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tv   BBC News at Nine  BBC News  September 19, 2019 9:00am-10:01am BST

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you're watching bbc news at nine with me annita mcveigh. the headlines: david cameron has revealed he was so worried about scotland voting to break away from the uk, he asked for help from the queen. not asking for anything that would be in any way improper or unconstitutional butjust be in any way improper or unconstitutional but just a be in any way improper or unconstitutional butjust a raising of the eyebrow. borisjohnson is warned to come up with fresh brexit proposals by the end of the month or the finnish prime minister says it will be ‘over‘. lawyers forformer prime minister sirjohn major will challenge borisjohnson‘s decision to suspend parliament on the third and final day of the historic hearing at the supreme court. i will be reporting live from the
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supreme court when we will have the extraordinary side today of a former conservative prime minister accusing the current conservative prime minister of dishonest motives. canadian prime ministerjustin trudeau says he "deeply regrets" wearing skin darkening make—up at a school gala almost two decades ago. i shouldn't have done it, i should have known better. it was something that i didn't think was racist at the time but now i recognise it was something racist to do. new research suggests robberies are increasing at a faster rate in england and wales than in any other major developed country. and manchester city get their champions league campaign off to a strong start with a 3—0 win in ukraine.
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good morning — and welcome to the bbc news at 9 david cameron has revealed for the first time how he sought the queen's help during the scottish referendum of 2014, admitting he asked her to "raise an eyebrow" over the question of independence. speaking to the bbc in the new two—part series, the former prime minister says he approached the queen fearing he could lose the vote which would see scotland leaving the union. the queen later spoke to a well—wisher of her desire for people to think very carefully about their future. our deputy political editor john pienaar reports. no - 19,000... the moment in 2014 david cameron realised the union was safe, for a time, anyway. the referendum campaign for scottish independence had been defeated. everybody happy? yes, thank you. are we running? but now, david cameron has told the bbc how,
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after a startling opinion poll suggested most scots wanted independence, the queen hinted openly at her concern, and how he had a hand in it. i remember conversations i had with my private secretary, and he had with the queen's private secretary, and i had with the queen's private secretary, not asking for anything that would be in any way improper or unconstitutional, butjust a raising of the eyebrow, even, you know, a quarter ofan inch. we thought would, you know, make a difference. although the words were very limited, i think it helped to put a slightly different perception on things. the convention is that the queen keeps and is kept clear of politics. it is bound up in the current controversy about brexit, where it touches the role of parliament, the palace and the prime minister. it is the biggest stitch—up... on borisjohnson and brexit, mr cameron is blunt, saying the man who is now pm expected the leave campaign to lose, but hoped to gain by backing it.
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in the end, i think, ultimately he put what was good for his political career ahead of what he actually thought was right for the country. so more secrets, secure until now behind this door, out in the open. more tension, more controversy — as if there is not enough already to be getting on with. let's speak to our deputy political editor norman smith who's in westminster now. good morning, norman. first of all, david cameron. how shocked do you think people are by this admission that he asked the queen to raise an eyebrow over the scottish independent question, given that lately we've been talking a lot about the queen being drawn into politics? i think it is genuinely extraordinary because it's been an unwritten rule for prime minister through the ages that you do not bring the monarchy into politics because you compromise the crown ‘s
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sort of impartiality and position above parliament and above the hurly—burly of daily politics. david cameron, by openly acknowledging that so worried was he about the outcome of the referendum that he sought the involvement of the queen, evenif sought the involvement of the queen, even if it was at a very subtle and carefully calibrated way is extraordinary in itself but even more extraordinary, i think, is the fa ct more extraordinary, i think, is the fact david cameron has chosen to go public about it, not only to do that but to say that he asked the queen to sort of metaphorically raise an eyebrow about scottish independence. and you know, interestingly, he has just done an interview on the radio 4 today programme and he thinks he knows he has put his foot in it and gone too far, he said he probably shouldn't have said that and he also said it had been a terrible mistake, you may remember, after the referendum, he let it be known that
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the queen had and i quote purred down the telephone line end quote when he told her about the outcome and he acknowledged this morning that was a terrible mistake. and i think on reflection he probably realises he certainly shouldn't have gone public with this information and it does, you know, this particular moment, when of course there an awful lot of controversy about whether boris johnson has brought the queen into politics by his decision to borrow parliament 110w his decision to borrow parliament now being challenged in the courts, has compounded the sort of spotlight on the queen ‘s. has compounded the sort of spotlight on the queen 's. the responsibility for that not for leaving the country unprepared? for that not for leaving the country unprepared ?|j for that not for leaving the country unprepared? i don't think there was a huge amount more that could have been done, setting out the alternatives, recognising then that i wasn't the right person to ta ke that i wasn't the right person to take the country forward, giving a new prime minister at the chance to choose between those alternatives and take the country forward. no
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regrets about the referendum? i have huge regrets. no regrets for the motive, the reason you gave for the referendum because your chief whip at the time more broadly on brexit, norman, the finnish minister has been saying that the clock is running down the uk to come up with proposals. is the timetable quite as stark as the finnish prime ministers suggests? the message, you are right, was very stark which is in effect we have 11 days to show our hand, to put down in writing exactly what it is we want or as far as he is concerned, it's over, in other words, the eu is simply going to pull up the drawbridge understand going to be any more negotiations and we will have to leave without a deal. i think in truth, it probably isn't a hard and fast deadline partly because he's not got the agreement of other eu leaders to such a fixed deadline. partly because, let's be honest, eu deadlines tend to be a little bit
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flexible and because the eu clearly wa nts a flexible and because the eu clearly wants a deal and i don't imagine they're going to just give up and close up shop at the end of the month, but it does reflect the mounting frustration, irritation, anxiety and the eu side that still, so anxiety and the eu side that still, so late in the day, we have not told them in writing what we want. now, them in writing what we want. now, the view of team johnson is we are not going to do that until we are pretty sure that the eu will give the proposal is a sympathetic hearing. because what team johnson don't want is to put forward formal written proposals, they get taken apartand written proposals, they get taken apart and you have to go back to square apart and you have to go back to square one because apart and you have to go back to square one because there simply isn't time to start, you know, exchanging different drafts of documents. so the view from team johnson is they will put forward proposals but they are only going to put them forward when they think there is a fair wind behind them and they've got a chance of getting a decent hearing as april you'd to a possible deal. norman, thank you very much.
