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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 20, 2019 6:00am-8:29am BST

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as an officer. getting to see the queen. ‘we|g to ride gain good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today: thomas cook's future in the balance — 22,000 jobs and millions of holidaymakers face uncertainty — as the travel firm scrambles for emergency funding. i'll be looking at how one of the world's biggest tour operators has come to this and what it means if you're booked on one of their holidays? the first of around five thousand climate change protests begin, as millions prepare to take part in climate change protests around the world. the rugby world cup starts this morning. hosts japan play russia. england meanwhile have named an attacking side for their opening match against tonga. captain 0wen farrell plays at centre
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with george ford at fly half. it isa it is a pretty chilly start to your friday. mist and fog around, too. but lots of sunshine to come. i will have the details on breakfast. it's friday the 20th of september. our top story: the future of thomas cook is hanging in the balance this morning, as it scrambles to raise £200 million pounds to secure an emergency rescue deal. britain's oldest package—holiday firm must secure the funds before a crucial meeting next friday. nina's here to explain what this could mean for its customers and staff. lots of people concerned about their jobs. and millions of holidays. it has been around since the 1840s. hundreds of high street branches. may, they revealed £1.5 billion of
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losses over the past six months and warned that they were tough times ahead. lots of debt. they blamed lots of reasons. one of them brexit uncertainty. people making fewer bookings. also the heatwave meant we we re bookings. also the heatwave meant we were spending less on holidays and also be competition from online holiday companies. at the end of august, there was a rescue deal on the table, £900 million of investment from banks and a chinese investor but we were hearing reports over the last 2a hours that they have now said they want to make sure there is another 200 million of backup to get you over the winter hump when there are fewer bookings. we are not going to provide that. you need to get it from elsewhere. time is of the essence. next friday, investors will meet to discuss whether to lay out that initial 900 million and it could be added topic for the company. the holidaymakers who have booked or abroad now, if they are protected, which most of them are, because most of thomas
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cook holidays a package deal, they will be returned home because —— and if the company collapses, you will get a free refund or a replacement holiday. we will be talking about this later with simon calder as well stop the european commission presidentjean—claude juncker has said it's still possible that a new brexit deal could be reached by the end of next month. his comments come ahead of a meeting between the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, and the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels today. let's speak now to our political correspondent, jonathan blake, who is in westminster. jonathan, do we know if any progress has been made? i think so. that is how downing street are looking at things. progress is being made, says the prime minister, though he didn't wa nt to prime minister, though he didn't want to exaggerate that. that comes afterjean—claude juncker has said
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want to exaggerate that. that comes afterjean—claudejuncker has said a deal could be done by the end of 0ctober deal could be done by the end of october and on that key sticking point of the backstop which is the pa rt point of the backstop which is the part of the withdrawal agreement which is designed to prevent a hardboard on the border with ireland ina hardboard on the border with ireland in a trade deal cannot be done in the future, he said in an interview with sky news he has no emotional attachment to the backstop and its objectives could be met, all of them, then there is no need for it. there might not be a shift in the overall position of the eu but there is certainly a shift in tone and language and as you say, something ofa language and as you say, something of a nuanced shift in terms of how the two sides are engaging. there will be a meeting later and the conditions, it seems, is therefore stop the willingness on both sides, it seems, is there, to move towards some kind of a deal. the reality check being grown in from the irish deputy prime minister this morning, saying the two sides are still far apart for. there is a big gap between them and the uk still needs
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to provide credible postals in terms of how it intends to replace the backstop in any brexit deal which he said simply haven't been received yet. we will talk more later, thank you. millions of people around the world are expected to take part in what could be the largest ever climate change protest today. more than 5,000 demonstrations are planned in more than 150 countries. those involved are calling for governments to take more urgent action to halt global warming. the girl who sparked today's action. greater to invoke sparked it after fighting in freedom. greater to invoke sparked it after fighting infreedom. —— greater to invoke sparked it after fighting in freedom. —— sweden. — young people fearful for their future. ms thunberg sailed to new york for today's demonstration. adults, inspired by their children, will take to the streets as well, hoping it will be the biggest worldwide climate protest yet, designed to influence world leaders meeting in new york on monday. the demonstrators may be disappointed. the former uk government chief
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scientist says the effects of climate heating are being witnessed much earlier than he had expected. we are seeing extreme weather events just rolling out, year after year, with massive loss of life — rising sea levels, rising temperatures, changes in weather patterns, impacting on farmers and everybody. is this a scary scenario? of course it is. and how should we react as human beings to this scenario? we have to all pull together and understand the challenges, and act to stop it. and the economic damage will be worse than forecast, as well, according to a group of economists. meanwhile, president trump has ordered officials to scrap rules and china is ordering new coal—fired power stations. it won't be the last day of protest.
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let's speak to our correspondent phil mercer who's in sydney, where people are being encouraged to walk out of school and work. already starting around the world and people being encouraged to walk out of the workplace and out of schools. what is happening? here in syd ney schools. what is happening? here in sydney they came in their sales are —— thousands near the new south wales parliament, right in the heart of australia's biggest city. they have been more than 100 events, from darwin in the north, melbourne in the south, perth on the west and chris been in the east. thousands of people voicing their concerns. —— brisbane. i spoke to an 18—year—old high school student here in sydney and she said she doubted she would ever have children. her view was that it would be to crawl to bring children in to a world that was dying. 0ther protesters say they are angry, scared and they have rallied for what they are calling climate
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justice. they want the australian government not to embark on any more coal, oil or gas projects and also for the country to move to 100% renewable energy. will the australian government be swayed i all of this? it is unlikely. the prime minister scott morrison said that there was too much activism in the classroom. australia is heavily reliant on coal for the lion's share of their electricity. and we heard in the last few moments from australia's education minister, a man called dan tehan, and he said politics should be kept out of the classroom. but today, thousands of children have abandoned to their studies to voice their concerns about climate change and they're very real concerns the future. interesting. interesting talking about activism or politicise them in the classroom. and we'll be speaking to the energy secretary, kwasi kwarteng, about the government's climate change
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strategy just after 8am. we will get his views on what he thinks about children walking out of the classroom in protest. canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, has faced the cameras for a second time to address further accusations of racism. it comes after more images emerged of him wearing racially offensive fancy dress. in a fresh statement to reporters, he said he "deeply, deeply" regretted his behaviour. the revelations come amid campaigning for an election at the end of october, when mr trudeau hopes to win a second term. 0ur north america correspondent david willis reports. working the crowd just a week into his run for re—election, justin trudeau's campaign is reeling from a scandal that may yet engulf it. 0ther blackface photos have emerged along with this video from the early 90s, showing a young justin trudeau sticking his face out ad tongue out and pulling faces. and the candidate admits they could be more to come.
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—— sticking his tongue out. admits they could be more to come. —— sticking his tongue outlj admits they could be more to come. -- sticking his tongue out. i am wa ry -- sticking his tongue out. i am wary of being definitive because the recent pictures i —— that came out i had not remembered and the question is, how can you not remember that? the fact is, i... i didn't understand how hurtful this is to people who live with discrimination everything all day. i have always acknowledged that i come from a place of privilege but i now need to acknowledge that that comes with a massive blindspot. seen here welcoming syrian refugees into canada, justin trudeau had cultivated the image of a champion of diversity. but the blackface row with its racist overtones has energised his opponents who are now calling into question his fitness to govern. canada goes to the polls in just over four weeks' time.
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the current system for fining people in england who wrongly claim free prescriptions is ‘not fit for purpose', according to a group of mps. in a scathing report, the commons public accounts committee says 1.7 million penalty charge notices have been issued incorrectly to patients — about a third of all fines imposed. the department of health has promised to introduce extra checks. heavy rainfall from tropical storm imelda has flooded parts of louisiana and texas, leaving at least two people dead. in the city of houston, thunderstorms have damaged power lines, flooded streets, and forced roads and schools to close. governor greg abbott issued a state of disaster for 13 texan counties, and deployed emergency responders to affected areas. sir paul mccartney says the brexit referendum was "probably a mistake" and he'll "be glad when it's over". speaking to newsnight, sir paul also said he hadn't voted in the referendum because he "didn't see anybody saying anything sensible enough".
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i don't think anyone quite knows what to do with it. you have this crazy thing. i think we will come through it. i think we always do. i mean, iam through it. i think we always do. i mean, i am old enough to remember garbage in the streets and people not being able to get buried because the gravediggers were on strike. that was a pretty rough time. we came through it. i don't know, i think we will come through it. i think we will come through it. i think it is a mess and i will be glad when it is over. here's a story to get your teeth into this morning, take a look at this. this is the moment an australian tourist‘s vehicle became surrounded by a group of crocodiles. yesterday we were talking about dolphins and i was concerned about being scared of dolphins. would you being scared of dolphins. would you be allowed to be concerned at this moment in time, charlie, on the fearometre? what do you say don't
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mark —— what do you mean concerned? more than 30 of them emerged from the murky waters of a river close to kakadu national park. the car managed to pass through without a hitch, saving any crocodile tears for the driver. the rulebook in that situation is don't get out of the car. unless you don't get out of the car. unless you do that great scene, i can't remember the james bond seen. do that great scene, i can't remember the james bond seenm do that great scene, i can't remember the james bond seen. it is sean connery, isn't it? so you are not scared of the dolphins that you are allowed to be scared of the crocodiles. are we scared about the rugby? there will be some pig tackles and crunches. this is one of the adverts. they are not the mascots but they are giving a sense of flavour. it is a bit of artwork.
