in southern scotland and northern england will clear and sunshine aplenty into thursday. if anything, feeling warmer with temperatures more widely in the high teens and low 20s. and if anything warming up further by friday and saturday, with temperatures widely in the 20s by saturday. warming up later in the week with lots of sunshine overhead. glorious apple is to be picked, so get out there and do it. continuing the apple facts, the science of apple growing is called pomology.”
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didn't know that! thank you so much indeed! learning so much about apples this morning. this is something we mentioned earlier on. are you all right? sorry! from our friends in the north to doctor who, christopher eccleston has enjoyed huge success as a stage and screen actor. now he's revealed that since childhood he's suffered from anorexia and a hatred of his own body. in a new book, he says that being a working—class man from the north of england prevented him from seeking help sooner. let's get more on this with tom quinn from the eating disorder charity beat, and dave chawner, a comedian and author who has lived with anorexia since his late teens. people who are hearing that news this morning, christopher eccleston, you make lots of assumptions about an actor and this isn't what you expect. what do you think about him saying this and coming out, incredibly helpful? yes, incredibly helpful and brave and it's amazing people can hear... men get eating
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disorders too and it's quite nice he has raised the fact he's from a working—class background. that debunks a lot of the myths people might have about eating disorders. there's also those feelings, tom, about men suffering in silence and this is a perfect example of someone who's been incredibly successful but has struggled with this for most of his life. yeah, in some ways it's sad he's suffered for so long in silence but incredibly brave he's come out now and help to show that anyone, however successful, whatever your background, can suffer. hopefully this is an encouragement for others who perhaps are suffering in silence and perhaps you've got a family memberyou're in silence and perhaps you've got a family member you're worried about, a chance now to say it's not just a feminine illness and that affects certain people from certain backgrounds. unfortunately everyone can be affected. dave, you are here
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because you suffered, when did you start developing issues?” because you suffered, when did you start developing issues? i first developed it when i was 17 but i didn't realise at the time i had developed it, it was something quite slow to manifest. also i think i never gained any perspective on my own experience, so people around me looked at the calorie counting, the exercise and the weighing myself was abnormal, but i didn't realise, and ididn't abnormal, but i didn't realise, and i didn't seek treatment until i was 24, seven years into the illness, and that's because i didn't feel anorexic enough. like tom says, i thought it was about severity, it's about impact, though. it's not about how thin you are, it's about how it affects your life. eventually you managed to deal with that, did you understand you were anorexic or did you need someone to say, look a listen, this is where you're what you're going through. lots of people have told me i was anorexic and i laughed it off, but eventually it drove me to quite
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serious depression and i ended up severely clinically anorexic and i had to go and get help for the depression. but a wonderful gp said to me, it's like you wouldn't expect your laptop to work if you don't charge it. it's exactly the same with your brain. if you don't fuel it, why would you expect it to work? looking at some of the christopher eccleston quotes, really powerful. i was eccleston quotes, really powerful. iwas ina eccleston quotes, really powerful. i was in a state of extreme anxiety, either thinking i would die or i would kill myself. often he had wa nted would kill myself. often he had wanted to reveal he was anorexic as well. how much difference can early treatment make, because he went on for many years without seeking help. at any stage, recovery is possible, but the evidence is the earlier you are treated, the more likely it is you will make a full recovery. i would encourage people worried about themselves or a loved one to not delay, get help as quickly as
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possible. nothing to be embarrassed about. unfortunately plenty of people suffer from this illness, so it's critical to get help. what sort of things are causing eating disorders in men? are there general themes, or is it specific? we don't think there particular causes for men as opposed to women. for many people, it's a coping mechanism. it's not actually about the food itself, it's more a coping mechanism for other feelings of depression or anxiety, so people feel there's something here that they can control where perhaps everything else in their life feels out of control stop the icu nodding along, was that your issue, dave? it was a disease coping mechanism, some might go to substances but for me it was a way to numb unwanted emotions. as ha rd emotions. as hard as it sounds, it was like an addiction. a little win, i thought i was rubbish at everything else in
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life but if i could get to a certain numberand life but if i could get to a certain number and restrict for a certain amount or exercise for a certain time, iwas amount or exercise for a certain time, i was a success. and with social media, people are increasingly feeling like a fay failure. there are incredible resources online through social media channels, which are really useful —— like a failure. i know you're interested in this, so stay with us for this. sarah thomas has become the first woman in history to swim the channel 4 times. shejoins us now. congratulations, how are you feeling? i'm really tired and i've lost my voice from all the salt water. tell us about it, because it was over 50 hours. how tough was it and what was the worst bit? probably dealing with the salt water over four days, or two days... dealing with the salt water over four days, ortwo days... it dealing with the salt water over four days, or two days... it really hurts your throat and your mouth and your tongue. i can see! how did you
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get through it mentally? it takes incredible stamina and endurance to be able to do that? it really does. my be able to do that? it really does. my crew was great helping me out and helping me stay strong. sarah, it's an incredible achievement. it's down in the studio. we heard the swim was going to be 80 miles but because of the strong currents, you ended up doing around 130. were you prepared for that before you started?” around 130. were you prepared for that before you started? i was, i knew what to expect from the currents and the weather and the cold. i was prepared for the amount of time! cold. i was prepared for the amount of time i was going to be in the water. tell us about what you've managed to eat and drink along the way, because fuelling is so important, isn't it? it's very important. are used a product that my team throws to me in a water bottle mixed with elect lights —— i used. that's what i ate most of the way. what did you see along the way?
