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tv   Beyond 100 Days  BBC News  September 18, 2019 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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you're watching beyond 100 days. the us secretary of state mike pompeo has arrived for talks in riyadh as donald trump demands further sanctions against iran. the americans say they have satellite footage from the weekend of munitions being prepared for launch in southern iran. the saudi government has displayed the wreckage of the drones and cruise missiles that hit their oil facilities — proof, they claim, of iranian involvement. tehran says they proved they know nothing. the attack was launched from the north, and was unquestionably sponsored by iran. the european parliament says it will block any future trade talks with the uk in the event of a no—deal brexit — until the uk has complied with the spirit of the
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withdrawal agreement. also on the programme: the us federal reserve cuts interest rates for the second time in a decade. climate campaigner, greta thunburg, comes to washington with a message for lawmakers — the time to act is now. i don't want you to listen to me, i want you to listen to the scientists. and i want you to unite behind the science. and then i want you to take real action. hello and welcome — i'm michelle fleury in washington, and christian fraser is in london. donald trump has promised a coordinated response to the weekend attack on two saudi oilfacilities. the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, arrived in riyadhjust a couple of hours ago, to present the saudis with intelligence the white house says will prove the missiles
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were launched from southern iran. the saudis have evidence of their own. this afternoon, they have been displaying the wreckage of iranian drones and cruise missiles which were recovered from the site. president trump has announced on twitter that he has instructed the treasury secretary, steve mnuchin, to substantially increase sanctions on iran. the iranians have confirmed today that an official note was sent, via the swiss on monday, denying they were behind the latest attacks and warning of immediate retaliation if america strikes. the saudi defence ministry spokesman said they were working to establish the exact launch point — but iran was behind it. this attack did not originate from yemen despite iran's best efforts to make it appear so. their collaboration with their proxy in the region to create this false narrative is clear. secondly, the attack was launched from the north and was unquestionably sponsored by iran.
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we are joined now by global affairs journalist elise labott and azadeh moaveni from the international crisis group. might hunt they arrived in saudi arabia, what is hoping to achieve with this trip? —— mike pompeo. arabia, what is hoping to achieve with this trip? -- mike pompeo. he is there to coordinate the response from saudi arabia. from what i have heard, the us is looking for the goldilocks response, not too tough so as goldilocks response, not too tough so as not to escalate and have an epic war with so as not to escalate and have an epic warwith iran, so as not to escalate and have an epic war with iran, but at the same time, the us feels it has to respond. the us are saying this was an attack against the world oil supply. as much as iran is trying to send a message to saudi arabia and
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split it from the uae, is also trying to send the message to the us and president trump that if they are going to crack down on the reigning economy, the iranians can put the us economy, the iranians can put the us economyjust as much in a election year. i do not anticipate massive strikes, i think the us will beef up saudi capabilities in the region, may be sent more trips. possibly some other defence case abilities, missile defence, i don't think it will be a massive strike by the us. the reaction is going to include substantial sanctions according to donald trump's tweets today, is there anything left to sanction? there is not a great deal less to sanction, the iranian economy is undera sanction, the iranian economy is under a stranglehold, an all out oil embargo. i think all that is left to do as embargo. i think all that is left to doasl embargo. i think all that is left to do as i symbolically, i think the
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sanctions are very symbolic. they won't be without economically because i think that iran has is then all the economic pressure it can take. but i think i cast the shadow over the potential for some de—escalation could have come at the un general assembly. i think there we re un general assembly. i think there were hopes that there could be some potential there for a de—escalations, i think the iranians had signalled they were ready for a meeting, sanction relief. but at the point at which both sides had recognised a dangerous moment i could have stepped back, at at the intention to sanction more certainly undermines the chances of that. we have had just some comment from donald trump, saying that his decision not to strike iran previously is a sign of strength. he is talking about the occasion where they brought down a us drowning was no military response, if he keeps talking tough about being locked and
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loaded, that he comes across as weak. and we do have from the iranian side from president rouhani at that saudi arabia could be attacked again? i think the variants are testing the us and saudi arabia, i'io are testing the us and saudi arabia, no doubt. this is the second time, la st no doubt. this is the second time, last year, when iran backed militias in iraq where hitting the us consulate in basra, i interviewed mike pompeo at the time and he said they were going as of the source, they were going as of the source, the us did nothing then, it did nothing injune, the us did nothing then, it did nothing in june, even the us did nothing then, it did nothing injune, even though i understand the attack was that there is by president trump, they were ready to go, but he pulled back. i think the iranians will continue to mmp think the iranians will continue to ramp up, continue to test, are not sure to what end, clearly they some sanction relief from the us, but i'm not necessarily sure this is the way to do it, but they will not stop. i
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think the us knows they will have to respond at some point, at least to say to iran, cut it out. we have heard that the message from the us that at some point iran must cut it out, but given the current rate and temperature, is that feasible?” don't think it's a mystery what is going on, i don't think iran is testing anything. i don't think it's a matter of the usa and cut it out. the situation we are in now is that iran has been waiting for a year for the europeans to offer some meaningful sanction relief to compensate iran for what it is suffering from the usa pulling out of the nuclear deal. the europeans have been unable to deliver. i think therefore iran sees no diplomatic pathway out of its current predicament. therefore, it has chosen a dangerous rout of trying to escalate, does the disrupt, to be able to manoeuvre itself is out of this precarious situation it has
