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tv   BBC News  BBC News  September 17, 2019 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines: 11 supreme courtjudges this is bbc news. the headlines: 11 supreme court judges have this is bbc news. the headlines: 11 supreme courtjudges have begun hearing to appeals to determine whether or not the prime minister acted lawfully when he shut down parliament for five weeks. the court is not equipped to decide what is a legitimate political consideration and what is an illegitimate critical consideration. no prime minister has abused his powers in the manner in which we allege in at least the last 50 years. feelings were running high on both sides as some of those bringing the cases of the court face the crowds outside. at the lib dems
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conference the party leader, jo swinson, pledges to stop brexit immediately if she was in government. today, i am standing here is that your candidate for prime minister. 30 years after a tragedy and ben stokes mahmoud abbas tragedy, he accuses the sons newspaper of being immoral. an israeli election. the second in six months as benjamin netanyahu six a new term in office. and the first person to swim non—stop across the english channel four times. at 11:30 this evening in the papers. our guestsjoining me tonight are jack blanchard, editor of the politico london playbook, and kate andrews, associate director of the institute
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of economic affairs. a very good evening and welcome to bbc news. the constitutional conflict provoked by the brexit crisis has reached the supreme court, the highest court in the uk. 11 supreme court judges court, the highest court in the uk. 11 supreme courtjudges have started hearing to appeals to determine whether the prime minister acted lawfully when he suspended parliament for five weeks. that decision was described by one barrister as an abuse of power but those arguing for the prime minister said he was acting in a political capacity which has nothing to do with the law.
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where does power lie in this troubled kingdom? how can you be so stupid? you tell us lie, after lie, after lie! with the brexit rift in noisy evidence outside the uk's supreme court today... court will rise. ..inside, the 11 most seniorjudges in the land sat in courtroom number one to consider that question, and make it clear they were not there to judge the merits of brexit. the determination of this legal issue will not determine when and how the united kingdom leaves the european union. a month after becoming pm, was borisjohnson‘s request to the queen that parliament be suspended for five weeks a ruse to silence mps opposed to a no—deal brexit? scottish judges did think it stymied the house of commons, ruling it unlawful. the high court of england and wales disagreed, arguing it was a matter for politicians, not judges. representing the remain campaigner gina miller against the government, lord pannick told the justices borisjohnson had acted unlawfully.
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no prime minister has abused his powers, in the manner in which we allege, in at least the last 50 years. without a written constitution, the relationship between the three pillars of uk governance is always evolving. you've got parliamentary power, of course, based over there. then you've got the government's power, focused on ten downing street, behind the walls of whitehall. and then you have the power of the courts, ultimately resting here, at the supreme court. and what we're seeing this week is that balance of power being tested. the geography of westminster reveals the triangle of power at the heart of the state. today, lord pannick focused on the relationship between mps in parliament and the government, headed by the pm in downing street, describing ministers as the junior partner. he also argued the courts were entitled to rule on the legality of number 10's suspending, or proroguing, parliament.