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lots of it in the dark and had big waves. what did you notice along the way? the channel is pretty clean, so ididn't way? the channel is pretty clean, so i didn't see a lot of garbage and trash. just fish and a lot of jellyfish. sarah, what's the plan now? we've been following you carefully this morning, as have the viewers. we hear you have been eating champagne and chocolate since you finished. what about the rest of the day, sleep somewhere? hopefully ican the day, sleep somewhere? hopefully i can sleep somewhere. i'm pretty out of it and pretty tired. it seems amazing, how do you stay awake for that long? presumably the water keeps you awake? the water keeps you awake and some of the electrolytes had caffeine in it, so that help keep me awake. explain the feeling when you finally reached land and you did it, who is there to greet you? were you in tears, where you
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elated? what was that like emotionally to finish?” elated? what was that like emotionally to finish? i was pretty numb. there were people on the beach to meet me and wish me well. that was really nice of them. but i feel mostly stunned right now. ijust can't believe we did it. you certainly did. is it true you have been celebrating with champagne and m&ms? i tried a bit of champagne but it didn't go down very well! but i have been eating some m&ms. we can hear your throat is sore. you're absolutely amazing, a real inspiration. congratulations and go and have a rest. you really deserve it, sarah. thank you very much. sarah thomas, if you've just switched on, she has won the channel 4 times switched on, she has won the channel 4timesa switched on, she has won the channel 4 times a non—stop, 130 miles in total, even though it was meant to be 80 but the strong currents turned it into an even more ethics feet and it into an even more ethics feet and it was when she started but everything tastes like salt at the
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moment. she is stunned! so am i. well done to her! see you in a moment. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. around 80 firefighters have been tackling a fire at a building in east london. crews were called to the block in clapton just before 11pm last night. the fire is now under control. 15 residents were evacuated and one woman was rescued but no—one was injured. an investigation into the cause is now under way. there's been a huge reduction in the number of older vehicles being driven into central london since the introduction of the ulez. that's the zone in which drivers of more polluting vehicles have to pay to enter. a report by transport for london looking at the four months after it was introduced in april, found a drop of around 12,000 non—compliant vehicles. big the musical gets its west end premiere tonight, and one young fan has had a behind the scenes look at how
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it's put together. 10—year—old khayam has been given the chance to interview the cast and go backstage ahead of opening night. it's all down to a charity which grants life—changing wishes to young people with serious illnesses. i was diagnosed with burkitt‘s lymphoma and so i was treated immediately, and i was rushed in and out of hospital. my mum and dad then got in touch with a very famous charity, which is called make—a—wish, so now my wish is being extended so i can do big the musical. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, there are severe delays on the district line between earls court and richmond and ealing broadway and barking to upminster. there are minor delays on the circle line. that's due to signal failure. on the roads, the a4 piccadilly
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underpass remains closed out of town from piccadilly to knightsbridge for gas repairs. in lewisham, on the a20 westbound, one lane closed for gas works at the junction with belmont hill. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. today, the sunshine returns. high pressure now starts to build into our weather and will continue to for the next few days, so dry and settled with plenty of sunshine. now, there is a bit of cloud around but it's fairly patchy, coming and going. these spells of sunshine really quite pleasant. through the afternoon, temperatures likely to reach around 20 celsius. quite a nice evening in the sunshine, and overnight, still have a little bit of cloud but clear spells as well and under the clear skies, the temperature will feel quite, quite chilly in the suburbs with a minimum of five celsius. tomorrow the high pressure still very much in place, so squeezes away the cloud. plenty of sunshine, plenty of blue sky. the wind is light, and notice the temperatures as we head
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through this week. lots of dry, fine and settled weather in the forecast and gradually the temperatures getting higher. by the end of the week, we drag in a southerly south—easterly flow. temperatures by saturday getting to 24 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with dan walker and louise minchin. 11 judges in the uk's highest court will begin hearing two appeals today to decide whether boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament in the run—up to brexit was legal. the suspension has so far been challenged in two separate cases, with each resulting in differentjudgements. the hearing is scheduled to last until thursday. patient safety could be put at risk
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because of a shortage of nurses in england — that's according to the royal college of nursing. it's calling on the government to follow scotland and wales by introducing a new law to ensure safe staffing levels. the government says nhs staffing is a key priority, and that extra training places and investment will ensure high quality care. people convicted of stalking, harassment and child sexual offences in england and wales could see their sentences increase under changes announced by the government today. ministers are adding 14 offences to the unduly lenient sentence scheme, which allows anyone to ask for a review of a punishment if they think it should be tougher. around a hundred sentences were increased last year, as a result of the scheme. energy suppliers have been given four more years to complete the roll out of smart meters. every uk home was supposed to get one by next year but companies will now have until 2024 — and the cost of the rollout will rise from £11 billion to £13.5 billion. the government says smart meters are vital to ensure the uk's energy
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is greener in the future. a medicine used to treat men with enlarged prostates may also slow down the progress of parkinson's disease, according to researchers. terazosin relaxes the muscles of the prostate and bladder but scientists from the us and china say it also prevents bra i n cells from being destroyed. they plan to start clinical trials. current treatments for parkinson's only manage the symptoms but do not stop its progress. the uk's food supplies could be at risk because of a failure to act on climate change. that's the warning from mps in a report published today. the environmental audit committee also says the nhs will need to prepare for a rise in health problems caused by our warming planet. the government says it recognises the threat posed by climate change and is holding a review to address the challenges to the food supply chain.
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we have just spoken to sarah thomas, but if you have missed the news this morning, she has become the first person to swim the english channel 4 times without a break. the route should have been 84—miles long but strong currents mean the 37—year—old, who had treatment for breast cancer last year, swam 130 miles. her unofficial time was 54 hours and ten minutes. we spoke to herjust a moment ago, she said she was stunned and frazzled. she said it was hard to talk, her throat and mouth were affected by all the saltwater. a huge congratulations to her. we spoke to the fellow on the support boat earlier as well. he was an official observer. sally, i forgot
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to show you this earlier. i built up a bit too much now, but there is a picture in the paper i wanted to show you earlier, and it is a yorkshire pudding that looks like a dog. your keyboarding! that is from a bistro that used to bea that is from a bistro that used to be a betting shop. it is on a tv programme called my restaurant revolution. is it about making food that looks like dogs? no, but someone looked at it and thought, that looks like a dog. itjust happen randomly? one of those happy accidents? yes, like a piece of toast that looks like elvis, occasionally you get that sort of thing. i had thing. ihada thing. i had a bit of ham once... shall we
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just leave it at that? i thought it looked likejohn just leave it at that? i thought it looked like john major, just leave it at that? i thought it looked likejohn major, but it didn't according to everyone else. like when i saw a painting on the side of a van and i thought it was luke skywalker. yes, and it was theresa may? yes! let's have a look at the champions league. it seems like yesterday that liverpool were victorious. tottenham's dramatic comeback against ajax. manchester united stunning paris saint—germain in france. liverpool coming back from the dead against barcelona on their way to lifting the title. after three months away, the champions league is back and the holders are ready to go again. we want to be as consistent at least as last year, but play this year. last year we were really good.