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been plunged into out of american policy. it has destabilise the whole region. it has no end game we are at the point that the us and iran are at the brink of war suddenly, it doesn't seem to be a way out of it. i think doesn't seem to be a way out of it. ithink iran doesn't seem to be a way out of it. i think iran is acknowledged if the scenario continues, it will be a lose lose for everyone, specifically, us affiliated countries who are vulnerable like saudi arabia. i don't think it's a matter of testing and acting antagonistically for no reason. iran isa antagonistically for no reason. iran is a nation of 80 million people, it is a nation of 80 million people, it is suffering severe sanctions causing food and medicine shortages. i think if there is no definitive pathway, iran is trying to find some way of command the attention of at least europe, if not washington. the americans have signalled the route has to be some sort of collision. former defence secretary here, liam fox, saying that he considered the nuclear deal dead as a dodo. you
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have the british are moving closer to the us for always reasons at the moment, does that mean there is no way back for the nuclear deal? as they said, there will be some kind of deal. i would say that the maximum pressure campaign is working because that is why iran keeps acting out and keeps trying to get itself out of his predicament by non—diplomatic means. i think what mike pompeo should be doing right i'iow mike pompeo should be doing right now is going to the europeans, trying to expand a coalition, try to get them on board for perhaps a correlation of trying to stop iranians seizing international tankers. —— coalition. but right now we don't have many friends, we are a bit of a vac because president trump has really antagonised the europeans of the jc poa. i think at point my
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if there is not going to be a hot war that even the iranians don't want, they will need to be some deal. i think the sanctions got iran to the table the first time, i think it will eventually be what gets into the table again. guess! thank you for joining the table again. guess! thank you forjoining us. mike pompeo arrives in riyadh as the most senior figure in the us foreign policy team. but the president has been relatively quick in replacing john bolton who he fired last week. the new man in is robert o'brien, who becomes donald trump's fourth national security advisor. mr o'brien served as a major in the us army reserve. president bush appointed him, in 2005, to serve as a representative to the un general assembly, where, in fact, he worked withjohn bolton. but more recently he has been serving as a hostage negotiator at the state department. in that capacity, he has been negotiating with the iranians to try and secure the release of american prisoners. standing alongside his pick —
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president trump gave some detail about his selection he did a tremendousjob on hostage negotiation, really tremendous, light, unparallel. we have had tremendous success light, unparallel. we have had tremendous success in that regard, but how many people. through hostage negotiation, i got to know him very well myself, but also, a lot of people that i respect rated him as the absolute number one choice. we couldn't let you go, elise, without asking you a question about this pic. people are describing this as a new drama pic compared to hisjohn boateng. clearly, robert brown has been working directly with mike pompey were shot pompeo who has the aim of poweras pompey were shot pompeo who has the aim of power as secretary of state. i think you'll take this henry kissinger will where he was
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secretary of state but also to facto national security advisor. i think robert o'brien certain did a lot for president trump in terms of working oi'i president trump in terms of working on hostage negotiation, he was not able to get a sub rocky release from his criminal activities in sweden but he has been working very hard. but if you look back to robert o'brien, who is quite hawkish, some people think along the lines ofjohn touting himself. ifound people think along the lines ofjohn touting himself. i found that he said while president trump was running for office in 2016 suggest that he is ready to have some of the issues, asjohn that he is ready to have some of the issues, as john boateng that he is ready to have some of the issues, asjohn boateng was. whether he is going to feel as indulgent as john bolton did, to undermine policy, to fit his objectives— probably not. but i don't think we are looking at someone who doesn't have any conservative, traditional
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republican foreign policy ideas that mike pompeo does but president trump does not. so perhaps more conservative and hawkish than we think. thank you for doing double duty, your lease —— elise. the uk and the eu "should not pretend to be negotiating" a brexit deal if no new proposals are on the table, said michel barnier today. the eu chief negotiator said it is "not enough" for the uk side to keep defining what it doesn't like. the british government says it's continuing to talk to eu leaders, and it would seem there are papers being shown at some of these meetings, but number 10 says is not going to publish these in advance for fear they will be "rubbished" by the commission. and in any case, the uk prime minister accepts there are still holes in the plan. in strasbourg, mep‘s voted in favour of a brexit extension today, if it is requested. but the parliament says it will block any future trade talks unless and until the uk honours its commitments under
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the withdrawal agreement. meanwhile, the prime minister of luxembourg has denied that he tried to embarrass or ambush boris johnson at their meeting on monday. our europe editor, katya adler, has the details. i am sad about this perception from people to think that i want to humiliate. i have too much respect for the uk, too much respect for the uk citizens and for boris johnson to think that i prepared this as a trickjust to have five minutes of popularity. really? there has been quite some outrage in the uk after prime minister bettel following a meeting on monday here in luxembourg with borisjohnson, decided to hold a press conference. mrjohnson, he holds the future... loudly criticising the brexit process in front of anti—brexit protestors after the prime minister had left the building. you vehemently deny accusations this was a planned ambush, a planned humiliation. no!