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the supreme court will hear submissions from the former prime minister sirjohn major today, who will argue borisjohnson acted unlawfully when he suspended parliament. ben brown is outside the court for us as you mentioned in the headlines, this extraordinary sight of two conservative prime ministers, former prime ministers pitting against each other. sirjohn major won't be here in person, it will be presented through his barrister. but let me just run you through what we expect him to say. he is going to say that in effect, what borisjohnson did in procuring or suspending parliament for five weeks, was deny parliament a voice motivated by his political interest in ensuring that there would be no activity in parliament in the period leading up to the crucial eu council summit on the 17th or 18th of october. and when he
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is considering what borisjohnson said was the reason for that suspension of parliament which was preparation for the queen 's speech, he said that it made no sense, sir john major says that makes no sense and cannot be the explanation. so effectively, accusing the current prime minister of dishonest motives. let's just recap for you what happened yesterday. in the courtier, the supreme court, the highest court in the land which is considering this crucial legal constitutional, political question about whether the prime minister did unlawfully suspend parliament. our legal correspondent clive coleman has been following proceedings inside the court. much of the argument has been had and lawyers for the government addressing the court from these benches have focused on the point that for rogaine or suspending parliament as a purely political matter and is not one on which a
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court can and should adjudicate because there simply are no legal standards against which it can be judged. on the other hand, lawyers for the business woman gina miller and a group of 70 parliamentarians have argued that the suspension was unlawful because its purpose was to silence, to shut down parliament, to stymie it, too frustrated in some of the critical weeks leading up to the uk leaving the eu. all of the justices who have sat and listened to this case will have to decide firstly whether it is an issue they can't rely on and if they decide that it can't rely on and if they decide thatitis, can't rely on and if they decide that it is, they will have to come toa that it is, they will have to come to a definitive judgement as to whether the suspension of parliament was unlawful and the behaviour of the prime minister and advising the queen was also illegal. that's clive coleman, our legal correspondent inside the supreme court. today is the third and final day of this hearing. to date the court will hear
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first from the scottish government, who argue that they should be allowed to intervene in the public interest. the court will also hear a statement from a northern ireland claimant raymond mccord, who argues that a no deal brexit would have a negative impact on the peace process. his son was murdered by the ulster volunteer force in 1997. just after midday the court will hear from lawyers for sirjohn major who asi from lawyers for sirjohn major who as i mentioned will argue that the suspension of parliament was unlawful because it stops parliament from scrutinising the whole brexit process. joining us now to talk about what we can expect today, we've got the barrister and legal commentatorjeremy bryant, doctor joelle grogan from middlesex university, thank you both. jeremy, this has been an incredible case anyway, landmark case for all sorts of reasons, constitutionally, politically. but now we've got a lawyer for sirjohn politically. but now we've got a lawyerfor sirjohn major politically. but now we've got a lawyer for sirjohn major who is going to be in there saying the
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current prime minister has been sort of telling porkies. it's an extraordinary moment of legal theatre, if you like. we have a former conservative prime minister who is actually being represented by a barrister who is a former conservative mp. lord garnier. standing up the supreme court and arguing the current conservative prime minister is essentially betrayed parliamentary sovereignty and his suspension of parliament should be ruled unlawful. it's particularly surprising given that john major is one of the only prime ministers that's actually been alleged to have used suspension himself for political reasons. that was 97. the cash for questions scandal. he will be accused of hypocrisy by his critics. he may well be but the question may be how much notice to the supreme court justices take of this and how much is it really for a bit of colour? what do you think will this weigh heavily on the minds of the 11 supreme court justices
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heavily on the minds of the 11 supreme courtjustices who ultimately have to make this decision, did boris johnson unlawfully suspend parliament? we will see a difficult point in the case, again it seems that sirjohn major is trying to lean into the politics of it, something the courts have naturally been trying to stay away from, to ask them to look closely at the motivation and intention, to look at all the evidence that's available, that's why there was such a keen line in the case in what sirjohn major said which is we must look at the evidence in front of us but also the silence of the evidence not in front of us. there is a question that's been running through this case about what was the motivation by the prime minister and advising the queen to suspend parliament but then, even if you ignore what his motives were, what was the effect, the effect of shutting parliament for that period of time and was that, in effect, bad for the country, wrong for the country? was it effectively pulling