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the prime minister's motive was to silence parliament for that period, because he sees parliament as an obstacle. lord pannick quoted from this bbc interview, to suggest borisjohnson‘s real purpose was not a queen's speech but achieving brexit by halloween. the best way to do that is if our friends and partners over the channel don't think that brexit can be somehow blocked by parliament. this afternoon, mrjohnson‘s lawyer in court had his turn to make the arguments. the prime minister will take all necessary steps to comply with any declaration made by the court. he'd come with an undertaking from borisjohnson but he also referred to westminster‘s balance of power, suggesting the supreme court would be meddling in what were political matters if it ruled against the government. one judge wanted to know, if they did, might the prime minister seek to suspend
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parliament a second time? we take it, then, he wouldn't apply to have parliament prorogued again? i'm not in a position to comment on that proposition at all, my lord. it would be helpful to have the undertaking given in writing. lam i am content for that to be done, my lord. judges like to have things written down, especially when feelings are running high and they're attempting to unpick the complex relationship between legitimate power and political ambition. mark easton, bbc news, the supreme court. the liberal democrat leaderjo swinson has told the party conference that there is no limit to her ambition for the party. she told activist that if they want an outright majority of the next general election, she would take action to stop brexit on day one. on the march — the liberal democrats have a new young leader, what they hope is a distinctive
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anti—brexit message and a clutch of mps who've joined up from other parties. jo swinson‘s taking a relaxed approach to her first conference as leader, but will she take the party in the right direction? cheering and applause. there's certainly plenty of ambition. today, i am standing here as your candidate for prime minister. applause. this is a party passionate about staying in the eu. it's campaigned for a second referendum for years but today, there was no mention of that. we must stop brexit. applause. and we are crystal clear — a liberal democrat majority government will revoke article 50 on day one. there was obvious emotion as she spoke about her father, who died last year. he encouraged me to believe that we can change things
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for the better. he encouraged me to challenge the way things are. on policy, she promised a well—being budget, where all government policy is measured by its impact on quality of life, an investment bank for green projects and protected spending on mental health. as for her political opponents, she didn't think much of borisjohnson‘s use of language. "big girl's blouse..." "girly swot. " if he thinks being a woman is somehow in weakness, if he thinks being a woman is somehow a weakness, he's about to find out it is not! cheering and applause. as for the others... nigel farage might be brexit by name, but it is very clear thatjeremy corbyn is brexit by nature. applause. and she's hoping other remain voters will agree with that. jo swinson wants voters to see the liberal democrats as the strongest anti—brexit party.
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she thinks politics is so volatile, there's no reason why she can't be prime minister. here, they love the ambitious talk but to many, it'll sound like an unrealistic message. so, in the places the lib dems want to win back at an election, is their strategy hitting the right note? # it's a little bit funny, this feeling inside...#. mid dorset is conservative and voted leave. among these choir members in wimborne, brexit‘s as divisive as everywhere else. remain voter, leah, needs to be persuaded. i'm in two minds about the lib dems and what they actually want. i mean, i know they tend to say things just for the votes, and, actually, not necessarily follow through on it. husband steve backed brexit. i feel that, you know, we should leave because that's what we decided in the referendum, and we shouldn't revoke article 50. across the road, businesswoman linda is likely to abandon the conservatives because of brexit.
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i feel the only party that really does have a very clear picture is the liberal democrats and i believe that, as things stand today, that's what i would be doing — voting liberal democrat. if an election comes soon, brexit will dominate and success for the lib dems will depend on traditional party allegiances shifting. vicki young, bbc news, dorset. ben stokes has described a front—page article in the sun newspaper about a family tragedy which happened 30 years ago as immoral and the lowest form of journalism. he said the papers decision to publish the story would have grave and long lasting consequences for his mother in particular. the sun says the events we re particular. the sun says the events were a matter of public record.
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from world cup winner to ashes hero, this has been a season to savour for ben stokes, but just two days after the final test of the summer, english cricket's biggest star finds himself embroiled in a bitter row with the sun newspaper, over what he condemned as an immoral and heartless article about a family tragedy more than 30 years ago — the details of which the bbc has chosen not to repeat. in a statement today, stokes said: ben stokes' heroics here at headingley this summer, where he produced one of the greatest innings ever seen to win the third ashes test, elevated him to the status of national hero. with that, of course, comes interest into every aspect of his life, but he clearly
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feels that this story has gone way beyond what's acceptable. in a statement, the sun said: often what happens is that an individual, they become high profile or become a celebrity. it becomes almost carte blanche that everything about them, their private life, their family, their old friends, anything from their history, almost becomes fair game and many would argue that's not fair and that the family and friends of that individual have a reasonable expectation to keep that information private. today, stokes received support from the ecb, his employers adding they were disgusted, appalled and saddened by the story. thanks to his performances with both bat and ball, the all—rounder‘s become one of the most famous faces in british sport. now he's taken a stand
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off the field too. dan roan, bbc news, headingley. the result of israel was mexican general election in nine months is too close to call. neither of the two main parties looks able to form a majority government. the prime minister, benjamin netanyahu, is fighting to hold onto power and throughout the campaign he has made evermore strident appeals to right—wing nationalists. last week he promised to annex part of the occupied west bank, moved the un says would destroy the chance of new peace talks between israelis and palestinians. israeli tv exit polls showed no decisive victory for any side. the votes will be counted through the night, but it could take weeks of coalition horsetrading before the next government — and prime minister — emerge.