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but you are a very experienced politician. you must have realised how it would look to have an empty podium where the uk prime minister should have stood, but borisjohnson wasn't there in order to answer the very emotional criticisms that you had about the brexit process. you must have realised how that was going to go down. do you regret it now looking back on it? no, because it was agreed to have this press statement together. so keen was mr bettel show me why he was unable to meet boris johnson's request to hold their press conference indoors to avoid the noise outside of the anti—brexit demonstrators that he took me on a personal tour of his prime ministerial offices. i have no room for 120 journalists. so, to pickjust five or ten and to say that we organise just with them, i think was a problem. yesterday we even had the united states ambassador to the uk in that argument saying that your treatment of boris johnson
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was evidence of why the uk is right to leave the eu. i am a friend of the united kingdom, so the fact that some people have been hurt makes me sad. let's look at the deal. you did sit here with borisjohnson, who also sat withjean—claude juncker, the president of the european commission, who described the meeting today as friendly and in parts positive. was that your feeling as well despite the anger outside, inside was it a constructive conversation with the prime minister? it was a perfectly friendly, constructive discussions that we had inside but i am waiting for concrete proposals. time is ticking. he told me what could be plans, ideas, but i can't decide on ideas. it is going to be, i need legally binding texts. are you actually going to be able to find a deal by mid—october?
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when i have concrete proposals, i can tell you. i would hope that we are able to have this deal and to have a future relations directly decided, and in a few weeks we are able to say we did it. that one rumbles on. yesterday i had found the french lexicon the four brexit, we were talking about the keywords that had been translated into french. i have been doing some further research and we have a problem, because it turns out that the french thought that yellowhammer, the document on preparedness, was in fact a yellow push hammer,. until it was pointed
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out to all the radio stations in france, that they have got it wrong. in fairness to many of my french friends, it's how many english people thought about it as well, they did think it was a hammer until it was pointed out it was a bird. but i'm not sure that they thought it was timmy mallett!” but i'm not sure that they thought it was timmy mallett! i think there we re it was timmy mallett! i think there were plans across whitehall to call all of these plans shot after birds because the treasure had project king for sharon but then had a hole blown in it by other departments. i'll keep digging. you keep digging and i'll start talking about the federal reserve.
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under pressure from wall street and the white house, america's central bank — the fed — hasjust announced it is cutting interest rates for the second time this year. the federal reserve cut its benchmark rate — which affects many loans for households and businesses — by 25 basis points to a range of 1.75% to 2%. we are expecting to hear shortly the man the president calls the "enemy" — the fed chair, jerome powell — will start his press conference shortly. we will keep an eye on that. he's in a tough spot, michelle. because at the europeans are putting the foot to the metal, quantitative easing, negative interest rates over here. wall street saying that he must respond to this. if you are jerome powell, is not a comfortable place to be right now. you look at the european central bank, they are cutting, that is putting pressure on him, wall street is putting pressure
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on him for more cuts. they want to hear from on him for more cuts. they want to hearfrom his on him for more cuts. they want to hear from his press on him for more cuts. they want to hearfrom his press conference on him for more cuts. they want to hear from his press conference that hear from his press conference that he is going to signal that are going to be more rate cuts coming this year, perhaps into next year. then you have the president, a sustained barrage of criticism that we have seen barrage of criticism that we have seen on barrage of criticism that we have seen on twitter directly at the federal reserve on monetary policy. no response yet from donald trump, but i'm sure will come on twitter since. indonesia is stepping up its response to thousands of forest fires on the islands of borneo and sumatra, which are sending thick smoke across the region. the army has been deployed to tackle the fires, which have led to thousands of people receiving hospital treatment for smoke inhalation. three people have been killed in venice after a powerboat crashed during a speed—record attempt. the boat hit an artificial reef in venice lido, while travelling at roughly 150 kilometres an hour, at the end of an attempt to break the offshore
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speed record from monte carlo. a new range of hoodies inspired by mass shootings have been criticised for being insensitive. the fashion brand bstroy revealed their range of clothes with rips that look like bullet holes and school logos for columbine, virginia tech, sandy hook and marjory stoneman douglas. the student gun control movement march for lives condemned the range as "disgusting and shameful." the uk's supreme court has adjourned after the second day of its hearing into whether borisjohnson acted lawfully in suspending parliament for five weeks — longer than usual. the court heard from those challenging the government that the prime minister's decision to prorogue parliament was carried out in "bad faith." but government lawyers said the decision by the prime minister was not something judges could rule on. i've been speaking to ben brown — from outside the court.