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japan is embracing the tournament. 15,000 people turned up to see wales training. the rugby world cup kicks off in japan later this morning. the hosts play russia in tokyo, kick off is at 11:45 uk time. it's the first time the tournament's been held in asia. new zealand are going for their third straight title, but it's being described as the most open world cup in years. all the home nations are in action in the first few days, and england have named a strong side for their opener against tonga on sunday. captain 0wen farrell will play at centre alongside manu tuilagi, with geroge ford at fly half. 18—year—old bukayo sa ka was the star for arsenal as they beat eintract frankfurt 3—0 in the europa league. manchester united and rangers also won, while celtic drew and wolves lost. and rory mcilroy had
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a shocker on the first day of the pga championship at wentworth. he shot a four over par to finish 11 shots behind leader matt wallace. he'll now have to up his game if he's to make the cut. we will be live injapan and speaking to a number of current and former players to give their take on the chances. everybody from the home nations talking. it could get heated! here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. having look at this skyline over central london, some of the images we've seen over the past few days, early morning have been stunning. good morning. they certainly have. we've been treated well and truly by these sunrises and sunsets this week. more of that to come over the next couple of days but a beautiful start here in central london. a
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little bit chilly in one or two spots, temperatures this time in eastern scotland seeing the lowest values, one, two degrees. if we take a look at the forecast, we just have some widespread around other parts of central and southern scotland, northern england especially, causing morning rush—hour issues but other than that, lots of sunshine developing today. it will start to feel that it warmer. that will gradually clear ways normals. blue skies right the way through today. temperatures will lift accordingly. temperatures will lift accordingly. temperatures a bit more widely into the 20s. this is where the air
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rises, drops down, warms things up, 23 or 2a celsius. we will see the wind pick up. what that would do, it will keep the mist and fog at bay. not as much around. one of two spots into single figures. it's because high—pressure is with us. we start to bring in more of a southerly wind. a bit more warmth from parts of france. a bit more cloud into south—west england and wales and northern ireland. the chance wanted to showers but for most on saturday, another blue sky day. we could see them reach 25 or 26 in the south—east corner. still into the 20s, a muggy night into saturday and sunday but thundery showers will
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develop a bit more widely across southern and western areas. working northwards into sunday itself. heavy bursts of rain into northern ireland and wales. particularly across northern and eastern parts of scotland. staying dry and warm as well, even with the breeze, highs of around 23 celsius. that will set the scene into next week when we see more on the way of wet and windy weather but certainly, for the next few days, more glorious autumn weather to come. back to you both. you are looking fantastic with that skyline behind you. let's take a look at today's papers. the times' front page says david cameron received "an unprecedented rebuke" from the queen, for revealing that he asked her to intervene in the scottish referendum. the guardian says thousands of reports of alleged rape have been inaccurately recorded by the police over
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the last three years. the paper reviewed audits of 3a police forces. the photo there is of canadian presidentjustin trudeau, who is facing further pressure after more images emerged of him in racially offensive fancy dress. "it was never you", is the headline in the sun, which says a builder allegedly conned the national lottery out of £2.5 million with a fake ticket. edward putman who is on trial for the alleged offence denies committing fraud. and finally, "queen's fury at cameron" is the headline for the i, which says a royal official has suggested the former pm has damaged future relations between the palace and no 10. all of that is quite timely considering brexit. in the business section, we've been talking about it a lot. thanks below thomas cook
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rescue of a lot. thanks below thomas cook rescue of course. a lot. thanks below thomas cook rescue of course. they've been trying to avert collapse with this £9 billion investment but investments are saying another £200 million is needed. we look at implications for employees and holidaymakers and in the daily mail, do you rememberwhen holidaymakers and in the daily mail, do you remember when the sugar tax was introduced? apparently it has because people who make drink have reduced the amount of sugar in the drinks by nearly 29% to try and escape. i wonder how many people have noticed. dentists will be devastated. they will be furious. we're talking rugby world cup. who is your money on? england looks like a really good chance but i didn't realise ireland is number one. top ranking. seven or eight teams could
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potentially wind. new zealand are favourites, south africa second stop how many are in it? good question. 12 teams? of course, the new zealand south africa thing is that they play in the first weekend, the way the pools of worked. bizarrely they play in one of the opening matches. this is the thing, people are saying potentially new zealand not being the best news there are match. it's all about peaking at the right time. was itjapan? it all about peaking at the right time. was it japan? it can vary. the interesting thing is, because of bad weather, some of the knockout matches will be rescheduled but if your group game matches will be rescheduled but if yourgroup game is matches will be rescheduled but if your group game is affected by the weather, it won't be. one minute it's very warm, it's very wet. some
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of them in the dry conditions, you get a downfall. i think the scottish team have in applying shampoo to their balls. i didn't go there. anything else? have you ever shared a log—in for netflix or any other streaming provider? you are allowed to have to log—ins in a family. 5% of netflix log—ins have been shared with exes which could be highly awkward if you get kicked off at the same time. get in touch with your ex and say, get off the net licks. it depends how many entries you are allowed. if my husband is on it, i can't go on it. i want the dog, i
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wa nt can't go on it. i want the dog, i want the pillows, and i want my net licks password. i've got mine, you got another account. but you can't watch them simultaneously pay the extra. you learn something new every day. that is what we are here for. during his four years in office, canada's prime minister has championed inclusivity and diversity — but the emergence of old images showing him in fancy dress has led to accusations of racism. justin trudeau has apologised for his past conduct — but admits he cannot remember how often it happened. joining us now from ottawa is political reporter, kristy kirkup. thank you very much forjoining us. how is this being received? it feels like all of this is part of an election campaign as well. it's all
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building, isn't it? we are only entering the second week of the election campaign here in canada and canadians are set to head to the polls at the end of october on the zist polls at the end of october on the 21st of october and this political controversy broke on wednesday evening when time magazine published a picture of the same prime minister, justin trudeau, who is seeking real action under the liberal party and this image of him dressed as aladdin with a painted face, neck, arms and hands really ignited a political firestorm face, neck, arms and hands really ignited a politicalfirestorm here. he was flying to destination on his election campaign, and spoke to reporters and then on thursday, there was a video that was published
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on line by canadian news outlet here. and subsequently the sitting prime minister had to go on to apologise to canadians for the second time in a 24—hour period. apologise to canadians for the second time in a 24-hour period. how well has bothered —— apology been received in terms of timing? he is known as someone received in terms of timing? he is known as someone who is largely respected and very straight talking, and has been advocating diversity issues. when he reacted so quickly, has that been seen as a positive at least? it really remains to be seen how the canadian public will respond to these two apologies. in his second apology, he admitted people would be hurt by this. he is getting
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a lot of lobe from the opposition parties in this election including the third—party, the new democrat party. going to create a lot of emotion. we don't know, because it's so early, whether or not canadians will be willing to forgive justin trudeau. he had a sweeping majority mandate but he was already engaged in a very close political fight with the opposition. wejust close political fight with the opposition. we just don't know what the impact will be.
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you learn something new every day. that is what we are here for. you're watching breakfast from bbc news. still to come this morning. we'll bring you the latest on the thomas cook rescue deal and how it could affect your holiday plans. that's after the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm victoria hollins. an inquest has ruled that failings by the national probation service probably contributed to the death of six—year—old alex malcolm. he was murdered three years ago by marvyn iheanacho, a violent offender who was in a relationship with alex's mother. she was not made aware of his history of offending by the probation services. in a statement, alex's mother, liliya said it had exposed "dreadful" and "horrible" failures. ambulance crews in the capital have been physically attacked at least once a day. so far this year around 346 attacks have been recorded by
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the london ambulance service. the metropolitan police have also seen around 5,600 assaults on officers. in response, a group of people created the "awesome movement" to show appreciation for the emergency services. today they're distributing ‘thank you' coffees and doughnuts to frontline workers. this sunday will see the largest ever car free day in the capital to enoucrage more people to cycle or walk. it's to highlight the dangers of air pollution and will see around 20 kilometres of roads closed in central london this year's mercury prize has been awarded to the rapper, dave for his debut album, psychodrama. the twenty—one year—old, who is from south london, beat acts including anna cal—vi and the 1975. the album reflects on his course of therapy for grief, depression and domestic abuse. let's take a look at the travel situation now. 0n the tube a signl failure at ealing common means that the district line is part suspended between turnham green and ealing broadway, and between ealing broadway
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and acton town and the piccadilly line is part suspended between acton town and uxbridge. 0n the roads, a4 piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. lewisham: a20 lee high road, westbound at the junction with belmont hill: one lane closed for gas works. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. 0therwise, hello, good morning. otherwise, we are playing autumn sunshine spot the difference yet again today. at a very similar to how it was yesterday. indeed the day before that. lots of blue sky and sunshine around. noticeable south—easterly wind, innovative cloud around at times perhaps. generally a milder start of the morning as well. temperatures in central london and doublethink is. there are a few missed patches to many, that early cloud. unbroken to many paces, top
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temperatures reaching below 20s. what went into the start of the day tomorrow. temperatures that milder hour will probably stick in double figures. lots of sunshine around. blue skies, the warmest of the week. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to naga and charlie. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning. we'll visit an experimental nursery in bristol that's replaced all of its toys with everyday objects like cardboard, telephones and magnets.