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the election has been a referendum on benjamin netanyahu's last ten years in office. he is israel's longest—serving prime minister. his main rival is retired general, benny gantz, from the blue and white party. some of his supporters fear he was politically naive not to press harder on corruption charges faced by mr netanyahu, which the prime minister denies. in opposition strongholds in tel aviv, queues of voters were waiting and hoping to end mr neta nyahu's political career. what's wrong with netanyahu? everything? what's not wrong with him? he's corrupted, he hates everyone, he rules in fear, he's too much right wing. but mr netanyahu has a reliable support
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from ultra religious israelis, who have their own political parties. just before the vote, they rallied in jerusalem. in exchange for privileges for their community, they've supported mr netanyahu's premierships. why am i going to vote? because that is what my rabbi tells me to do. who would you like as the next prime minister? i guess netanyahu, that's what the rabbis say. the power of the ultra religious has become one of israel's most divisive issues. mr netanyahu was, as usual, a formidable campaigner, even starring in his own commercials. in this one, he puts hikers back on the right track, while losers follow untrustworthy guides named after his opponents. israelis have been offered more personal insults than policy debates. mr netanyahu's message was that he's the only one, with his powerful friends,
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to protect israelis from iran and the palestinians. in a close race, he upped the ante by promising to annex the occupied jordan valley, around a third of the land palestinians want for a state. it was an extravagant gambit to keep the votes of the israeli right. in the valley, it's harvest time for date farmers — palestinians and israelis who have settled here since it was captured in the 1967 war. this palestinian farmer says he was scared by the prime minister ‘s promise of annexation. translation: where is the piece he is talking about. benjamin neta nyahu where is the piece he is talking about. benjamin netanyahu wants to ta ke about. benjamin netanyahu wants to take ourland. about. benjamin netanyahu wants to take our land. annexation will be off the agenda if benjamin netanyahu cannot form a government after all
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the votes are counted. on walkabout in tel aviv, this could be the politician the prime minister fears most once the coalition negotiations though. polls suggest his party, israel our home, and he may become the kingmaker. he might control the balance of power. one important factor though, he used to be a major ally of the prime minister benjamin netanyahu ally of the prime minister benjamin neta nyahu and now ally of the prime minister benjamin netanyahu and now they are opponents, even enemies. translation: after the exit polls, avigdor lieberman's supporters were the only ones celebrating. polls are not always accurate but if so, then the benjamin neta nyahu's not always accurate but if so, then the benjamin netanyahu's era is ending. let us remind you of the headlines
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on bbc news. supreme courtjudges have begun hearing two appeals to determine whether or not the prime minister acted lawfully when he sat down parliament for five weeks. at the lib dems conference, the new leader, jo swinson, pledges to stop brexit immediately if the party is in government. 30 years after a judge of the in ben stokes' family, he accuses the sun newspaper of being a moralfor its he accuses the sun newspaper of being a moral for its latest coverage. dash immoral. the trial of four people accused of murdering the girl scoutjodi chesney four people accused of murdering the girl scout jodi chesney has four people accused of murdering the girl scoutjodi chesney has begun. the 17—year—old was fatally stabbed in an east london park in march while listening to music with friends. two men, aged 20 and i9, and two youths aged 16 and i7 friends. two men, aged 20 and i9, and two youths aged 16 and 17 old denied the charges against them. dan johnson reports from the old bailey. jodi chesney was described to the jury jodi chesney was described to the jury isa jodi chesney was described to the
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jury is a talented, popular, fun young women are judged no—one and love everyone. those words came from her grieving family, who were at the old bailey today to hear those tributes read out at the start of this trial to establish why she was killed so suddenly and by whom. but at times today, some of the details we re at times today, some of the details were just too upsetting. jodi was in this park in his london with a group of friends one friday night, back in march. one of them bought some cannabis from a local drug dealer, and they were listening to music. cctv footage shows a car pulling up over there and two young men getting out, then heading across this field do the play area. one that dispensed, one came through here. they went straight up tojodi, and without extending a word, she was stabbed in the back. it was an attack, apparently without motive stop today, the jury heard the car belonged to manuel petrovich, who was 20. also on file is spencer