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ben, we heard from borisjohnson's allows today on the second day of this hearing — no surprise, i guess, they were justifying his actions? that's right. the government's lawyer, sirjames eadie qc, was really saying that this decision by the prime minister when he went to the queen and advised her to suspend parliament for five weeks, that hugely controversial decision, the government's lawyer saying that was a political decision, then later we heard from the other side, the lawyer, aidan o'neill qc, argued that it actually is a matter for the courts, and more than that, or the prime minister did in the suspending parliament was disgraceful. he says the mother of parliaments had been shut down by the father of lies, referring there to the prime minister. and he said to the 11 judges here, stand up
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for democracy, enough is enough. when are we likely to get a ruling? or what is going to happen next from these 11 judges? there are three days of hearings at the supreme court, which is the highest court in the united kingdom. as you say, 11 judges who are hearing this case. it is a three—day hearing, they may give their ruling at the end of those three days or they might want to think about it over the weekend and give us a ruling perhaps early next week on monday. but whenever that does come, whatever the ruling is, it's going to have huge legal, constitutional and political implications on a country that is so deeply divided by the whole issue of brexit. ben brown outside the supreme court. what's interesting is that if you look at what has been happening this week, we have that hearing going on in the uk at the supreme court. we
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we re in the uk at the supreme court. we were talking earlier about cavanaugh, you were talking earlier about cava naugh, you see were talking earlier about cavanaugh, you see that the of the supreme court, more of an issue here in the us. the question is if brexit will have the same impact in politicising the supreme court in the uk? it was a bit dry today, i didn't find it very easy to follow. tomorrow should be a blockbuster, john major, the former prime minister, will be taken to the stand and speaking to the 11 judges but we'll be watching closely. you know we were talking about man—flu earlier in this week, and my capacity to survive it? i do like think of myself as a bit of a trooper, a survivor — or at least i did until i heard this next story. yes, are you ready for this? neil parker, was bushwalking alone near brisbane on sunday. he slipped and fell six meters down a waterfall. he suffered a broken wrist and his lower leg snapped in half. the next big problem — his phone was nowhere to be seen. alright, so lemsip is not going to help in this situation. but luckily for neil,
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he did have some painkillers, which he took before he began crawling with his broken wrist and his broken leg. and so he crawled and he crawled for two whole days before he was found — but only after an agonisingly slow journey to safety. but he lives to tell the tale. in our morning conference this morning, our brutus the may above a story about a guy in brisbane who snapped his leg in half and crawled for two days. but then he said, he did have some painkillers, as if that made it all right, as if it's all right to crawl for two days if you have something college. he fashion splints with his walking stinks. a moment did he really? extraordinary. this is beyond 100 days from the bbc. coming up for viewers on the bbc news channel and bbc world news — as saudi arabia lays out the evidence that i say iran proves that
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iran was behind the oil attacks, we spoke to a former brigadier general to find out how conclusive it is. and climate campaigner takes on congress, we will tell you how it went. our weather picture is a really quiet ones in its two days across the uk, we have high pressure to thank. some light winds, plenty of sunshine, things also turn considerably warmer at the end of the week and the start of the weekend. at the moment, the centre is directly across that is a week one front through northern reaches many more planned for scotland and some outbreaks of rain. turning dry overnight, the rain becoming confined to the northern isles. some patches have mist and fog returning anywhere in southern scotland and northern part of england. with clear skies to the south, it will get
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chilly, a few rural frost hollows down to two or three degrees. thursday is largely dry highs from the northern isles. even more sunshine across scotland, elsewhere, no mist and fog burning. warmer in the sunshine for scotland, 18 in aberdeen, 20 or 21 to the south of the uk. thursday and friday, i su btle the uk. thursday and friday, i subtle change, high pressurejust eastwards putting us on the western flank of the hive. we are pulling it in the from the south—east of france, a warmerair in the from the south—east of france, a warmer air source, in the from the south—east of france, a warmerairsource, meaning a warmer day on friday, less cloud across scotland. one of our top cabbages could be in any north—east of scotland, we could see up to 2a celsius here. we are looking at temperatures widely in the high teens or early 20s. enter the start of the weekend, there is a direct southerly air flow on the western
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flank of our high, all the way from spain, right the way across the uk, it will feel humid and very warm for the time of year. temperatures in the time of year. temperatures in the low 20s, 25 or 26 possible to the low 20s, 25 or 26 possible to the south of the uk. out towards the west, the rain gathering, an area of low pressure will come into play for the second half of the weekend, it will run into all of that warm air and it looks like it could bring some pretty heavy and thundery rain into many areas on sunday. silvery humid and pretty warm, but overall, a different feeling and looking day.