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the rug from under parliament '5 feet and undermining the critical constitutional principle of parliamentary sovereignty. we saw aidan o'neill yesterday afternoon trying to dig deep into the fact, what was the motive behind the barrister who was representing the case that the prime minister had unlawfully suspend parliament? absolutely. he was successful in scotland and now he's trying to say, look at the absence of a witness statement from the prime minister. what can we infer from that? it was encouraging the court to see bad faith, bad motives, really drilling down into what was going on in the political sphere. of course, the government say it's not a legal matter, it's a political matter, that's the precise point here. so the court cannot really get involved and make a meaningfuljudgement. actually, those remarks yesterday by aidan o'neill were pretty political in part, weren't they? he actually at one stage towards the end, said to the 11 judges, stand up for
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democracy, enough is enough, the mother of parliaments has been shut down, he said, by the father of lies, talking about the prime minister. this is what's very interesting about today, this morning is all about the intervenors, people stepping in and saying there are important arguments here but what's interesting is every single intervener has said this is unlawful, this should not be happening. from my legal perspective, the one really to look out for is the public law project, at the very end of the day. they are going to pick up on a very important legal point, brought continuously by the judges over the past few days which is essentially saying, look not at the big legislation, the act of parliament, look at what is called the secondary legislation, the lot that has been made by government. that can be made but it cannot be laid. which means, we are going to sea law that could be created, that could impact people, for example, anything from pesticides to citizens rights, but it cannot be scrutinised while
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parliament is not sitting. all right, thank you both much indeed. going to be another fascinating day here at the supreme court, the last day of these hearings, we don't yet know when we are going to get the ruling, thejudgement in know when we are going to get the ruling, the judgement in the 11 supreme courtjustices. ruling, the judgement in the 11 supreme court justices. could ruling, the judgement in the 11 supreme courtjustices. could be towards the end of this week or it could be that they want to take the weekend to think about it, mull it over, these are huge constitutional, legal, political questions of course and they may need a bit more time so we may not get a finaljudgement until the beginning of next week. but for the meantime, from the supreme court, it's back to you. the canadian prime minister justin trudeau has apologised after a photograph emerged of him wearing a turban and dark coloured makeup. the picture — taken at an arabian nights themed fancy dress party almost 20 years ago — has led to accusations of racism just as mr trudeau faces a battle for re—election. david willis reports. the photograph appeared in a school
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yearbook 18 years ago. now, it has come back to haunt canada's prime minister. pictured in robe and turban, brown paint on his face and hands, isjustin trudeau. the event — an arabian nights gala at the posh private school in vancouver where he was teaching at the time. i dressed up in an aladdin costume and put make—up on. i shouldn't have done that. i should have known better, but i didn't, and i'm really sorry. publication of the picture comes just a week afterjustin trudeau launched his re—election campaign, and political rivals have been swift to condemn his actions. well, it's troubling. i mean, it's really — it's insulting. any time we hear examples of brownface or blackfacing, it's really — it's making a mockery of someone for what they live, and what their lived experiences are. i think he needs to answer for it. i think he's got to answer the question why he did that.
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a politician of the instagram age, justin trudeau had carefully cultivated an image as a champion of canada's racial and ethnic minorities, a progressive on issues ranging from gender equality to indigenous rights. trudeau had just started to pull ahead of his main rival in the polls, with little over four weeks to go to the election. what this will mean for his re—election prospects remains to be seen. david willis, bbc news, washington. it's 19 minutes past nine. the headlines on bbc news... david cameron has revealed he was so worried about scotland voting to break away from the uk, he asked for help from the queen. borisjohnson is warned to come up with fresh brexit proposals by the end of the month or the finnish prime minister says it will be 'over‘. lawyers for former prime minister sirjohn major will challenge borisjohnson's decision to suspend parliament on the third and final day of the historic hearing at the supreme court.
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and in sport, manchester city began their champions league campaign with a win, beating their opponents 3—0, totte n ha m a win, beating their opponents 3—0, tottenham and threw away a three—goal lead in athens as they we re three—goal lead in athens as they were pegged back against olympia because. psg beat 13 time champions real madrid 3—0 in paris. the spanish team not registering a goal. england have trained in preparation for their opening world cup match against tonga, they host japan getting the tournament under way against russia tomorrow. more to come on all of those stories, a full update later in the hour. and we will seejohn very soon. the number of robberies in england and wales is increasing much faster than in other wealthy countries. a new report showsa 45 percent rise in robberies with knives in four years. the increase is being blamed on police cuts and the growth in smartphone use.