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nonequity, i9, alongside a 16 and i7 road we can't show because of their age. even though the prosecution says only two of them that the car, they are all accused of, and all denying, murder. the prosecution barrister described jodi as an entirely blameless individual who got caught in a row between drug dealers. he said her motor was a terrible but predictable consequence ofan all terrible but predictable consequence of an all too casual attitude towards knives. police investigating the murder of an officer in berks have made a new arrest and rearrested three teenagers. pc andrew harper who was 28 was killed near the village of sol homestead last month while responding to reports of a burglary. he married his wife lucyjust three weeks previously. a fit man has already been charged. a public enquiry will be held to examine safety issues that two scottish hospitals. the government
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at holyrood announced the enquiry will examine delays to the opening ofa will examine delays to the opening of a new children's hospital because of a new children's hospital because of problems with its ventilation system. it will also examine death related to pigeon droppings at the queen elizabeth university hospital in glasgow. world leaders are meeting at the un climate action summit in new york next week to discuss how to cut global emissions and the economic consequences of tackling climate change. for the first in a series of bbc briefings, in—depth investigations into the biggest issues facing the uk today, our business editor simonjack issues facing the uk today, our business editor simon jack examines the challenges and opportunities of the challenges and opportunities of the drive for a zero carbon economy. the uk because myjourney to a zero carbon future, arguably started here, gullible in cornwall. they thought we were mad. -- della boels. they were the first commercial wind
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farms in 1991. nearly 30 years on, he says there is a genuine wind of change in the air. i think the political climate regarding renewable energy or energy supply as a whole has changed dramatically. people have really woken up to the idea that climate change is really real and really urgent. 10,000 turbines later, the energy system is transformed. in 1990, coal and turbines later, the energy system is transformed. in 1990, coaland oil we re transformed. in 1990, coaland oil were dominant, in 2018, renewables made up one third and cold has all but disappeared. use a low carbon, eve ryo ne but disappeared. use a low carbon, everyone says, is a nuclear, like this plant in construction in hinckley, some feel less co mforta ble. hinckley, some feel less comfortable. critics that it is big, it is low, and a £20 billion, it is expensive. builders idiot argue it is the perfect backup when the wind does not blow. people are furious about climate change, they really need to rethink nuclear. it is low carbon, it's safe, and it is affordable —— builders e d f. we
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need nuclear. we are going to need a lot of electricity if we are going to replace petrol and diesel engines. it seems very odd looking at the bonnet and seeing nothing, really. there are you get used to it. can hand vehicles emergences business is risk. it's breast. it's gone from more of the knees being to —— its brisk, it's gone from electric vehicles being an easy thing to more of a mainstream being. electric vehicles make up less than 196 electric vehicles make up less than 1% of vehicles on the road. and there is a tougher and more exciting challenge. so, here it is, the good old fashion gas boiler, 2a million of them across the uk, that is a problem. they are one of the biggest sources of emissions. in fact, they turn out as much as five uk aviation
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systems. this looks like an air—conditioning unit? systems. this looks like an air-conditioning unit? does what it is, but in reverse. ithink if air-conditioning unit? does what it is, but in reverse. i think if you can make a positive change for daily life, that is a good thing. the bill for reheating systems? £500 million out of a total of 1 for reheating systems? £500 million out of a total of1 trillion over the next 30 years to get to zero carbon. the vision is to power vehicles while producing hydrogen to supplement heating systems for well insulated systems lived in by people who don't eat much meat and really get on an applicant was that it is a gigantic economic and societal challenge that produces just 1% of global emissions. however green and pleasa nt global emissions. however green and pleasant this land becomes, the net zero target doesn't include the carbon cost of beings consumed here,
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but made abroad. we have to set an example, it's just that we have to be brutally honest, our example is about our spending, our consumption and our unsustainable lifestyle. if not some technical pixel nasty company we can just tell it to behave itself. as a nation that is it in the industrial revolution, maybe we have a responsibility to lead a green revolution was that in the end, it may amountjust as much asa the end, it may amountjust as much as a moral to economic times, do we wa nt to as a moral to economic times, do we want to be part of the problem or the solution? simon jack, want to be part of the problem or the solution? simonjack, bbc news. and for more facts and information about climate change and energy, download our energy briefing, do go to bbc .co .uk/ energy. sarah thomas, a cancer survivorfrom colorado, has become the first person to swim across the english channel 4 times non—stop. she began the challenge in the early hours of sunday morning and finished after more than 5a hours. the swim was due