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the rugby world cup gets underway in japan later. just after eight thirty we'll be joined by players from england, ireland, scotland and wales. and after 9:00, we'll find out about the german ship that's going to lock itself in sea—ice for a year as part of the biggest arctic expedition of all time. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. millions of people around the world are expected to take part in what could be the largest ever climate change protest today. more than 5,000 demonstrations are planned in more than 150 countries. those involved are calling for governments to take more urgent action to halt global warming. 0ur correspondent roger harrabin has more. the girl who sparked today's action, greta thunberg, started a global crime climate youth movement after striking from school in sweden — young people fearful for their future. ms thunberg sailed to new york
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for today's demonstration. adults, inspired by their children, will take to the streets as well, hoping it will be the biggest worldwide climate protest yet, designed to influence world leaders meeting in new york on monday. the demonstrators may be disappointed. the former uk government chief scientist says the effects of climate heating are being witnessed much earlier than he had expected. we are seeing extreme weather events just rolling out, year after year, with massive loss of life — rising sea levels, rising temperatures, changes in weather patterns, impacting on farmers and everybody. is this a scary scenario? of course it is. and how should we react as human beings to this scenario? we have to all pull together and understand the challenges, and act to stop it. and the economic damage will be worse than forecast, as well, according to
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a group of economists. meanwhile, in the usa, president trump has just ordered california to scrap efficiency standards that actually reduce emissions from cars, and china's reported to be building still more coal—fired power stations. it won't be the last day of protest. roger harrabin, bbc news. the future of thomas cook is hanging in the balance this morning, as it scrambles to raise £200 million pounds to secure an emergency rescue deal. britain's oldest package—holiday firm must secure the funds before a crucial meeting next friday. bosses have blamed a series of events for its profit warnings, including political unrest in destinations like turkey, last summer's prolonged heatwave and customers delaying holidays due to brexit. the european commission president, jean—claude juncker, has said it's still possible that a new brexit deal could be reached by the end of next month. his comments come ahead of a meeting between the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, and the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels today. borisjohnson said he did not want to "exaggerate progress"
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but some was being made. there's a warning that thousands of teenagers in england are leaving education without the equivalent of five ‘good' gcses. the children's commissioner, anne longfield, says the problem has increased by 28 percent in the last four years — something she describes as "shameful". the government says maths and english gcse results have got better and it's working to improve standards. canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, has faced the cameras for a second time to address further accusations of racism. it comes after more images emerged of him wearing racially—offensive fancy dress. in a fresh statement to reporters, he said he cannot remember how often he wore the make—up as a younger man and that he "deeply, deeply" regretted his behaviour. the revelations come amid campaigning for an election at the end of october.
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heavy rainfall from tropical storm imelda has flooded parts of louisiana and texas, leaving at least two people dead. in the city of houston, thunderstorms have damaged power lines, flooded streets, and forced roads and schools to close. governor greg abbott issued a state of disaster for 13 texan counties, and deployed emergency responders to affected areas. the current system for fining people in england who wrongly claim free prescriptions is ‘not fit for purpose', according to a group of mps. in a scathing report, the commons public accounts committee says 1.7 million penalty charge notices have been issued incorrectly to patients — about a third of all fines imposed. the department of health has promised to introduce extra checks. who is going to win rugby world cup? it is so open this year. it is so open this who is going to win rugby world cup? it is so open this year. it is the first time it has been staged in asia. a great atmosphere. 15,000
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fa ns asia. a great atmosphere. 15,000 fans turned out to just to see wales training. it all kicks off in a few hours. in a country where rugby is by no means the main sport, but where the public have embraced the excitement. 0ur sports correspondent katie gornall‘s been in tokyo, where japan play russia later. tokyois tokyo is a sprawling, enchanting city. the traditional is alongside the contemporary. and this sport is hoping to make a good impression. excitement is building. 15,000 people turned up just to watch wales training in southern japan and the country's commissioner for sport believe this tournament could leave a lasting legacy. translation: this is the first time at the world cup is the first time at the world cup is coming to a company that has no tradition in rugby. for us injapan, we are tradition in rugby. for us injapan, we a re really tradition in rugby. for us injapan, we are really excited to have the tournament and so i hoping that by tournament and so i hoping that rugby becomes part of our culture.
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for that to happen, more children need to pick up a rugby ball. right now, these boys at a high school in tokyo a re now, these boys at a high school in tokyo are in the minority. they hope the world cup will change that. translation: at mac since we japanese don't know much about by, japanese don't know much about rugby, iam hoping japanese don't know much about rugby, i am hoping we get a better understanding. —— since we don't know. translation: all the best teams from around the world are coming to japan so around the world are coming to japan soi around the world are coming to japan so i will watch them play and try and learn something. four years ago, they taught south africa a lesson when they beat them in the opening game. it went down as the biggest upset and has raised expectations. here in downtown tokyo, you get the sense japan is embracing this world cup. there are posters and adverts for the big stars all around here. but of course what will really help ca ptu re but of course what will really help capture the public‘s expectation is excitement on the pitch and there are signs this could be the most open world cup yet. holders new zealand may be favourites but it is
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ireland who currently topped the world rankings. however, theirform has dipped this year. england, meanwhile, could be peaking atjust the right time. scotland fans will be craving consistency from the team that too often swings from the ridiculous to the sublime and grand slam winners wales are a big threat on the big stage. this is probably the tightest world cup we have been in. it is great. it is great for us to be watching, it is exciting and thatis to be watching, it is exciting and that is what builds excitement. to be watching, it is exciting and that is what builds excitementm is unfamiliar territory but in the neon glow of japan, is unfamiliar territory but in the neon glow ofjapan, rugby might have found a new home. let's go live to tokyo now and speak to our reporter mariko 0i. we saw some of the great pictures in katie's piece. it appears there is a real appetite in japan for this tournament. indeed. as you can see behind me, the opening game between japan and russia is still five hours
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away but can you see all the fans wearing the japanese rugbyjed —— jersey in red and white, walking in, preparing themselves for the opening game of the tournament? in a tournament where baseball and football are still a lot more popular, i think it is fair to say that the locals are still very much excited. i have noticed a lot of local tv channels are running special programmes about rugby rules, whether or not the viewers understood them is another matter, but nevertheless, people are definitely excited about being the first asian nation to be hosting this tournament and can i show you my favourite in the local newspaper? rather — make rubbery art, wishing them a new —— wishing them good luck. —— rugby art. them a new —— wishing them good luck. -- rugby art. we saw them produce one of the biggest —— upsets in tournament history when they beat south africa. if they can do something exciting, will we see a
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similar kind of reaction this time? i think that is definitely the hope. many experts that i have spoken to say that japan's team is currently at its best and they are hoping to survive the pool stage to make it to quarter—finals. if that happens, it will be the first time for the japanese team and as you said, it will probably bring up a lot of excitement. interesting, when i was talking to a rugby player earlier this morning, they said after the shock victory in 2015, the number of high school students playing rugby actually went down against all the excitement and hyper because mothers got to watch the games closely and thought it was too dangerous for their sons to be playing. but definitely, the organisers hope that if the home team does well and also
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many rugby fans excited to be watching those international teams playing in their home stadiums instead of on television, definitely, there are a lot of excitement that this would boost rugby's popularity even further. many thanks, mariko 0i. it will surely boost participation. england, scotland, ireland and wales are all in action over the next few days. england have named their team to play tonga on sunday. head coach eddiejones has named an attacking side, with captain 0wen farrell playing at centre alongside manu tuilagi. that means that george ford will play at fly half. bbc radio 5 live has exclusive radio coverage of the rugby world cup, and every game is live on bbc sounds and the bbc sport website. no fewer than five british sides in europa league action last night, and a couple of teenagers stole the headlines. 18—year—old bukayo sa ka score his first goal for arsenal and set up the other two as they beat eintract frankfurt 3—0 in germany.
