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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 20, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm martine croxall. today at two. schoolchildren lead what could be the biggest demonstration yet against global warming — with protests planned in more than 150 countries. the younger a person is, the more the changing climate will impact them as they grow and the less of a voice they're given today. rallies are taking place across britain: this is the scene live at the demonstration in the scottish capital. a race against time for thoms cook — the holiday firm must find 200 million pounds to stay in business. new brexit talks in brussels — but is a deal any closer? there is still a lot of work to do but there is a common purpose to secure a deal and recognition in the
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capitals and the foreign ministers i have been speaking to. they want to see a no deal avoided. saudi arabia say that they have evidence that iran is behind attacks on oil installations. our security correspondent is at the scene. coming up on afternoon live all the sport with gavin. rugby world cup under way with japan facing russia in opening game. yes, japan yes,japan are off yes, japan are off to a fantastic start, a straightforward win over russia. we have an update on that and of course the home nations. thank you. another dry day coming up for many of us on saturday, a slow slide into marek, settled conditions on sunday. and we will be look at what has been happening in the us where a tropical system has been working in. nota where a tropical system has been working in. not a hurricane, for most of its life not a tropical storm, but it has already brought so much rain in that it is one of the top five wettest systems ever in the
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us. we will take a look at that. and also... also coming up — all at sea... the research ship heading to the arctic to drift among the ice floes for a whole year. hello, i'm martine croxall. children around the world have stayed away from school to lead what could be the biggest day of protest yet against climate change. thousands of separate demonstrations are taking place in 150 countries, including the uk. the protestors are demanding more action from both governments and businesses — as duncan kennedy reports. what do we want? climate action! when do we want it? now! home to 7.5 billion people. beautiful, but fragile. robust, but warming.
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and today, the stage for a global message. the pacific island of vanuatu helped send the first of those messages. and no wonder. their low lying homes could be among the first to disappear, if sea levels rise. in sydney, children also put climate before classroom, thousands marching with teachers and other workers to call for government action to cut greenhouse gas emissions. the younger a person is, the more that the changing climate will impact them as they grow, and the less of a voice they are given today. considering we have such a short amount of time to turn this issue around, it's vital that young people are at the forefront of this conversation because they will be impacted more than anyone else. i think this is the most important
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issue of our time and i'm here for my children's future. i think it is that important. this isn't a fringe movement, this isn't a greeny issue, this isn't a lefty issue, this is a human issue. they have to stop making political advantage of this issue and unite the country behind a crisis approach to dealing with modifying our economy to be carbon free. it's absolutely essential. the swedish environmental activist greta thunberg later tweeted her support. the new day in south africa brought singers and dancers onto the streets. here in johannesburg, they also wanted to send a message to next week's un conference on climate change that the speed of action must be increased. in india, the crowd seemed more modest. but, in a country whose economy
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is expanding at around 7% a year, the government has argued growth can exist alongside climate controls. from thailand, where this was still a day that found room for humour... ..to berlin, where the crowds gathered to demand change. in britain, around 300 protests are taking place across the country. this was hove on the south coast. a place bathed in sunshine, for campaigners basking in the solidarity of theirjoint action. what do we want? change! when do we want it? now! at harrogate in north yorkshire, children were again the focus. the government said it could not endorse a school day being missed but that message seemed lost here amid the enthusiasm of their first time protest.
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bikes have been integral to nottingham since the 19th century and today campaigners used to pedal power to push their climate message here. this is the most important, only important thing going on at the moment. there is no planet, there no nothing. i have never been a protester before but we have to act now otherwise it's just too late. they are in my way. does it annoy you? yes, they're in the road, i've got deliveries to make. the biggest presence has been in westminster, thousands on the march here, all part of a day of action involving 150 countries. and quite possibly the biggest global warming protest yet seen. duncan kennedy, bbc news.
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in a moment we will talk to caroline davies — our correspondent at the climate change protests in central london, but first to edinburgh where our scotland environment correspondent — kevin keane — has been following what's happening there... how well attended is that rally? pretty well attended, estimates of 10,000 to 15,000 which exceeds the highest end of the expectations from the organisers. they started in march at half past 11 in the meadows area of aberdeen and walked for two miles down through the centre of edinburgh, down the royal mile, past holyrood, which is the home of the scottish parliament, and have come to holyrood park. behind me there is a stage, we had a procession of people on stage giving speeches, there has been some music too and thatis there has been some music too and that is expected to continue through the afternoon. there is no doubt that the weather we have experienced here today has probably brought out additional numbers too but when they
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we re additional numbers too but when they were coming down the royal mile, they were in fine voice, chanting for a good, long period of that. there were musicians and bands playing too and a lot of people of all ages. this is, after all, youth strike. people who have come here on a school day to protest and strike and they are supported by others from organisations like friends of the earth, rspb scotland, all here to show support for that message you've been hearing about. 10,000 — 15,000 here at holyrood park, some just beginning to drift away now the main protest has ended. still two or three hours left here. kevin, thank you. now, caroline davies in central london, similar pictures there? yes, welcome to the square next to parliament, plenty of schoolchildren trying to get their message across,
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plenty of people here with home—made banners and flags, plenty of papier marchais planet earth ii. we have seen marchais planet earth ii. we have seen thousands of people here. the crowd has thinned from earlier on. caroline lucas, the green mp, she has been addressing the crowds. we've had speeches and music, many people have taken time out of school to come here. i am joined by two stu d e nts to come here. i am joined by two students who have taken time out of school. izzy and scarlett. why did you decide to come here today? climate change is the defining issue of my generation. we have got a very limited amount of time to act on it and it is very scary to see that there are millions of people dying or at risk of dying right now and we don't hear anything about it. you have our generation who could be the la st have our generation who could be the last generation who see a livable planet and that is terrifying. that fear and planet and that is terrifying. that
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fearand anger planet and that is terrifying. that fear and anger motivated me to be here today. do you think it is irresponsible to be leaving lessons behind to come out today?|j irresponsible to be leaving lessons behind to come out today? i think it is irresponsible of the politicians in charge of protecting our country to not be acting on the climate crisis. politics, by definition, is the process where conflict is resolved and arguably this is the biggest conflict and crisis, that there is no legislation to back—up there is no legislation to back—up the climate emergency that we have declared. we want a transformative agreement, to rapidly phase out fossil fuels. and solve the massive inequality problem we have in the uk and we need to see that implemented. missing one day of school is doing far less damage than the damage being done to the planet. thank you both very much. we are continuing speeches here, they are meant to finish at three o'clock. the met police have said if people do not leave by 3:30pm, they could risk
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arrest. there is a festival atmosphere. we will wait and what happens later. caroline davies in london, and kevin edinburgh, thank you. the labour leader is due to speak. 0wenjones the labour leader is due to speak. 0wen jones has the labour leader is due to speak. 0wenjones has also been speaking tell in the crowds there that now is the time to act. thomas cook could go into administration this weekend, unless it can plug a two—hundred—million pound funding gap. britain's oldest package—holiday firm is in talks with stakeholders, after its banks demanded that it comes up with contingency financing. without a rescue deal, the firm is likely to collapse — leaving more than 150,000 british holiday—makers in need of repatriation and threatening 9000 jobs in the uk. simon gompertz reports. holidays in danger.
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at any time, there are up to 100 thomas cook flights in the air. now there is mounting concern they will not be able to keep going. people who have booked have been turning up at shops to see how they are affected, likejean in london, hoping to go to tunisia next month. she thinks the government should step in. we have just got to keep our fingers crossed, haven't we? and hope for the best and we will hopefully know by sunday, or whenever. are you worried that thomas cook might be in financial trouble? i don't think so. i think they are a big company. i mean, they will find a way of getting out of it, obviously. well, hopefully they do. already overseas with thomas cook right now, more than 150,000 uk travellers, mostly on package holidays with atol protection to bring them back. but tens of thousands are on flight only deals without that guarantee. the cost of repatriation is put at £600 million, organised by the civil aviation authority. that includes paying for some to finish their hotel stay.
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there are 22,000 jobs at risk, 9,000 of them in the uk. a big question is who qualifies to be brought back without paying. when monarch failed two years ago, the government did intervene and paid for everyone to return. that set a precedent which ministers would find hard to ignore. your flight will be organised by the civil aviation authority and you will be brought back pretty much as normal. it is people who have maybe got a half term booking, christmas or new year trip, or indeed who have booked for next summer who will find that, while they will get their money back, either from their credit card company or under the atol scheme, of course there will be fewer holidays out there and prices probably will have gone up. thomas cook is in the throes of negotiating a rescue deal with the chinese group fosun, which already owns club med and wolves football club. but what has thrown all of that injeopardy is a demand from thomas cook's banks to show it can produce £200 million in funding to tide it over
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the lean winter months. the pilots' union says that since one of the banks calling for more financial assurances is state—owned rbs, it should be making sure the company is rescued rather than putting it underfurther pressure. thomas cook, his statue in leicester, founded the business back in the 1840s. it might still survive much longer but, if it doesn't, we could see the biggest ever emergency return of holiday—makers. simon gompertz, bbc news. the brexit secretary has been holding talks in brussels with the eu's chief negotiator — michel barnier. stephen barclay said both sides had ‘serious detailed discussions' and that getting a deal remains their common purpose. yesterday, the european commission president, jean—claude juncker said he was confident a deal can be reached. when asked if he shared mrjuncker‘s confidence, this is what the brexit
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secretary had to say... yes, ido, yes, i do, and that is why we are working so hard to secure a deal, i was in cyprus the day before that with the prime minister in luxembourg on monday. both sides wa nt to luxembourg on monday. both sides want to see the deal. we are working ha rd want to see the deal. we are working hard on that. the technical teams will get together early next week to continue working on that detail and i think there is a shared desire reflected in the meeting today to secure a deal because we both recognise the deal on both sides. nobody wants to see a no deal, that is why there is a shared sense of purpose to get a deal over the line. there has always been the recognition that the commission themselves have an important part to play but what is clear from the irish government is like the uk government, they want to see a deal done. they recognise no deal is not in the interests of the irish
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government. there is a common purpose in dublin, london and brussels to see a deal over the line andi brussels to see a deal over the line and i think the fact the meeting overrun today, we were getting into the detail and technical teams will meet next week. the prime minister and president task are expedia michael expecting to meet next week. we wa nt michael expecting to meet next week. we want a deal on both sides and we are working hard. there are detailed discussions setting out what would work, and how we take that forward. that is why technical teams have been meeting and why they will meet again next week. to set out that detail and ensure we move forward to secure a deal. there is a lot of work to do but a common purpose to secure a deal. there is recognition in the capitals, the foreign ministers i have spoken to, they wa nt to ministers i have spoken to, they want to see a no deal avoided and they want these teams to reach a deal. there is a clear message from jean—claude juncker and the prime minister that a deal is doable but
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at the same time there is significant work to do. there are serious discussions taking place. we are moving forward with momentum. talks will continue next week between technical teams and it is important we deliver a deal because thatis important we deliver a deal because that is in the interests of the uk and the eu as we move forward to a strong future relationship which is where we wa nt to want to go. the brexit secretary stephen barclay. let's discuss this further with our correspondent, damian grammaticas. they are still talking and they want to find a solution but how far have they got? you get a bit of a different sense of things when you listen to the eu side and what they have been putting out. they want a deal, they want to avoid a no deal. certainly, they are open and continuing to talk. but michel barnier‘s version of this was to say that he is neither optimistic or
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pessimistic but still talking. they are having technical talks, looking at the broad concepts the uk has put out. that means nothing new from the uk, substantially, and in fact his own statement goes on to say that he is reminding the uk side that they have to come up with a workable proposalfor have to come up with a workable proposal for the have to come up with a workable proposalfor the border have to come up with a workable proposal for the border in have to come up with a workable proposalfor the border in ireland to keep the border open and when you marry that up with what the irish foreign minister, the deputy prime minister said this morning, he was very direct in saying that we have to be honest and we are still a long way from a deal. the reason for that is the approach of the british prime minister and that is the fact boris johnson wants to scrap the elements of the deal that theresa may had done. he wants to scrap backstop provisions and in effect that means the prospect of customs checks in ireland but the uk position is that alternative deals, although they
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should be left until the future, a transition period but nothing clear until after the uk has left. the eu and irish view is that is not good enough and i think that is where the talks seem to be stuck. for all the fa ct talks seem to be stuck. for all the fact that technical meetings will go on. jean-claude juncker was quoted in the papers here as saying that he was not emotionally attached to the backstop. michel barnier‘s statement we refer to said that they remain willing and open to examine any proposals that meet all of the objectives of the backstop. if we don't have that, it will be something that does pretty much what the backstop would have done? yes, exactly. that is exactly the eu and irish position. i have to say, it has been for a very long time. ever since the idea of the backstop came up. the uk first said they did not
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like it, we are talking 18 months ago. the eu said to give an alternative and we will absolutely do that if it does the same thing but still hearing the same message today and i think that's part of the reason why simon coveney said they are far away. if anything they have moved backwards. where there was a deal agreed with theresa may's government that dealt with these things through the backstop, that is now not the position of the uk government. the view on the irish and eu side is that the uk is trying to row back on those commitments and they think that is dangerous for the peace process in ireland and unworkable for the eu as a border management process. 0r arrangement. those two tests are ones that have to be met. the fact is, we are now six weeks from a potential exit date, a couple of years down the track. still, no sense of what
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either the final destination for the uk is or what their ideas are for a solution that is workable for all of theissues solution that is workable for all of the issues around the border. that is where, i think, there is the eu view of a sense that the progress is pretty limited at this stage. damian grammaticas, thank you. we will hear more from michel barnier later this afternoon. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... people across the world are joining a day of global climate change protests. the aim — to get businesses and governments to cut emissions. a race against time for thomas cook , the holiday firm must the aim — to get businesses and governments to cut emissions. a race against time for thomas cook — the holiday firm must find 200 million pounds to stay in business. the brexit secretary has held talks in brussels with the eu's chief negotiator, he's said he still believes a brexit deal can be done japan come back to win the opening
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match of the rugby world cup, getting the tournament under way with a 30—10 victory over russia. england's fast bowlerjofra archer has been awarded with a central contract after strong performances in the ashes and at the cricket world cup. valtteri bottas crashes in fact is that the singapore grand prix as he tries to close the gap between him and lewis hamilton this weekend. max. and was the early pa cesetter weekend. max. and was the early pacesetter but air pollution is the talking point of that race. a 19—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a young woman was found dead in staffordshire. police said the body of the woman, who was 19, and has been named locally as keeley bunker, was found at about nine o'clock last night. she was last seen in the early hours of thursday morning. floral tributes have been laid at the scene where her body was found.