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this is beyond 100 days. with me michelle fleury in washington, christian fraser is in london. our top stories, mike pompeo has arrived in saudi arabia, describing saturday's drone attack there as an act of war. earlier, the saudis displayed the remains of what they said were iranian—made weapons used in the strike. israel's two major parties are deadlocked after an election that produced no clear winner. is another coalition the only way out? coming up in the next half hour. climate activist greta thunberg testifies to congress with an unequivocal message — "don't listen to me, and yesterday we told you about the hero plumber who refuses to charge elderly people.
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today, he joins us on the show. the united states and saudi arabia are working together to build a comprehensive case against iran, after the bombing of saudi oil facilities at the weekend. the saudis have put on display piles of wreckage today from the munitions they recovered. on show at least five drones, labelled as iranian delta wing uavs, which are said to be small in size — around a five foot wing span. and alongside them were the remains of two lacms, land attack cruise missiles, which appear not to have exploded. mike pompeo, who has just landed in riyadh, said the intelligence community has high confidence that these type of weapons would not have been in possession of the houthis. and even if they were, he said you cannot sub—contract the devastation of 5% of the world's global energy supply,and think that you can absolve yourself from responsibility.
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in response the iranian foreign ministerjavad zharif has tweeted this. we just wejust had some we just had some pictures wejust had some pictures in of mike pompeo sitting with crown prince. what a difference a year makes. anybody rememberjamal can sodje. they are getting on well there. a meeting like this would have been awkward about a year ago. but i suppose things have moved on and they are talking about the intelligence that the americans are said to have taken with them to re—had. i'm joined now by retired brigadier general mark kimmitt.
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thank you you forjoining us, what are the options that are likely to be laid out in front of the president? well, i think it would be the full range of option, as the white house have said none of the options are off the table. we would prefer options are off the table. we would p refer to options are off the table. we would prefer to use diplomacy but the iranians don't want to talk diplomatically on this issue, we have a range of option, military and economic, we have options such as cyber options that have been used very discriminately but this maybe the time to use them. so what do you think is, we have seen the ministry of defence in saudi arabia showing some of the ordinance, what does that tell us, what are they hoping to learn from what they have collected ? to learn from what they have collected? i don't think they are hoping to learn anything, i think what they are try doing is show evidence to the international community, clear evidence that these
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weapons were made in iran, and whether they are launched from iran oi’ whether they are launched from iran or elsewhere, as secretary of state pompeo has said you can't sub contract responsibility.” pompeo has said you can't sub contract responsibility. i am still puzzled how does saudi arabia to a country with the third largest military budget in the world, a us built pate trot missile system failed to defend against weapons like this i think what we are seeing isa like this i think what we are seeing is a significant number, if not most of those assets have been moved to the southern border to protect houthi attacks and candily the iranians may have found a back door because of that. if you were to take a look at google maps you see the location of the sites, they took advantage of a weakness and open door. if they have exposed that wea kness door. if they have exposed that weakness and you have the president saying there could be future attacks on saudi arabia does it need a
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pre—emptive attack to take that off the table? well that is one of the number of option, i don't think that is the leading oion right now, being discuss board i the president. if that is not being discussed i guess the question is is there any hope for de—escalation going forward oi’ hope for de—escalation going forward orare hope for de—escalation going forward or are you more hope for de—escalation going forward or are you more concerned hope for de—escalation going forward or are you more concerned about an accident happening?” or are you more concerned about an accident happening? i think the best route is doing what i think is being considered between saudi arabia and the us right now. get the evidence, matic sure it is an unimpeachable set of evidence, take it in two weeks to the un general assembly and let the world decide what needs to be done. let us not make that us unilateral action or the saudi action, the world should respond. thank you as always for your insights.