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manchester united's mason greenwood is even younger. he's just 17, and got his first goal for the club as they beat the kazakh side astana 1—0 at old trafford. it was a disappointing night for wolves — back european action for the first time since the early 80's. they were beaten 1—0 at molyneux bu the portuguese side braga. rangers meanwhile were 1—0 winners over the dutch side feyenoord. this great strike from sheyi 0jo giving steven gerrard's side all three points. celtic had to come from behind against rennes. ryan christie levelling things from the spot after the french side had taken a first half lead with a penalty of their own. the countdown is on to the opener later and of course we will be speaking to a lot of players, getting their thoughts about who could win it, who could take the title. hard to see beyond new zealand, i think, title. hard to see beyond new zealand, ithink, even title. hard to see beyond new zealand, i think, even though people are saying they are not the team they were. if you ask any other teams, they say no matter what the world rankings are, new zealand at a world cup, they are the ones to
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beat. they know how to handle pressure. they had the choke attack but in those big pressure moments, they do deliver. we will be talking later about, you know, you mentioned japan's great win against south africa. there is the sense in rugby that the big guys always win. the minnows win sometimes. e.g., the tiny little islands, full of giant by tiny little islands, full of giant rugby players, sometimes those tiny islands win. —— fiji. rugby players, sometimes those tiny islands win. -- fiji. which is physically the smallest team? you mean in terms of stature? i guess you would think the japanese. i am not sure. those of the upsets you wa nt not sure. those of the upsets you want to see. size, of course, is not the only factor in the world we live in. there are amazing players in many of the world teams who defy. you know, speed. talking about nippy
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people. matt is out there. it is that time of year where the sun rises are really dramatic. it is setting us up for someone weather. “ some warm weather. setting us up for someone weather. -- some warm weather. this fine speu -- some warm weather. this fine spell of autumn weather is set to continue and it is getting warmer today and tomorrow. mark quite a chilly start, particularly across scott under northern england. dense fog patches. a day of widespread sunshine. it will slow your commute across scotland and northern england. a bit more cloud across the far north of scotland. the it's a
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blue sky day. 2a celsius. the winds genuinely ignite. more of a breeze today. that breeze will pick up a little bit further. some of the mist and fog at bay. temperatures to the start of saturday morning. not as low as it has been during the last few days. high pressure has been with us and nudges up in eastern and central parts of europe. we are on the western side of it. tucking into some warmth that has been building across france. saturday, blue skies for the vast majority. southwest wales, northern ireland through the day, a bit more cloud. the chance
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wa nted day, a bit more cloud. the chance wanted to heavy and thundery showers. the vast majority of estate dry and warm. 25 or 26 degrees. the breeze picks up further for all of us. breeze picks up further for all of us. it's going to be acquired a mild and muggy night, certainly compared with what we've had. as we going to sunday, randall started to develop a bit more widely, pushing its way north and east. some of the heaviest rain, a bit of uncertainty where those downpours will be. it could stay dry and temperatures here still into the 20s, around 22 or 23 celsius during the afternoon returning pressure for the west. as we going to next week, after the warmth of the next few days, it's going to feel much more autumnal. stronger winds and rain at times but many a gardener in the south will be
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looking forward to that stop certainly will be. climate change protests very much in the headlines. hundreds of thousands across the world but it will present employees and employers, schools with problems? what happens if you don't go to work? exactly. yes the organisers are calling today the "largest ever global climate strike". demonstrations are taking place around the world led by teenage activist greta thunberg in new york where a big climate summit is happening next week. the protests follow lots of walkouts by students but this time workers are also being asked tojoin in. here's some pictures from protests which happened overnight in sydney. people are being urged to down tools, leave their desks and go on strike — even for part of the day — to encourage the leaders at next week's summit to make
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some big decisions. andrew leng will be joining them — he is one of the bosses of an engineering consultancy firm and he is also allowing his workers to go on strike today. a very good morning to you. huge dishes and for a small business. why was it so important to you? it's personally important to me. i've been committed to reducing my climate impact over the past few yea rs climate impact over the past few years and i realise there is not a lot of point in doing that if i don't tell people why i'm doing it. as an opportunity for the business to get our message out to the people who i work with. it was a big decision to say that people could stop working. we've been careful not to call it a strike because we are not unionised. i'm supporting those
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who are striking. that is what we are doing. nonetheless, you must have made an estimate on what impact it will have? what do you think it will be on the business?” it will have? what do you think it will be on the business? i didn't make that assessment. my codirectors might have preferred it if i had. we area might have preferred it if i had. we are a service industry. we work flexibly doing, we work the hours that need to be worked and honestly, in terms of flexible working, i don't think you lose much by offering your staff lacks ability but in terms of today, the work that i need to do this week is done and will be done next week. what if your employees say, i'm not going to be there. will they get paid for today? they won't and all alive. we've agreed that the pay would otherwise have gone into their wages and my
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wages, we're to package up and spend on trying to reduce our climate footprint. it sounds like you have the padding and also your employers do. a lot of people cannot afford to lose a day ‘s pay. that's very true. i'm enormously privileged. by being a white man. i'm privileged by having a job i can lose some money from. i will use that privilege to reduce my climate impact. without make a difference? sceptics said so what. i think lots of people around the world striking has the chance to make a difference. the last time i
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went on a march was make poverty coming back history. it made a difference politically. does it feel as if there is increasing awareness among employments —— employees about the critical nature of this? not really. i talk about it in the business and a few people respond to that. most conversations with had this week was yesterday afternoon. it was something that people started talking about. people saying we've got to do better. as a race, we don't do very well at this. looking to the future. those conversations raising the profile. wide and you won't be the only fostering it.
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there are 200 companies across the uk taking part in the demonstrations. do check with your employer what the implications could be. the us and canada have lost birds, and on the island ofjava in indonesia, our science correspondent has been to java to find out more. sold in their thousands every day — injava, indonesia, the songbird trade is thriving. it is fuelled by a national passion for birdsong. singing competitions like this take place all over the country every weekend.
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but it is also driving an extinction crisis. dozens of species caught from the forests to supply the trade are disappearing from the wild, and scientists studying this say it has now reached a tipping point. java is an island about the size of england, and we estimate that there's around 75 million birds in captivity. that's probably more than there may be in the wild, which is a very serious issue for the island and its wild environment. this is one of two major studies published today that point to a global crash in bird populations. the other, a project carried out by scientists in the us and canada, examined 50 years of bird surveys in north america. it revealed that there are 3 billion fewer birds on the continent today than they were in 1970.
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habitat loss driven by human activity has been blamed, but the researchers are actually optimistic that their conclusions could be a wake—up call, triggering action to protect vital habitats and migration routes, and in indonesia, the widespread love of the birds could provide a catalyst for them to be protected in the wild. victoria gill, bbc news. take a look at this scene and we will explain why our cameras are there. this is norfolk, holkham beach. the king's troop royal horse they're the ones who fire royal salutes but having such an importantjob takes a lot of training. today the troop is practicing on holkham beach in norfolk
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and john maguire is there. a very lucky member is there, sent there for hisjob. i'm notjealous at all, john. not at all. i wouldn't blame you if you are. you're quite right, absolutely stunning this morning. holkham beach is very often used for movies and televisions and tv adverts. even more spectacular today. we're used seeing them at those role in state occasions. it will be used as a training day. why do you do it here? it's good for a couple of reasons. it's good for a couple of reasons. it's nice the horses have that chance. writing on sand on the beach is one of the hardest things. it's a
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real show of courage. multitalented if you like. they have to look fantastic. they also strong and need to pull the guns. the guns are pulled by six of these horses. they are multitalented, providing the queens lifeguard on holkham beach, it's not just queens lifeguard on holkham beach, it's notjust a one trick pony. very good. in the sand is good for them to exercise on. they can be susceptible to injuries. they like the sand. it's a real difference. they do a lot of roadwork to london. fantastic. it promises to be a spectacular morning. we'll bring you the pictures on breakfast later on after the news, travel, and weather where you are.
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good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. an inquest has ruled that failings by the national probation service probably contributed to the death of 6—year—old alex malcolm. he was murdered three years ago by marvyn iheanacho, a violent offender who was in a relationship with alex's mother. she was not made aware of his history of offending by the probation services. in a statement, alex's mother, liliya said it had exposed "dreadful" and "horrible" failures. ambulance crews in the capital have been physically attacked at least once a day. so far this year around 346 attacks have been recorded by the london ambulance service. the metropolitan police have also seen around 5,600 assaults on officers. in response, a group of people created the "awesome movement" to show appreciation for the emergency services. today they're distributing ‘thank you' coffees and doughnuts to frontline workers.
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this year's mercury prize has been awarded to the rapper, dave for his debut album, psychodrama. the 21—year—old, who is from south london, beat acts including anna calvi and the 1975. the album reflects on his course of therapy for grief, depression and domestic abuse. i know i tell this story all the time but i want to thank my brother christopher, that inspired this album. this is your story, your story to be told and even though you can't be here with us today, i know you are watching this programme and i'm so grateful. 0n guys, so much. a signl failure at ealing common means that the district line is part suspended between turnham green and ealing broadway, and between ealing broadway and acton town and the piccadilly line is part suspended between acton town and uxbridge. roads — a4 piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs.