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i'm not sure whether the best team in europe but we were really good in the right moments. liverpool's title defence begins against napoli, a familiarfoe. they beat liverpool in the last group stage, but with five wins from five so far this season, jurgen klopp's team are filled with confidence. chelsea's start has been a mixed one. still mourning the loss of eden hazard, they have brought back a club legend as manager. frank lampard has been there and done it before. it is the ultimate in football. there is something about nights at stamford bridge, the champions league music. something that i have here as chelsea people, and i want to experience it on this side of the fence. because of an embargo, chelsea had to promote from within. tammy abraham and mason mount have already done well in the premier league, but now we will see if they can do it on the big stage. it was goalless in last night's premier league match between aston villa and west ham.
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no goals but a bust—up between villa teammates tyrone mings and anwar el ghazi. the pair got into a heated exchange trying to keep a west ham attack at bay. the video assistant referee looked at it to see whether either should be punished, but decided not to. the wsl champions arsenal have started the season with two wins out of two. they beat manchester united 1—0 last night. it took 85 minutes but they finally got the goal they deserved through danielle van de donk. united have lost both of their opening matches in the top division. well there's only three days to go now until the rugby world cup kicks—off in japan. all of the teams are making their final preparations and some have gone down exceptionally well with the locals, particularly wales. they've been based in the city of kitakyushu, where more than 15,000 locals turned out for a training session. some were even signing welsh hymns in the stands!
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and as a thank you, the welsh team sang one back to them after. all sing calon lan marvellous that. lovely, just a little bit... they are saving their enthusiasm for the playing, obviously. and it hasn'tjust been the wales squad loosening their vocal cords. singing
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i don't know if you can see the lady... look at this poor lady in the middle of that looking a bit bemused. she is struggling for space, that guy beside her is about 18 feet tall! here are england's opening world cup opponents tonga getting into the spirit of things as they fly into japan for sunday's opener against eddiejones's side. and for any of you heading out to japan to cheer your country on, or if you mightjust be travelling to the country at some point soon. then we've got some very important advice for you. this is how to use a toilet injapan! helpful advice posted on twitter by our tokyo correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes. i like the sound of gentle spray. a p pa re ntly i like the sound of gentle spray. apparently i was inadvertently showing some of those pictures on the back of the dog earlier. the picture of the dog i showed you, the yorkshire pudding, there was something on the other side, which i
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can now see. what was it? never mind. never seen one before! thank you very much, see you in half—an—hour. the liberal—democrat conference draws to a close today, with delegates in buoyant mood after declaring their intention to cancel brexit if they get into power and following rousing speeches from several new mps who have joined from other parties. perhaps the most high—profile of those defectors is the former labour mp chuka umunna, whojoins us now from bournemouth. thank you forjoining us, it looks lovely down in bournemouth. you used to bea lovely down in bournemouth. you used to be a labour party mp. if you are so convinced the lib dems of the party you should be in, why did you notjoin them first when you left labour six months ago? it's a good question, i wish i had joined them
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sooner. i think at the beginning of the year there was a real? about what was likely to be the best vehicle for liberal, progressive, pro— european politics in this country. the jury was out at the start of the year. i believe what people wanted was a new party, but we got a very clear response from the british public in the european elections, where the liberal democrats proved to be the strongest remaining party, getting 20% of the vote. they got 23.3% of the vote combined against the other two major parties. i have always had the same values as the liberal democrats but at the beginning of the year it wasn't necessarily clear that we we re wasn't necessarily clear that we were going to be that vehicle. i think it is very clear as we going into the autumn that we are the biggest and strongest remaining party, and if you want to stop brexit — but more than that, if you have internationalist, socially liberal, open and outward looking values, we are liberal, open and outward looking values, we are your liberal, open and outward looking values, we are your home now. i see not just myself and values, we are your home now. i see notjust myself and three other former colleagues from the
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independent group, but also the two former ministers, philip lee and sam gyimah coming to us, it is quite clear that we are home for liberal progressive internationalist values. you are clearly not the home for anybody who wants to leave or voted to leave. on that issue, you spent yea rs — to leave. on that issue, you spent years — and we have interviewed you many times on this programme and you have passionately talked about the need for another referendum. now you are saying — we were talking to your leader yesterday, that you want to revoke brexit entirely and revoke article 50. why this change of position? why are you happy now to say... some people are saying you are turning back in a vote. we decide things in this country by reference to the british people, and we have done that sometimes by referenda, but usually we have done it at referenda, but usually we have done itata referenda, but usually we have done it at a general election. all we're
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saying is look, when it gets to the general election, that is a public vote whether have their say, we are putting forward our offer and our suggestion of the trajectory we go on as suggestion of the trajectory we go onasa suggestion of the trajectory we go on as a country, which is — we have a lwa ys on as a country, which is — we have always been clear, i have always wa nted always been clear, i have always wanted to stop brexit, and that has been the goal. that means if you like has been a people 's vote in this period before a general election, but at a general election we are saying that if we had a lib dem majority government that would bea dem majority government that would be a democratic mandate empowering us to revoke article 50, given that thatis us to revoke article 50, given that that is what we will put in the ma nifesto. that is what we will put in the manifesto. i suppose what i would say is that if we put revoking article 50 in the manifesto, it goes to the people in a democratic vote ina to the people in a democratic vote in a general election, and we don't deliver on that, that would be the undemocratic. all we're saying is that what we think we should do, and if we get elected we will deliver on its. i that you are giving voters a clear choice of what you stand for. i get that. but what about... we have had a lot of people contacting
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us, but what about those liberal democrat voters who voted leave and now feel alienated by the party. and people within your own party. norman lamb has said the policy is too extreme and there is a greater need for compromise. simon hughes talking about taking the focus away from another referendum, which he feels is the right way to go. i think of poor brenda from bristol, who was complaining about having another general election. we're going to end up with another because the government has a majority of -43. the government has a majority of —43. think about it, if we were elected at the general election on the clear policy of. brexit and revoking article 50, then saying to brenda we want you to go to the polls again to determine this ——. brexit. you've asked the legitimate question about people who voted to leave. in the last parliamentary