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to be about 80 miles, but because of strong tides, sarah ended up winning close to 130 miles. our correspondence robert hall reports. exhausted, but triumphant. the first rays of the sun lit the shoreline ahead, sarah thomas reached out towards the end of herjourney. there she comes! friends have willed her to succeed during moments when her to succeed during moments when her spirit and, where there on the ta bles to her spirit and, where there on the tables to greet her. well done, sarah! you've done it! i was sick... they just sarah! you've done it! i was sick... theyjust said, sarah! you've done it! i was sick... they just said, you sarah! you've done it! i was sick... theyjust said, you got theirs. sarah! you've done it! i was sick... theyiust said, you got theirs. my husband said keep going. this story of the termination and stamina again in the early hours of sunday morning —— determination. she said she used women to cope with her cancer treatment. she dedicated this challenge to those who survived the
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disease. 5a hours and ten minutes, crossing the world's busiest shipping lanes. i've been through chemo, radiation and a vasectomy. i didn't know if i was going to make it to this point. this one was scheduled on my calendar and i told my doctors and myself that i was going to do this no matter what. i just go to every other quiet place in my head. when i was struggling to the second night ijust kept repeating over and over four the second night ijust kept repeating over and overfour hours i can swim through this note. i can swim through this note, i can swim to the snow. and i almost didn't, but i did. anytime i wanted to quit, just that affirmation — i can swim through the snow. the four legs of the journey should have totalled 84 miles, but the channel currents forced sarah to swim in a series of leaves so the actual distance was closer to 130 miles. does make a series of loops. kevin murphy, a channel swimmer himself, was one of
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the observers aboard cerebral‘s support boat. it is this new record is an extraordinary achievement. support boat. it is this new record is an extraordinary achievementm you haven't got the power to withstand the demons, the demons in your head, which say you can't do this, if you can't buy those, you never will do it. sarah thomas has been known to sleep for 24 hours after her swims. well done, sarah! the physical and mental effects of this one will determine if you can set her sights even higher. robert hall, bbc news at sandgate in cannes. we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers kate andrews and cate blanchett, that is coming up in a moment after the outlines. now it is time for the weather for the week ahead stop hello, there. if you like your weather story dry and settled, so your weather story dry and settled, so far so good this week. it has been quite quiet this week. this was a weather watch a picture set in from lincolnshire on tuesday afternoon. but i could have picked
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numerous illustrations. and there's more to come, actually, for the rest of the week. yes, dry by day, but by nights, cool overnight with a potential for some mist and fog to form. the high pressure is really the driving force behind the story this week. with a weak weather front topping across that high, it is going to bring some patchy rain into scotland, a little more cloud for scotland, a little more cloud for scotland, elsewhere it looks like it is likely to be a promising day with later winds while temperatures fairly uniform, 10— 20 degrees the overall high. as we move out of wednesday into thursday, that frontal system drifted its way into the north sea, the high pressure establishes itself a little further and again things will stay quiet. we could see some early morning mist and fog salutes are clear, but it will do so, and then again it is a promising day. largely dry, light winds around, some sunshine coming through, hires a little warmer in
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scotland, 19 degrees, 22 possible in the south—east corner. it is a repeat performance on most for friday. a good deal of dry weather in the forecast. the winds are slowly starting to change direction. if anything, that could make it a little warmer still. though, as we move out of friday into the weekend, we'll need to keep a close eye on this weather front pushing it from the atlantic. the high pressure is drifting its way further south—east and that means the winds are going to come more than a southerly direction, it was my going to dry more heat across the uk, my humidity, which is going to be an important factor does make it is going to a lot of sunshine and some decent warmth out there, quite widely across the country. but, we just need to look at what is happening out to the west a few sharp thundery downpours could trigger off late in the day. ahead, 25- 26 trigger off late in the day. ahead, 25— 26 degrees is not out of the question. so they moved to saturday night into sunday morning, we could see a potential for some sharp, thundery downpours to dry their way in from the west. rate news for
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