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lewisham: a20 lee high road, westbound at the junction with belmont hill: one lane closed for gas works. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. weatherwise, we are playing autumn sunshine spot the difference yet again today. a day very similar to how it was yesterday. and indeed the day before that too. lots of blue sky and sunshine around. it will feel a bit breezier tgoday. noticeable south—easterly wind, innovative cloud around at times perhaps. generally a milder start of the morning as well. temperatures in central london in double figures. chilly in rural spots. there are a few missed patches to many, that early cloud. unbroken to many paces, top temperatures reaching below 20s. quite windy into the start of the day tomorrow. temperatures in that milder hour
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will probably stick in double figures for most of the towns. quite chilly in most spots. lots of sunshine around. blue skies, the warmest of the week. highs of 25 or 26 celsius. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. 0ur headlines today(read 0n) —— 0ur headlines today: the first of 5,000 climate change protests begin, as millions prepare to take part in demonstrations around the world. thomas hooker‘s future is in the balance as millions of holiday for —— holidaymakers face uncertainty. freshers finances. as thousands of nervous students prepare to head off to university for the first time — they're spending hundreds of pounds to buy things to take with them. i'll find out how they can spend savvy. hosts japan play russia in the rugby world cup. georgia ford starts at fly half. —— george ford. everyone likes it outside, none more than the royal horses of the royal force
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artillery. we will be here live to watch them go through their paces. and a perfect weather for a day at the seaside. lots of sunshine to come today. a little bit on the chilly side but things will warm up. it's friday the 20th of september. our top story: millions of people around the world are expected to take part in what could be the largest ever climate change protest today. more than 5,000 demonstrations are planned in more than 150 countries. those involved are calling for governments to take more urgent action to halt global warming. 0ur correspondent roger harrabin has more. the girl who sparked today's action, greta thunberg, started a global crime climate youth movement after striking from school in sweden — young people fearful for their future. ms thunberg sailed to new york for today's demonstration.
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adults, inspired by their children, will take to the streets as well, hoping it will be the biggest worldwide climate protest yet, designed to influence world leaders meeting in new york on monday. the demonstrators may be disappointed. the former uk government chief scientist says the effects of climate heating are being witnessed much earlier than he had expected. we are seeing extreme weather events just rolling out, year after year, with massive loss of life — rising sea levels, rising temperatures, changes in weather patterns, impacting on farmers and everybody. is this a scary scenario? of course it is. and how should we react as human beings to this scenario? we have to all pull together and understand the challenges, and act to stop it. and the economic damage will be worse than forecast, as well, according to a group of economists. meanwhile, in the usa, president trump has just ordered california to scrap efficiency standards that actually reduce emissions from cars, and china's reported to be building still more coal—fired power stations. it won't be the last day of protest. roger harrabin, bbc news.
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we are getting a real sense of the scale of the protests happening. we are in nairobi. here they will be more than ten organisations who have come together to make their voice heard. they have prepared documents that will be presented later to the minister for environment. among the issues they are demanding, the protection of water towers. there have been ongoing evictions of people who have approached into forests where most of kenya's comes from. they are also denouncing the government's plan to exploit coal energy for the first time. they said thatis energy for the first time. they said that is not the right way to go even though the government insists that
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it has to develop energy for industry through coal. dank you very much. —— thank you. and we'll be speaking to the energy secretary, kwasi kwarteng, about the government's climate change strategy just after 8am. jean—claude juncker has said jean—claudejuncker has said it is still possible a brexit deal could be reached by the end of the month. his comments come ahead of a meeting between the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, and the eu's chief negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels today. let's speak now to our political correspondent, jonathan blake, who is in westminster. jonathan, do we know if any progress has been made? we are getting a bit of push and pull each day between the eu and the uk ministers. there is no doubt things are looking better in terms of reaching a new brexit deal than they were just a couple of weeks ago. stephen barclay will sit down with the eu's chief negotiator
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michel barnierfor the with the eu's chief negotiator michel barnier for the first time since the beginning ofjuly, later today. that is assigned itself that progress is being made. the prime minister said that he wouldn't get too excited about the amount of progress that's being made but there is some there and that came after jean—claude juncker, the president of the european commission, said that his talks with borisjohnson earlier this week were positive and he also said the backstop, the controversial part of the deal negotiated by theresa may to avoid border checks on the border with ireland, could be made in the future, he said he had no emotional attachment to it and if the objectives could be met with other means than there was no need for it. that of course is a big if and there is still a sticking point. the uk has put forward plans, not proposals, but working ideas, which the eu is looking at. a big reality
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checkin the eu is looking at. a big reality check in terms of anyone getting excited that there is going to be a breakthrough anytime soon coming from the irish prime minister leo varadkar, reminding us all that the two sides are still far apart. jonathan, thank you very much. canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, has faced the cameras for a second time to address further accusations of racism. it comes after more images emerged of him wearing racially offensive fancy dress. in a fresh statement to reporters, he said he "deeply, deeply" regretted his behaviour. the revelations come amid campaigning for an election at the end of october, when mr trudeau hopes to win a second term. 0ur north america correspondent david willis reports. applause. working the crowd. just a week into his run for re—election, justin trudeau's campaign is reeling from a scandal that may yet engulf it. 0ther blackface photos have emerged along with this video from the early ‘90s, showing a young justin trudeau sticking his tongue out and pulling faces, and the candidate admits they could be more to come.
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and the candidate admits they could be more to come. i am wary of being definitive about this because the recent pictures that came out i had not remembered, and i think the question is, how can you not remember that? the fact is, i, i, uh... i didn't understand how hurtful this is to people who live with discrimination every single day. i have always acknowledged that i come from a place of privilege but i now need to acknowledge that that comes with a massive blind spot. seen here welcoming syrian refugees into canada, justin trudeau had cultivated the image of a champion of diversity. but the blackface row with its racist overtones has energised his opponents who are now calling into question his fitness to govern. canada goes to the polls in just
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overfour weeks' time. heavy rainfall from tropical storm ‘imelda' has flooded parts of louisiana and texas, leaving at least two people dead. in the city of houston, thunderstorms have damaged power lines, flooded streets, and forced roads and schools to close. governor greg abbott issued a state of disaster for 13 texan counties, and deployed emergency responders to affected areas. the current system for fining people in england who wrongly claim free prescriptions is ‘not fit for purpose', according to a group of mps. in a scathing report, the commons public accounts committee says 1.7 million penalty charge notices have been issued incorrectly to patients — about a third of all fines imposed. the department of health has promised to introduce extra checks.
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those are the main stories this morning. we will have the weather, the sport, the opening of the rugby world cup. details coming up a little bit later. the future of travel firm thomas cook is hanging in the balance this morning. if the company goes bust, more than 150 thousand british holidaymakers will be left stranded abroad. simon calder, travel editor of the independent, joins us now from our london newsroom to tell us what could happen. we need to clear this up. there are two sides to this. well, three, if you think about it. first of all, the funding of the business and the chinese firm that was going to help it out. then you have the employees who will be very common concern. and then thousands of holidaymakers who are wondering what is happening to their holiday plans. let's make it absolutely clear that everything is normalfor absolutely clear that everything is normal for thomas cook this morning. the first wave of light from gatwick, manchester, edinburgh, taking off absolutely as normal. people waking up on their holidays,
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everywhere from turkey to tenerife, just as normal. and just at nine o'clock, many of those excellent thomas cook employees will be opening up the travel agent in your local high street. however, behind—the—scenes, it is i think tougher than what i have ever seen. the oldest, arguably the best, in travel, had problems in 2011, got through those, but now we have what we thought was a rescue deal organised by the chinese company that owned club med and various other organisations and they were going to be helped by the banks, the lenders, to thomas cook, who were effectively going to give up, write off some of the debt in return for shares in the refinanced company. that hit problems yesterday. they said it is going to be a tough
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winter which everybody agrees. you need to have £200 million of emergency funding in place stop at that point, everything started to look very difficult. it is the criticality. trying to find that money. september, i need to say, is the cruellest month of holiday companies and you see an awful lot of dahlias and that is because new money isn't coming in for new holidays but all of the bills are coming in. —— awful lot of failures. they are simply running around trying to find the financing, trying to keep the company going. meanwhile, worrying times. and what protection do they have? what if people are on holiday? 0r
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protection do they have? what if people are on holiday? or they have something booked? first of all, i am not in the business of self—fulfilling prophecies and some of the headlines this morning, quite possibly capable of helping thomas cook over the edge. and second of all, people stranded abroad? they are not! they are on holiday! the best thing you can do is sit by the pool and buy another drink. there is no problem for those people. we have seen no problem for those people. we have seen two years no problem for those people. we have seen two years ago no problem for those people. we have seen two years ago when no problem for those people. we have seen two years ago when we saw no problem for those people. we have seen two years ago when we saw the colla pse seen two years ago when we saw the collapse of monarch, and very well organised airlift operation and very expensive for the taxpayer, as it turned out but people will be brought back as normal. you might end up in birmingham airport when you're light was originally going to manchester but that is the end of your problems. it is the 100s of thousands of people with advanced bookings. very few people will lose cash right if you have booked a half
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term 0ctober holiday or you have something over christmas, you will be concerned about that. you will get your money back but they will not be the same and prices will undoubtedly go up.|j not be the same and prices will undoubtedly go up. i love that line, they are not stranded abroad, they are on holiday. have another drink! ok, are on holiday. have another drink! 0k, thank you simon calder. you don't have to go abroad to see wonderful weather. this, believe it or not, is our cameras at a beach in norfolk. it's holkham beach and it looks absolutely spec macula. it's just a beautiful place. matters got some thoughts. he is musing. i would say good pause, but it reminds me of my catalogue. i am just enjoying the same sunrise you saw. a beautiful
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start once again, a very good morning to you. a bit on the fresh side once again. temperatures in single figures. 0ne side once again. temperatures in single figures. one or two degrees and parts of scotland and northern england. we do have some fog patches around. parts of scotland, northern england and northern ireland, some dense fog patches. gone by mid morning and then a day of widespread sunshine. much more sunshine developing here, patchy cloud towards eastern england. it's going towards eastern england. it's going to feel warm as well. temperatures highest in northern scotland, 23 or 24 degrees. a bit of breeze developing around the english channel and that breeze will pick up further as we head into tonight. that. the temperatures from
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dropping. it's a dry night. temperatures down to single figures for some. the weekend will start on a slightly fresh note. through saturday, high pressure with us. across central parts of europe, wins all around that in a clockwise fashion. airfrom the all around that in a clockwise fashion. air from the south. all around that in a clockwise fashion. airfrom the south. france has been warming up. air in the uk turning hot and has been warming up. air in the uk turning hotand humid has been warming up. air in the uk turning hot and humid as we had with the first half of the weekend. details for saturday, sunshine from dawn to dusk. south—west england or wales, northern ireland, the chance of some heavy and thundery showers developing, particularly during the afternoon. temperatures 25, 20 six celsius. 23 degrees in the highlands. through saturday evening and overnight from the breeze will be early risk. it's going to be a
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humid nightand be early risk. it's going to be a humid night and for some, it will be a bit ofa humid night and for some, it will be a bit of a thundering night, particularly the western half of the country. sunday, heavy and thundery rain spreading slowly northwards and eastwards. hit and miss for some of you. we will keep you tuned to the forecast. driest of all, northern and eastern scotland. temperatures still up to around 23 degrees. you will notice in the west, temperatures back into the teens once again. that will set the scene the next week, looking much more changeable stop raining, windy conditions as well. the other side of autumn from the warm, sunny and crisp side we have at the moment. that is how it is looking. sorry, matt, we were just talking. i was listening very closely to you. i was talking about how good your catalogue posies. it's a missed vocation. look at that sun shining on you. an ironman pose next time.