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the business minister, kwasi kwarteng, has said the conservative party has "enough structure and discipline in place" to deal with allegations of islamophobia. the party said it had suspended a number of members after becoming aware of the cases, but wouldn't say how many. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth, said this all came to light after the bbc told the conservative party of 20 new cases. these were handed to us by a twitter user who has been campaigning on the issue., collating the data. we went through each case to independently verify it. it is a range. some people haps liked or endorsed what could be offensive material on one or two occasions but others seemed to be repeatedly posing michael posting what could be deemed as islamophobic material. we gave these to the conservative party and they said they looked at them, all of those they consider to be conservative party members have been suspended pending investigation but this is the latest tranche of cases
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like this which has fuelled calls for the conservatives to hold an independent enquiry to this issue of alleged islamophobia. during the conservative party leadership race, borisjohnson suggested that he might back such an independent enquiry and has since said he would like a wider enquiry looking at all forms of racism. we are told by the conservative party that they are establishing terms of an investigation but there has not been detail beyond that. 0nce investigation but there has not been detail beyond that. once again we have had people saying the party has to get on and come up with details of this enquiry and pretty soon, at the moment that detail seems to be lacking. ministers say that the party has robust processes in place to deal with incidents when they are brought to their attention but there the muslim council of britain said that they wanted much tougher action.
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baroness farsi has said that party has been dragging their feet but now they are investigating the terms of they are investigating the terms of the wider issue. the conservative party has been targeting older facebook users with political adverts about brexit, according to research from bbc news. in contrast, younger facebook users are being shown ads by the party on issues such as policing and mental health. maryamm ahmed is here now with more detail... political advertising on facebook is everywhere but we only ever see a fraction of it. if you are 45 years old or over — you may have seen this ad from the conservatives — pro—brexit, anti—remain mp message. however, if you're a man under 45 you may have seen this one. a message about increased resources for policing. same party, different message. this targeting is happening across the political spectrum to varying degrees and thanks to bbc analysis, we can make some interesting observations.
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firstly, our data team noticed that the conservatives are running more ads than other parties that were running a significant number of ads. we also noticed that there was a big difference in the sort of messages the conservatives are choosing to use depending on age. pro—brexit for the over 45s, policing and mental health for the under 45s. we also saw similar audiences split for the lib dems who are also campaigning on brexit — albeit to stop brexit. they are mostly targeting younger voters. the labour party have been less strongly targeting in general. there are fewer brexit campaign messages, with more issues like the environment highlighted alongside general calls to action. but there are hints of a strategy based around gender. 73% of the people who've seen this fox hunting ad are women. targeted advertising on facebook is nothing new but having the ability to drill down in detail is something political parties are tapping into. sam jeffers, co—founder of who targets me, which monitors the use of political ads on social media, says this reflects a growing trend.
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i think there is some evidence that people are switching to facebook and other digital channels from traditional campaigning methods. you can control the message directly that people are seeing, you can go to them again and again where if you have a small number of volunteers knocking on doors, it is difficult to get that to happen. we are seeing a switch in campaigning methods with people looking for online ways of reaching people. we know that facebook has become a huge tool for political campaigning and over the next few months, no doubt things will only get more active. earlier we heard from stephen barclay the brexit secretary about the prospects for a brexit deal and in the last few minutes we've heard from the man he met in brussels, the eu chief negotiator michel barnier. here's what he had to say. firstly, i just met
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firstly, ijust met president tusk, as we did on a regular basis. as jean—claude juncker said this week very clearly, we are always ready to examine an objective base, any proposal in the uk must reach all the objectives of the backstop. to protect the irish economy and the consumers and businesses if their eu and single market. after my cordial meeting with steve barclay and his team, lots of work has to be done in the next few days. you have been patient for a long time on this. exit is a school of patients but we are still ready to reach an agreement —— brexit. you ask if i am optimistic or pessimistic compared to yesterday. when i'm not
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optimistic or pessimistic, i'm still determined. time for a look at the weather... chris has joined chris hasjoined us. chris has joined us. news of a puny depression? but packing a massive punch. these pictures are from texas where imelda has been dumping rain forfun. the where imelda has been dumping rain for fun. the only way to get around is by boat. there has been so much rainfall. there have been big problems, robust trucks can make their way through, i have seen some footage of army vehicles trying to help some of the stranded other vehicles around. houston has also been hit. this is not what caused the rain but this is hurricane humberto as it went past bermuda. an impressive storm system. this looks puny in contrast but because those storms have hit the same part of texas‘ day after day, we have
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enormous quantities of rain build up asa enormous quantities of rain build up as a result and bringing in flooding. how much rain? take a look. they have had 1.1 metres of rain in recent days, incredible. it ra nks rain in recent days, incredible. it ranks as the fifth wettest truck also never. it didn‘t look impressive but it is right up there. it compares a little too hurricane harvey which hit back in 2017, the wettest storm ever to hit the usa. this is not too far behind, and it dumped most of its rain as a tropical depression as the wind eased down. but it goes to show, it isn‘t always the wind with these tropical systems that cause problems. it is a named system, what is the difference between imelda and what would be categorised as a hurricane? the wind speeds, the tropical depression is the weakest of those tropical systems. when it gets passed 7a miles an hour it
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becomes a hurricane and then you go through categories of hurricane on the surface is hurricane scale until you get to the category five which is really nasty like the one that flattened the bahamas a week or two ago. that was the most powerful hurricane that you can get, category five. there has been some debate with scientists thinking we may need another category beyond that, maybe category six should be created because we are seeing really powerful hurricanes, particularly of late. there is some debate in the meteorological community as to whether we need another category of storm after category five. our weather is more straightforward. a glorious start to the day, is a mist and fog in the valleys to start the day, but the latest satellite picture shows extensive sunshine across the country. the only
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exception, this area of cloud has been affecting east anglia, but even thatis been affecting east anglia, but even that is thinning and breaking up. it isa that is thinning and breaking up. it is a one day, temperatures into the 20s, but peaking at 2a degrees across inland parts of aberdeen, more sunshine than shetland, some brighter conditions here. it has been a windy day up to 50 mph around cornwall, and it will continue to be bloody here overnight and into saturday. most of the country, more breeze around, that will stop mist and fog forming, just a few patches here and there, in part of scotland, through the vale of york as well. on into the weekend because my forecast, the wind is coming in from a south—easterly direction, and so it will be dragging in some warm air from france. it will be a woman day, for most of us, sunshine from the start, but a few mist and fog patches. as the day goes by, we may see some showers across the west, but that will be late in the day. with the south—easterly wind, it is warmer, temperatures 22 in edinburgh, great for the time of
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year, 25 in london, higher than you would normally see in the peak of the summer, let alone for the latter pa rt the summer, let alone for the latter part of september. 0n into saturday night and into sunday, a weather system will move on and ultimately, through saturday evening, we will see some showers breaking out, and some of those could be thundery in nature ahead of more persistent rain that will work its way into the west later on in the night, and through sunday, that will push northwards and eastwards. still some uncertainty about the detail, but it looks like the driest weather will be across the north—east of the country, the rain could be heavy at times, and as it pushes through comedy temperatures will be dropping across wales and south—west england, across wales and south—west england, a fresher feel to the weather here as we go through sunday afternoon. next week, low pressure in charge and we will see outbreaks of rain and we will see outbreaks of rain and showers around frequently on most of the days next week. at times, pretty windy as well, rain at times, pretty windy as well, rain at times, turning cooler as well. edinburgh around 15 degrees and the main message from this is enjoy the
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sunshine that we will have over the weekend, there will not be as much of that next week. that is your weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: schoolchildren lead what could be the biggest demonstration yet against global warming. protests are taking place in more than 150 countries, including the uk. this is the scene a little earlier in westminster. a race against time for thomas cook, the holiday firm must find
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£200 million to stay in business. new brexit talks in brussels — but is a deal any closer? saudi arabia claims it has more evidence showing iran sponsored attacks on two of the country‘s oil installations. sport now on afternoon live with gavin ra mjaun, the rugby world cup is under way, and the hosts japan off to a good start? absolutely. colourful and vibra nt start to the rugby world cup. japan, first time hosts, wanting to impress. they certainly did that with a wonderful opening ceremony. and they made it count on the pitch too. they came back from conceding an early try to beat russia. russia have never won a world cup match — and were even beaten byjersey in the build up to the world cup but did take a surprise lead in tokyo. japan were expected to win this one and made their superior skill and fitness count. kotaro matsushima crossed for their first try.
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he added another before half time and then completed his hat—trick 11 minutes from time as the hosts ran out 30 points to 10 winners. they‘re in the same group as scotland and ireland and will probably have to beat one of them if they want to make the knockouts for the first time. it proves to be an exciting pool there. plenty for the home nations to look forward to, then, over the next few days when they start their campaign? some really exciting matches ahead — this weekend, there are some absolute belters. the highlight perhaps being two favourites — the holders nz and south africa going head to head tomorrow. but the home nations are in action. and we‘ve had some team news today — all in action over the next few days. two of them play each other on sunday. ireland have named their side to face scotland in yokohama. it‘s an inexperienced back—three, jordan larmour comes in at full—back for rob kearney who has a calf problem. keith earls is also out. they‘re missing 170 caps from those two alone.
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and as for scotland, sam johnson will play alongside duncan taylor at centre for only the second time, but it‘s an experienced side with stuart hogg, sean maitland and tommy seymour re—unitying in the back three. england have named their strongest possible side to face tonga on sunday in saporro. captain 0wen farrell plays at centre alongside manu tuilagi. that means that george ford will play at fly half. so how is the head coach looking forward to the tournament? the world cup is like a roller—coaster. we are at the top of the ride now looking down. everyone is nervous and excited, you get down the first slope and you‘re not quite sure if you‘re going to throw up or hang on! and you have to adapt to that the players have equipped themselves to ride the roller—coaster because there is gonna be some turns, some accidents, there will be some fun. and we want to enjoy all of those things that come along and the team is equipped to handle it.
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cannot wait to see that much at the weekend. jofra archer was one of the stars of england‘s summer, only making his debut four months ago. he‘s been rewarded with a central contract. he was their leading wicket—taker at the world cup which they won and he also had a very good test series against australia. he has been given a contract for all forms of the game. rory burns has been given a test contract but fellow openerjoe denly has just been given a one—day contract. i thinkjofra is capable of anything. i chatted with his dad at the oval and he thought he would hit 100 mph next year and i said i would take that. but it‘s important we look after him, it‘s not easy to bowl that pace consistently, and he is a fine asset for the team. hazey conditions have overshadowed preparations for the singapore grand prix this weekend, with the city‘s worst air pollution in three years causing some concern. but practice has been taking place today.
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valterri bottas crashed in the first session — hitting the barriers of the street circuit. he missed the opening session as a result. max verstappen was the early pace—setter. the dutchman expecting to challenge the mercedes of bottas and championship leader lewis hamilton over the weekend. that‘s all the sport for now. thank you, gavin. let‘s take you to paris now and show you how they are marking there is a global day of protest to highlight the issue of global warming. we know that in many places, 150 countries, taking part. thousands of different rallies joining in and there will be likely a lot of schoolchildren taking time out of classrooms, some politicians criticised, to make it clear that they want their voices to be heard.
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they are calling on governments and businesses around the world to take action. let‘s hear from businesses around the world to take action. let‘s hearfrom our correspondence around the world who have been following the protests, starting with phil mercer in sydney. there have been more than 100 events across australia, as this country helps to kick—start a global day of action. thousands and thousands of people have gathered here in sydney to campaign for what they are calling climate justice. i was talking to a high school student, a young teenager, and she said that she was too scared to think about ever having children because the future was far too bleak. they are angry, they are scared and they are insisting that the world is on the edge of a climate catastrophe. what they want is for australia to have no new coal, oil or gas projects and also to shift to 100% renewable energy. all of this, of course, in a country, australia, that relies on coal for the vast majority of its electricity. will the prime minister scott
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morrison be swayed by all of this? probably not. in the past, he says, that there has been too much activism in classrooms. here in paris, hundreds, no, thousands of schoolboys and schoolgirls have decided to ditch classes this afternoon and join this demonstration from the place de la nation, one of many such demonstrations across france and, indeed, across europe as the youth movement seeks to weigh upon the consciences of decision—makers around the world. the call, here as elsewhere, is on governments to get serious. to take not just what they would call half measures, but really important life—changing steps to bring the rise in global temperatures under control. because, and it is the age—old unanswerable charge of the young against the old, if nothing is done, it‘s not you who will
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suffer, you will be gone. it‘s us who will pay the price. here in africa, the impact of climate change is already being felt, even though it contributes can significantly less to climate change itself. we are seeing more recurrent droughts, it means people cannot get food, their livelihoods as farmers are threatened, as well as energy problems, a lot of hydroelectric power depends on rivers and the water levels, when they fall, it means that they cannot have electricity. we are already seeing rationing of electricity in some countries, malawi, zimbabwe, south africa, because of that. in the north, it is already making strides towards conserving the environment, just this year, they planted 350
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million trees in one day, so they are showing that it can be done and how the climate can be preserved. in the last half hour, the labour leaderjeremy corbyn has been addressing a protest in westminster — critising donald trump for pulling the us out of the paris climate agreement and calling on all countries to come together to fight global climate change. let‘s have no more of this handholding with donald trump, we wa nt every handholding with donald trump, we want every country on board on this, every country fully signed up to paris, and going a lot further than that. and so, i say to people all over the world today, those who are demonstrating against climate change it is important for climate
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emergency, well done all of you, it feels like the global demonstrations we re feels like the global demonstrations were held in 2003 to try and stop the terrible war in iraq, people coming together across the land from peace and forjustice, to sustain our world and planet. the boyfriend of the murdered teenagerjodie chesney has given a court an emotional account of the night she died. two men and two teenagers are on trial charged with the murder of the 17—year—old who was stabbed in a random attack in march. dan johnson is following the case at the old bailey. eddie coyle, who isjodie chesney‘s boyfriend, has been giving evidence here about that night, the 1st of march, a friday evening, when he, jodie, and a group of friends were sat in east london in a park. they had been smoking cannabis, were listening to music and chatting, and eddie described how two men had been sat close to them in the park but then left. he then described that half an hour later, he saw two men,
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who believed they were the same two men, coming towards the group and he saw one of them approachjodie, who had her back to him, and he demonstrated to the court how he saw the man plunge what he believed was a knife intojody‘s back. after that happened, he said thatjodie was in a shock at first, she didn‘t know what had happened, shejust a shock at first, she didn‘t know what had happened, she just started screaming. he said she screamed very lightly, continuously. she was screaming for about two minutes straight and then she began to faint. as he described how some of his friends went to get help, some people who live nearby came across to the park to do what they could foster peace and didn‘t realise at first how serious her injuries were because of how thick her coat was. he said it was about 15 minutes before the police and paramedics arrived to try to help her, but she could not be saved. this morning, the court has also heard aboutjodie av the court has also heard aboutjodie a‘s character. eddie coyle said she was a great person, very funny, silly, sensible sometimes, and he was asked, is there any reason why
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anybody would want to hurt her? eddie said no, he could think of no reason. the suggestion from the prosecution was that this was some sort of argument about a drug steel, of whichjodie sort of argument about a drug steel, of which jodie chesney was no sort of argument about a drug steel, of whichjodie chesney was no part, she was an innocent victim. —— drugs deal. senior school leaders have supported a call for a review into why there‘s been a rise in the number of young people in england leaving school without five good gcses. the children‘s commissioner, anne longfield, says the problem has increased by 28% in the last four years , with about 100,000 pupils a year affected — that‘s almost one in five. the government says maths and english gcse results have got better and it‘s working to improve standards. in a moment, we will have the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: a day of global climate change protests. the aim — to get businesses and governments to cut emissions. the brexit secretary has held talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator, he‘s said he still believes a brexit deal can be done.