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she's sailed across the atlantic, now climate campaigner greta thunburg is taking on the us congress. on tuesday she told lawmakers to save their praise and instead try harder to implement policies which would save the environment. it comes ahead of a global strike on friday in which schools and businesses are taking part. but today she had this message while giving testimony before the house of representatives. i don't want you to listen to me, i want you to listen to the scientists. and i want you to unite behind science. and then i want you to take real action. we're joined now by democratic congressman gregory meeks who was in that hearing. thank you forjoining us. what did you make of greta thunberg's words there, listen to the scientist, take more action? i thought that she was excellent. made very salient points. you know, what we are talking about
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is saving this place that we all share, it is called the earth. the world. and scientists have been working on this for a long time. and i think that her advice is, well, who knows better, those of us sitting here, not knowing the research and understanding what is taking place or the sign cyst —— scientists and so we should follow. i heard people on both sides saying indeed global climate change is real, and indeed, we need to listen to scientists. she was critical of you too, she said essentially that congress wasn't doing enough. well, you know, i thought it was a very good and important hearing. we had four young people, all of them under the age of 21, 21 and younger, all of them
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concerned about where the future lies for them and this planet and you had one who was even a kvist, saying yes, climate change is here, and is real. and so the points that we re and is real. and so the points that were made out were very and extremely important. in fact when theissue extremely important. in fact when the issue came up, because someone was arguing that the united states should look at what was taking place in other countries like china, etc, and seemed to be indicating if china wasn't going to do anything, the united states with regard to combatting global change, the us yes should not move forward but we were reminded by her that in her native land, switzerland, they said, well, she hears individuals there say if united states are not going to take any united states are not going to take a ny ste ps united states are not going to take any steps then why should we? so here again is the reason why the united states should be the leaders, and do everything that we can do to
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cut the carbon level on the planet and help preserve this planet that we all share. i think lots of people would applaud that, there she is telling you to take action and today the president has taken action by revoking the special waiver, the state of california has relied on for years, he is saying no state can impose more ambitious pollution controls than those adopted by the federal government. well, it is clear that the president is on the wrong side of history, the wrong side of saving this planet. pulling out of the paris agreement made that obvious, and i think that even the individual who was on the panel, a young man who was a kvist, he left the with the with a message saying mr president, listen to the scientist, that climate change is real, it is not a joe scientist, that climate change is real, it is not ajoe it scientist, that climate change is real, it is not a joe it is scientist, that climate change is real, it is not ajoe it is not scientist, that climate change is real, it is not a joe it is not a
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hoax, it is real. i think that came through very clearly from all of the four young people that were there, and basically it has to be acknowledged that all of the democrats that were there, and too, by the few, there was some, a few republicans that were at the hearing, that this is something that we've got take very seriously, because we don't have an, on earth we don't have life as we know it, and the time to do something about it that is right now, and that is message that was being given by those four young people to members of congress on the committee today. thank you forjoining us. the israeli election, the second in five months, was supposed to break the country's political deadlock — but not a bit of it. benjamin netanyahu, looking to stay in power for a record fifth term, is behind, but onlyjust.
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his likud party is on course to win 32 seats, his opponent benni gantz‘s of blue and white party has 33 seats. that leaves benni gantz in the driving seat, for now. his center left bloc would have 56, the right wing religious block in which mr netenyahu sits with 56. avigdor lieberman with his eight votes in position as potential king maker. though he has already said he will notjoin a right—wing and religious government. so the result leaves benjamin netanyahu in an even weaker position than he was after april's vote. but, with the obvious health warning. israeli politics, as ever, is complex, and the result only the beginning of weeks of political horse trading. our correspondent barbara plett usher is in jersulam and was watching overnight. where does this leaf us, do you think, barbara? —— leave?” where does this leaf us, do you think, barbara? -- leave? i have asked a few people that today and many of them say these coalition talks are kind of wide—open, we can't really tell you where they are
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going, they are various ways it could go, but the main, the main picture, is that you have the two key party, who can hot form a government on their own, and then you have a third element, avigdor lieberman, the former defence minister who can be the king maker because he has enough seats to help either side but they both need him. it depends on the horse—trading between them. what many people are talking about is the possibility of a national unity government, this would involve blue and white, and also mr netanyahu's likud party but not mr netanyahu, so that would be a whole set of negotiations, there is also the possibility if mr avigdor lieberman decides he is going to ove i’co m e lieberman decides he is going to overcome his objections to binyamin netanyahu, for him to help the prime minister in which case it would be a right—wing government, but these are all sorts of things that are going to be negotiated over the next couple of week, and we will have a much better idea of where it is going to go at that point and what
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most israelis are hoping and many politicians are hoping is this will not result in a third election. it sounds like you are saying the path is narrowing but it is not the end of the binyamin netanyahu era? yes, i mean i think the assessment here is that mr netanyahu has been weakened, you have seen titles like the magician has stumbled. the spell has broken. he is in a position that is not as strong as what he went into this election, so, there is that, but he is not out, he hasn't given up. he is still going to try to eco—out some political survival. what he was aiming for was a right—wing coalition government that would help him pass an immunity law that would protect him from prosecution with looming corruption indictments coming. that possibility seems less now, much less. and so if he does manage to survive it would be likely be in a way that he would
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be likely be in a way that he would be weaker than before, but he has not been ruled out of the picture. barbara, i know you will keep us aprized of all the latest twists and turns. last week we showed you andrew yang shooting hoops ahead of a presidential debate in houston. this time he has been playing the part of another contender. rocky balboa. mryang was campaigning in philadelphia, outside the famous art museum. made famous by those steps that sylvester stallone ran up ahead of his heavyweight title fight. no sign yet mr yang is about to deliver the knockout blow but he certainly puts on a show. have a look. music: theme from rocky he is quite quirky this guy. you
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have him promising a thousand dollars to a couple of families for a year, that is part of his sort of campaign pledge, that is all being looked into. all of this momentum is helping him in the polls even though helping him in the polls even though he does remain at the lower level of all the contenders out there, he is still starting to see this small boost. but it was ever thus for rocky, came from nowhere. but it was ever thus for rocky, came from nowhere. this is beyond 100 days. still to come — the plumber who refuses to charge old age pensioners, and went viral after twitter found out about it. we'll be speaking to him from my hometown, burnley. a pensioner has been cleared of murdering her terminally ill 81—year—old husband who died after they both took an overdose at their home in staffordshire. mavis eccleston, who's 80, was accused of giving her husband a potentially lethal dose of prescription drugs without his knowledge. she sobbed in the dock as the verdict was read out.