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thank you. no apologies for milking the pictures. we will never apologise. the number of young people in england leaving education without five ‘good' gcses has gone up, according to new analysis for the children's commissioner. anne longfield described the 28 per cent increase in the last four years as "shameful". good morning to you, thank you for your time. this is very important stop. it's about young people's education at a crucial time. what is your analysis saying? my analysis which comes from the dfe's own figures on attainment published last year shows despite the fact children are staying on longer, they stay
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until 18 hour. your children are leaving with a basic set of qualifications and that is usually defined as level two, five gcse attainments on that accounts for one in five children, 100,000 children. as is so often the case, children who are the poorest, children with social educational needs that the worst in this situation. the government draws different conclusions. they are saying the attainments are improving. there has been a 25% increase in the number of children who leave school without that basic set of qualifications between 2015 and 2018. accounts for well over a third of all children, leaving without the basic set and in some areas, that rises to over half and half of children with special
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educational needs leave without that basic set of qualifications. this isn't just a basic set of qualifications. this isn'tjust a piece of paper. this is the route to their career, their employment, income for the rest of their lives and what it does mean is they are limited if they don't have that basic set on the kind of progression they have. many won't be able to start basic apprenticeships without that basic qualification. i'm trying to get my head around, you are the children's commissioner and as! you are the children's commissioner and as i understand it, the government's response to what you are saying, it's true, is a real bubble, is that the results are getting better. they say your analysis, and the figures you are basing your research on, is out of date, the system has changed in the picture is different. the first to applaud and celebrate if things have turned around radically in the last few months but these figures from last year, which show a disturbing
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rise in numbers leaving without qualifications over the last three yea rs. qualifications over the last three years. there has been a change in the way the exams are organised. the government figures i saw say that 68% are now getting qualifications that still leaves a third that aren't getting those qualifications. i know there has been a huge amount of effort put into attainment but i think the majority of that effort has gone into raising grades at the higher end. this week, the secretary of state talked about poverty of ambition around attainment or disadvantaged children in the absolute focus needs to be on those children who are being left behind, how we can get them the qualifications they need to flourish. and it's an enormously important issue but at the heart of it, if we got a government, i'm trying to understand, are you saying
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the government is in denial? they are very clear. they are discounting what you are saying. they have a different narrative. you can't both be right about this. somebody somewhere is paying the price. i would agree. what government says is true. the overall figures are increasing, the number of children who are 16—18 and out of work is slightly decreasing. you can talk about many of these things in a different way but for those kids that are leaving school without the basic passport and qualifications they need to be able to go on and expect to be able to progress in their career, this is absolutely devastating. i want government to investigate this. i want them to commit to reduce those numbers leaving without qualifications by half over the next five years. and also identify where those children
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are reaching that level at 16 and put in place the plans needed get them there by 18. children are raising it overall, that is fantastic stop but we shouldn't be satisfied of a system that leaves 20% of children absolutely at the starting point. you are in a position of some authority. when you sit down with the education secretary, i don't know when that is the next time, as you just said to me, iwant the next time, as you just said to me, i want this to change and i wa nted me, i want this to change and i wanted to happen. something tells me they are going to say, we don't agree with your analysis. you say there is a major problem. what i've done is, i've written a letter to the ministerfor done is, i've written a letter to the minister for schools. it's a statutory letter under my powers requesting that action ijust downline expect outlined is taken.
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when i talk to secretary of state, of course i these points. i'd be very happy to look in further detail at this but these are dfe figures and they are stark and i don't think they will be contested. great to talk to you this morning. thank you for your time. we have been showing you some glorious views all morning. mrs holkham beach. the king ‘strip is going to be training. that is one of them riding. —— king ‘s troops. they ta ke them riding. —— king ‘s troops. they take part in big royal events. john can tell us more. what are stunning shot. it's like an old period drama. it's like from a movie. john is down there somewhere as well. good morning. iam
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there somewhere as well. good morning. i am down on the beach at holkham beach, it's absolutely stunning and it does look like a movie set. it's often used as a movie set. it's often used as a movie set, on the norfolk coast. that way is due north. if sarah thomas was to do another way of her amazing swims, she would end up in holland, belgium but the horses are, as you say, king's troop, the king's troop royal horse artillery, normally based in london, woolwich barracks, or those huge state occasions, royal occasions, due to 41- occasions, royal occasions, due to 41— gun salute dragging six horses, dragging the1.5— 41— gun salute dragging six horses, dragging the 1.5— ton canon, wearing those victorian uniforms, the blue tunics with the tall hats. the idea of this training exercise is taking place all week for the soldiers, and it's an interesting organisation, so the soldiers and horses get a chance to get out of london and the city, come to the seaside. we all love going to the beach, train on the sea
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and also get into the water as well. you can't imagine the location. we are expecting around 28 horses, something like that across the week, there have been more than i think, 100 trips training out here this weekend. we promise you more beautiful shots like this later in the programme this morning. that's all coming up after the news, travel, and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm victoria hollins. an inquest has ruled that failings by the national probation service probably contributed to the death of 6—year—old alex malcolm. he was murdered three years ago by marvyn iheanacho, a violent offender who was in a relationship with alex's mother. she was not made aware of his history of offending by the probation services. in a statement, alex's mother, liliya said it had exposed dreadful and horrible failures.