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by—election which you covered in brecon and radnorshire, we went into that with a clear stop brexit message and everyone knew that was the goal and we would do everything to make that happen but we won in that seat, which had a majority for leave. the way you address the issuesis leave. the way you address the issues is by moving on from this brexit chaos. the problem with this issueis brexit chaos. the problem with this issue is it's taking up all the bandwidth, it's often all we talk on your shows about, and all the bandwidth in parliament and we're not talking about the big issues like not enough affordable housing and knife crime and nhs funding. this is how you resolve it, a general election, a clear policy toe stop it so we can move on and deal with the real issues that affect people. you said yesterday that the lib dems could win a maximum of 100 seats in a general election, and that would mean obviously no majority and you have to work with
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someone else. who else would you work with? well, the first thing is i was asked on current polling what good you get. i certainly didn't say there was any maximum. let's be honest, none of us have been particularly great at forecasting, and certainly the 2017 election proves that. presumably you don't think you would win enough seats to be the majority party?” think you would win enough seats to be the majority party? i certainly wouldn't rule that out. the fact is, we just wouldn't rule that out. the fact is, wejust don't wouldn't rule that out. the fact is, we just don't know what's going to happen. i think there's something very big going on in british politics at the moment, seeing a reconfiguration. the conservative party that used to be a broad church is becoming a right—wing nationalist party. it hasn't just is becoming a right—wing nationalist party. it hasn'tjust kicked out its own ‘— party. it hasn'tjust kicked out its own —— it hasjust party. it hasn'tjust kicked out its own —— it has just kicked party. it hasn'tjust kicked out its own —— it hasjust kicked out party. it hasn'tjust kicked out its own —— it has just kicked out its mps, own —— it has just kicked out its mp5, 21 of them, for insubordination. we have lost a moderate tory tradition and we know jeremy corbyn has done the same in the centre—left for the labour
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party. there's something big going on in british politics right now, so therefore we can't be sure what would happen at a general election. ourjob at this democracy —— in this democracy is to put forward a clear alternative, and we're doing that. chuka umunna, thanks very much for that to us. lovely there and lovely where is. —— lovely where is. matt's at an orchard for the start of the apple harvest. morning, matt. surrounded by apples from people's private gardens. the start of the apple harvest, we are in mid september. fantastic high—quality this year, but 90% in the gardens is wasted and i'm with a community project that uses it and turns it into proper applejuice. project that uses it and turns it into proper apple juice. we project that uses it and turns it into proper applejuice. we will chat to the owner later and show you what happens. but certainly this
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morning, the apples are still on the trees in the orchard in lovely, crisp sunshine. beautiful start. while a bit chilly if you're heading out the door and off to work or school, most places are dry and fairly sunny as well. what's happening? high pressure is moving in from the atlantic and where you see high pressure, generally means dry but around the top edges we're seeing showers in northern scotland, and to the west of scotland at the moment, there is a weatherfront pushing in later, bringing rain later today and into tonight. for most, dry today. a bit cloudy in the channel islands and parts of cornwall, but that will clear and sunshine will come out later. good, sunny spells elsewhere and cloud amounts varying in northern england, northern ireland and western scotla nd northern ireland and western scotland and showers in northern scotla nd scotland and showers in northern scotland at the moment will fade and later in lewis and harris, wetter. temperatures today, 12—15 in scotland. not very warm but the
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breeze is easing compared to what we've had, high teens or low 20s in the far south and not far from where we should be for the time of year. a good journey home for most, good sunny spells, but turning wetter this evening and overnight in the far north of scotland. heavy bursts in the likes of the highlands and islands, but that will stop the temperature dropping to much here but for england and wales, especially where the skies are clearest a nd especially where the skies are clearest and the winds are lightest, a chilly start to tomorrow morning, if you above freezing again. for much of a known and wales, dry and sunny and cloud at times in northern england and northern ireland, and scotla nd england and northern ireland, and scotland will be cloudier. temperatures uk wide similar to this afternoon, always feeling better where you have blue skies overhead. check the chart out for thursday, blue skies overhead for most from dawn till dusk. some fog first thing in southern scotland and northern england on thursday, but that will clear during the first few hours of
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the day, and then a cracking autumn day. feeling pleasant in the sunshine with temperatures up a couple of degrees compared to the next few days, more widely into the mid—to—high teens if not low 20s. thing is warming up further into the rest of the week and the weekend. your apple fact for this hour, apples are 25% air. that's why they float. i thought you woke going to say water, but thanks very much! are you fed up yet? not at all, we love the apple facts! —— i thought you we re the apple facts! —— i thought you were going to say water, but thanks very much. crude oil prices saw their sharpest rise in 30 years yesterday, following drone attacks on two saudi arabian refineries at the weekend. ben's at a petrol station in stockport to assess how this could affect us all. morning, ben. good morning to you. a significant rise in prices, jumping the highest in15 rise in prices, jumping the highest
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in 15 years. rise in prices, jumping the highest in15 years. up rise in prices, jumping the highest in 15 years. up by 15%, and that's after 5% of the world's oil production was taken off—line in those two attacks in saudi arabia. on friday, oil was $60 a barrel and todayit on friday, oil was $60 a barrel and today it is $68 a barrel. that has an impact on us through the prices we pay on the petrol forecourt, but also the prices we pay in the shops because the majority, 93% of all the stuff that we buy in the shops, is transported by lorry, so therefore it is passed on to consumers. let me introduce you tojo, the boss at often green petrol station. how does this work? how do you put up your prices? they could change as a result of what happened in south saudi arabia. —— saudi arabia. result of what happened in south saudi arabia. -- saudi arabia. we have a tanker coming later this afternoon. they change daily. the price between friday and today will have gone up significantly. we will
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look at the price this afternoon. when the tanker comes in, how immediate is the change? people say they go up quickly but they don't come down as quickly. generally most of the time it is stable, but when you get events in the far east, there's a spike. we'll have a close look today, but i think there is no doubt they will go up. let me introduce you to the two steves, steve is from portland fuel consultancy, and the other is from harbour freight international. saudi arabia is the biggest oil producer in the world and what happens there affects us all? oil is a global commodity. if i can sell it more expensively because of what happened i wouldn't sell it to the rest of the world, i would just sail it there. we've had 5% taken out of supply of the global oil market, and that's had a massive effect on
