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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 18, 2019 11:30pm-12:00am BST

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and we'll be taking an in—depth look at the papers with our reviewers. that is coming up after the headlines at 11:30pm. now to the weather. thank you forjoining me. we will be taking a look at the outlook for the next ten days. the next few days looking quiet. a lot of settled weather, light winds and dry conditions thanks to these area of high pressure. —— this. cloud and rain into scotland. sitting across the northern isles on thursday. sunny spells developing through the course of the day. much drier and brighter than wednesday and warmer
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as well. a factor of 5—6d, for example, in aberdeen. sunshine pushing temperatures up into the low 20s. thursday into friday, the height not moving anywhere in a high, drifting slowly this was, putting us on a westwards flank. it ta kes putting us on a westwards flank. it takes us into a south—easterly air strea m takes us into a south—easterly air stream pulling warm air from the continent. it looks like some spots in the north—east of scotland, could see highs of 2a degrees. to the south, 22 or 23 possible. the one mistake looks like will be saturday. notice how the isobars line from south to north, pulling the air straight from france and that will rise the temperatures significantly. an area of low pressure coming in
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from the west. for saturday, a lot of dry and sunny weather. a light southerly breeze and it will feel unseasonably warm. if you had your eye towards the west, you may have noticed some rain already trying to get into the south—west of england and wales. the low pressure starting to come into play overnight into sunday and meeting with the wife just in jack's sunday and meeting with the wife just injack‘s energy into it and the rain is likely to be heavy and thundering. still very humid. the temperatures do not fall away but it will look different. it will feel very different as well. possibly brighter in the west later on in the day. once the weather system is through, we move into the early part of next week and we face this area
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of next week and we face this area of low pressure. a lot of energy, with the potential of heavy falls of rain but also strong winds, potentially widespread gales to the north of the uk, particularly for scotla nd north of the uk, particularly for scotland and there may be warnings. the low will pull away into the north sea and weekend but then we're left lingering low to the north of the uk. a much more unsettled picture in contrast to this week. it will be cooler and the temperatures will be cooler and the temperatures will hold on to relatively milder air. temperatures are still a little above average for the time of year.
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hello, this is bbc news. we will be taking a look at tomorrow morning's papers in a moment. first the headlines: the finnish prime minister calls on borisjohnson to put forward his alternative brexit plans within 12 days, or he warns it's over. a bbc news investigation finds teenagers in care are being placed at risk of abuse in unregulated homes saudi arabia has displayed what it says is wreckage of drones and cruise missiles which it says prove that iran was behind the recent attacks
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on two oilfacilities. president trump said he would substantially increase sanctions on iran. the pensioners who planned to end their lives together. mavis ecclestone survived and is cleared of murdering her terminally ill husband. hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are former trade minister digbyjones, and talkradio presenter daisy mcandrew. many of tomorrow's front pages are already in. no one story leads the papers tonight. the metro goes with the angry father of a sick child who confronted borisjohnson whilst he was visiting a london hospital. the man, who was also a labour activist, accused the prime minister of only visiting for
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a press oppurtunity. the telegraph leads on comments from the the leader of the house of commons, jacob rees—mogg, praising nigel farage and calling on brexiteers to return to the conservative party after britain has left the eu. there is more brexit in the express. the paper says the eu wants to see borisjohnson‘s brexit plan injust 12 days‘ time. the guardian says saudia arabia has shown off what it says is wreckage of drones and cruise missiles that proves iranian involvement in weekend attacks on two oilfacilities. the paper says the move increases pressure on president donald trump to respond to the attack. and the times says the home office is manipulating crime figures by telling the national anti—fraud service to dismiss tens of thousands of legitimate cases.