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saudi arabia claims it has evidence showing iran sponsored attacks on two of the country‘s oil installations. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live. as you‘ve been hearing — thomas cook is racing to get hold of more rescue funds — the travel company could fall into administration this weekend unless the it finds an extra £200 million. rbs is the first of the uk‘s big four banks to be led by a woman — it‘s named alison rose as its new chief executive. she joined the bank 27 years ago as a graduate trainee, will replace ross mcewan in november. and she‘ll be paid more than him — her annual salary has been set at £1.1 million. and climate change commitments — some of the world‘s largest firms have promised big—spending on green energy plans.
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amazon has pledged to be carbon neutral by 2040 and google says it will make record renewable energy purchases. those announcements coincide with today‘s "climate strike" day — with millions taking part across the globe. let‘s pick up on that top story and thomas cook — how do you suddenly realise that you need £200 million by the end of the weekend? it isa it is a bit ofa it is a bit of a surprise, they suddenly needed by the beacon, how does this happen? this dates back to july when thomas cook came up with a business plan and said, actually, we need around £900 million in refinancing, that is a lot higher than they originally thought, they thought they only needed £150 million. they thought most of the money would come from the chinese firm who were involved in a rescue dealfor firm who were involved in a rescue deal for thomas firm who were involved in a rescue dealfor thomas coke, but firm who were involved in a rescue deal for thomas coke, but the lenders had a very good look at the business plan and didn‘t think that £900 million was enough and have
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actually asked them for more, so they have to have a £1.1 billion in total, that is the extra 200 million. a worrying time for them and for people who have booked to go on holiday with them. in america, another death said to be related to the use of e—cigarettes? another death said to be related to the use of e-cigarettes? that's right, this is a subject close to donald trump is my card, only last week, he announced he wanted to implement a ban on flavoured e—cigarettes. let‘s speak to our north american business reporter. she is at the new york stock exchange. vivian, the number of people suffering illnesses is on the rise, another death, what do the health authorities say in the state about this? health authorities here have actually given the advice to stop using e—cigarettes altogether while they investigate what is causing these illnesses. as you say, the numberof causing these illnesses. as you say, the number of people fronting up to hospitals here with serious lung problems has risen to over 500 now, and eight people have been killed.
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all health problems happening to people using e—cigarettes and vaping. is a big worry is young people, isn‘t it? they are using e—cigarettes more and more, and in really big numbers. absolutely, there are some amazing statistics out here, as many as one quarter of senior heysel students in the us have used an e—cigarette in the last month. —— high school students. perhaps the health problems are being caused by the e—cigarettes on the black market, e—cigarettes that contain thc, the active ingredient in marijuana, it is available on the black market. doctors think that in many of these cases there is some kind of oil at acetate that is being used to dilate the thc and that is being trapped in people's lungs, stopping them from breathing properly. scientists and investigators are investigating that train of thought, but there are still a lot of questions. in the la st 24 still a lot of questions. in the last 24 hours, because young
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people's risks are so great, networks have stopped all cigarette —— e—cigarette adverts, because they run channels like mtv and the comedy channel, popular with young people, so channel, popular with young people, so there is worry about young people using e—cigarettes which is growing day by day. thank you, vivienne, we will keep an eye on this story. we have a quick time to look at the markets. thomas cook uc down 18%, it was down more than that before. royal bank of scotland, investors seem royal bank of scotland, investors seem to like the fact they have a woman in charge. about time, too. i‘m glad you said that, it saved me saying it. i don‘t mind waiting, thank you. the rugby world cup has kicked off in tokyo, with the hosts japan comfortably beating russia 30 — 10 in the opening game. around 400,000 foreign fans are expected to descend
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on the country over the next 6 weeks. japan is the first country in asia and the first outside of rugby union‘s traditional strongholds to stage the event. we can speak now tojosh gardner, rugby fan and one half of the rugby union podcast "blood and mud". he joins us via webcam from bath. you might be in england, but you support wales, don‘t you? you might be in england, but you support wales, don't you?” you might be in england, but you support wales, don't you? i do, yes. lets a n support wales, don't you? i do, yes. lets an our colours are nice and early. —— nail i will colours. how exciting is this world cup for you? is exec sighting for a number of reasons, primarily because it is the most open world cup that i can remember in my lifetime. there is not really a clear favourite, previously, the last two world cups, we have had some teams looking streets ahead of everybody else, thatis streets ahead of everybody else, that is not the case, this time, it is an open tournament, any one of maybe five teams could win it, that
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makes it exciting. island are ranked top in the world, how much pressure does that put them under? —— ireland. sun try to put as much pressure on them as they want.l ireland. sun try to put as much pressure on them as they want. a lot of people get funny about the world rankings, there was a lot of consternation when wales were number one last month for a couple of weeks. it should be a benefit to them if anything, they can go into them if anything, they can go into the tournament thinking, yes, we are the tournament thinking, yes, we are the best team in the world on paper at least. whether that will pan out in reality remains to be seen. the wales assistant coach has been sent home for an alleged breach of betting regulations. how problematic will that be for the side? it's not ideal, certainly. it is a huge distraction, particularly so close to the start of the tournament, just a couple of days before the first game, to have somebody who has been pa rt game, to have somebody who has been part of the wales setup for 11 yea rs. part of the wales setup for 11 years. it is absolutely not what you
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want. 0n the plus side, they have stephenjones, who will want. 0n the plus side, they have stephen jones, who will take want. 0n the plus side, they have stephenjones, who will take over the wales attack job stephenjones, who will take over the wales attackjob after the world cup anyway, he is coming in early now to fill in, and also, wales are a very settled team, so there is a sense that if they don‘t know what they are doing by now in terms of an attacking game plan, they probably never will. it is not ideal, but it is not as bad as it could be. at seventh in the world, scotland are the lowest ranked of the home nations, but they got through to the quarterfinals last time. if it is an open competition, as you say, how much might that help scotland?m certainly will not hinder them. they are ina certainly will not hinder them. they are in a group with ireland, japan, russia and samoa, and on the evidence of the opening game earlier, worries about japan that quite a lot of people had before the tournament perhaps don‘t look like they are as much of a banana skin as they are as much of a banana skin as they were maybe four years ago with south africa. scotland has a very
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strong chance of qualifying for the quarterfinals and from then, it is anyone‘s game and scotland play a brand of rugby that is very attacking, so there is nothing to say that they cannot essentially go deepin say that they cannot essentially go deep in the tournament themselves, if they have a good run. elliot daly, an england player, has been quoted saying the first target for the england team is to get beyond the england team is to get beyond the group phase after the defeat in 2015, putting your allegiances to one side, is that the kind of approach that england should be taking? i mean, yes. it is definitely... i hope they have learned that lesson from four years ago that you cannot run before you are walking in that regard. they have to do the boring stuff first, they have to get the pool out of the way, they have not got an easy pool, they are with france and argentina, who are both potentially quite strong. they are definitely the favourite in that pool, and they are definitely one of the favourites for the world cup, but it is sensible
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and probably given everything that happened in 2015, it is safer for them to focus on the world cup pool before they start thinking about winning it. which home nation has the best chance of winning?” winning it. which home nation has the best chance of winning? i think england, with the way the draw could fall, they could certainly have a very good chance. ireland have a great chance, wales have a great chance as well and scotland, i would say, are probably, if they will struggle a little bit, particularly because they don‘t have the forward power that ireland, england and wales do, but certainly, any three of those three could go very far in the tournament and could potentially go all the way. josh gardner from the podcast blood and mud, thank you for talking to us. now it‘s time for a look at the weather.
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some glorious sunshine already today, for the vast majority of us, it will stay that way this afternoon. some mist and fog earlier this morning, that has cleared and we have clear blue skies now. you can see the extent of the sun shone on the satellite picture. we had an area of cloud across east anglia, that has melted out of the way, sunshine here. eight sunny afternoon in shetland compared with recent days. we have just in shetland compared with recent days. we havejust hit in shetland compared with recent days. we have just hit 24 degrees in the scottish highlands, temperatures into the low 20s today, but we will continue to have strong gusts of wind around the headlands of cornwall. gusts here of around 50 mph and they will continue to be very gusty overnight and into saturday. the weasel pick—up for many of us overnight, so not quite as extensive mist and fog as we had this morning for this coming night. —— the breeze will pick up. still a few patches for the vale of york. another chilling out in the countryside. tomorrow, things will warm up, south—easterly wind dragging warm airfrom france and pushing it across the vast majority of the uk, temperatures will be
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rising nicely. some cloud around across north—east scotland for a time, otherwise, sunshine across the board. later on in western areas, we could start to see some such hours breaking up, but before they arrive, the temperatures, 24 in birmingham, 25 in london, 22 in edinburgh, so the warmth will be widespread. through saturday evening, saturday night and into sunday, we will have this area of low pressure ultimately putting the band of rain three. initially, saturday evening, we will see some thundery showers breaking out, but a more persistent band of rain will work in from the west as we head into sunday itself. still some uncertainty as to where the heavy rain will be, but it looks like the driest weather will continue across the north—east of the uk. as the front pushes through, you will notice a temperatures dropping across wales and south—west england, there will be a fresher feel to the weather here during the second half of the weekend. main message from the forecast is make the most of the dry weather we have
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at some point in the weekend, because next week, low pressure is coming from the atlantic, bringing spells of heavy rain, plenty of showers, and at times, it will be windy as well. temperatures will ease downwards, towards the middle pa rt ease downwards, towards the middle part of the week, edinburgh, 15 celsius. you will remember we are expecting 22 on saturday, so we are going to drop 7 degrees as we head into the middle of next week. cooler, more unsettled weather next week, make the most of the sunshine this weekend.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall. today at three. school children lead what could be the biggest demonstration yet, calling for urgent action on climate change. protests are taking place in more than 150 countries, including the uk. this is the scene in paris. new brexit talks in brussels — but is a deal any closer? there is still a lot of work to do but there is a common purpose to secure a but there is a common purpose to secure a deal, i think there is recognition in the capitals and the foreign ministers i have been speaking to. they want to see a no deal avoided. the famous grandfather said i'm not optimistic or pessimistic, but feeling determined.
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a race against time for thomas cook — the holiday firm must find 200 million pounds to stay in business. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — gavin. the host nation —japan — get off to the best start at the rugby world cup... a comfortable win over russia. we‘ll also have an update on how the home nations are preparing for their opening games. and chris has all of the weather. make the most of the sunshine while it lasts? it's one for the next couple of days before we see u nsettled couple of days before we see unsettled conditions. as we head through the second bit of the weekend. we have a look at what is going on in texas, severe floods thanks to depression imelda. thanks chris. also coming up — we‘ll be speaking to singer jack savoretti as tomorrow celebrities will gather for a special celebration on the un‘s international day of peace.
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hello, this is afternoon live. i‘m martine croxall. millions of children around the world have stayed away from school to lead what could be the biggest day of protest yet demanding urgent action on climate change. thousands of separate demonstrations are taking place in 150 countries, including the uk. the protestors are demanding immediate action from both governments and businesses — as duncan kennedy reports. what do we want? climate action! when do we want it? now! home to 7.5 billion people. beautiful, but fragile. robust, but warming. and today, the stage for a global message. the pacific island of vanuatu helped send the first of those messages. and no wonder.
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their low—lying homes could be among the first to disappear, if sea levels rise. in sydney, children also put climate before classroom, thousands marching with teachers and other workers to call for government action to cut greenhouse gas emissions. the younger a person is, the more that the changing climate will impact them as they grow, and the less of a voice they are given today. considering we have such a short amount of time to turn this issue around, it‘s vital that young people are at the forefront of this conversation because they will be impacted more than anyone else. i think this is the most important issue of our time and i'm here for my children's future. i think it is that important. this isn't a fringe movement, this isn't a greeny issue, this isn't a lefty issue, this is a human issue. they have to stop making political advantage of this issue and unite the country behind a crisis approach to dealing with modifying our economy to be carbon free. it‘s absolutely essential.
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the swedish environmental activist greta thunberg later tweeted her support. the new day in south africa brought singers and dancers onto the streets. here in johannesburg, they also wanted to send a message to next week‘s un conference on climate change that the speed of action must be increased. in india, the crowd seemed more modest. but, in a country whose economy is expanding at around 7% a year, the government has argued growth can exist alongside climate controls. don't let our people die! save our
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earth! from thailand, where this was still a day that found room for humour... ..to berlin, where the crowds gathered to demand change. when do we want it? now! in britain, around 300 protests are taking place across the country. this was hove on the south coast. a place bathed in sunshine, for campaigners basking in the solidarity of theirjoint action. what do we want? change! when do we want it? now! at harrogate in north yorkshire, children were again the focus. the government said it could not endorse a school day being missed but that message seemed lost here amid the enthusiasm of their first time protest. bikes have been integral to nottingham since the 19th century, and today campaigners used to pedal power to push their climate message here. this is the most important, only important thing going on at the moment. there is no planet, there no nothing.