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sian lloyd reports. a devoted couple, married for 60 years. but mavis eccleston was accused of murdering the man she described as the love of her life in a so—called mercy killing. it took a jury four hours to clear her of all charges, verdicts welcomed by her family who described the past 18 months as a terrible ordeal. if there had been an assisted dying law in the uk, our dad would have been able to have the choice to end his suffering. he would not have asked our mum to do something that is considered breaking the law. our dad would have been devastated at the thought of his beloved wife waiting to find out if, at the age of 80, she would face a life sentence in prison simply for respecting his wishes. at their home, the prosecution alleged that mavis eccleston had
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given her husband a potentially lethal dose of prescription medicine in a night—time drink, without him knowing. she told the court that they had acted together, that dennis wanted to end his life and she couldn't live without him. she had also taken an overdose and the couple were found unconscious during an unexpected visit from relatives. following hospital treatment, she survived. a sense of relief for this family, but wider questions will again they are looking forward to getting her home. sian lloyd, bbc news, stafford crown court. there is more on that story on the bbc website. there is more on that story on the bbc website. the financial times is normally printed on pink paper but as you can see today it has a rather
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distinctive, yellow wraparound. and the headline is capitalism — time for a reset. really? the ft, the ultimate tubthumper for free market capitalism. what is going on here? well, inside ft readers were greeted by something very different. "it is time for a rethink of corporate governance", says the paper. "we need a new collaboration between directors, managers, employees, suppliers and communities." the editor, lionel barber, says that since the 2008 global financial crash, the capitalist principle of maximising profits are still principles of good business, but no longer sufficient on their own. here in us the top 1.0% now earns twice as much as the whole bottom 50% — twice as big a share as a0 years ago. we're joined from new york by gillian tett, chair of the editorial board of the ft‘s us edition, and also its editor—at—large. thank you forjoining us on the programme. you are sitting in new
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york, the financial capital of america, i mean, are the titans of american business ready to change the way they view dam, the way they operate? the short answer is there isa operate? the short answer is there is a huge debate about this now and we are at the ft feel so strongly about it we have made the entire website free to read for anybody, today, because we want to get the ebait going and just a couple of weeks ago the business round table which is a group of the biggest coe, the cardinals in the vatican of the religion of capital, they came out and said what we are saying which is it the time to think what the point ofa pan it the time to think what the point of a pan is. it the time to think what the point ofa pan is. we it the time to think what the point of a pan is. we have spent years saying it is about making as much money as you can and the shierld and the chief executive. now we are saying you have to think about wider society. none of that should come as a surprise for anyone who ever
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studied adam smith, because when he wrote about the profit motive and created the idea of the invisible hand of markets he knew there was a social component, so we are saying let us go back to real adam smith, back the capitalism because we believe in capitalism but a slightly different version. that would require shareholders though to take a different approach or be less demanding and expect less than they have come to. well, here is the issue, you are seeing shareholders already starting to think about this more broadly. there is a new movement called efg, it is something we set up a website to talk about, called moral money. $31 trillion worth of fund have moved into a place where they are trying to adhere to some element of this framework, so you are already seeing
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investors saying if i don't care about anything else, chasing greed, that doesn't work or won't work long—term. next week here in new york, you will have the un general assembly meeting, when you have people like greta thunberg and other activists here, talking about the issue, what is really striking though and going back to what the ft is doing is you are getting a lot of ceos, big investors saying the world is changing and if we ignore this, we will have all kinds of problems not least a big social and political backlash. the world is changing, and some might say you are a bit late to the party, if you look at the policies of elizabeth warren, raising the minimum wage orjeremy corbyn over here, transferring 10% of shares to worker, plans for inclusive ownership and i tend to remember you were sniffy about some of those plan, the politicians are
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already ahead of you. well, i would say certainly a lot of the protestors are, and the problem being up until now a lot of corporate boards have been trying to shut their eyes to this orjust dismiss what people are saying, what we are saying we may not agree with the proposals, although there are some elements that are sensible. much we don't agree with but we agree on with the idea there needs to bea agree on with the idea there needs to be a new debate and vet and between the two extreme trueing saying nothing needs to change and others are saying we need to go for a soft socialism there is a middle grouped which needs to be embraced. for people who want to see a better world. thank you very much, much for your thoughts. it takes us neatly to the next story.