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ambulance crews in the capital have been physically attacked at least once a day. so far this year around 346 attacks have been recorded by the london ambulance service. the metropolitan police have also seen around 5,600 assaults on officers. in response, a group of people created the awesome movement to show appreciation for the emergency services. today they‘re distributing ‘thank you' coffees and doughnuts to frontline workers. this year‘s mercury prize has been awarded to the rapper dave for his debut album, psychodrama. the 21—year—old, who is from south london, beat acts including anna calvi and the 1975. the album reflects on his course of therapy for grief, depression and domestic abuse. i know i tell this story all the time but, you know, i want to thank my brother christopher, that inspired this album. this is your story, your story to be told and even though you can‘t be here with us today, i know you‘re
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watching this programme and i‘m so grateful. thank you, guys, so much. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. the tube — a failure at ealing common means that the district line is part suspended between turnham green and ealing broadway, and between ealing broadway and acton town, the circle line is part suspended clockwise and there are severe delays on the piccadilly line between acton town and uxbridge. queueing on the a13 into town through the goresbrook interchange, dagenham hello, good morning. weatherwise, we‘re playing autumn sunshine spot the difference yet again today. a day very similar to how it was yesterday. and indeed the day before that too. lots of blue sky and sunshine around. it will feel a bit breezier today, though. a noticeable south—easterly wind, and notable cloud around at times perhaps. generally a milder start
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of the morning as well. temperatures in central london in double figures. chilly in rural spots once more. there are a few mist patches but not too many, due to that breeze. lots of sunshine everywhere. unbroken to many paces, top temperatures reaching below 20s. the wind will pick up overnight. quite windy into the start of the day tomorrow. temperatures in that milder air will probably stick in double figures for most of the towns. again, quite chilly in rural spots. lots of sunshine around. blue skies, the warmest day of the week. quite breezy with it, highs of 25 or 26 celsius. a sunny start to sunday but rain by the afternoon. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news: millions of people around the world
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are expected to take part in what could be the largest ever climate change protest today. more than 5,000 demonstrations are planned in more than 150 countries. many will involve young people staying away from school, university or work. those involved are calling for governments to take more urgent action to halt global warming. the future of thomas cook is hanging in the balance this morning, as it scrambles to raise £200 million pounds to secure an emergency rescue deal. britain‘s oldest package—holiday firm must secure the funds before a crucial meeting next friday. bosses have blamed a series of events for its profit warnings, including political unrest in destinations like turkey, last summer‘s prolonged heatwave and customers delaying holidays due to brexit. the european commission president, jean—claude juncker, has said it‘s still possible that a new brexit deal could be reached by the end of next month. his comments come ahead of a meeting between the brexit secretary, stephen barclay, and the eu‘s chief
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negotiator, michel barnier, in brussels today. borisjohnson said he did not want to "exaggerate progress" but some was being made. canadian prime minister, justin trudeau, has faced the cameras for a second time to address further accusations of racism. it comes after more images emerged of him wearing racially offensive fancy dress. in a fresh statement to reporters, he said he cannot remember how often he wore the make—up as a younger man and that he "deeply, deeply" regretted his behaviour. the revelations come amid campaigning for an election at the end of october. heavy rainfall from tropical storm ‘imelda‘ has flooded parts of louisiana and texas, leaving at least two people dead. in the city of houston, thunderstorms have damaged power lines, flooded streets, and forced roads and schools to close. governor greg abbott issued a state of disaster for 13 texan counties, and deployed emergency responders to affected areas. the current system for fining people in england who wrongly claim
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free prescriptions is ‘not fit for purpose‘, according to a group of mps. in a scathing report, the commons public accounts committee says 1.7 million penalty charge notices have been issued incorrectly to patients — about a third of all fines imposed. the department of health has promised to introduce extra checks. matt has been given the opportunity be out on the roof in london. and we‘re going to japan. be out on the roof in london. and we're going to japan. what a place. the rugby world cup. you have got to love a major tournament. what makes this one so special is it could be so open this time around. there are so open this time around. there are so many teams that could potentially win it this year which makes it great. we will see monster tackles, big hits. when you have a
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nation like —— when you have a nation like —— when you have a nation like —— when you have a nation like japan, there is something fresh about the approach to it. i think that is one of the things we will see. and helped by what they did in the last world cup. 0ne what they did in the last world cup. one of the biggest upsets in the tournament cosmic history. and who was the coach? eddiejones. tournament cosmic history. and who was the coach? eddie jones. eddie jones was the coach ofjapan? he is england coach. they felled one of the giants of the game. he of course hasjapanese the giants of the game. he of course has japanese heritage. he the giants of the game. he of course hasjapanese heritage. he is australian and his parents are australian and his parents are australian and his parents are australian and japanese. there is a lot of interest in the mix. it all kicks off in a few hours. in a country where rugby is by no means the main sport, but where the public have embraced the excitement. 0ur sports correspondent katie gornall‘s been in tokyo, where japan play russia later.
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tokyo is a sprawling, enchanting city. it‘s a place where the modern nestles alongside the traditional and it‘s a new frontier for a sport hoping to make a good impression. excitement is building. 15,000 people turned upjust to watch wales train in southern japan and the country‘s commissioner for sport believes this tournament could leave a lasting legacy. translation: this is the first time the world cup is coming to a country that has no tradition in rugby. for us injapan, we are really excited to have the tournament and so i am hoping that rugby becomes part of our culture. for that to happen, more children need to pick up a rugby ball. right now, these boys at tokyo high school in tokyo are in the minority. they hope the world cup will change that. translation: since we japanese don't know much about rugby, i‘m hoping that we get a better understanding. translation: all the best players
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from all over the world are coming to japan so i'm going to watch them play and try to learn something from them. four years ago, they taught south africa a lesson when they beat the two—time champions in their opening game. it went down as the biggest upset in the tournament‘s history and has raised expectations at this world cup. here at downtown tokyo, you do get the sense that japan is embracing this world cup. there are posters and adverts for the big stars all around here. but of course what will really help capture the public‘s imagination is excitement on the pitch and there are signs that this could be the most open world cup yet. holders new zealand may be favourites but it‘s ireland who currently topped the world rankings. however, theirform has dipped this year. england, meanwhile, could be peaking atjust the right time. commentator: finn russell under the post! scotland fans will be craving consistency from the team that too often swings from the ridiculous to the sublime and grand slam winners wales are a big threat on the world stage.
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this is probably the tightest competition that we‘ve ever had, tightest world cup. and which is great, it‘s great for the viewers, it‘s great for us to be watching, it‘s exciting, that‘s what builds excitement when you know it‘s just not a foregone conclusion. it‘s unfamiliar territory but in the neon glow ofjapan, rugby might have found a new home. katie gornall, bbc news, tokyo. let‘s go live to tokyo now and speak to our correspondent rupert wingfield—hayes. wright some of those pictures, 15,000 fans turning up just to see wales train. i presume that will be reflected in the stadium behind you when japan get the reflected in the stadium behind you whenjapan get the tournament under way later. i am in front of the stadium and it has been renamed the tokyo stadium for this tournament because the main 0lympic stadium that was supposed to host the opening ceremony is not been finished. there are thousands of
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fa ns finished. there are thousands of fans covered here, japanese and russian fans but they are not just japanese and russian, there are england fans here and other countries, coming along to either watch the match or soak up the atmosphere. excitement is building. three hours from now, the opening ceremony will begin. and then russia will take on japan ceremony will begin. and then russia will take onjapan in the opening match. as you said, we heard in the report before, this is not biggest sport in japan. baseball and football which is known as soccer here, are much, much bigger sports. the japanese are hoping that this tournament for a month here will really start to build interest are not just here really start to build interest are notjust here in tokyo but of course this tournament will take place right across japan from hokkaido in the far north, down to the south. small cities across japan will host big matches and they are hoping that thatis big matches and they are hoping that that is really going to stimulate interest in this sport injapan
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which does have a hard core of rugby supporters but which is still a minority sport. amazing pictures. we can see how much it is filling up behind you. thank you rupert. that is kicking off at 1145 this morning. england, scotland, ireland and wales all in action over the next few days. england named their team to play tonga on sunday this morning. head coach eddie jones naming an attacking side, with captain 0wen farrell playing at centre alongside manu tuilagi. that means that george ford will play at fly half. in the last half—an—hour, ireland have named their side to face scotland on sunday. captain rory best will lead out the team in what will be his final tournament before retirement. and don‘t forget radio 5 live has every game covered, on radio, on bbc sounds and the bbc sport website. no fewer than five british sides in europa league action last night, and a couple of teenagers stole the show. 18—year—old bukayo sa ka score his first goal for arsenal and set up the other two as they beat eintract frankfurt 3—0 in germany.
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manchester united‘s mason greenwood is even younger. he‘s just 17, and got his first goal for the club as they beat the kazakh side astana 1—0 at old trafford. it was a disappointing night for wolves — back in european action for the first time since the early 80‘s. they were beaten 1—0 at molyneux bu the portuguese side braga. —— by the portuguese side. rangers meanwhile were 1—0 winners over the dutch side feyenoord. this great strike from sheyi 0jo giving steven gerrard‘s side all three points. celtic had to come from behind against rennes. ryan christie levelling things from the spot after the french side had taken a first half lead with a penalty of their own. what a great night for those two. 17 yea rs what a great night for those two. 17 years old, amazing. rory best, who you mentioned, the captain of ireland, if they like to see raw emotions ahead of a sporting
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occasion, rory best as the cameras looked down as he is singing or not singing the national anthem, is quite something to see stop the emotions of his face. he always just barely contained himself. he is coming right towards the end of his career and sometimes those moments you think you can grasp on occasion. and they are holding really firm. some people are super composed and some people have tears down their faces. we look forward to those moments. it is 20 minutes to eight. if you‘ve ever seen small children unwrapping presents, you‘ll know that the paper and boxes are often as exciting as the gift inside. a nursery in bristol has decided to take that one step further and has been testing out what happens when they take away the toys and replace them with everyday objects. 0ur reporter andy howard has been to see what they‘ve found.