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i have never been a protester before but we have to act now otherwise it's just too late. they are in my way. does it annoy you? yes, i'm in a rush, i've got deliveries to make. the biggest presence has been in westminster, thousands on the march here, all part of a day of action involving 150 countries. and quite possibly the biggest global warming protest yet seen. duncan kennedy, bbc news. let‘s hear from some our correspondents around the world who‘ve been following the demonstrations — starting with phil mercer in sydney. there have been more than 100 events across australia,
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as this country helps to kick—start a global day of action. thousands and thousands of people have gathered here in sydney to campaign for what they are calling climate justice. i was talking to a high school student, a young teenager, and she said that she was too scared to think about ever having children because the future was far too bleak. they are angry, they are scared and they are insisting that the world is on the edge of a climate catastrophe. what they want is for australia to have no new coal, oil or gas projects and also to shift to 100% renewable energy. all of this, of course, in a country, australia, that relies on coal for the vast majority of its electricity. will the prime minister scott morrison be swayed by all of this? probably not. in the past, he says, that there has been too much activism in classrooms. here in paris, hundreds, no, thousands of schoolboys and schoolgirls have decided to ditch classes this afternoon and join this demonstration from the place de la nation,
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one of many such demonstrations across france and, indeed, across europe as the youth movement seeks to weigh upon the consciences of decision—makers around the world. the call, here as elsewhere, is on governments to get serious. to take not just what they would call half measures, but really important life—changing steps to bring the rise in global temperatures under control. because, and it is the age—old unanswerable charge of the young against the old, if nothing is done, it‘s not you who will suffer, you will be gone. it‘s us who will pay the price. here in africa, the impact of climate change is already being felt. it contributes significantly less to climate change itself but we are seeing recurring droughts, and
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in southern africa it means people cannot get food, their livelihoods as farmers are threatened, as well as farmers are threatened, as well as energy problems, a lot of hydroelectric power depends on rivers and water levels, when they've, it means they cannot have electricity. we are already seeing rationing of electricity in several countries, malawi, zimbabwe, south africa because of that. but in the north, ethiopian is already making strides towards conserving the environment. just this year they planted 350 million trees in one day. they are showing that it can be done and how the climate can be preserved. let‘s take a look at what‘s been happening here in the uk... this was birmingham earlier today where thousands of protestors, including hundreds of children gathered in victoria sq, before marching through nearby streets.
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while in the north west thousands more gathered around st george‘s hall in liverpool to add their voices to the global action... and children have been leading the protests — these school pupils from liskeard in cornwall children protested outside their school this morning. thomas cook could go into administration this weekend, unless it can plug a two—hundred—million pound funding gap. britain‘s oldest package—holiday firm is in talks with stakeholders, after its banks demanded that it comes up with contingency financing. without a rescue deal, the firm is likely to collapse — leaving more than 150,000 british holiday—makers in need of repatriation and threatening 9000 jobs in the uk. simon gompertz reports. holidays in danger. at any time, there are up to 100 thomas cook flights in the air.
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now there is mounting concern they will not be able to keep going. people who have booked have been turning up at shops to see how they are affected, likejean in london, hoping to go to tunisia next month. she thinks the government should step in. we have just got to keep our fingers crossed, haven‘t we? and hope for the best and we will hopefully know by sunday, or whenever. are you worried that thomas cook might be in financial trouble? i don't think so. i think they are a big company. i mean, they will find a way of getting out of it, obviously. well, hopefully they do. already overseas with thomas cook right now, more than 150,000 uk travellers, mostly on package holidays with atol protection to bring them back. but tens of thousands are on flight only deals without that guarantee. the cost of repatriation is put at £600 million, organised by the civil aviation authority. that includes paying for some to finish their hotel stay. there are 22,000 jobs at risk, 9,000 of them in the uk. a big question is who qualifies to be brought back without paying? when monarch failed two years ago,
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the government did intervene and paid for everyone to return. that set a precedent which ministers would find hard to ignore. your flight will be organised by the civil aviation authority and you will be brought back pretty much as normal. it is people who have maybe got a half term booking, christmas or new year trip, or indeed who have booked for next summer who will find that, while they will get their money back, either from their credit card company or under the atol scheme, of course there will be fewer holidays out there and prices probably will have gone up. thomas cook is in the throes of negotiating a rescue deal with the chinese group fosun, which already owns club med and wolves football club. but what has thrown all of that injeopardy is a demand from thomas cook‘s banks to show it can produce £200 million in funding to tide it over the lean winter months.
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the pilots‘ union says that since one of the banks calling for more financial assurances is state—owned rbs, it should be making sure the company is rescued rather than putting it underfurther pressure. thomas cook, his statue in leicester, founded the business back in the 1840s. it might still survive much longer but, if it doesn‘t, we could see the biggest ever emergency return of holiday—makers. simon gompertz, bbc news. the brexit secretary has been holding talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator — michel barnier. stephen barclay said both sides had ‘serious detailed discussions‘ and that getting a deal remains their common purpose. yesterday, the european commission president, jean—claude juncker said he was confident a deal can be reached. when asked if he shared mrjuncker‘s confidence, this is what the brexit secretary had to say... yes, i do, and that is why we are working so hard to secure
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a deal, i was in madrid yesterday and in cyprus the day before that with the prime minister in luxembourg on monday. both sides want to see the deal. we are working hard on that. the technical teams will get together early next week to continue working on that detail and i think there is a shared desire reflected in the meeting today to secure a deal because we both recognise the deal on both sides. nobody wants to see a no deal, that is why there is a shared sense of purpose to get a deal over the line. there has always been the recognition that the commission themselves have an important part to play but what is clear from the irish government is like the uk government, they want to see a deal done. they recognise no deal is not in the interests of the irish government. there is a common purpose in dublin, london and brussels to see a deal over the line and i think the fact the meeting overran today,
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we were getting into the detail and technical teams will meet next week. the prime minister and president tusk are expected to meet at the un next week. we want a deal on both sides and we are working hard. there are detailed discussions setting out what would work, and how we take that forward. the eu chief negotiator michel barnier said he was still determined to get a deal with the uk. firstly, ijust met president tusk, as we did on a regular basis. asjuncker said this week very clearly, we are always ready to examine an objective base, any proposal in the uk must reach all the objectives of the backstop. to protect the peace in ireland and the irish economy
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and the consumers and businesses of the eu and single market. after my cordial meeting with steve barclay and his team, lots of work has to be done in the next few days. you have been patient for a long time on this. brexit is a school of patience but we are still ready to reach an agreement. you ask if i am optimistic or pessimistic compared to yesterday. when i‘m not optimistic or pessimistic, i‘m still determined. 0ur correspondent in brussels, damian grammaticas, said despite the positive noises coming out of today‘s meeting, both sides are a long way from agreeing a brexit deal. you get a different sense of things when you listen to the eu side and what they have been putting out. stephen barclay is right that the eu wa nted stephen barclay is right that the eu wanted deal and want to avoid a no deal. certainly they are open and continuing to talk but michel barnier‘s own version of this was to say that he is neither optimistic
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nor pessimistic, he is still talking and what they are doing is he said technical talks looking at the initial broad concepts that the uk has put out. that means nothing new from the uk substantially, and in fa ct from the uk substantially, and in fact mr barnier‘s own statement goes on to say he is reminding the uk side they have to come up with a workable proposal for the border side they have to come up with a workable proposalfor the border in ireland, to keep the border open and when you marry that up with what the irish foreign minister simon coveney said this morning, he was very direct in saying we have to be honest, we are a long way from a deal and the reason for that, he said, was the approach of the british prime minister and that is the fact boris johnson wants british prime minister and that is the fact borisjohnson wants to scrap the elements of the deal that theresa may had done. he wants to scrap backstop provisions and the prospect of customs checks in
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ireland but the uk position is the alternatives to deal should be left until the future. a transition period, but nothing clear until after the uk has left. the eu and irish view is that is not good enough and i‘m afraid i think that is where the talks seem to be stuck at the minute for all the fact that technical meetings will go on. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: schoolchildren lead a day of global climate change protests. the aim — to get businesses and governments to cut emissions. the brexit secretary has held talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator — he‘s said he still believes a brexit deal can be done. a race against time for thomas cook — the holiday firm must find 200 million pounds to stay in business. and in the sport, japan kick off the world cup with a convincing win over russia. the tournament hosts are hosting the event for the first
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time, the home nations prepare for their matches. jofra archer has been awarded with a central contract covering all forms of the game. he was their leading wicket take at the cricket world cup and impressed in the ashes. va ltteri bottas and impressed in the ashes. valtteri bottas crashes in the first practice at the singapore grand prix. championship leader lewis hamilton was fastest in second practice. air pollution is the biggest talking point though from there. i will be back in 15 minutes. see you then! the boyfriend of the murdered teenagerjodie chesney has described how she collapsed in his arms after being stabbed in a london park. two men and two teenagers are on trial charged with the murder of the 17—year—old who was killed in a random attack in march. danjohnson has been following the case at the old bailey. eddie coyle, jodie chesney‘s boyfriend, has been giving evidence today about that night, the 1st of
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march. a friday evening when he, jodie comer and a group of friends we re jodie comer and a group of friends were in harold hill in london. —— jodie chesney. he described to the court how two men had been sat close to them in the park then left. he described how 30 minutes later he saw two men, he believed to be the same two, coming towards the group. 0ne same two, coming towards the group. one of them approached jodie, who had her back to them. he demonstrated how he saw the man plunge what he believed was a knife into her back. after that happened, he said thatjodie was at first in shock, she did not know what happened. she started screaming very loudly and continuously. she was screaming for about two minutes straight and then she began to faint. she described —— he described how his friends went to get help and some people living nearby came to do what they could. he did not realise at first how serious her injuries we re at first how serious her injuries were because of how thick her coat was. it was 15 minutes before police
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and paramedics arrived to help her but she could not be saved. this morning the court has also heard aboutjody‘s morning the court has also heard about jody‘s character. morning the court has also heard aboutjody‘s character. eddie coyle said that she was a great person, very funny, silly and sensible sometimes. he was asked if there was any reason why someone would want to hurt her and he said no, any reason why someone would want to hurt herand he said no, he any reason why someone would want to hurt her and he said no, he could think of no reason. the suggestion from the prosecution is that this was some sort of rail about a drugs deal of whichjodie chesney was of part. no part. a 19—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a young woman was found dead in staffordshire. police said the body of the woman, who was 19, and has been named locally as keeley bunker, was found at about nine o clock last night. she was last seen in the early hours of thursday morning. floral tributes have been laid at the scene where her body was found.
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the business minister, kwasi kwarteng, has said the conservative party has "enough structure and discipline in place" to deal with allegations of islamophobia. the party said it had suspended a number of members after becoming aware of the cases, but wouldn‘t say how many. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth, is at westminster. what is the background to this? this has been going on. time. they have been calls for the conservative party to hold an independent enquiry into this issue of alleged islamophobia among some members. at times, batches of cases have come to light. we were passed details of more than 20 cases by a twitter user who has been campaigning and collating this information. we went through and independently verified each. these people say they are conservative party members and have posted this content on twitter. in some cases one or two offensive posts, other times fairly regularly posting offensive content. we gave the details to the party and they said they immediately suspended all of those they found were party members. they say they do not stand
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for prejudice or discrimination of any kind but that has not stopped calls for an independent enquiry. even today there has been criticism from the former conservative party chairman baroness pharmacy, saying in her view they are feet dragging and back—seat siding —— baroness warsi. this comes down to the issue as to whether or not they are prepared to have an independent investigation. during the conservative leadership contest, this issue came up and at the time sajid javid said to the other conservative contenders that we should commit to investigation into islamophobia. at the time they seemed to agree. borisjohnson went on to win that race and he said he thought there should be a wider enquiry into all forms of discrimination and racism in the party. we haven‘t had many specifics since then. i‘m told by a party spokesman they are establishing the
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terms of the investigation and i understand the timeframe depends on whether the work going on in government and to —— and they are defining islamophobia. baroness wa rsi defining islamophobia. baroness warsi has been critical of how long the process takes, saying it is too slow and the conservative party needs to commit more quickly to holding an enquiry, looking specifically at this issue of islamophobia. alex forsyth, thank you. now have a look at this — a high resolution image has been released by the european space agency this week shows a slice of mars, from north to south pole. taken by the mars express orbiter back in june, this image reveals clouds encircling the northern polar region, the variations in colour and tone of the differing surface composition across the planet‘s regions and "the martian dichotomy" — the boundary between the two hemispheres where the altitude of the terrain changes by several kilometers,
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the north being much lower than the south. meanwhile, back on earth the weather forecast with chris. in the elder hasn‘t reached hurricane proportions but has caused some damage. rather than carbon dioxide parts like they have on mars, we are talking about water. a lot in houston and texas more generally. in houston and texas more generally. in houston itself we have had severe floods in 2015, 2016, 2017 and this year as well. there seems to be a trend. houston itself as one of the fastest developing cities. partly the spread of concrete isn‘t helping things, the warmer world holds more water. this is the area we are looking at. imelda is quite unique compared to that hurricane we went past. it is stuck in the same place
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day after day. that rain has been colossal with this one. puny but persistent! yes, these are the rainfall totals that have full on. 1.1 metres of rain. more than london gets ina 1.1 metres of rain. more than london gets in a year. there are reports that some areas have had a metre in 24—hour is. more than london‘s rainfall in the space of the day. incredible. that is why they have had so many flooding problems. they think this is the fifth wettest tropical system to hit the mainland united states. it may have been persistent but puny but it packed a punch. compared to hurricane harvey that hit a couple of years ago, that is the wettest, bringing 1.5 metres of rain. but houston got really badly hit by that one. a pattern emerging. some of the gulf coasts are sinking. that is caused by ice a static rebound. i didn‘t make it up,
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he said that! it is where the glaziers, sheets from the last ice age were pushing down on canada, now they have gone, the land comes back up they have gone, the land comes back up and the south is falling. we get the same in the uk. scotland is bouncing up, london and south—east england is slowly sinking downwards as the planet readjust. great is being lifted off. the things you learn in the weather forecast! and finally, on imelda, is it passing? what is coming up behind?m finally, on imelda, is it passing? what is coming up behind? it is fragmenting. there is still flash flood warnings in force, the situation is still severe. it is the case of the worst passing but a long time before that floodwater has gone away. there have been reports of some fatale are teas from this. it has been very serious. —— fatalities. and weather—wise, we
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have sunshine. this was in cumbria, early morning mist and fog. that has cleared. as has this finger of cloud affecting parts of norfolk and suffolk today. plenty of sunshine across—the—board. suffolk today. plenty of sunshine across—the—boa rd. sunny skies reaching the shetlands. we have seen temperatures peaking at 24 degrees. strong winds continuing to affect the headlands of cornwall, where we have gusts of just the headlands of cornwall, where we have gusts ofjust over 50 miles an hour. it will stay windy across the headlands. as we go through the night and into saturday, and through the uk, that breeze will be stronger. mist and fog, less widespread tonight but patches around. the vale of york and the valleys in scotland as well. another chilly night, temperatures getting into low single figures. at the start of the weekend, south—easterly winds dragging in airfrom france. boosting temperatures significantly. more cloud in north—east scotland but a sunny start to the day. once
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we lose that mist and fog. showers break out across western parts of the uk but before they happen, temperatures up to 22 degrees in edinburgh, 24 in cardiff and birmingham, and 25 in london. it will feel warm in the sunshine. we see a slower slide into more u nsettled see a slower slide into more unsettled weather through saturday evening, saturday night and sunday. this area of low pressure moves in, there will be some heavy showers and thunderstorms breaking out ahead of the main band of rain swinging into parts of the south and west of the uk as we go through sunday morning. rain extends north—eastwards but there is uncertainty about the exact position of this rain. looking likely that the driest weather is in the north—east of the uk through sunday. temperatures warm for this time of year but cooler in wales and south—west england. next week, the weather pattern looks like this. low pressure running through the uk,
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bringing spells of rain and heavy showers. also strong winds at this time of year as well. unsettled, a different week compared with the dry week we have had. getting cooler, 22 degrees tomorrow, 15 degrees as we head through the middle of the week. make the most of the warm sunshine while it lasts.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. schoolchildren lead what could be the biggest demonstration yet, calling for urgent action on climate change. protests are taking place in more than 150 countries, including the uk. this was the scene a little earlier in westminster. the brexit secretary has held talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator, he‘s said he still believes a brexit deal can be done. a race against time for thomas cook — the holiday firm must find
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200 million to stay in business. sport now on afternoon live with gavin ra mjaun, the rugby world cup is under way, and the hosts japan starting with a win. you that is right, japan got off to the best possible start, you must have been a tense occasion for them, they are the first time hosts, and they are the first time hosts, and the first time the tournament has been held in asia. a wonderful opening ceremony in tokyo, and the day was capped off with that fine win over russia. russia have never won a world cup match — and were even beaten byjersey in the build up to the world cup but did take a surprise lead in tokyo. japan were expected to win this one and made their superior skill and fitness count. kotaro matsushima crossed for their first try. he added another before half time and then completed his hatrrick 11 minutes from time as the hosts ran out 30 points to 10 winners.