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sell a variety of stories on the front pages, as we said. but let's start with the metro. just sort out oui’ start with the metro. just sort out our nhs. this is a quotation from a father of a hospital patient who confronted borisjohnson, who was on a press trip to a hospital today. and shock horror, politician visits hospitalfor and shock horror, politician visits hospital for photo up, it has never happened in the history of politics. —— photo opportunity. our sympathies are with this guy, his baby daughter yesterday nearly died because of what it looks like from the paper, not a clinical problem, incompetence, mistake, but the inefficiency of dealing with admission and what is wrong. and this goes to the core of the nhs. the nhs doesn't need more moneyjust per se, it needs money properly applied. the trouble is, the moment any politician says the word reform
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the left says you want to privatise it, and everyone knows that the clinical side of the nhs is first class. the administrative side has a lot to be sorted out. so he confronts boris johnson lot to be sorted out. so he confronts borisjohnson and he says, basically, just sort out our nhs. not only is he right, but i do like living in a country where the prime minister of the nation can be confronted like this, entirely peacefully, not a hint of any violence or problem, like this, minora —— mano violence or problem, like this, minor a —— mano a violence or problem, like this, minora —— mano a mano. it is evidence of what democracy should be about. emotions clearly running very high, and as digby has outlined, little wonder. he is also a labour activist, isn't he? two and this is where the problem with this story has stemmed from. if you look at many social media sites, people are saying two sides of the argument, one saying whether or not he is a labour supporter is completely
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irrelevant. it wasn't like he was protesting outside of the hospital. he was there because his child has been very, very sick. he happened to been very, very sick. he happened to be in the paediatric ward when the prime minister happen to be touring the ward. so we had this very awkward moment on camera where he said, just for a photo opportunity, and borisjohnson said, just for a photo opportunity, and boris johnson said said, just for a photo opportunity, and borisjohnson said the press are not here. and he pointed at the cameras and said well, who are they, then? so there was a very embarrassing moment. but then there has been this follow—on which has involved your own political editor, laura kuenssberg, who i am a big fan of, he simply stated the fact that this man was a labour activist. she was an outing him as a labour activist, but he himself had tweeted oi'i activist, but he himself had tweeted on his twitter account that he had a go at the prime minister and on his
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twitter account he proudly proclaims that he is a labour supporter. laura wasn't saying by the way this is a set up, orthere wasn't saying by the way this is a set up, or there is something fishy about this. she simply said what he himself has tweeted. she has been attacked so much. it's really crazy, so attacked so much. it's really crazy, so much so that the bbc has had to put out a statement tonight saying it wasn't a malicious tweet, saying what ijust said. it was a statement of the fact. she was doing herjob. and the people that attacked her, if this had happened and she was a tory activist, would they have said the same? well, the good thing is that downing street, who don't always handle these things well, and boris didn't handle it particularly well at the time, did show some common sense and did say it doesn't matter whether this man was a labour supporter or a conservative supporter or a conservative supporter stop if you are of any political or totally nonpolitical, and your child is sick and you believe as this man does that the nhs failed his child by not having enough nurses and doctors, which is what he said, then you are going to have a go at the prime minister. borisjohnson has tweeted tonight and said he isn't in the slightest bit embarrassed and this is basically part of the job. well, it
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is part of the job, and basically part of the job. well, it is part of thejob, and by basically part of the job. well, it is part of the job, and by the way it is part of being a taxpaying participant in the nhs to stand there and do it. all i will say to people who viably attacked —— vilely attacked a journalist, it will be the left to have gone after her, all i will say to them is, if it had been a tory activist, would you have done the same? and the answer is no. if only people on twitter and facebook tried to become a modicum of sense... the trouble is, common sense isn't that common. well, i wonder what they are going to say about you, digby! they usually do, so about you, digby! they usually do, so that's. .. nothing about you, digby! they usually do, so that's... nothing is new there. labour starts to reverse tony blair's clause four reforms. this was a key plank of the party's constitution, and tony blair changed it. it is worth reminding people
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what clause four is. it is basically a commitment to widespread nationalism, isn't it? this would be unpicking a major reform. for those old enough to remember the fights when tony blair was trying to change those words, on the basis of it was all common ownership of the means of production, distribution and exchange, he changed those words and replace them with a dynamic economy serving the public interest in which the enterprise of the market and the rigour of competition are joint with partnership and cooperation. the furore within old school corbynista was extreme. the times have a very interesting quote from alan johnston, the former home secretary, who at the time of the clause four reforms was the only trade unionists, because he was in the postal workers' union, he was the only one to back tony blair. he has
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said fine, change the words, things change, but for god '5 sake don't revert to the original. but this is just another sign of how, you know, the corbynistas have got their grip on the labour party and they are determined to take no prisoners. we saw the student wing of the party basically being pushed out earlier this week. we have seen the way that the selection for the mp5, that is all being changed. the welsh party is up in arms because they have changed that, and it isjust to get that tightened grip on the way the party works in the run—up to their conference. and karl marx always said take control of the party. that is what will govern the country. and frankly, mps will be... marks didn't say mps, but the mps will be secondary to it all. that is, the usual marxist takeover. —— marx. what they are doing here is another way, as you rightly say, of marxists taking over the second order of the