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prices. we shouldn't worry. we won't run out. the us and saudi arabia have 800 million barrels in their strategic reserve, which would last 180 days if they used it all to replace the 5 million barrels last. plenty to go around but we should be aware. steve, a few pence on the later, we know so much of that is taxed at the pump, but it has an effect on getting your lorries around? a tank of fuel costs between 400 and £500 her tank on a vehicle, so 400 and £500 her tank on a vehicle, so 45p is an astronomical amount to increase and those costs have to be passed on to the customers and the consumer. passed on to the customers and the consumer. when you speak to those customers and you say you're going to have to charge them more for the stuff you deliver to their supermarkets, warehouses and factories, what is the reaction? you can't absorb that cost, can you? last year when this happened customers were unhappy. it took
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stern conversations with customers to say this has to be passed on, we can't absorb them sloppy steve, when you talk about the increases and you see the effect it has on business day—to—day, what about on the forecourt, it affects the money we have in our pockets? as joe was saying, he has to pass the cost onto the people up so it will cost £2 or £2 50 more expensive at the moment. if the situation escalates in the middle east, which is the biggest concern now, we could see further price rises in the next month or so. fascinating how linked these things are. thanks very much. that's the impact on the day today basis. we might feel it on the forecourt and we might feel it in the shops, but it gives you a sense of how susceptible we are —— day today. amazing how easy it was to take out
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the two production facilities in saudi arabia and that's one of the concerns, the biggest supplier in the world, 5% of the global amount, taken out seemingly overnight. see you later. thanks, ben. coming up later we will be joined you later. thanks, ben. coming up later we will bejoined by former wales and british lions captain sam warburton talking about his career, so many injuries, but looking ahead to the world cup, which starts on the weekend. you're very excited, aren't you?” which starts on the weekend. you're very excited, aren't you? i can't wait! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm geeta pendse. around 80 firefighters have been tackling a fire at a building in east london. crews were called to the block in clapton just before 11pm last night. the fire is now under control. 15 residents were evacuated and one woman was rescued but no—one was injured. an investigation into the cause is now under way.
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there's been a huge reduction in the number of older vehicles being driven into central london since the introduction of the ulez. that's the zone in which drivers of more polluting vehicles have to pay to enter. a report by transport for london looking at the four months after it was introduced in april, found a drop of around 12,000 non—compliant vehicles. a group of teenagers who fled the taliban in afghanistan have found a sense of belonging through cricket. their coach, amran malikfrom luton, has dedicated his life to the sport, introducing it to hard to reach communities. a year ago, he set up luton blue tigers with no facilities and no equipment, but now they're winning games and gaining confidence. these young kids are in the same position where i was once upon a time, and if i can help them overcome and face these challenges and give them a pathway, then i would have thought i've done a good job. we didn't have nothing but now he's making, like, teams and matches for us to go and play cricket. cricket changed my life.
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let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube, there are severe delays on the district line between earls court and richmond and ealing broadway and barking to upminster. there are minor delays on the circle line. that's due to signal failure. disruption on south—western services due to a safety inspection on the track. on the roads, the a4 piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town from piccadilly to knightsbridge for gas repairs. now the weather with kate kinsella. the weather might be warming up? good morning. today, the sunshine returns. high pressure now starts to build into our weather and will continue to for the next few days, so dry and settled with plenty of sunshine. now, there is a bit of cloud around but it's fairly patchy, coming and going. these spells of sunshine really quite pleasant. through the afternoon,
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temperatures likely to reach around 20 celsius. quite a nice evening in the sunshine, and overnight, still have a little bit of cloud but clear spells as well and under the clear skies, the temperature will feel quite, quite chilly in the suburbs with a minimum of five celsius. so, for tomorrow, that high pressure still very much in place, so squeezes away the cloud. plenty of sunshine, plenty of blue sky. the wind is light, and notice the temperatures as we head through this week. lots of dry, fine and settled weather in the forecast and gradually the temperatures getting higher. by the end of the week, we drag in a southerly south—easterly flow. temperatures by saturday getting to 24 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now it's back to dan and louise. bye for now. good morning, welcome to breakfast with dan walker
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and louise minchin. our headlines today: the uk's highest court begins hearings to decide if boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament was legal. the nurses' union warns staff shortages are putting patient safety at risk. an american woman sets a new world record by swimming the channel four times non—stop. good morning. the biggest rise in oil prices in 15 years, so should thai could it make a difference to the price we pay in the shops and at the price we pay in the shops and at the pump? —— show could it make a difference? fans get ready for the start of the rugby world cup. wales have already made quite an impression in japan. we're going to bejoined by former captain sam warburton just after 8:30am. it is the start of the apple harvest, because of the variability of the weather this summer we expect a really high quality to chapel this
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summer. as a weather forecast which will contain plenty of sunshine not just today but also in the days ahead. it's tuesday the 17th of september. our top story. 11 judges in the uk's highest court will begin hearing two appeals today to decide whether borisjohnson's decision to suspend parliament in the run—up to brexit was legal. the suspension has so far been challenged in two separate cases, with each resulting in differentjudgments. our legal affairs correspondent, clive coleman, is outside the supreme court now. clive, what will take place there today? it will be a really interesting day ahead? constitutional law, dry and dusty, not a bit. this is not quite the gunpowder plot that the prime minister stands accused of misleading the manic and undermining parliament, the sovereign body in our constitution. two completely conflicting judgments,
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our constitution. two completely conflictingjudgments, one our constitution. two completely conflicting judgments, one from the scottish courts ruling borisjohnson had an improper purpose in advising the queen to prorogue parliament for five weeks, that was to stay new parliament on the one hand. a com pletely parliament on the one hand. a completely different judgment from the high court in london which ruled that proroguing parliament is a political matter, not a legal one the courts can get involved in. the 11 justices in the court behind me will have to resolve those two conflicting judgments and firstly decide whether this is a matter of the courts. if they decided is, they will come to a definitive ruling as to whether the prime minister's motive in asking the queen to prorogue was improper, to frustrate parliament in some of the critical weeks leading up to the uk leaving the eu, and that will determine whether parliament is recalled and mps whether parliament is recalled and m ps start whether parliament is recalled and mps start sitting again.