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japan are in the same group as scotland and ireland, and will probably have to beat one of them if they want to make the knockouts for the first time. how promising is this tournament for the home nations? they will all get started in the next few days on their campaigns. yes, they‘re in action alongside some other tantalising ties. perhaps one of the matches of the tournament, when new zealand play south africa — that‘s tomorrow. but the home nations all play over the next few days. six nations rivals scotland an ireland play each other on sunday. and we‘ve had some team news today. ireland have named their side to face scotland in yokohama. it‘s an inexperienced back—three, jordan larmour comes in at full—back for rob kearney who has a calf problem. keith earls is also out. they‘re missing 170 caps from those two alone. and as for scotland, sam johnson will play alongside duncan taylor at centre for only the second time, but it‘s an experienced side with stuart hogg, sean maitland and tommy seymour re—uniting in the back three.
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and england have named their strongest possible side to face tonga on sunday in saporro. captain 0wen farrell plays at centre alongside manu tuilagi. it means george ford will play at fly half. and head coach eddiejones can‘t wait to get going. the world cup is like a roller—coaster. we are at the top of the ride now looking down. everyone is nervous and excited, you get down the first slope and you‘re not quite sure if you‘re going to throw up or hang on! and you have to adapt to that the players have equipped themselves to ride the roller—coaster because there is gonna be some turns, some accidents, there will be some fun. and we want to enjoy all of those things that come along and the team is equipped to handle it. i‘m sure there will be some fun to be had there. jofra archer was one of the stars of england‘s summer. he only made his debut four months ago — he‘s now been rewarded with a central contract.
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it covers all forms of the game. rory burns has been given a test contract — but fellow openerjoe denly has just been awarded a one day version. archer was their leading wicket—taker in their world cup winning campaign. so what next for the fast bowler? i thinkjofra is capable of anything. i chatted with his dad at the oval and he thought he would hit 100 mph next year and i said i would take that. but it‘s important we look after him, it‘s not easy to bowl that pace consistently, and he is a fine asset for the team. hazy conditions have overshadowed preparations for the singapore grand prix this weekend, with the city‘s worst air pollution in three years causing some concern. but practice has been taking place today. valterri bottas crashed in the first session — hitting the barriers of the street circuit. he missed the rest of the session as a result. championship leader lewis hamilton was the fastested in second practice ahead of qualifying tomorrow. that‘s all the sport for now. i‘ll have more for
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you in the next hour. tomorrow is the un‘s international day of peace. celebrities will gather tomorrow for a concert at the globe theatre in london to mark the 20th anniversary of the nonprofit organisation peace one day, that has campaigned to make the day more widely recognised. peace one day began in 1999 as a day of ceasefire and non—violence, and in 2001, it received the backing of the united nations. stars including sting, emeli sande, jude law and jack savoretti will be performing. jack is here. about how peace one day began from its founderjeremy gilley. over the next three years, i travelled the world to build the case, working with the united nations, governments, nobel peace laureates, humanitarian organisations and those living in conflict zones. if there is a cessation for a day, then it gives us an opportunity to move supplies through places that
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are otherwise difficult. any moment that we can give the combatants to pause, to think, and reflect on what they are doing to their own people and their environment will be a great achievement, and i would support it 100%. the great thing is that at least we have done something for the next generation. in september 2001, the member states of the united nations unanimously adopted a peace day, a day of ceasefire and nonviolence, the 21st of september, annually. it was incredible. it was originally brought to our attention by a uk—based organisation, peace one day. it is so decided... jack savoretti is here. how did you get involved with this? i got involved, jeremy, who started
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this in 1999, he came to me when he was putting together this concert for tomorrow, which will have the likes of sting, willie young, macros one, ofan likes of sting, willie young, macros one, of an organisation —— emeli sande, ofan one, of an organisation —— emeli sande, of an organisation that i had about 15 years ago, through friends and miners were working on it, and to see the success it has had, when they were working on it in about 2007 and i remember in that year, they had managed to get to the taliban to partake in a day of peace, in 24 hours of peace, they put down their weapons to the point where 1.4 put down their weapons to the point where1.4 million children were able to get vaccinated throughout that year because of the change where doctors and nurses were able to come in during this time, so it wasn‘t just an idea of peace, it was actually being put into action and that was something that i was very inspired by and i‘m very honoured to be taking part tomorrow in the 20th anniversary. why do you think the taliban responded to this organisation in that way? where
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talks at government level have failed successively over the years. this isn‘t about... this is about a day. it is easier to grasp and it is not about trying to change a com plete not about trying to change a complete mentality or a complete culture, it is a day where you just ta ke culture, it is a day where you just take a moment and talk about what peace means to different people, it has a different definition around the world within individuals, i‘m sure we would have different definitions of what it means to me or you. it is easier to grasp, a 24—hour moment, it is the same way we respond to father‘s day, mother‘s day, valentine‘s day, christmas, and i hope it becomes more like that, a day where it is easily accessible to understand and to embrace and i think that is why it has been so successful on a global scale, not just locally. you mention this 20th anniversary concert at the globe tomorrow. those attending will get tomorrow. those attending will get to enjoy some fantastic entertainment, lots of wonderful music, but what you hope they will
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ta ke music, but what you hope they will take away with them from it?|j music, but what you hope they will take away with them from it? i hope they take away the idea that peace isn‘t a dirty word, it is something you should about, it is something... people are saying, what should be do on the day? i am not in conflict, i don‘t live in an area of conflict, what should i do? for those who do live in conflict, i hope it is a big discussion, but for those who don‘t, make peaceful someone who you are at war with, you are struggle with, don‘t make nasty comments on instagram or facebook, say something nice to someone. try for this one day to put peace in the forefront of your mind and see if it makes a difference in your life, because it will, and just because of that, you will, and just because of that, you will have more of an impact on peace in the world. i hope that is what people take from it. you are quite happy for it to be that personal or pedestrian? absolutely, that is what it has to be, that is why people are responding to it. otherwise, sometimes with these movements or initiatives, it can be overwhelming and you are like, well, what difference will i make? i don‘t live in certain areas, i don‘t understand
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conflict, i don‘t live at war with anybody. each of us has something that we could make peaceful that we could be a bit kinder. it is a bit like growing up in italy, i went to church with my grandma, there was a moment of turnaround and make peace with someone in the church, and religious or not religious, that was my favourite part, because you are able to connect with someone that you wouldn‘t have connected with. that is interesting, because a lot of people find that cringing, particularly if you are british. the british thing is the contact, you don‘t have to make contact, just say something nice. is a great idea, and may be a stop and think about what peace means for you for a day, but how do you get it to endure? 0therwise, how do you get it to endure? otherwise, it can be a bit naive or short lived. i don't think it will be naive, you havejust 24 hours, thatis be naive, you havejust 24 hours, that is not naive. i don‘t think us believing in magic is naive because we ca re believing in magic is naive because we care about father christmas, our generosity isn‘t naive because we give presents for one day a year on
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your birthday, it is still inspiring, it is a start. i don‘t think it is the finish point and it has an brought world peace yet, but i think the world is a better place for having an actual day. we have these days for so many other things that mean nothing, i think peace should be the one important thing that we should have a day four, the zist that we should have a day four, the 21st of september is now that day. imagine five years from now, the 25th anniversary, what will this movement have achieved by then do you hope? i think it is endless. bringing up that story of 1.4 children being vaccinated in afghanistan, if there are more stories like that, due to getting organisations such as the taliban involved in this and putting weapons and for 24 hours, being able to make and for 24 hours, being able to make a global and go to more areas of conflict and seeing it have the response it as having, that is all very much the peace 0ne response it as having, that is all very much the peace one day movement, they are relentless with their travelling around the world, spreading this incredible message, hopefully there will be more stories like that where we can all say, ok, maybe it wasn‘t naive to live in
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this, maybe there was a cool purpose. have a wonderful time at the concert tomorrow, thank you, jack. senior school leaders have supported a call for a review into why there‘s been a rise in the number of young people in england leaving school without five good gcses. the children‘s commissioner, anne longfield, says the problem has increased by 28% in the last four years, with about 100,000 pupils a year affected — that‘s almost one in five. the government says maths and english gcse results have got better and it‘s working to improve standards. now, a special report from the victoria derbyshire programme about a boy called rhys william, who‘s 14 tomorrow and lives in constant pain from a severe life—limiting condition. he has epidermolysis bullosa — which leads to excessive tearing of the skin, blistering, difficulties in swallowing and his fingers and toes being fused together. ahead of his birthday,
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rhy‘s friends have got together to show him just how loved he is. and a warning that you may find some of the pictures in clairejones‘ film distressing. sometimes i struggle to move in bed. because i‘m really sore. everywhere is sore. painful, every day. 24/7, just pain. it affects him everywhere and internally, as well. he gets mouth blisters, in his throat. his throat can close up. the tongue's fused to the bottom of his mouth. obviously, all his fingers and toes are fused. rhys has a rare life—limiting and agonising skin condition, called epidermolysis bullosa — or eb — which causes skin to become very fragile and can blister or tear, at even the slightest touch. it‘s estimated there are 5,000 people living with eb in the uk. currently, there‘s no known cure. rhys was born with the condition
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and has been living with the effects, ever since. he has protective dressings all over his body, to prevent infection and, as soon as blisters arise, they are popped with a sterile needle. he has a bath once a week, to fully clean his wounds, and all of his dressings are then replaced. i think he's got to that age now, where he's realising that things are difficult for him to do, like go out with his friends and stuff like that. just one night, he was in so much pain, he sent me a text wishing that the butterflies would come and take him. because he'd had enough, he'd had enough of the pain. that was... that was heartbreaking. we were talking, just now, about eb being a life—limiting condition. so, for you to reach another birthday, what does that mean to you?
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it feels like... it‘s another year i‘ve gone through, of being sore, all day, every day. but a public appeal for birthday cards by rhys‘s mum has lifted his spirits. we've had nearly 18,000 cards now. he's had hundreds upon hundreds of presents. "rhys, keep smiling and don‘t give up hope that, one day, things will get better for you." isn‘t that nice? now that i know that people actually do care, about my condition and that, it‘s made me feel a lot better. clairejones reporting.
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claire jones reporting. happy birthday, rhys. indonesia has arrested hundreds of people it suspects of starting forest fires to clear land for plantations. the haze caused by the fires is an annual problem for locals and for surrounding countries but this year is said to be one of the worst ever. rivan reports from kalimantan. firefighters and volunteers struggled to put out this fire — one of the thousands of hotspots burning across the island. but their water resources are running out. the community is praying for rain. translation: our main problem now is water. here, the long dry season has made our water sources run dry. it‘s difficult to get water close to the hotspots. from the air, their homes are barely visible through the haze. hundreds of thousands of acres of burning forest and peatland has thrown a toxic blanket over the region. it‘s having a devastating
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effect on people‘s health. tens of thousands of people are now suffering from haze—related illness. this local hospital has set up this clinic with bags and oxygen for the locals who have been breathing in toxic haze for weeks and the air outside is having real impact on locals and some of the worst our children. this five—month old baby has been struggling to breathe. he‘s being treated alongside his sister. endangered orangutans are also suffering while the fires destroy more of their shrinking habitat. their forest cleared to make way for lucrative palm oil plantations. indonesia is the world‘s largest producer and these fires were lit illegally to clear more land.