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our home affairs correspondent danny shaw reports. it is a frightening crime. every hour, about ten people become victims of robbery, sometimes by thieves riding mopeds. now, a new report has identified robbery as an entry point into serious violence. the study examined robbery trends across 13 western countries since 2014. it found there was a 33% increase in england and wales, far more than anywhere else. researchers said the availability of smartphones and cuts to front—line police were possible reasons for the rise. robbery is a significant offence, we think. we think it acts as a bit of a gateway offence into more serious violence. whether that's because young people are being asked to carry out robberies as an initiation into gangs, whether it's because they're paying off debts, more research is required. but a large proportion of the violence we're seeing on the streets is
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accounted for by robbery. the home office said improvements in the way police record offences had contributed to the rise in robberies. the department said it was funding the recruitment of an extra 20,000 officers and making it easierfor police to use stop—and—search powers. but the report suggests the problems may be greater than previously thought. it estimates as many as 269,000 young people aged under 18 were involved in or at risk of violence last year. afghan officials say a truck bomb has killed at least 30 people and injured 90 others in the capital of zabul province, in the south of the country. the province's governor said a building of the intelligence services was targeted, but a nearby hospital was also destroyed. the taliban said they had carried out the attack. ajapanese court has acquitted three former executives of the tokyo electric power company of professional negligence in the fukushima disaster in 2011. this was the only criminal case
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to arise from the crisis, when an earthquake and giant tsunami caused a meltdown in the power station's nuclear reactors. the executives, who faced up to five years in prison if found guilty, said they could not have anticipated the tsunami risk with the information available to them. 20 families are considering taking legal action against the government because their children are being treated as truants — when they are actually missing school due to mental health conditions. thousands of families face fines or prosecution for the absences but parents say the real reasons for missing school such as anxiety or depression — are not being taken into account. mark ansell reports. feel sick, get a headache, feel dizzy, have panic attacks. just start breathing really heavy, and turn bright red. 14—year—old kai, from chesterfield, walks his dog to help ease his anxiety. he has been diagnosed with social anxiety disorder.
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it has meant that, for years, he has rarely been to school. teachers don't really notice how you have it. they just think that you're misbehaving or not concentrating in class. and they think that you're naughty. his mum, debbie, says she has been threatened with fines from the school for kai's low attendance, and social services have even been called to her home. i have sat at work and cried. i have almost lost myjob. and i used to ring school, crying, saying, you know, "can you help me? what are we going to do?" "oh, no, you need this, you need a doctor's letter." and i'm like, well, we've got that. we've presented you with that. what more do we do? kai's school say that they recognise that some of their students experience many challenges, and they take their role they play in their care incredibly seriously. but the charity mind believes that many children like kai, who experience school refusal, are being treated as truants. the department for education told us:
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i just don't want to be, like, the one who has anxiety, and known for it and everything. i want to be known as a kid who is just normal. by speaking out, it will lead to more understanding and support for children experiencing school refusal. mark ansell, bbc news, chesterfield. donald trump has announced he'll stop the state of california setting its own emissions standards on cars. the president claimed in a tweet that the move would allow manufacturers to make cheaper, safer cars and create jobs. the governor of california has described the president's claim as "factually inaccurate," and the state has begun a legal challenge — as gareth barlow reports. los angeles — america's second largest city is known for its sweeping skyline, hollywood sign, and, in the past, smog. in the 1970s, as cars choked
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the streets and their emissions choked the air, the state was allowed to set its own tough environmental standards. now, though, donald trump has reversed that. in a series of tweets he said... the president also claimed the move would lead to the manufacture of more cars and create more jobs. the governor of california, gavin newsom, disagreed. it's about the oil industry. period. full—stop. it's not about the car manufacturer, it's not about consumers, it's not about the health, it's not about our economy. it's about oil companies. over a dozen other states have adopted california's stricter
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standards and the democratic state has already taken steps to block the efforts of the republican president. our communities are screaming for help to address the climate crisis. unlike the trump administration, we don't run scared. and so whether it is climate change or an administration recalcitrant in taking on its responsibilities, we are prepared to lead, we'll prepare to fight. until the court cases have been completed, there is no knowing if donald trump's efforts will blow over or if the environmentally progressive state will have to take a new course. gareth barlow, bbc news. burger king has announced it will no longer be giving away plastic toys with children's meals, following pressure to reduce plastic waste. it comes after two schoolgirls from hampshire petitioned the fast food giant, and its rival mcdonald's, to remove the toys. mcdonald's announced it will allow parents to swap happy meal toys for a bag of fruit in selected stores.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. good morning. lovely start out there this morning, crisp, fresh, a good, autumn day ahead and lots of sunshine to come. the next few days we see the sunshine but what you notice over the next couple of days as things gradually turning that little bit warmer, especially once we've lost the morning chill. out there at the moment, as well as the sunshine we have fog around, showing up sunshine we have fog around, showing up here, these areas of white come across central and southern scotland and northern ireland, the fog taking and northern ireland, the fog taking a couple more hours before it's gone, colder in northern scotland, but here, a brighter and drier day than yesterday, for most of us, sunshine from dawn until dusk, feeling warmer this afternoon. after a chilly start temperatures at levels they should be, if not higher. tonight the pressure conditions return, mist it for
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possible any work from the midlands, north wales into central and southern and eastern scotland. that could cause some issues for the commute tomorrow morning, if you are travelling to work or school on food, it's another chilly start tomorrow but if anything, a sunnier and warmer day and the sunshine and warmth continuing for many of you into saturday as well. see you soon!