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it is playtime at this nursery in bristol. magnets, metal and imagination. it is fascinating because that is not a toy designed for a child to use it so it is difficult for them to dislodge a bit of metalfrom difficult for them to dislodge a bit of metal from the magnet. she difficult for them to dislodge a bit of metalfrom the magnet. she is learning skills of dexterity that she might not learn from a toy that was designed for a two—year—old. here, shells, boxes and shiny envelopes are allowed but these are not and were locked away in a cupboard for a month. some of the older children at the end of the month said they would really like their trains back and their purpose was never to deprive the children are so of course they had them back after the month but two —year—olds, they don‘t want any of this back all. what is interesting, what you have picked up, you have a female queen and a very male, muscular superhero. gender is something that can be reinforced through toys. having observed the children for the
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one—month trial early this year, staff here say that 75% of the two —year—olds used more imagination in their play. in 13—year—old class, more than half used their imaginations friendly. and in another group, between a quarter and another group, between a quarter and a half of boys communicated more imaginatively. if this is really having this sort of impact, it raises all sorts of interesting questions for us. what sort of toys do they really need? what are toys for? who is selling us the toys? why are we buying them? so this is the nursery with very few toys. although they will play with anything else, including bbc camera equipment. the head teacher, matt, is explaining to us, did we get our microphone back? we did. was it
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intact? we had to explain it was a very expensive thing. did that fall into the category of what they were allowed to play with? absolutely because it is not a toy. how do you define a toy? it is a midget -- miniature object of something else was not but it is not that downes was not but it is not that downes was not but it is not that downes was not they were trains, dinosaurs, bikes will stop you didn‘t get rid of xylophones, did you? know, because a musical instrument is not a toy. what do you see change? the children use a lot more creativity. there was a lot more language and communication and i think less is more. just thejoy of communication and i think less is more. just the joy of having 20 cardboard boxes in a room and that was it, it kept them going. how often from day one did you have some often from day one did you have some of the kids coming up and saying, what did they call you? matt. matt,
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can we have our toys? we explained to them. they knew it would be a bit different and children saying please, can we have our dinosaurs? it wasn‘t about depriving them but it was adding to what they had. leave did all the parents entertain this? initially, maybe not but then they really entertained it. —— did all the parents entertain this? what we re all the parents entertain this? what were their reservations? they thought the children would be bored of fighting. children want other children. they want to talk to adults. they want to communicate. they do not need stuff. did they fight? much less fighting. really? they are not squabbling over the toys. it is a cardboard box that they wanted and they had lots of them. it is back to christmas day. you buy an expensive present in a
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cardboard box and what do they play with? the cardboard box. it goes back to some of those basic principles. 0n the basis of what you witnessed first—hand and maybe you knew already, to be honest, why do we feel nurseries with lots of toys? ijust think it is part of what we feel nurseries with lots of toys? i just think it is part of what we do. we think, well, we are providing for children, we give them stuff that actually they don‘t need. for children, we give them stuff that actually they don't needm for children, we give them stuff that actually they don't need. it is cheaper as well. did that have something to do with it? we are a local authority and budgets are really tight but no way would we do it for budgetary reasons. we did it because we believed it was a project that would improve communication. and you are sticking to it. in the two—year—old room, they haven‘t had toys back. in the three —year—olds room they are toys but they are more natural, wooden toys. so you intend
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for it to be permanent? in the two—year—old room, yes. for it to be permanent? in the two-year-old room, yes. it would be interesting to see how their language develops. that is a thing if they are communicating more rather than focusing... one if they are communicating more rather than focusing. .. one of if they are communicating more rather than focusing... one of the things, two children happily talking on pretend phones and their language was just amazing. they were not using words but communicating and thatis using words but communicating and that is because to language. using words but communicating and that is because to languagelj using words but communicating and that is because to language. i still do that now, pretend to talk on the phone quite a lot. do you? i try to look busy. lovely to see you this morning. two i think charlie has done that to us before. you know when you walk along and you see charlie and he is on his phone? ignoring us. that is what he is like. lectures is that live? just explain the images here. we have a drone
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above the beach this morning they‘ve invited us, we are very lucky to watch the training under way in these frankly hollywood —esque style sceneries. it just looks spectacular. matt, i don‘t think you can beat that. i can‘t beat the beach. the next couple of days, looking fine for many. danner and holkham beach across the country. a bit of a chilly start. some dense patches of scotla nd chilly start. some dense patches of scotland and northern ireland, just be wary, it will be gone by mid—morning. for most of you, starting the day with loose guys up
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ahead. you‘re going to see that all the way through. a bit more cloud across the far north of scotland. around shipment in particular. even he will brighten up compared with recent days. the fog elsewhere will gradually clear. the temperatures lifting up quite markedly. given the fa ct we lifting up quite markedly. given the fact we have a southerly breeze developing, northern parts of scotla nd developing, northern parts of scotland where we see the best temperature. 24, 20 three celsius across the highlands. more widely, temperatures into the 20s. the breeze will strengthen that. the temperature dropping. still down into single figures. the most, another blue sky day, feeling a bit more more as well. bringing in warmth across france. moreover
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breeze, we will have to watch the skies. have your thundery showers. mostly staying dry, saturday, the highest temperatures, still 23, 20 four celsius. and with a more human feel. as we go through saturday, that human feel becomes more extensive. but you will notice there, some heavy and at times thundery rain. it will move its way northwards and eastwards. you do see the rain, there could be the odd heavy downpour. the best way to stay dry, northern and eastern scotland, temperatures around 23 but if you got plans for sunday, keep watching the forecast. exact areas may change. for today and tomorrow, a lot of that lovely autumn sun trying to look forward to. glorious view
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again and we are milking it. absolutely beautiful stop students arriving, starting uni. it's it‘s the time when thousands of stu d e nts it‘s the time when thousands of students pack up and head off to university. you might have noticed displays and promotions. 0n university. you might have noticed displays and promotions. on average, pa rents a re displays and promotions. on average, parents are spending about 650 pounds to kit out their kids, before they even arrive on campus. i've been heading off next week and doing my shopping for the next month. it's turned out to be a lot more expensive than we thought it would be. when! expensive than we thought it would be. when i arrived at university i bought a student essential pack, cutlery, pots and pans, new bedding, new winter, new laptop and i also
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did bathroom stuff. before coming to university, i spent most of my money on kitchen appliances to help me cook and also bedding and decorations for my room. now the time that i'm at uni, my money goes on the weekly food shop. my laundry. i‘ve had experience with a part—time job at home but i do believe a lot of my money will go on temptations such as going out and socialising. we‘ll have to see how it goes when i get there. felicity hannah is with me now. she‘s a personal finance journalist. i remember turning up with a pair of trainers and a tin of beans. £650 per student? it has been a real change in marketing. it‘s become a marketing event. going to supermarkets and there is a whole aisle with everything brand—new. a
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brand—new duvet, a brand—new pillow, a brand—new spatula. i think parents are feeling a bit of pressure. giving that positive first facade. we know they are spending more on that initial outlay. it is life more expensive? living costs of really ratcheted up. one area is accommodation. some research out from the national union of students says between 2012, rate costs, it‘s usually down to what accommodation costs are. it used to be a room in a old draughty house, like the young 0nes, another affected desks, ensuite bathrooms. there is a lot to give bill to go with that. if you have not seen mice in the night in your flat, you‘re not have not seen mice in the night in yourflat, you‘re not a have not seen mice in the night in your flat, you‘re not a student.
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have not seen mice in the night in yourflat, you‘re not a student. a different sort of spending. ten yea rs different sort of spending. ten years ago, 62% of students were spending on alcohol, that is dropped to 48%. 19% in healthy food, that‘s gone up significantly by 33% so significant gone up significantly by 33% so sig nifica nt lifestyle gone up significantly by 33% so significant lifestyle changes.” gone up significantly by 33% so significant lifestyle changes. i was thinking that is partly cultural. a lot of younger people, they are not drinking as much and i bit more conscious about what they eat. degrees are so expensive. getting their money ‘s work, that would make sense. what would you say to students, when money would be another thing on their mind. students, when money would be another thing on their mindm students, when money would be another thing on their mind. it is really, really exciting. that is the most important things, such a great time of life. the most essential thing is learning to budget. i know it‘s not the most interesting things, if they know how much money they‘ve got and how long that is. that‘s going to stop them running
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out of cash, five weeks, having to live on baked beans for the rest of the year. if they know what they‘ve got to spend on what they can spend on having fun and what they need for bills, that is really going to make a difference. thank you very much, some good advice there. make sure you budget, that‘s what lots of us forget to do. it‘s exciting, isn‘t it? have a look at some of these images. 0ur cameras high above holkham beach in norfolk because the king‘s troop royal horse artillery are having a training session. this is no ordinary training session. 0n the beach there. with our reporter, john mcguire. good morning. good morning, charlie. 0nce
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john mcguire. good morning. good morning, charlie. once the pictures absolutely stunning? 0ur drone pilot is channelling david lean. it looks like lawrence of arabia. here in the norfolk coast, going through their paces. normally based at the woolwich barracks in south—east london. trying to do this once a year of possible. very much enjoying it in getting huge benefits. joining the ceo, major vicky flood. the benefits of this training, first. what are they? the benefits coming down here are predominantly, despite what you see, for the soldiers so rather than riding on the beach and having fun in the surf, they‘re doing it annual training requirement. we are used to you
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seeing the 41 gun salute. so many different disciplines involved. everything is very polished and regimented. as you said, the chance to relax but also to do an exercise. they are honing the drawers. putting shoulders outside the comfort zone. amy, you‘ve been riding with him this morning. what is your life like as an officer. getting to see the 01:56:54,035 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 queen. going to ride down.
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