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biggest party in the country. and this was done in 1985. if you think, if you are 35 years old today, you we re if you are 35 years old today, you were 11 at the time. idsa those of us were 11 at the time. idsa those of us who are old enough... there are all these people aged between 18 and 35 who will go into the next general election, they have no... nor do they, i am election, they have no... nor do they, iam not election, they have no... nor do they, i am not blaming them, but just a statement of fact, they have no cog sense of what this means. and isn't it interesting? this wording they want to go back to, good old quality left socialism, was created in 1970 -- quality left socialism, was created in1970 —— no quality left socialism, was created in 1970 —— no cognisant. 1917 is actually very famous for being the date of something else, which is the russian revolution, when marxism got hold of a country. and it is quite a historic coincidence that the labour party... and that happened on the same day, and coleman and his mates are trying to take everything back to that. this time is peace also
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says there is a new poll showing the liberal democrats have overtaken labour —— time piece. the latest poll i have seen which came out today showed labour pretty much stag na nt today showed labour pretty much stagnant on 26 but showed the lib dems on 18. the interesting thing about that poll was it showed the tories on 34, which is up significantly, which is a surprise to many, because most of us don't think that borisjohnson has done particularly well, but he is speaking to the brexit party because the brexit party is sliding down the polls. they are doing what they set out to do and they are taking back those votes they have lost to the brexit party. let's turn to the daily telegraph. this is the widow who was cleared of the mercy killing. she was cleared of killing her terminally ill husband. husband and wife of 60
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yea rs. husband. husband and wife of 60 years. he is dying of cancer. she cannot imagine life without him. he wa nts to cannot imagine life without him. he wants to dictate the time and way of his death. they signed a suicide pact. they both take this cocktail of drugs, they are found unconscious. he has a do not resuscitate on his record, she has not. they manage to save her life, he dies. they die with him holding hands in hospital. and what nation, what system, what cps puts an 80—year—old woman, who hasjust lost her husband of 60 years in the dock for that and, by the way... she was actually charged with both motor and manslaughter and cleared of both. the defence would have been, if you
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are ina the defence would have been, if you are in a suicide pact, that is not murder or manslaughter but if it wasn't, it could clearly be either. iam part wasn't, it could clearly be either. i am part of the legislature, and i am very clear that this country needs legislation on this. i do not blame the cps and the police, the judges and jurors. they would say they are just judges and jurors. they would say they arejust doing judges and jurors. they would say they are just doing what the law says but what sort of country allows that woman to be put that sort of health. the problem was - i agree with everything you have said that to be put this trial after all the horrors, losing a husband, coming around to being resuscitated and facing these charges. the 14 page
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suicide letter was entirely written by herand suicide letter was entirely written by her and not signed by him. i suspect he was to poorly to sign. the drugs that killed him and nearly killed her, were undiluted, as in a drink, and they said he did not know he was committing suicide, she says he was committing suicide, she says he didn't know. all they had to go on it was her word because they have not made their plans... defence council said, how could he have been given the drink with it better taste with no idea what he was taking. i just queried, why are we still having this argument? we are a sophisticated democracy. we are a country at the forefront of compassion for hundreds of years and we are sitting here putting a woman like this through that sort of hell andi
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like this through that sort of hell and i think it is disgraceful. i agree. we are agreeing far too much. i will disagree with you nowjust for the hell of it! laughter. this is the finnish prime minister talking to the french president who turned around to borisjohnson saying you have to make your plans basically about the irish stop explicit within 12 days or it is over. we only have the story coming out from the finish side. most of us who follow these things would pretty much suspect it is coming from emmanuel macron. he is the bruiser of the brexit negotiations, he wants to give us a bloodied nose. he very much want to kill off our brexit and
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set die. the problem is, i cannot see how they do it. as we keep being told, the 27 nations each of them has a veto so in order for this plan to be actually put into practice, we would have to be unanimous. it cannotjust be would have to be unanimous. it cannot just be too country thank you have two weeks or you are out but, of course, we have a really tricky. coming up. the supreme court could possibly make parliament seat again. september the 30th which is a they they are talking about it during the conservative party conference. it is also the week that boris johnson is going to new york, to the un. it is very difficult time for the government and as i do not need this kind of pressure. i... i wonder, when borisjohnson kind of pressure. i... i wonder,
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when boris johnson is kind of pressure. i... i wonder, when borisjohnson is being accused of proroguing parliament for five weeks. on that first week it was three days because they sat on the monday and then on the friday. then for three weeks, the liberals, the tories, the labour would not be sitting anyway. it is hypocritical to say... that argument, which i do not necessarily agree with, was they we re not necessarily agree with, was they were going to insist parliament was recalled... even if they wouldn't. i have been to more party conferences thani have been to more party conferences than i cared to remember. the money spent both by the party but also taking the money from all the sponsors, they would lose all that money when they are about to fight an election. i agree. money when they are about to fight an election. iagree. in money when they are about to fight an election. i agree. in this article, i would love the people watching tonight to give me an answer. . . watching tonight to give me an answer... isn't that yourjob! john