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helicopters water bomb hotspots and thousands of troops have been deployed to fight the fires. these fires release enormous carbon dioxide into the atmosphere. at the peak of the 2015 fires, the worst fires in two decades, the blaze are estimated to have emanated more greenhouse gases than the entire us economy in the same period. after those devastating fires, indonesia vowed to prevent it from occurring again. but observers say that weak law enforcement and corruption is the major barrier to stopping them coming back every year. in a moment, we will have the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: schoolchildren lead a day of global climate change protests. the aim — to get businesses and governments to cut emissions. the brexit secretary has
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held talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator — he‘s said he still believes a brexit deal can be done. saudi arabia claims it has evidence showing iran sponsored attacks on two of the country‘s oil installations. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: as you‘ve been hearing, thomas cook is racing to get hold of more rescue funds — the travel company could fall into administration this weekend unless it finds an extra £200 million. rbs is the first of the uk‘s big four banks to be led by a woman — it has named alison rose as its new chief executive. she joined the bank 27 years ago as a graduate trainee, will replace ross mcewan in november. and she‘ll be paid more than him — her annual salary has been set at £1.1 million. and climate change commitments — some of the world‘s largest firms have promised big—spending on green energy plans. amazon has pledged to be carbon
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neutral by 2040 and google says it will make record renewable energy purchases. those announcements coincide with today‘s "climate strike" day — with millions taking part across the globe. you have just said that alison rose will be the first female boss of one of the big four banks, that is great for her, but still some big challenges? yes, let's not forget, after the financial crisis, the uk government had to fit quite a big bill, 45 and a half billion pounds -- £45.5 bill, 45 and a half billion pounds —— £45.5 billion, and they are still a big stakeholder in the business. with the conservative government have said they would like to sell all the shares by 2024, whether they are still in power then is another question, but that is their aim. the share price, even though it is up today, is nowhere near where we got involved, where the taxpayers got involved, where the taxpayers got involved with. lets look at thomas
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cook, how do you suddenly realise that you need an extra £200 million by the weekend? it is not a sudden realisation, it sounds like it, but they came up with this big business plan in july, they they came up with this big business plan injuly, they said they needed £900 million to refinance the business. that is still a lot of money and it was way higher than they originally estimated, which was hundred and £50 million. they thought them money would come from a rescue deal that they were planning with the chinese group fosun, mainly. the lenders look at their plan and thought, no, that‘s not right, we need another £200 million, so right, we need another £200 million, so the total refinancing is £1.1 billion, and they have until this weekend to come up with the whole amount. climbed and climbed, hasn't it? where does this leave customers who have booked holidays? we have the perfect guest to answer those questions, we have the bbc‘s personal finance reporter. kevin, this situation is unbelievably bad for people on holiday right now. what can they do? well, thousands of people who work for thomas cook will
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be worried, but concerns, too, for those more than 150,000 people who are on holiday. if they are on a package deal, relax, enjoy the rest of your holiday, because they will be flown home. it may be, remember, it isjust be flown home. it may be, remember, it is just an be flown home. it may be, remember, it isjust an if be flown home. it may be, remember, it is just an if at the moment, be flown home. it may be, remember, it isjust an if at the moment, if the company does get into trouble and collapses, there is a scheme in place that will make sure they are flown home. if people have just bought a flight with thomas cook, it isa bought a flight with thomas cook, it is a bit more complicated, but there is a bit more complicated, but there isa is a bit more complicated, but there is a precedent that they will be flown home without any charge as well. what about those with bookings for the future? are they scuppered now or what happens? we have heard stories from people who have weddings coming out, someone on a luxury holiday to celebrate recovering from cancer, there are some real stories like that coming through of people who have booked their holidays and who are clearly worried about what will happen. again, if they have a package deal, they will be covered, they will be
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refunded. now, it is clearly difficult for them, because they will not get a replacement and if they look around for another holiday instead, they might find the prices have increased, they may have got holiday plans for christmas or next summer holiday plans for christmas or next summer already in place, but they may have to rearrange those. again, we are talking about if the company goes under. does everyone get a refu nd goes under. does everyone get a refund if it does go under? well, it becomes a bit more complicated, again, the package deals, you will be refunded. if you have only a flight, be refunded. if you have only a flight, you may have to go to your travel insurance. if you have extras like airport parking for example, then you might have to go to your travel insurance or perhaps the credit card company for the credit ca rd credit card company for the credit card you booked with. i think what consumer experts are saying today as it underlines the importance of getting your travel insurance at the same time as you put your holiday, because clearly, you are then cove red for because clearly, you are then covered for these eventualities, and looking at the small print, too,
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because not every insurance policy cove rs that because not every insurance policy covers that failure of an airline or ofa covers that failure of an airline or of a travel company. kevin, thank you. if you want more information, kevin has written an excellent article on our websites. so the markets, the ftse100 higher, not on the border at the moment, but thomas cook shares are still down by over 1596 cook shares are still down by over 15% and rbs shares are up because they clearly like the fact that alison rose is taking over. thank you. the winner of the 2019 mercury prize for music has been announced. and it‘s gone to british rapper dave. his album psychodrama looks at issues of race, class and grief, it‘s been called the boldest british rap album in a generation. here‘s the moment dave won, and brought his mum up on stage with him. i want to firstly thank god. i want to invite my mum up, i want to invite my mum up onto stage. cheering and applause.
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good boy! taking his mum up on the stage, i like to see that. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. for many of us, mist and fog early this morning, but many of us have had the sunny weather, but we have had the sunny weather, but we have had this bit of cloud coming into east anglia through the early part of the afternoon, that was lingering. sunny skies for shetland and across the board, temperatures getting into the high teens to low 20s, may be about 24 inland. it will be wendy around the coastlines, is, had lands of cornwall, gusts of wind up had lands of cornwall, gusts of wind up to 50 mph. that will likely continue into the night time and
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into saturday as well. 0therwise, continue into the night time and into saturday as well. otherwise, it will be a breezy night, not as much mist and fog as we have seen recently there will still be a few patches in some of the valleys, may be in the vale of york, and still quite chilly in the countryside, temperatures getting down into the low single figures. for saturday, south—easterly winds will bring in warm airfrom south—easterly winds will bring in warm air from france south—easterly winds will bring in warm airfrom france and south—easterly winds will bring in warm air from france and that will tend to boost the temperatures even further. so, saturday, drier weather, a lot of sunny weather, early mist and fog will clear quickly and we could see some showers breaking out later in the day across western parts. before they arrive, look at the temperatures, 24 in cardiff, 25 in london, 22 in edinburgh, so it will feel warm in the sunshine. there will be further changes in the weather picture as we head through the rest of the weekend. the weather front eventually will stagger its way across the uk, showers or thunderstorms initially working their way thunderstorms initially working theirway in, thunderstorms initially working their way in, but then a more potent band of rain will work into the west
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as we go on through the night. from there, through sunday, the rain will push northwards and eastwards, a degree of uncertainty as to how far north it will get, but it looks like the best chance of staying dry will be across the far north—east of the uk. temperatures down on recent days, around 19 celsius toward parts of wales and south—west england, around 18. into next week, low pressure in charge, that will bring us spells of heavy rain and spells of strong wind, so temperatures will continue to slide into next week, highs of 15 celsius in edinburgh towards the middle of the week. heavy rain around at times, too.
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make the most of the warm sunshine while it lasts.
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hello, you‘re watching afternoon live — i‘m martine croxall. today at 4... school children lead what could be the biggest demonstration yet, calling for urgent action on climate change. protests are taking place in more than 150 countries — including the uk. this is the scene this afternoon in leicester. new brexit talks in brussels — but is a deal any closer? there is still a lot of work to do but there is a common purpose to secure a deal, i think there is recognition in the capitals and the foreign ministers i have been speaking to. they want to see a no deal avoided. the famous grandfather said i'm not optimistic or pessimistic, but feeling determined. a race against time for thomas cook — the holiday firm must find 200 million pounds to stay in business.
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coming up on afternoon live all the sport — gavin. lots to talk about for the rugby world cup. we‘ll have more onjapan‘s convincing opening day win.... anbd how the home nations are preparing. thanks gavin, and we‘ll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. chris fawkes has all the weather. a decent start to the weekend but a slide into unsettled weather. all of the details coming up later on. also this hour — i‘ve been catching up with singerjack savoretti as tomorrow celebrities will gather for a special celebration on the un‘s international day of peace. we have the likes of staying, will young, and emily sunday celebrating the 20th anniversary, an
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organisation i was overwhelmed about when i heard more about it —— emile sande. hello, iam hello, i am martine croxall. this is afternoon live. millions of children around the world have stayed away from school to lead what could be the biggest day of protest yet demanding urgent action on climate change. thousands of separate demonstrations are taking place in 150 countries, including the uk. the protestors are demanding immediate action from both governments and businesses — as duncan kennedy reports. what do we want? climate action! when do we want it? now! home to 7.5 billion people. beautiful, but fragile. robust, but warming. and today, the stage for a global message. the pacific island of vanuatu helped
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send the first of those messages. and no wonder. their low—lying homes could be among the first to disappear, if sea levels rise. in sydney, children also put climate before classroom, thousands marching with teachers and other workers to call for government action to cut greenhouse gas emissions. the younger a person is, the more that the changing climate will impact them as they grow, and the less of a voice they are given today. considering we have such a short amount of time to turn this issue around, it‘s vital that young people are at the forefront of this conversation because they will be impacted more than anyone else. i think this is the most important issue of our time and i'm here for my children's future. i think it is that important. this isn't a fringe movement, this isn't a greeny issue, this isn't a lefty issue, this is a human issue. they have to stop making political
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advantage of this issue and unite the country behind a crisis approach to dealing with modifying our economy to be carbon free. it‘s absolutely essential. the swedish environmental activist greta thunberg later tweeted her support. the new day in south africa brought singers and dancers onto the streets. here in johannesburg, they also wanted to send a message to next week‘s un conference on climate change that the speed of action must be increased. in india, the crowd seemed more modest. but, in a country whose economy is expanding at around 7% a year, the government has argued growth can exist alongside climate controls. don‘t let our people die! save our earth! from thailand, where this
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was still a day that found room for humour... ..to berlin, where the crowds gathered to demand change. when do we want it? now! in britain, around 300 protests are taking place across the country. this was hove on the south coast. a place bathed in sunshine, for campaigners basking in the solidarity of theirjoint action. what do we want? change! when do we want it? now! at harrogate in north yorkshire, children were again the focus. the government said it could not endorse a school day being missed but that message seemed lost here amid the enthusiasm of their first time protest. bikes have been integral to nottingham since the 19th century, and today campaigners used to pedal power to push their climate message here. this is the most important, only important thing going on at the moment.
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there is no planet, there no nothing. i have never been a protester before but we have to act now otherwise it's just too late. they are in my way. does it annoy you? yes, i'm in a rush, i've got deliveries to make. the biggest presence has been in westminster, thousands on the march here, all part of a day of action involving 150 countries. and quite possibly the biggest global warming protest yet seen. duncan kennedy, bbc news. let‘sjoin caroline davies — our correspondent at the climate change protests in westminster. well, the last performer left the stage at 3:30pm, and since then the crowds have been steadily leaving in this direction. many going home but
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in the distance there, some have been heading out towards parliament square and others heading towards trafalgar square through towards whitehall. about 1000 or so. we understand they have been stopped in trafalgar square. the met police set out some conditions for this demonstration, saying anyone breaching conditions could be at risk of arrest but we have spoken to the police and we understand the way they will treat protesters depends on the action. we are not hearing of any on the action. we are not hearing of a ny arrests on the action. we are not hearing of any arrests at the moment. this day has had schoolchildren. we‘ve seen people joining has had schoolchildren. we‘ve seen peoplejoining from has had schoolchildren. we‘ve seen people joining from trade unions too. but many people left and decided to walk out of school today. we have two sixth form is today, we have rosie and boo. i thought it was important not to be passive but take action and provoke the government to
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do something. it's an immediate and pressing issue. and boo, do you feel it is irresponsible to leave to come ona it is irresponsible to leave to come on a protest? it's not irresponsible, we should show that this is one day of school and today we have made a change that is so we re we have made a change that is so were third. and how do you feel about the fact that they have been images around the world protesting. what is it like to see and be part of it? it is lovely, this is a really scary time but it is nice to know that you are not alone and so many people are striving to make a difference. especially in australia, thatis difference. especially in australia, that is the biggest climbing microcode climate strike which is so significant and amazing. we are united by the common goal of sustainability and saving the planet and it feels comfortable. we are all aiming forthe same and it feels comfortable. we are all
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aiming for the same thing. do you feel optimistic about the impact this protest will have? yes, i think you have to be optimistic. hope is all we have. we need to keep that optimism. definitely. especially with the head of the teaching union speaking about how he is really proud of us and how he supports us. the support that we have, not only from the union but from individual teachers, that shows we are all working towards this and it feels like a more achievable goal which is really amazing and it feels optimistic. what was the atmosphere like among the crowds today? optimistic. what was the atmosphere like among the crowds today7m optimistic. what was the atmosphere like among the crowds today? it was incredible to have so many like—minded people around you. it was so like—minded people around you. it was so nice. it felt electric. like everyone was buzzing to do something and provoke the government to make a change. it was amazing. thank you for joining change. it was amazing. thank you forjoining us. the protest today has finished. whether it will make
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an impact, we are waiting until the start of the un climate change summit. whether it has impacted uk leaders and world leaders? we will wait and see. caroline davies in westminster, thank you. let‘s take a look at what‘s been happening here in the uk... this was the scene in aberystwyth, wales — where a piper marched with hundreds of protestors. in belfast — thousands marched through the city centre ahead of a rally on the grounds of city hall.0rganisers put the turn—out at between 3,000 and 4,000 — far in excess of what they had been anticipating. and there were huge crowds in edinburgh too as people there marched down the royal mile. and school children in leeds left the classroom behind and were at the front of the protest march in their city. another protest is being held in new york city ahead of the united
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nations climate summit. this organisation has its headquarters there. they are making three specific demands these protesters, to end fossilfuel specific demands these protesters, to end fossil fuel extraction and consumption, prioritising front—line communities and workers in transitioning to 100% economies, holding those organisations most responsible for polluting accountable for the damage they are causing the climate. samira hussain joins us from new york, they have high profile climate change leaders in the city for this? absolutely, there is no question that this is very much a youth led event. in less than one hour, we are expecting the swedish climate activist greta thunberg to make an appearance here and she will lead the protest march, and she will lead the protest march, and already there are at least 15 minutes before it begins and we are
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seeing hundreds of young people making their way into the square to listen to what she has to say and participate in the march. the new york city school system, the public school system, teaches them over1 million students and they have all been allowed and excused absences to attend the event. 0rganisers are expecting this to be one of the biggest marches happening around the world. and in new york, they have, in recent years, seen their own... how to cope with examples of extreme weather events? certainly, new york has had its own weather events, you are right. but also, new york, one of the largest cities in the us, the us is one of the largest economies. asa us is one of the largest economies. as a country, and home to one of the
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biggest world corporations, they are grappling with how to address these issues of climate change. you are hearing a lot from young people here, but even from environmental groups and religious groups all attending and trying to the issue to make people understand how important it is to treat climate change immediately. samira hussain in new york, thank you. the brexit secretary has been holding talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator — michel barnier. stephen barclay said both sides had ‘serious detailed discussions‘ and that getting a deal remains their common purpose. yesterday, the european commission president, jean—claude juncker said he was confident a deal can be reached. when asked if he shared mrjuncker‘s confidence, this is what the brexit secretary had to say... yes, i do, and that is why we are working so hard to secure a deal, i was in madrid yesterday and in cyprus the day before that with the prime minister in luxembourg on monday. both sides want to see the deal. we are working hard on that.