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if you want more detail on how the supreme court works, clive has done and explain which is on the bbc website. our political correspondent jessica parker is in westminster. the prime minister has been talking about what he might not do or might do once there is a decision. boris johnson has always had the prorogation of parliament was to allow for a queen's speech so he could set out to new legislative agenda, some people debate that, which is why it is heading for the highest court in the land. what will the government do if the supreme court agrees with the court of session in scotland? laura kuenssberg asked prime minister. obviously i have the greatest respect for the judiciary, the independence of the judiciary is one of the greatest things for which the uk is admired around the world. having said that, i had to wait and
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see what they say. would you be ready to recall parliament if the supreme court says you ought to?” need to wait and see what the judges say. not exactly a crystal-clear commitment from the prime minister, but if the supreme court agreed with the court of session, huge questions would be asked over the government's decision to prorogue parliament and mps might return to westminster pretty determined to hold the government plasmid fee to the fire on the brexit strategy. someone who has been holding borisjohnson's fee to the fire on his brexit strategy is the prime minister of luxembourg. you will have seen the pictures of the empty podium after boris johnson, following brexit talks in luxembourg, decided not to take part ina luxembourg, decided not to take part in a press conference due to noisy protesters. downing street tried to move it inside, but that was not possible. the prime minister of luxembourg really laid into the government's brexit strategy. some
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would suggest he was simply grandstanding but others would ask if the two sides can't even agree to the choreography of a press conference, what chance that they will agree on a deal? thank you very much. and you can follow every development from the supreme court, and watch the hearing live online, at bbc.co.uk/news, or via the bbc news app. we understand there are 11 justices and it will take several days. we will bring you up to date tomorrow on breakfast too. people convicted of stalking, harassment and child sexual offences in england and wales could see their sentences increase under changes announced by the government today. ministers are adding 14 offences to the unduly lenient sentence scheme, which allows anyone to ask for a review of a punishment if they think it should be tougher. around 100 sentences were increased last year, as a result of the scheme. energy suppliers have been given four more years to complete the roll out of smart meters. every uk home was supposed to get one by next year, but companies will now have until 2024 — and the cost of the roll—out
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will rise from £11 billion to £13.5 billion pounds. the government says smart meters are vital to ensure the uk's energy is greener in the future. a medicine used to treat men with enlarged prostates may also slow down the progress of parkinson's disease, according to researchers. terazosin relaxes the muscles of the prostate and bladder but scientists from the us and china say it also prevents bra i n cells from being destroyed. they plan to start clinical trials. current treatments for parkinson's only manage the symptoms but do not stop its progress. the uk's food supplies could be at risk because of a failure to act on climate change. that's the warning from mps in a report published today. the environmental audit committee also says the nhs will need to prepare for a rise in health problems caused by our warming planet. the government says it recognises the threat posed by climate change and is holding a review to address the challenges to the food supply chain. an american woman has become the first person ever to swim
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the channel four times without a break. sarah thomas started on sunday morning and finished just after six o'clock today. the route should have been 84 miles long but strong currents mean the 37—year—old, who has been treated for breast cancer, swam more than 130 miles. her unofficial time was 54 hours and ten minutes. earlier we spoke to sarah and asked what the most challenging part of the swim had been. probably dealing with the salt water over four days, or two days. it really hurts your throat and your mouth and your tongue. oh, oh, i can see! and just tell us, how did you get through it mentally, because it takes incredible stamina and endurance to be able to do that? it really does. my crew was really great about helping me out and helping me stay strong. it is an incredible achievement. so many congratulations to sarah
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thomas, she slammed four times without stopping. and she has recently been treated for breast cancer. an amazing woman. hopefully when she recovers again, we might have her in the studio. as we've been hearing this morning, there are currently 40,000 unfilled nursing posts in england. the royal college of nursing says that's a dangerous situation which will only get worse unless the government invests £1 billion in training new nurses — and brings in legislation to ensure minimum staffing levels. estephanie dunn is from the rcn. she's here to tell us more. that morning. lovely to see you, thank you. —— good morning. let's talk about patient safety, what are some of the issues caused by a lack of number of nurses that we need?” think the challenge people had daily as staffing the water at a level that the nurses delivering their ca re that the nurses delivering their care field comfortable with and know that at the end of their shift they had in everything they would like to do for those patients. —— staffing
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the water at a level. people are not at risk of dying everyday because there are not enough nurses that we are concerned that having more nurses ensures the right care is given at the right time by people with the right skills. what is it like to be working as a nurse in the nhs at the moment?” like to be working as a nurse in the nhs at the moment? i think it is very difficult for many members. the stories we hear is they do 12 hour dates, invariably doing extra hours at the end of their shift to do documentation. they often go without brakes, they do not have enough time for drinks to the day so they are tired, hungry, dehydrated and stressed. they are called in on their day off because of the 40,000 vacancies. obviously the managers need to ensure it is staffed with nurses. they are constantly working ata nurses. they are constantly working at a higher rate. there are probably at a higher rate. there are probably a number of factors but what, for
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you, is the main reason we have this deficit of 40,000 nurses? probably the lack of long—term planning. we have had decades of boom and bust approach to workforce planning in the nhs when we have had to have had to the workforce, including nursing under the posts, and it is difficult to recruit them back into nursing. when you have shortages, people working in those environments tend to go upset, get stressed, leave the profession and then the introduction of the bursary has not held because mature students in particular had not been attracted into training. he will be aware of what the department of health and social care has said, there are 16,800 more nurses than in 2010, 15,000 there are 16,800 more nurses than in 2010,15,000 more in training and we are providing more flexibility and career development alongside multi—year pay rises to retain staff. yes, those figures are
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correct, but for every nurse that has been recruited to work in the nhs, there has been 157,000 more admissionsjust into nhs, there has been 157,000 more admissions just into the acute hospitals, so it is very complex. 1.5 million more hospital admissions every year, and the people we are caring for have got more complex needs, they are more dependent and the turnover is much higher. what could england learn from scotland and wales, where the issue was not quite so severe, is that right? the issueis quite so severe, is that right? the issue is the same but they have managed to get the government to start to agreed towards putting in legislation. what the rcn is wanting is for one body to be responsible for planning and monitoring the nursing workforce in england. that is to ensure we have enough numbers. there is already a law to have the right stuff in the right place at