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hello, good morning. this is bbc news at nine with annita mcveigh. the headlines: david cameron has revealed he was so worried about scotland voting to break away from the uk he asked for help from the queen. borisjohnson is warned to come up with fresh brexit proposals by the end of the month, or the finnish prime minister says it will be "over". lawyers forformer prime minister sirjohn major will challenge borisjohnson's decision to suspend parliament on the third and final day of the historic hearing at the supreme court. canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, says he "deeply regrets" wearing skin darkening make—up at a school gala almost two decades ago. new research suggests robberies are increasing at a faster rate in england and wales than in any other major developed country. and john humphrys has presented his final edition of radio 4's today programme after 32 years on the show — we'll be playing you his final words.
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time now for the morning briefing, where we bring you up to speed on the stories people are watching, reading and sharing. let's start with one of our top stories today — and also the most read on the bbc news website. the canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, is facing accusations of racism, after a photo emerged of him at a fancy dress party in 2001. the picture shows him dressed up at an arabian nights—themed event. mr trudeau has apologised. well, the story is getting lots of reaction on social media — justin trudeau's name is trending in the uk as well as worldwide, where they've been more than 200,000 tweets. the picture was published by time magazine, and their tweet, which you can see now has over 6,000 retweets and close to 10,000 likes. meanwhile, cbc's power & politics programme
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quoted jagmeet singh, the leader of canada's new democratic party, who called the picture "troubling" and "insulting". well, the host of cbc's power and politics program, vassy kapelos, told bbc world that the image is particularly embarrassing for mr trudeau because he has made progressive policies a signature issue. i can't describe for you exactly how big of a moment this is in this campaign. it had been a quiet campaign until now. his party is neck and neck with the opposition, and this potentially could really, really change things for him. so a lot of people are going to be hurt, offended, surprised, outraged. what is the political damage, do you think? the political damage is a little bit more than that, only of course on the face of it it's a completely offensive and awful thing to have done. however, this prime minister, this leader of the party has, as prime minister, talked to so much about diversity, and really modelled himself, and i'm sure you've really seen it on the international stage, as the embodiment
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of canadian values. and as the anti—racist person, anti—racist candidate, he's criticised opposition so much in the first week of this campaign for keeping candidates that had social media pasts that exposed either racist or homophobic views — in fact he said that the leader of the opposition should not forgive them, that those candidate should be booted. so now that the tables are turned on him, it's the hypocrisy really of those comments that is going to be so politically damaging for him. another of the most read stories on our website is the news that from today, the fast food chain burger king will no longer be giving away plastic toys with its children's meals. the move was spurred on by a petition from two primary school girls — sisters ella and caitlin mcewan — which called on companies to stop giving away the toys because of the environmental impact. alasdair murdoch, the chief executive of burger king in the uk, has been speaking to ben thompson on bbc breakfast. ben started by asking him, why it took two children,
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aged just 9 and 7, to spur the company into action. i think what that might have done, and we spoke to them last night, they certainly hurried us up and we re they certainly hurried us up and were quite catalytic, but we have been moving towards a sustainable strategy for about 18 months, but it is very 30 say they hurried us up along that process. it isjust a tip of the iceberg, as we know, and i touched on it and introduction. so many visits to your restaurants and those of your rivals involve single pot use —— single—use plastics, straws, cutlery, that kind of thing. how do you get rid of that? absolutely, it is one part of it. we have many other strands to our strategy about trying to remove packaging, particularly packaging from our suppliers that come into thirds. caps, lids. straws, as you say? we took 30,000 tonnes of plastic out of her straws last year. i think what we are doing, it is taking action today, not committing
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to something in five years' time. this is a piece on the journey. but we are doing something and we are doing something now, but we are not sitting here pretending that we are smug or we have done a greatjob and it is all finished. there is a lot of work to do and this is just a pa rt of work to do and this is just a part of it. broadcasterjohn humphrys has presented his final edition of the bbc radio 4's today programme. his departure brings to a close his 32 years on the flagship show, during which time he built a reputation as a tenacious interrogator of politicians. the bbc‘s director general, lord hall, said that while a lot has changed since the two started working at the brand new television centre many years ago, a lot has also stayed the same. finding the ways in which we can engage people through interviews, through ourjournalism, engage people through interviews, through our journalism, in engage people through interviews, through ourjournalism, in the stories that matter, is the common thread that has run straight through both of our careers. i think now... lam both of our careers. i think now... i am optimistic, i think there are more ways in which we can engage
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people with the debates that matter, the stories that matter, than when you and i wear in the television ce ntre you and i wear in the television centre many, many centuries ago.|j just want to say a big thank you to you on behalf of all of us, the people who have loved working with you, the people who have put up with you, the people who have put up with you at times too, a very big thank you, andi you at times too, a very big thank you, and i also want to say, all the things you reading the paper, you are also someone things you reading the paper, you are also someone who handles interviews with people who have been through traumas or disasters or have something they want to get off their chest but they don't know how to do it, with amazing sensitivity. i don't know if that was back to aberfan and, being the first person... is it? i suppose they all play a part in the way you behave, but anyway that is very kind of you. thank you very much. and john humphrys gave his closing remarks at the end of today's programme — in which he thanked his employer, the bbc, his fellow presenters and colleagues, and all those who he's interviewed over the years. but he saved his final thanks
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for all his listeners. far more important than anything else, my thanks to you, to the vast numbers who have written over the years, sometimes to give me a pat on the back and often to give me a kick up the back and often to give me a kick up the backside to get it wrong or for being out of touch. you are always right. well, nearly always. i am amazed at the loyalty you have shown this programme. you really are the backbone of our country. you ca re the backbone of our country. you care about our democracy. i know that from all of your letters and e—mails. it's an old—fashioned thing to say, i suppose, but i really do feel that i have got to know you over the decades, and you are decent people. i'm more proud than i can say that you have put up with me for so say that you have put up with me for so long. thank you. all of you. and ido so long. thank you. all of you. and i do hope you keep listening. today matters for tomorrow. and if that's
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a rather corny way to end my years on the programme, well, so be it. and there's been plenty of reaction tojohn humphrys‘ departure on social media — his name is trending on twitter in the uk as well as worldwide. fellow bbc broadcaster, john simpson, said he's sad to see his good friend leave — he added, that "for all those people who are so sure he's pro or anti brexit, or labour or conservative, i promise that i've known him well for 42 years and have absolutely no idea. i suspect he's agin all sides." and this one thanking him for
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enhancing the political debate. these are the top stories you have been watching. this one, david cameron saying the queen raised an eyebrow in him asking her on the scottish independence question. this one, still duping customers, the market authority told booking.com to make its practices in the way it displays rooms clearer. the site says it is working hard to implement those recommendations. let's go down to the most watched. number one, and you can see straightaway at the beginning of this video, this huge explosion with a tank flying into the airata explosion with a tank flying into the air at a turkish chemical factory in istanbul. this tank shuts off like a rocket, you can see, and then plunges quickly back down to then plunges quickly back down to the ground. there were some injuries and some people were affected by breathing in fumes, but thankfully no fatalities at that incident.