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humphreys tomorrow makes his last appearance on today and john eustace say to me, you have been even going to say you don't know. emmanuel macron gets his way because germany bowls the tunes. they get together, they are going to force the 27 to say, pull out without a deal so they tell us you have not given us an a nswer to tell us you have not given us an answer to the question so it is over. no deal. you have members of the house of commons saying they will be no no deal. you have the domestic parliament saying there will be no no deal and in europe will be no no deal and in europe will not give us one. that's it for the papers tonight. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online
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on the bbc news website. it is all there for you seven days a week at bbc.co.uk/papers, and if you miss the programme any evening, you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. goodbye. after two defeats out of two, the english side made a better first of things in the champions league. craig templeton reports on a co mforta ble craig templeton reports on a comfortable win for manchester city in ukraine. a defence depleted, but pep guardiola insisted his side were ready for the challenge. the challenge started against a familiar
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photo, for the third year in a row. maybe that could explain the ease with which they found place. the post denied them. but not again. the german making it 2—0. the opponent was still threatening on the counter. and they were also becoming increasingly generous at the back. soon, city would be in again. they sealed all three pies. pep guardiola said they were ready for the challenge. it appears he may have been right. —— all three points. well earlier spurs squandered a 2—nil advantage away at olimpiakos. the greek side then scored either
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side of half time to salvage a point..patrick gearey reports. the music, the noise, the colours, it must have taken space back. now back to the boil. spurs started in a slumber until awoken by a crucial whistle. penalty, hurricane. —— harry. olympiakos had been the better tea m harry. olympiakos had been the better team for long periods and quick, quality moments. a goaljust before halftime putting fire beneath the cauldron. then got bad. the greek champions level. still, they could have still wanted. but it was a chance missed.
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there were 8 games in total this evening — gareth bale started for real madrid as they lost 3 nil. angel di maria with two — bale did have the ball in the net — ruled out for handball. atletico madrid fought back from 2 nil down to level things againstjuventus and you can find lots more details on all the matches on the bbc sport website. europe's captain padraig harrington has named robert karlsson as the first of his vice—captains for the 2020 competition at whistling straits. the swede had the same role in paris last year as europe regained the trophy. karlsson made two ryder cup appearances as a player, he was a winner at the k club in 2006 and he also tasted defeat at valhalla two years later. somerset will have to beat new county championship leaders essex in their final match if they are to claim a first ever title. that's after essex beat surrey, and somerset slumped to a heavy defeat to hampshire
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at the ageas bowl. hampshire's south african fast bowler kyle abbott took 17 wickets in the match. they're the best figures in a first class game sincejim laker took 19 wickets in a test against australia in 1956. the defeat means somerset trail essex by 12 points heading into the title decider at taunton that's all the sport for now. thursday getting off to another rather chilly starts across many parts of the uk but actually the emphasis over the next few days by day and by night is for things to turn a little warmer and for the majority it will be dry, thanks to this area of high pressure firmly in charge. this little frontal system here still bringing some extra cloud and the odd spot of rain across scotland. further south, rather chilly. some spots in the countryside down to three or four
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degrees. across england and wales plenty of sunshine through the day. ploughed through east anglia and the south—east. fog patches clearing. sunshine developing here in northern ireland. scotland, more in the way of cloud but the cloud breaking up spells of sunshine. generally speaking a slightly warmer day. as we go through thursday night, we will continue to peel the cloud away from much of scotland. breezy across western areas so not too much mist and fog. north—east england could have the odd patch. another chilly night but perhaps not quite as cold as recently. saturday, lots of sunshine. a little bit of fault to clear away early in the morning. in the sunshine, some spots in north—east scotland could get to 24 degrees. warmer still as we get into saturday. warm air wafting up from
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the south. as high pressure pushes away eastwards. but it will allow frontal systems to make some progress from the west. on saturday, for most it will be fine, dry with a lot of sunshine and quite breezy and across the south—west, perhaps into wales and northern ireland, we could see some thunderstorms breaking up in the afternoon. 21 degrees in glasgow. 25 in london. by sunday, increasing chance of downpours becoming more widespread across the uk. uncertainty about just becoming more widespread across the uk. uncertainty aboutjust how extensive these will become. some spells of sunshine as well but it will start to turn cooler and fresher from the west.
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i'm rico hizon in singapore. the headlines: as indonesia battles forest fires in borneo and sumatra, pollution reaches critical levels, and the land still burns. the and the land still burns. firefighters are still trying put the firefighters are still trying to put out the blaze, but it's hard because the water sources are very dry because of the dry season that is occurring right now. the us secretary of state, mike pompeo, says the attack on saudi arabia's oil facilities was an act of war. he again blames iran. i'm kasia madera in london. also in the programme: the us federal reserve cut

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