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the technical teams will get together early next week to continue working on that detail and i think there is a shared desire reflected in the meeting today to secure a deal because we both recognise the deal is in the interests of on both sides. nobody wants to see a no deal, that is why there is a shared sense of purpose to get a deal over the line. there has always been the recognition that the commission themselves have an important part to play but what is clear from the irish government is like the uk government, they want to see a deal done. they recognise no deal is not in the interests of the irish government. there is a common purpose in dublin, london and brussels to see a deal over the line and i think the fact the meeting overran today, we were getting into the detail and technical teams will meet next week.
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the prime minister and president tusk are expected to meet at the un next week. the eu chief negotiator michel barnier said he was still determined to get a deal with the uk. firstly, ijust met president tusk, as we did on a regular basis. as presidentjuncker said this week very clearly, we are always ready to examine an objective base, any proposal in the uk must reach all the objectives of the backstop. to protect the peace in ireland and the irish economy and the consumers and businesses of the eu and single market. after my cordial meeting with steve barclay and his team, lots of work has to be done in the next few days.
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you have been patient for a long time on this. brexit is a school of patience but we are still ready to reach an agreement. you ask if i am optimistic or pessimistic compared to yesterday. when i‘m not optimistic or pessimistic, i‘m still determined. 0ur correspondent in brussels, damian grammaticas, said despite the positive noises coming out of today‘s meeting, both sides are a long way from agreeing a brexit deal. you get a different sense of things when you listen to the eu side and what they have been putting out. stephen barclay is right that the eu wanted deal and want to avoid a no deal. certainly they are open and continuing to talk but michel barnier‘s own version of this was to say that he is neither optimistic nor pessimistic, he is still talking and what they are doing is he said technical talks looking at the initial broad concepts that the uk has put out.
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that means nothing new from the uk substantially, and in fact mr barnier‘s own statement goes on to say he is reminding the uk side they have to come up with a workable proposalfor the border ireland, to keep the border open and when you marry that up with what the irish foreign minister simon coveney said this morning, he was very direct in saying we have to be honest, we are a long way from a deal and the reason for that, he said, was the approach of the british prime minister and that is the fact borisjohnson wa nts to scrap the elements of the deal that theresa may had done. he wants to scrap backstop provisions and the prospect of customs checks in ireland but the uk position is the alternatives to deal should be left until the future. a transition period, but nothing clear until after the uk has left. the eu and irish view
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is that is not good enough and i‘m afraid i think that is where the talks seem to be stuck at the minute for all the fact that technical meetings will go on. you‘re watching afternoon live, these are our headlines... schoolchildren lead a day of global climate change protests. the aim — to get businesses and governments to cut emissions. the brexit secretary has held talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator — he‘s said he still believes a brexit deal can be done. a race against time for thomas cook — the holiday firm must find two hundred million pounds to stay in business. in the sport, japan kick off the world cup with a convincing win over russia. the tournament hosts are holding the showpiece event for the first time and the home nations prepare for their opening matches in the next few days. one of england‘s cricket stars of the summerjofra archer has been awarded a central
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contract. he was there leading wicket taker at the world cup and impressed in the ashes. valtteri bottas crashes in first practice of the singapore grand prix, mercedes team—mate and championship leader lewis hamilton was fastest in second practice. air pollution is the big talking point from there. more on those stories in 15 minutes, see you then. thomas cook could go into administration this weekend, unless it can plug a two—hundred—million pound funding gap. britain‘s oldest package—holiday firm is in talks with stakeholders, after its banks demanded that it comes up with contingency financing. without a rescue deal, the firm is likely to collapse — leaving more than 150,000 british holiday—makers in need of repatriation and threatening 9000 jobs in the uk. simon gompertz reports. holidays in danger. at any time, there are up to 100 thomas cook flights in the air. now there is mounting concern they will not be able to keep going. people who have booked have been turning up at shops to see
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how they are affected, likejean in london, hoping to go to tunisia next month. she thinks the government should step in. we have just got to keep our fingers crossed, haven‘t we? and hope for the best and we will hopefully know by sunday, or whenever. are you worried that thomas cook might be in financial trouble? i don't think so. i think they are a big company. i mean, they will find a way of getting out of it, obviously. well, hopefully they do. already overseas with thomas cook right now, more than 150,000 uk travellers, mostly on package holidays with atol protection to bring them back. but tens of thousands are on flight only deals without that guarantee. the cost of repatriation is put at £600 million, organised by the civil aviation authority. that includes paying for some to finish their hotel stay. there are 22,000 jobs at risk, 9,000 of them in the uk. a big question is who qualifies to be brought back without paying? when monarch failed two years ago, the government did intervene and paid for everyone to return. that set a precedent which ministers
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would find hard to ignore. your flight will be organised by the civil aviation authority and you will be brought back pretty much as normal. it is people who have maybe got a half term booking, christmas or new year trip, or indeed who have booked for next summer who will find that, while they will get their money back, either from their credit card company or under the atol scheme, of course there will be fewer holidays out there and prices probably will have gone up. thomas cook is in the throes of negotiating a rescue deal with the chinese group fosun, which already owns club med and wolves football club. but what has thrown all of that injeopardy is a demand from thomas cook‘s banks to show it can produce £200 million in funding to tide it over the lean winter months.
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the pilots‘ union says that since one of the banks calling for more financial assurances is state—owned rbs, it should be making sure the company is rescued rather than putting it underfurther pressure. thomas cook, his statue in leicester, founded the business back in the 1840s. it might still survive much longer but, if it doesn‘t, we could see the biggest ever emergency return of holiday—makers. simon gompertz, bbc news. the boyfriend of the murdered teenagerjodie chesney has described how she collapsed in his arms after being stabbed in a london park. two men and two teenagers are on trial charged with the murder of the 17—year—old who was killed in a random attack in march. danjohnson has been following the case at the old bailey. eddie coyle, jodie chesney‘s boyfriend, has been giving evidence today about that night, the 1st of march. a friday evening when he, jodie, and a group of friends
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were in harold hill in london. they had been smoking cannabis, they we re they had been smoking cannabis, they were listening to music and chatting. he described to the court how two men had been sat close to them in the park then left. he described how 30 minutes later he saw two men, he believed to be the same two, coming towards the group. one of them approached jodie, who had her back to them. he demonstrated how he saw the man plunge what he believed was a knife into her back. after that happened, he said that jodie was at first in shock, she did not know what happened. she started screaming very loudly and continuously. she was screaming for about two minutes straight and then she began to faint. he described how his friends went to get help and some people living nearby came to do what they could. he did not realise at first how serious her injuries were because of how thick her coat was. it was 15 minutes before police and paramedics arrived to help her
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but she could not be saved. this morning the court has also heard aboutjodie‘s character. eddie coyle said that she was a great person, very funny, silly, sensible sometimes. he was asked if there was any reason why someone would want to hurt her and he said no, he could think of no reason. the suggestion from the prosecution is that this was some sort of row about a drugs deal of which jodie chesney was no part of. she was an innocent victim. a 19—year—old man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a young woman was found dead in staffordshire. police said the body of the woman, who was 20, and has been named locally as keeley bunker, was found at about nine o‘clock last night. she was last seen in the early hours of thursday morning. flowers have been laid at the scene where her body was found. in the last hour, staffordshire police gave this update
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on the investigation. we were alerted to the discovery of a woman‘s body in woodland at 9pm last night. whilst formal identification is yet to take place, we now believe the woman to be keeley bunker, aged 20, of tamworth. her death is unexplained at this time and a home office postmortem is due to take place tomorrow. i would politely request that people refrain from speculating as to the circumstances of keeley ‘s death to avoid distress for her family that are being supported by specially trained officers. we have cordoned offa number of trained officers. we have cordoned off a number of areas for forensic examination as the investigation continues. a19—year—old man from tamworth, arrested on suspicion of murder last night, remains in custody. the bbc has been taken to see the saudi oil facilities that
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were attacked with missiles and drones last weekend. the attack — which saudi arabia has blamed on iran — struck at the heart of the country‘s economy — and threatened global oil supplies. 0ur security correspondent frank gardner reports from one of the installations that was hit. the missiles were able to penetrate through saudi arabia‘s very expensive multibillion—dollar defences that they bought advanced cost from the west. now there is a lot of head scratching, trying to work out how to protect places like this, this vulnerable critical infrastructure from repeat attack. what we are looking at here is called a separation tower. this is where part of the operation separate out gas and oil from the crude mix that comes out the ground. this is what they have to do before they transport it and export it. it is the vital beating heart of the countries oil economy. that is what the country depends on. the incoming missiles smashed into this and
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further east, they hit a processing plant, crippling half the country‘s capacity temporarily. they have repaired a bit of it but the longer there is a rivalry between iran and saudi arabia, what is to stop this from happening again? now have a look at this — a high resolution image has been released by the european space agency this week shows a slice of mars, from its north to south pole. taken by the mars express orbiter back in june, this image reveals clouds encircling the northern polar region, the variations in colour and tone of the differing surface composition across the planet‘s regions and "the martian dichotomy" — the boundary between the two hemispheres where the altitude of the terrain changes by several kilometers, the north being much lower than the south. an education, isn‘t it? now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes.
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hello, again. looking at the picture of the weather through the evening we will see strong gusts of wind through the headlines of cornwall. gusts of 50 miles an hour, continuing overnight and into saturday. more of a breeze then we have seen recently. some mist and fog patches, into parts of scotland and the vale of york, not as widespread as we have seen over recent nights. it will be a chilly night, temperatures in the deep valleys getting down in low single figures. 0n valleys getting down in low single figures. on saturday, south—eastern winds dragging warm air in from france. temperatures will be rising. most of us have a fine and sunny start today, little overall change. more cloud coming into eastern and northern scotland. late in the day we have showers breaking out in western parts. 0therwise, warm and sunny. temperatures of 22 degrees in edinburgh but 25 in london. that‘s your weather.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: school children lead what could be the biggest demonstration yet, calling for urgent action on climate change. protests are taking place in more than 150 countries, including the uk. this is the scene this afternoon in leicester. the brexit secretary has held talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator, he‘s said he still believes a brexit deal can be done. a race against time for thomas cook — the holiday firm must find £200 million to stay in business. sport now on afternoon live with gavin ra mjaun, the rugby world cup is under way, and the hosts japan started well with a win. japan got off to the best possible start. they‘re first time hosts — and it‘s actually the first time the tournament has actually been held in asia. a wonderful opening ceremony in tokyo —
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and the day was capped off with a fine win over russia. russia have never won a world cup match — and were even beaten byjersey in the build up to the world cup but did take a surprise lead in tokyo. japan were expected to win this one and made their superior skill and fitness count. kotaro matsushima crossed for their first try. he added another before half time and then completed his hatrrick 11 minutes from time as the hosts ran out 30 points to 10 winners. well, japan got a bonus point for scoring four tries. it could be all important, as they‘re in a tough group, and at the last world cup, they won three group games, but still failed to qualify for the knockout stages. so let‘s see what happens this time round. there should be plenty of exciting matches ahead for the home nations, they will start their campaigns over they will start their campaigns over the next few days, won‘t they? the home nations all play over the next few days. they‘re in action alongside some other tantalising ties. scotland and ireland play
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each other on sunday — they‘re both injapan‘s group. and we‘ve had some team news today. ireland have named their side to face scotland in yokohama. it‘s an inexperienced back—three, jordan larmour comes in at full—back for rob kearney who has a calf problem. keith earls is also out. they‘re missing 170 caps from those two alone. and as for scotland, sam johnson will play alongside duncan taylor at centre for only the second time, but it‘s an experienced side with stuart hogg, sean maitland and tommy seymour re—uniting in the back three. and england have named their strongest possible side to face tonga on sunday in saporro. captain 0wen farrell plays at centre alongside manu tuilagi. it means george ford will play at fly half. and head coach eddiejones can‘t wait to get going. the world cup is like a roller—coaster. we are at the top of the ride now looking down. everyone is nervous and excited, you get down the first slope and you‘re not quite sure if you‘re going to throw up or hang on! and you have to adapt to that the players have
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equipped themselves to ride the roller—coaster because there is gonna be some turns, some accidents, there will be some fun. and we want to enjoy all of those things that come along and the team is equipped to handle it. jofra archer was one of the stars of england‘s summer. he only made his international debut four months ago — he‘s now been rewarded with a central contract. it covers all forms of the game. rory burns has been given a test contract — but fellow openerjoe denly has just been awarded a one day version. archer was their leading wicket—taker in their world cup winning campaign. so what next for the fast bowler? i thinkjofra is capable of anything. i chatted with his dad at the oval and he thought he would hit 100 mph next year and i said i would take that. but it‘s important we look after him, it‘s not easy to bowl that pace consistently, and he is a fine asset for the team.
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hazy conditions have overshadowed preparations for the singapore grand prix this weekend, with the city‘s worst air pollution in three years causing some concern. but practice has been taking place today. valterri bottas crashed in the first session — hitting the barriers of the street circuit. he missed the rest of the session as a result. championship leader lewis hamilton was the fastested in second practice ahead of qualifying tomorrow. that‘s all the sport for now. thank you, gavin. next week across bbc news, we‘ll be taking a close look at the city of stoke—on trent as part of our "we are" series. the city at the heart of the staffordshire pottery industry is made up of six towns: tunstall, burslem, hanley, stoke, fenton and longton. being one city of six towns brings a number of challenges. 0ur editorial director kamal ahmed met people at the potteries museum and art gallery to find out what makes stoke tick. welcome to the potteries museum and art gallery in stoke—on—trent.
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this is our third in the we are series. we have had we are middlesbrough and bradford. it is an attempt by bbc news to get out of london to properly cover the regions of england, as well as the nations of the united kingdom. but really, it is about the audience talking to us about how we should be covering what is important to them. this will be a week of special coverage from stoke—on—trent, guided by these fabulous guests we have brought together in the potteries museum, about what they think is important, how they would like to see their city, the places they live and work, how they want those issues to be covered. there is a great degree of fear in this city. we are scared of ourselves and our schizophrenic six towns nature. there‘s something beautifully crazy and mad about the fact that that is the way we work.