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number two is a film about what it is like to live in indonesia when periodically each year fires are set in forests deliberately, but this creates an enormous haze which spreads over vast areas and can have a really long term implications for people's health. we willjust show you another clip, number five people's health. we willjust show you another clip, numberfive in people's health. we willjust show you another clip, number five in the most watched at the moment. we have put together some pictures on this for you to show it full frame, another of their most watched stories today. it shows a human chain rescuing stranded dolphins in st petersburg in florida. the team of 14 volunteers... let's get those pictures up for you. i hope they are coming. there you can see them, the tea m coming. there you can see them, the team splashed the water in front of them to encourage the dolphins, two mothers and their calves, who have become stranded in a busy city centre canal, and they encourage them to move back out toward tampa
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bay. the volunteers thought they had become afraid of the bridge over that canal and it was stopping them from moving but within about 45 minutes or so they got them heading out in the right direction and back into tampa bay. so i rather wonderful story there, and that is it for today's morning briefing. sport now, and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here'sjohn.
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yes, manchester city successfully navigating to shakhtar donetsk. memories of the defeat at norwich faded. city have still to win the champions league yet some believe them to be europe's best. this time, ilkay gundogan made sure. it meant they could spend the rest of the match waiting for the kind of opportunity gabrielle chases got here. three goes, three points. totte n ha m here. three goes, three points. tottenham also headed east on a feverish night in athens. last season's finalists started in slumber to be awoken by a whistle, penalty. 1—0, by harry kane. while he was out injured last season spurs had to turn to new heroes, men like lucas moura. they had smashed and grabbed but forgot to complete the getaway. olympiakos dominated for long periods and with quality moments, this cool lighting the fire beneath a cauldron. not long into the second half tottenham got burned. jan vertonghen's trip, and a great penalty. the champions place
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level. despite it all, spurs might have won it. dele alli might have passed it. like the evening, that opening was a chance missed. yes, his expression says it all. that is their disappointment featuring on their disappointment featuring on the back pages of most of this morning's newspapers. this is the headline in the mirror, greeky blinder. and this line in the daily telegraph, harry's payne, still frustrated at that pass dele alli did not make to in that match. and this one. but the talk of the night was at the parc des princes where an understrength paris st germain beat real madrid 3—0 and to showjust how far the 30 time champions have fallen, real madrid did not register a single shot on target all night. a great score—mac there. this time tomorrow —— great goal there. this time tomorrow we will be
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getting very excited about the rugby world cup, japan play in russia in the opener. england start their tournament on sunday, playing, in the north of japan, tournament on sunday, playing, in the north ofjapan, against greeky blinder in sapporo. eddiejones names his side for that opener tomorrow. preparations have been far from idealfor wales, as we know. their coach sent home for an alleged betting breach. they play georgia on monday. the forward coach says the controversy has made the players more determined now to lift the trophy. they want to take a lot more responsibility, they have an input into training a little more than they would have in the past, and, you know, on the back of that, because of that onus that they feel —— ownership that they feel, the intensity in the training was the best it has ever been. what a performance it was from europe last weekend as the won back the solheim
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cup from the united states in dramatic circumstances. captain katrina matthew instrumental in that, sealed by that brilliant pot from suzann pettersen to claim it. katrina joins us now. have you got over that high? it was dramatic, clenching with the last putt of that match? yes, unbelievable. ithinki am not over it yet, still on a bit ofa high, am not over it yet, still on a bit of a high, taking am not over it yet, still on a bit ofa high, taking it in these am not over it yet, still on a bit of a high, taking it in these last few days, but an amazing finish. and to win on home soil as well, some 90,000 fans there to watch. some impressive numbers as far as the crowds were concerned. impressive numbers as far as the crowds were concernedlj impressive numbers as far as the crowds were concerned. i have never seen crowds were concerned. i have never seen crowds like it at a women's golf event. for myself, to be captaining golf event. for myself, to be ca ptaining scotland was unbelievable. as a european you don't often get the chance to be the captain of your own country, so the scenes on the green on the sunday when suzann put in that plot, will
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never forget. fight night and as a norwegian veteran, she hadn't played a lot of golf coming into that tournament —— and is a norwegian vetera n. tournament —— and is a norwegian veteran. was it a fairly easy decision? it was. i played with her six weeks earlier in a team event and just from what i saw at that i knew she was going to be ready, she was playing well, looking fit and strong, so, yeah, knew she would be ready. i kind of stuck my neck out and chose her but she proved it was and chose her but she proved it was a good choice in the end. white night proved to be so, didn't it? some criticism over the pace of some of the round. we saw some sex around at times. i know conditions didn't help that but -- we saw some six hour rounds at times. what do you make of it? do you think there needs to be more enforcement with time penalties, which we know are in place to speed up the game a little, but seemingly are not being enforced? i would say it is a problem in all golf, men's and
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women's. i would say the only solution is for the referees to start enforcing it more. if they start enforcing it more. if they start giving one, two shot penalties, the players will start speeding up. but seemingly they are not doing that at the moment? element there may be a little generous in their timing at times. if they get a little stricter in that, you know, it won't take many. two or three penalties, and people start speeding up pretty quickly. the big question. how do you build from here? the same is asked after that big victory in 2011. obviously a big moment for women's golf. how do you do that? a huge moment for the let and hopefully they can really build on that, get more tournaments next year. i think they need to ride the momentum of this win and get some new sponsors, some events, and give the ladies a chance to showcase their skills. like migrate to obviously at the trophy with us today in the studio. amazing to get your hands on it —— with us today in the studio. amazing to get your hands on it -- and it is obviously great to have the trophy in the studio with us today. would