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the right time. is that helping? i'm not sure it is necessarily a law, if it is it is very loose. so say you have eight nurses and two health ca re have eight nurses and two health care support workers on a ward, but is not helping because we do not have enough now. the campaign needs to drive, we need the right numbers, it needs one body which is accountable to ensure it happens. can it be numbers? if it were numbers, what would it be?m can it be numbers? if it were numbers, what would it be? if you are doing proper workforce planning you have to look forward and think about what we will need in the future. we know what our workforces like in of age, understanding the age spread of our nursing workforce will allow us to at least project better what will happen in ten, 15, 20 years, so we need to be recruiting to backfill those numbers
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and looking up the changes to the way we deliver care and services. we need more nurses. we are talking at the moment about acute hospitals, the moment about acute hospitals, the community and mental health services seminal —— have some in —— have similar problems. estephanie, thank you. you can get in touch with us on social media or e—mail us with your views. i have given dance and food he cannot finish, one of the apples from my garden which is clearly not sweet enough. —— i have given dan some food. it is a little sharp. matt is with us. iam in i am in the countryside of berkshire. we are into the apple
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season but 90% of privately grown apples go to waste. what can you do with them? joining me is the owner of my applejuice, tony watt your company does? we are a community apple pressing service, a bit like the olive press in the mediterranean, but for apples. we juice, price, bottle and pasteurise the juice and we put their name on the juice and we put their name on the label. it is a good way for schools and communities to raise money? 30 primary schools but the word around the village community, parents brought in a job lot, the school name and logo is on the bottle, we discount so they can sell it through the school and make around 1p per bottle. there are several companies like us around the country but not many places do it
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for very small batches, hopefully there will be more like on the continent. we will see exactly how it is done in half an hour. a wonderful way to reduce waste and get a fantastic project at the end. you can sit back and enjoy the apple juice until lovely blue skies like this. let's look at the forecast for today. most started the day with sunshine and will finish with sunshine. temperatures drop back into single figures through the night. a bit cold for some of you, but the sun is getting to work. a bit more cloud across southern areas and parts of scotland, still some showers at the moment and a weather front will push towards north lescott a nd front will push towards north lescott and later in the day. good sunny spells, the cloud across the channel islands and corn will gradually breaks up. showers in northern scotland is for a time, figure crowd is back towards the hebrides and we could see some rain
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late afternoon and into the evening. temperatures across parts of scotla nd temperatures across parts of scotland a little fresh thanks to the breeze, and 12 to 15 degrees. further south, more widely into the teens, some spotting to the low 20s as we finish the afternoon. towards the school pick up, the evening rush—hour, most of us full finish the day fine with sunshine that cloud will thicken across the north of scotla nd cloud will thicken across the north of scotland in particular, rain becoming more extensive. clearer skies further south, the odd mist and fog patch canopy will doubt and temperatures to nature into single figures with clearer skies, not as cold across parts of scotland in particular. into wednesday, a cloudy day., outbreaks particular. into wednesday, a cloudy day. , outbreaks of particular. into wednesday, a cloudy day., outbreaks of rain for the northern half of the country, some of which will be heavier. —— a cloudy day.. sunny is to pull through central, southern england
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and wales. for thursday, through central, southern england and wales. forthursday, not through central, southern england and wales. for thursday, not much if any cloud event too much of the uk, there could be some morning fog on thursday morning. it might hamper your commute, but blue skies foremost from dawn to dusk and it will feel pleasant. temperatures creeping more widely into the mid to high teens if not low 20s, and those temperatures will climb even further into friday and saturday. just to get you through this half—hour, did you know that every apple pip contains a little bit of cyanide, but such low levels you will not really notice it, and it is safe. studio: hold on a minute! good fa cts , studio: hold on a minute! good facts, matt.
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it is lovely for you to bring in apples for the team, but that one was not so tasty! we're celebrating a fantastic achievement this morning. it belongs to sarah thomas, who has just become the first person ever to swim the english channel four times without stopping. let's have a look at how she did it. she set off near dover in the early hours of sunday morning, arriving at calais some 11 hours later. on sunday afternoon she headed back, arriving in dover early on monday morning. battling on — she continued her return to the french coast all morning and then she turned around for one last crossing, arriving on a beach near doverjust after six o'clock this morning after swimming for an incredible 54 hours and ten minutes non—stop. this is how she celebrated, with a
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glass of champagne and some sweets. we didn't ask her what she had on her body but i know some people use goose fat. we spoke to her earlier and she told is how she was feeling. i'm really tired! i'm losing my voice from all of the salt water. tell us about it because it was over 50 hours. how tough was it? what was the worst bit? probably dealing with the salt water over four days, or two days. it really hurts your throat and your mouth and your tongue. oh, oh, i can see! yes. and just tell us, how did you get through it mentally? because it takes incredible stamina and endurance to be able to do that. it really does. my crew was really great about helping me out and helping me stay strong. sarah, it really is an incredible achievement. it is dan here in the studio as well. we were hearing that the actual swim was due to be just over 80 miles but because of the strong currents,
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you've ended up swimming about 130 miles. were you prepared for that before you started as well? i was. i knew what to expect from the currents and the weather and the cold. so i was very prepared for the amount of time that i was going to be in the water. and just tell us a little bit about what you have managed to eat and drink along the way because fuelling is so important, isn't it? yes, it is very important. i used a maltodextrin product called carbopro that my team threw to me in a water bottle, mixed with electrolytes, and that is what i ate most of the way. tell us what you saw on the way as well, because i know lots of it is in the dark and lots of it is in big waves as well, but what did you notice along the way? yes, the channel is actually pretty clean so i didn't see a lot of garbage or trash, just fish and a lot ofjellyfish. what is the plan now? we have been following you very carefully this morning, as have the viewers. we have heard you have
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been stuffing chocolate and champagne since finishing. what is your plan for the rest of the day? are you going to try to sleep somewhere? yes, i hope that mostly i can sleep the rest of the day. i'm pretty out of it and tired right now. itjust seems so amazing. how do you even stay awake for that long? presumably the water keeps you awake. yes, the water keeps you awake and then some of the electrolytes i had had some caffeine mixed into it so that helped keep me alert. sarah, just explain to us, that feeling once you finally reached land and you have done it, who was there to greet you? were you sort of in tears? were you elated? what was it emotionally like to finish? i was reallyjust pretty numb. there was a lot of people on the beach to meet me and wish me well. it was really nice of them. but i feel just mostly stunned right now. ijust can't believe that we did it. you certainly did! is it true you have been celebrating with champagne and m&ms?