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last night we introduced you to a rare breed — an unequivocally good person. james anderson, the plumber from my home town burnley, who is fixing boilers for vulnerable people, many of them old age pensioners, free of charge. he started his non—for—profit business after he came across an elderly and disabled man who was being scammed by over £5,000 to fix his supposedly dangerous boiler. well, it got quite a response. james's acts of kindness has gone viral, after a picture of his bill for zero pounds, sent to a 91—year—old woman with acute leukemia, was posted online. christian will be pleased to hear that the crowdfunding website he called for last night was set up to support james's business, and so far it has raised over £22,000. and james joins us now via webcam from burnley.
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how is it in burnley? it is wet, it is warm but it is happy. it is a lwa ys is warm but it is happy. it is always wet in burnley. you are a prince among men sir, tell us how your business came about? we have told the tory about the man who was being scammed. what made you think, i need to set up a not for profit and help these people? well, i've done a bit of research online and i found there is no other company that i could find that did anything to help the elderly and disabled on this scale. i sat down and come up with a name after a couple of days that would involve the elderly and disabled plumbing and heating. i spoke to my accountant and decided to go for a not for profit 2115 would benefit the public more and benefit the community more and itjust, it just went on from there and now it is sky rocketed which is unbelievable because the...
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is sky rocketed which is unbelievable because the. . ” is sky rocketed which is unbelievable because the... i was wondering whether you were surprised by the response to that bill that was posted online, highlighting your work? i was, i was was posted online, highlighting your work? iwas, iwas at was posted online, highlighting your work? i was, i was at my grandison's christensening when my stone started bleeping. i realised the lady's daughter had posted it on line because she was so grateful. that was on sunday. how many people have you helped? 22389. can you go national with this? i am going national, yes. you heard it here first, james, thank you very much for coming on the programme. get on that site and help james help more elderly people with their boilers. amazing that. gone from 111,000 to 22,000.50 amazing that. gone from 111,000 to 22,000. so people are getting behind it which is good. thank you very
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much for watching. we will see you tomorrow, from me and michelle. goodbye. hello. good evening, ourweather picture is a quiet one for the next few days across the uk. we have high pressure to thank. it will mean dry weather, that is light winds, plenty of sunshine, it will mean things turn warmer through the end of the week. particularly for the start of the weekend. at the moment the centre is directly across us, we have had a weak warm front looking through the northern reaches of the high and that meant more cloud for scotland. turning dry, the rain becoming confine odd the northern isles, patches of mist and fog returning from southern scotland, into northern england into the midlands on thursday and with clearer skies to the south, could get chilly too, a few rural frost hollows down to two or three
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degrees. thursday dawns largely dry, aside from that rain across the northern isle, we will from the get go see more sunshine, pleasant sunny spell, elsewhere the mist and fog burning off, certainly warmer with the sunshine, for scotland up to 18 in aberdeen, 20 or 21 to the south. thursday into friday, there is the high centre again, subtle change it d rifts eastwards, high centre again, subtle change it drifts eastwards, puts us on the western flank if you follow the isobars, we are pulling the air in from france, that is a warmer air source and that will mean a warmer day on friday. lets cloud new scotland. one of the top temperatures could be in the north east of scotland with help from the mountains and we could see up to 2a degree, we are looking at temperatures in the high teens or the low 20s and then into the start of the weekend, we get a direct southerly airflow on the western flank all the way from spain, across france, right across the uk, it will
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feel humid, it will also feel very warm for the time of year. temperatures in in the low 0s. . towards the west, the rain gathering an area of low pressure is going to come into play for the second half of the weekend. it will run—in to that warm air end it looks like it could be bring heavy and thundery rain to many areas on sunday. centre humid, still warm but overall a very different feeling and looking day.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at eight. a bbc news investigation finds teenagers in care are being placed at risk of abuse in unregulated homes. three teenagers have been charged with the murder of a police officer who was killed while investigating a burglary. saudi arabia says debris from drones and missiles proves the attacks on two oil sites were ‘unquestionably sponsored by iran', president trump says he will "substa ntially increase" sanctions on iran
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gareth thomas reveals that a

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