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you take on the role of captain again and try to get a hold of it?|j am enjoying this one but maybe a couple of months down the line, if they asked, i would certainly consider it, i would say.|j they asked, i would certainly consider it, iwould say. i suppose after the emotions, having played it out, it must be a big draw for you, to go through it all again? element i don't think you could top winning in scotland on home soil but it certainly would be a chance to go to the us and try to retain it.|j certainly would be a chance to go to the us and try to retain it. i know a lot of the team would love you back. catriona, many thanks for that. congratulations on that brilliant win in the solheim cup. that is just about it from us. plenty more to come on the bbc news channel throughout the day. annita. studio: john, thank you very much. the latest figures for people with learning disabilities and autism who are in assessment and treatment units in england have just been released, and show that 2,255 people were in hospital as inpatients at the end of august. the government said in 2015 it was committed to reducing inpatient numbers in england by at least 35% by march of this year.
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they've since extended the deadline to 2020 after failing to reach that target. kari gerstheimer, director of information and advice for mencap, the uk charity for people with a learning disability, is here. thank you very much for coming along. i have literally been scanning these figures. you had only a few more minutes to look through them, kari, but take us through what you see is the main figures, made headlines, from this report? sure. what i think is really important is to understand these figures in context. so the government themselves have recognised that assessment and treatment units are not suitable settings for people with a learning disability and or autism and behaviour that challenges. people are being held in inappropriate settings, they are being subjected to over medication, seclusion and really inhumane treatment. many of the families that
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we speak to refer to the treatment that their loved ones are receiving in these units as torture. in that context, we of course do welcome the reduction in numbers of people being held in the units, but those stats have just taken us back tojune figures. in actualfact, by now, even at the very lower end of the government target, they should have been —— there should have been 437 less people in these units, and at the higher end 800 less people. in actualfact, the higher end 800 less people. in actual fact, the the higher end 800 less people. in actualfact, the government the higher end 800 less people. in actual fact, the government have missed that target substantially. each of those numbers is a human being, a human being that is suffering. of course it is good the numbers have gone down a bit, but you are saying not nearly enough and not fast enough? element that's exactly right. and, remember, more
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than -- that's exactly right. more than -- that's exactly right. more than 200 children are being held in these units. that was my next question. drawing attention to the fa ct question. drawing attention to the fact children are being held in these units as well. the issue of both children and older people in these units and the use of restraint has been a topic we have covered a number of times. are there any figures on the use of restraint in what you have seen so far?|j figures on the use of restraint in what you have seen so far? i haven't seen what you have seen so far? i haven't seen statistics this month but i can tell you that injune it was the highest ever recorded figures for restraint and restrictive practices in these units. people are being unlawfully restrained. we hear stories about people being fed through hatches, being held in isolation for months and months. just go back a step, if you would, for reviewers, kari, and tell us by people with autism, learning disabilities, why they are in the sorts of units in the first place? —— for our viewers. why are they not any more appropriate setting? social
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ca re any more appropriate setting? social care in our country has been underfunded for so long that community services have crumbled. and as a result people are not receiving the support that they need in the community, and what we see is that because people are not receiving the right support their behaviour can escalate. and eventually people are being sectioned and placed in these units, often hundreds of miles away from home, where there is limited visiting times and families are far away. so there is not enough oversight of what is happening in these units. the figuresjust out say that out of the 145 in patients who were discharged or transferred from hospital in august, 69%, 100 of those people, were discharged back into the community, which obviously is the idealfrom into the community, which obviously is the ideal from your perspective, if they can be back in the community. but what more do you want
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the government to do? it has reset the government to do? it has reset the target, as mentioned in the introduction, but are you optimistic, do you feel that the government is working with you on this? we are anxious about the plans. the government is due to issue plans in the autumn. what we really wa nt issue plans in the autumn. what we really want to see is a meaningful plan of how local support is going to be implemented and arranged. there is a real lack of suitable placements, a lack of a properly trained workforce, and what we would like to see is cross ministerial responsibility and accountability for really making a difference on these issues. so you are hearing the right words, but you want to see the action to back those words up? element and we want to see a meaningful plan. we also want real engagement with families. families are engagement with families. families a re close engagement with families. families are close and closest to what is happening —— are close and closest to what is happening -- yes, and we want to see
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a meaningful plan. and they understand with great depth the complexities of the issues and the right buttons to press. kari, thank you very much for coming along to speak to us. kari gerstheimerfrom mencap. the rnli performs thousands of rescues around britain's coasts every year. men were the victims of the majority of coastal deaths each year. lucie fisher finds out why going to the beach often leads to people taking more risks. this man had been caught out with strong currents near hale. this is just one of thousands of rescues performed by the rnli around our coasts this year. what happened? my son and a friend of his went in over here but they got ripped straight out across the bay well i was a bit worried so i swam out after them.