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i tried a little bit of champagne and it did not go down very well! but i have been eating some m&ms. so many congratulations, i think she will have a rest, she deserves it. judging by the reaction this morning, she has inspired so many people, especially as somebody who has battled back from breast cancer. she has just undergone treatment, and to do that for 54 hours plus, amazing. it's exactly 75 years since the start of operation market garden — an attempt by allied forces to build on the success of d—day by sending huge numbers of airborne troops deep into enemy—held territory. one of them was glider pilotjim hooper, who was later captured by german forces. he's been telling his story to the bbc‘s robin gibson. he's an eyewitness to history.
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he was at arnhem, described in books and films since as a bridge too far. jim hooper‘s first battle experience was flying a glider, carrying troops to land in the middle of enemy held territory. there was a sort of keenness, certainly amongst my colleagues, to get into the battle. he just wanted to see action. at least we would have done something to tell our grandchildren in later years that we had become involved. he and the platoon he carried survived two accidents in the days before arnhem. the soldiers elected to stick with a pilot who had saved them, and went with him for a third flight. and i was relieved, i think the whole of the platoon were relieved, that this time they got down safe and sound and the glider was still in a fairly intact state.
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it was a feeling that did not last, as he became part of the arnhem story, an operation that went wrong. within days, they found themselves outnumbered, pinned down by tanks and heavy guns, and eventually, ammunition started to run out. there appeared just above us, a german holding a stick grenade, and he invited me to hand it over, which i did very rapidly. and so i was taken prisoner. he became one of more than 6500 taken prisoner. there were 2000 allied troops killed, along with over 1300 german and more than 400 civilians. they were friends and comrades who never came home. and i still remember them. i remember their names. i remember how they looked. and i certainly miss them.
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arnhem remembered, 75 years on. such an important story to remember, to be retold. thank you so much for eve ryo ne to be retold. thank you so much for everyone involved in getting that brilliant piece on the telly for us. coming up on breakfast this morning: crude oil prices are soaring after attacks on refineries in saudi arabia. ben's at a petrol station to find out what effect it'll have on the cost of filling up. good morning. expect to see the price at your local petrol station go price at your local petrol station 9° up price at your local petrol station go up today because of the two attacks in saudi arabia that took out 5% of the world's oil production, a significant amount which centred global oil prices by 15%. you can fill up with diesel for 131.9 p currently, we have spoken to
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the boss here telling us it could rise to about 135 when his new tanker delivery gets here today. they buy feel daily so they pay the price on delivery, not when it was pumped out of the ground, so a significant impact for them. not only will we see prices rise when we fill the car but we could see prices rise in the shops too because about 93% of all the stuff we buy in the shops is delivered to the shops in trucks, and it means for haulage firms they will pay much more too, it could mean a few thousand pounds extra on bills for each track every year, so expect to see prices rise. saudi arabia and the united states a they have enough oil in reserve, we will not go short, but there are big questions about seemingly how easy it was to take that supply offline seemingly overnight. this morning we will look at the implications, talk about the global oil market too and
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clearly the significant impact it could have on prices. we will talk about that later, but now let's get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning. it was a fairly chilly start on the day with temperatures for many getting down into single figures. but higher pressure is in charge of our weather at the moment. it is moving its way in from the west and that is really going to settle things down, not only today but really for the rest of this week. this morning, we have got a bit of cloud floating around but by this afternoon, we may still see some hazy sunshine. thick cloud starting to work its way into the north of scotland. a few showers here as well but otherwise, it is dry and it will be fairly bright.
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despite some cloud around, some sunny spells, with temperatures into the high teens to the low 20s. through this evening and tonight, again, some cloud just drifting around, one or two mist and fog patches, they can cloud across scotland, rein in the far north. again, temperatures getting down into a fairly low single figures. after a chilly start on wednesday, many of us having another fine day, with a get lots of sunshine. sicker cloud for scotland. some outbreaks of rain affecting the far north. temperature is very similar to today, about 18 or 19, maybe 20 degrees. here is that area of high pressure continuing to move eastward, slap bang right across the uk as we go into thursday. again, there could well be some mist and fog patches first thing in the morning. those clearing away and you can see lots of dry and sunny weather right across the uk during thursday. temperatures are still again in the high teens and low 20s.
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ourarea of high again in the high teens and low 20s. our area of high pressure will continue to move its way eastward. towards the end of the week, we will start to pick up a southerly wind. temperatures will start to rise but as you can see again on friday, we're just looking wall—to—wall sunshine, lots of bright skies. this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and tadhg enright. see you in court. apple takes on the eu in a fight over a multi—billion tax bill. live from london, that's our top story on tuesday the 17th of september. apple is challenging a mammoth tax bill over its so—called sweetheart deal with ireland. it's a landmark case in the eu's efforts to close tax loopholes. also in the programme. doing a deal — president trump announces that the us and japan have

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