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they are back in now? —— so i was a bit worried. like many rescues involve families and children but there is one group most at risk by far. particularly young and middle—aged men. far. particularly young and middle-aged men. i think a lot of the time it is because they think their ability is better than it is full stop they will say, no, i'm a good swimmer, i will swim where i want, i'm a good swimmer in the pool want, i'm a good swimmer in the pool, and they don't actually know how the sea is, such a raw and natural environment. do you get a lot of people who don't listen to you? element in general you get a lot of people who don't listen to. psychologist dr isabel richter has studied how people behave near the sea studied how people behave near the sea and she said there is reasons why people live differently. looking at tourist versus home behaviour, it
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shows people on holiday have more risk taking behaviour than at home. you think, it is my holiday, i deserve to have been waiting for this the whole year and now i want to go out and enjoy myself. and as the latest statistics from the maritime and coastguard agency shall, the consequences of making the wrong call on risk or ignoring safety advice can be fatal. 28 people died this year around the south—west coast. more than double the number last year. why has it happened? is at a statistical fluke. perhapsjust so happened? is at a statistical fluke. perhaps just so many people are utilising the coastlines around cornwall and the fact that people are doing the things they may not otherwise do —— is it a statistical flu ke ? we otherwise do —— is it a statistical fluke? we discovered some of the swimming fatalities we have had have beena swimming fatalities we have had have been a nonlife guarded beaches. while we were filming a jet ski were sent to look for a man who had been reported in the waterjust around the headland, often not a life guarded beach. tragically in that
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case a body was picked up by the lifeboat. a sobering reminder of the dangers of the sea. if you think something is wrong, for someone else or yourself, don't wait until you confirm that. ring 999 and ask for the coastguard. and you can see more on this story in inside out: south west, available now on the bbc iplayer. now it's time for a look at the weather with simon. hello, annita. sunshine and some changes to come on sunday. but look at the scene in derbyshire this morning. lovely blue skies. high pressure in charge of the weather at the moment and that will stick around. just gradually moving east over the next few days. for the moment keeping these weather fronts at bay. a bit of cloud at the moment in north west england. still some clout across eastern and southern scotland. some breaks developing to give sunny spells. plenty of
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sunshine for northern ireland and through this afternoon england and wales. a bit of cloud building this afternoon. maximum temperature is getting to about 17—22d. through tonight, there is the chance of some mist and fog developing again. it could be a little more extensive than last night, especially for northern ireland through southern scotland, northern and eastern parts of england. but elsewhere, clear skies and temperatures down to around 7—11d. first thing tomorrow it might feel a little chilly, and of course there may be that mist and fog around but it will tend to lift and clear away and for most of us again during friday, lots more sunshine to come. setting on a sunny day for scotland than today. a bit of cloud building across parts of east anglia and the midlands. temperatures on the rise, 19—21d, but with the air modifying and getting warmer, the scottish mountains would see maybe 24 celsius in the north—east of scotland. into the weekend, a south easterly wind is going to develop and bring in
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much warmer conditions during saturday. lots of sunshine again during saturday and just a few show is coming into the south—west late in the day. maximum temperatures on saturday, may not be getting up into the 20s for most of us —— getting up into the 20, for most of us, and the mid 20s in the south—east. goodbye.
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hello, it's thursday, it's ten o'clock, i'm victoria derbyshire... good morning. how much is the queen being dragged into politics? david cameron has revealed for the first time that he sought her majesty's help to keep the uk together during the scottish referendum campaign in 2014. i remember conversations i had with my private secretary and he had with the queen 's private secretary and i had with the queen private secretary, not asking for anything that would be any way on proper —— improper or unconstitutional, just a raising of the eyebrow, even, you know, a quarter of an inch, we thought, would make a difference. the family of owen carey — the 18 year old who died after eating buttermilk in a byron burger restaurant while

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