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that is something that should be embraced. as we sit here under the wonderful icons that decorate us, i do wonder sometimes, don‘t we realise there is something about the juice and the actual soil of this area which has allowed us to be one of the most creative places on earth. we are a place where we have taken the ground itself and made it into something which you can see all around you. not many places on this planet can argue that. i am shocked by this notion of the £10 bus return fare in a city that is not huge. the transport network has separated the towns, in effect. the towns have not worked together because there is no connectivity. and again, working with young people, the public transport is very poor in the city, so with work and leisure and creative activities, people really struggle to get around and get to places. one of the real problems,
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if you go from the southernmost town to the northernmost town, if you were to try to make that journey by public transport, it would take at least one hour longer than your trip up from london today. wow, how long would it take? probably about two and a half hours. then, tell us a bit about you, do you live and work in stoke? also, from a younger perspective, what do you feel you would like to see covered about this city? there are a lot more things in manchester and birmingham to do for people my age, and younger, than to stay in stoke. it doesn‘t really have anything, there are not manyjobs and a lot of people, my friends who are finishing university, they are going elsewhere, they don‘t want to have anything to do with stoke—on—trent. the challenges faced here in stoke—on—trent are no different than they are in other post—industrialised cities. what we have had over the last, certainly, ten years or more is a recognition that
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there is no white knight out there that will come back, we have to stand up and take responsibility and to do this for ourselves. what should be next for stoke—on—trent? i absolutely think we should be going to be a unesco creative city. we have what no other city around the world has that would allow us to have, those other bidding processes that we went through our short lived, a unesco creative city has longevity. tell us what you think the main challenges are and what other issues we should be covering? i think the biggest problem in stoke—on—trent is pride. years gone by, people worked on the pot banks, and made beautiful things like that peacock behind you. at the end of the day, they were proud of what they made. now, they are filling supermarket shelves, there is no pride in the job at all. cani can i mention politics as a mirror
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of the society? for instance, it is not so long ago that we had nine bnp councillors, more than any other city in the country. quite recently, we are the third or second biggest brexit supporter. none of this, of course, tells us exactly what we are and who we are. what it does tell us is that there is an immense amount of disenchantment here. how would you like to see the we are stoke project? what should we touch on?|j love stoke—on—trent, there is so much opportunity, an abundance of community spirit that there is a lot going on. we have our issues and i think we need to focus on that, but there is also a lot of great stuff in the city, i think in stoke, house prices, you can get on the property market, there is a better standard of living, a better family life balance. there is a problem with outside people seeing the inside, and that has to change, because i remembera lot of
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and that has to change, because i remember a lot of reports that the bbc have done, and i think if i was in my rolls— royce bbc have done, and i think if i was in my rolls—royce or bentley coming through the m6 at birmingham to invest millions of pounds in here, i would say to the chauffeur, turn round, charles, i don't want to go to stoke—on—trent. that is the perception you get from the media. this is a coal—mining place, and what is the greatest thing that coal sometimes? even though it is power, it isa sometimes? even though it is power, it is a diamond. crushed pressure, a diamond in the city that needs to be brought out. on that positive note, thank you all so much, that was really enjoyable and invigorating and will really help us cover your great city, the positives, as well as some of the challenges. bbc stoke‘s political reporter sophie calvertjoins us now. how much of that resonated with you and how you cover what is happening politically there? yes, some of the issues they have talked about, the
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transport and pride, even, issues they have talked about, the transportand pride, even, is something that we hear on a regular basis at bbc radio stoke. it is no surprise to hear that. there are other problems as well, they talk about homelessness, children in care is an issue as well, and of course, brexit isn‘t going away, it is still something people are talking about as well. those things really do chime interest with us here. how do the local politicians try to address those concerns? there is so much clamour with so many other national and international priorities at the moment. it is definitely going to be difficult for a city council to try and say, look, i know this is what everybody is talking about when it comes to brexit or the nhs, but they do try and take their spin on it. what we are hoping through this week through we are stoke is hoping to get some of the stories out there for what is being done. we are going to hear from communities, creativity, things you heard about in the video, and one of the issues
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we will look at early next week as the £1 house scheme from the city council, where they are trying to reinvigorate and regenerate some of the city‘s areas, so we will look at that and that is the way city councils are trying to say that they are trying to do things locally as well as focus on national issues. how keenly have people embraced this we are series? i think massively. we have had so many people involved already in films that have been done, some recording that has been done, some recording that has been done and things we have been setting up. there is a choir that has transformed people‘s lives, i watched the video and it is phenomenal, when people get to see this next week, they will really see how much of a community there is in a stoke—on—trent, and people want to be part of that. again, in that video, people are saying, we are creative, we are a community sense minded people but that is what happens in stoke—on—trent, so people are happens in stoke—on—trent, so people a re really happens in stoke—on—trent, so people are really getting involved, but we do want to hear more stories throughout the whole week as well,
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so throughout the whole week as well, so if it is something that people have a story about, get in touch with us. we want to reflect what is happening in stoke—on—trent, which is the positive and not positive, so please, get in touch with us. thank you, sophie. and we are stoke—on—trent starts next week here on bbc news. tomorrow is the un‘s international day of peace. celebrities will gather tomorrow for a concert at the globe theatre in london to mark the 20th anniversary of the nonprofit organisation peace one day that has campaigned to make the day more widely recognised. peace one day began in 1999 as a day of ceasefire and non—violence, and in 2001, it received the backing of the united nations. stars including sting, emeli sande, jude law and jack savoretti will be performing. i spoke to jack savoretti earlier — he told me how he first got involved. jeremy, who started this in 1999, he came to me when he was putting together this concert for tomorrow, which will have the likes of sting, will young, emeli sande,
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of an organisation that i heard about 15 years ago, through friends of mine who were working on it, and to see the success it has had, when they were working on it in about 2007 and i remember in that year, they had managed to get to the taliban to partake in a day of peace, in 24 hours of peace, they put down their weapons to the point where 1.4 million children were able to get vaccinated throughout that year because of the change where doctors and nurses were able to come in during this time, so it wasn‘tjust an idea of peace, it was actually being put into action and that was something that i was very inspired by and i‘m very honoured to be taking part tomorrow in the 20th anniversary. why do you think the taliban responded to this organisation in that way? where talks at government level have failed successively over the years. this isn‘t about... this is about a day.
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it is easier to grasp and it is not about trying to change a complete mentality or a complete culture, it is a day where you just take a moment and talk about what peace means to different people, it has a different definition around the world within individuals, i‘m sure we would have different definitions of what it means to me or you. it is easier to grasp, a 24—hour moment, it is the same way we respond to father‘s day, mother‘s day, valentine‘s day, christmas, and i hope it becomes more like that, a day where it is easily accessible to understand and to embrace and i think that is why it has been so successful on a global scale, not just locally. you mention this 20th anniversary concert at the globe tomorrow. those attending will get to enjoy some fantastic entertainment, lots of wonderful music, but what you hope they will take away with them from it? i hope they take away the idea that peace isn‘t a dirty word, it is something you should talk
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about, it is something... people are saying, what should be do on the day? i am not in conflict, i don‘t live in an area of conflict, what should i do? for those who do live in conflict, i hope it is a big discussion, but for those who don‘t, make peaceful someone who you are at war with, you struggle with, be nice, don‘t make nasty comments on instagram or facebook, say something nice to someone. try for this one day to put peace in the forefront of your mind and see if it makes a difference in your life, because it will, and just because of that, you will have more of an impact on peace in the world. —— an interest of peace in the world. in a moment, we will have the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: schoolchildren lead a day of global climate change protests. the aim — to get businesses and governments to cut emissions. the brexit secretary has held talks in brussels with the eu‘s chief negotiator, he‘s said he still believes a brexit deal can be done. saudi arabia claims it has evidence showing iran sponsored attacks on two of the country‘s oil installations.
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here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: as you‘ve been hearing, thomas cook is racing to get hold of more rescue funds — the travel company could fall into administration this weekend unless it finds an extra £200 million. rbs is the first of the uk‘s big four banks to be led by a woman — it has named alison rose as its new chief executive. trainee, and will replace ross mcewan in november. and she‘ll be paid more than him — her annual salary has been set at £1.1 million. news just in that five planned strikes by ryanair pilots have been called off, according to the british airline pilots‘ association. ryanair exported to rya nair exported to have
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ryanair exported to have strikes throughout the end of september and they have all been called off. the aircraft carrier described the strikes, they have already happened in the past, as complete failures. to be fairto in the past, as complete failures. to be fair to him, there haven‘t been that many disruptions to ryanairflights, been that many disruptions to ryanair flights, a very different story for what british airways experience with striking pilots. ryanair have experience with striking pilots. rya nair have managed experience with striking pilots. ryanair have managed to get agency staff work the timetable a bit better, pull in pilots from other european countries to help them out. yes, because they park their planes and other places, rather thanjust in one particular airport, don‘t they? exactly, that is that how they have managed to negate all of the impact. lets look at rbs, alison roseis impact. lets look at rbs, alison rose is the first female boss at one of the big four banks, which is a great achievement, but she will face some big challenges. she has some huge challenges, particularly that shortly after the financial crisis,
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the taxpayer, the uk government pumped in £45.5 billion of money into the bank to take a 62% share of the company. we have sold off parts since then, but the current conservative government wants to get rid of the whole lot by 2024. whether they are still in power to do that is another question, but the share price is up today, but nowhere near the levels that we put money into the bank at, so that is a huge challenge for her. and to help us talk more about that is our market correspondent. justin, just going back on alison rose, why has it taken so long for a top formica bank to appoint a woman at the top of their bank? it is quite remarkable, it is not as if they are 50—50, there is still —ish great shortage, but nonetheless, there are some extremely bright females operating in london, i don't want to be patronising, but the point is that
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there have been a lower number of females to have an appointment. what is interesting here is that it is not someone they have brought in on a golden handshake to be part of the group of people in this city renowned in their own area, this is someone renowned in their own area, this is someone who has worked in the bank for their whole career, going the whole way through. much easier for companies to say, i will get a head hunter, we will find somebody from the markets and if it goes wrong, you can blame the head hunter, not me. there are only six women bosses are amongst the top 100 companies in the ftse100. he also said that she has been at rbs her whole career, is that necessarily a good thing? she has only got experience at one organisation shall, surely it might be better for her to have a diverse experience? rbs is nothing like it was when we had to first take it over when it was passed, technically quite close to it, still. nonetheless, it is less complicated and no one, even back in those heady
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days, actually understood all the facilities that the bank was offering around the world. the senior executive certainly did not understand what was going on. someone who understands the culture, understand what it is like in terms of working for that company over the la st of working for that company over the last few years, which have been incredibly depressing with all the headlines, maybe it is good to have someone headlines, maybe it is good to have someone rewarded coming from the inside, and at least she can say, i have shared your pain. thank you, justin. let‘s have a quick look at the markets. rbs shares up, they like the news that alison rose has taken over. but thomas cook, down by over 20% now and it is not looking good. they have the weekend to find £200 million. they need some help, don't they? thank you, nice to see you. the ministry ofjustice has apologised after a speeding motorist killed a man when he should have been banned from driving. ivan girga — who is 27 — was allowed to keep his
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licence in spite of having 25 penalty points. he admitted causing death by dangerous driving; and four counts of causing serious injury by dangerous driving. but it emerged in court that he shuold not have been on the road at all because he had already accumulated 25 points for a range of offences. he should have been banned from driving under the "totting up" scheme, following convictions for driving with no licence or insurance. girga had only bought his vw golf the day before and was driving aggresively and overtaking lines of cars at speeds of up to 72 miles per hour in a 30 miles per hour zone — when he ploughted into a car with a family inside, killing its driver. girga has now been jailed for nine years. in a statement, the ministry ofjustice said... us president donald trump has described a whistleblower‘s accusations against him that he made a promise to a foreign leader — as a political hackjob. some reports allege that mr trump
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asked ukraine‘s new president, volodymyr zelensky, to investigate joe biden and his son hunter — who previously served on the board of a ukrainian gas company — in return for continued us military support. speaking a few moments ago, president trump described the whistle—blower as partisan, but said he didn‘t know their identity. i have had conversations with many leaders that are always appropriate, at the highest level, always appropriate, and anything i do, i fight for this country. i fight so strongly for this country. it is just another political hackjob. greg miller was one of the journalists who broke the story and he explains what‘s caused so much concern. are just a really extraordinary development. i spoke with a number of american intelligence officials today who said they could never re call today who said they could never recall a circumstance where the
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president himself was the subject of this kind of scrutiny. he has a track record that is working against him, if he is trying to make the case that he is careful in these circumstances. i have written stories about his disclosure of classified information to russian officials in the oval office, and he has repeatedly gotten into fights with his intelligence agencies, he is often siding with autocrats, including vladimir putin, the saudi crown prince, and the leader of north korea, over what his spy agencies are telling him. bird populations in asia and the us are "in crisis", according to two major studies. the first says there are three billion fewer birds in the us and canada today, than there were in 1970. the second claims that on the island of java in indonesia, more birds now live in cages than in the wild. 0ur science correspondent victoria gill has been to java find out more.
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sold in their thousands every day — injava, indonesia, the songbird trade is thriving. it is fuelled by a national passion for birdsong. singing competitions, like this, take place all over the country, every weekend. but it is also driving an extinction crisis. dozens of species, caught from the forests, to supply the trade, are disappearing from the wild, and scientists studying this say it has now reached a tipping point. java is an island about the size of england, and we estimate that there‘s around 75 million birds in captivity. that‘s probably more than there may be in the wild, which is a very serious issue for the island and its wider environment. this is one of two major studies, published today, that point to a global crash in bird populations.
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the other, a project carried out by scientists in the us and canada, examined 50 years of bird surveys in north america. it revealed that there are three billion fewer birds on the continent today than there were in 1970. habitat loss, driven by human activity, has been blamed, but the researchers are actually optimistic that their conclusions could be a wake—up call, triggering action to protect vital habitats and migration routes. and in indonesia, the widespread love of the birds could provide a catalyst for them to be protected in the wild. now it‘s time for a look at the weather. for many of us, i find it with plenty of sunshine with only a few exceptions. some mist and fog patches, some on this photograph from cumbria earlier today. most of
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us have had sunny weather, but we have had a little bit of cloud coming into east anglia through the early pa rt coming into east anglia through the early part of the afternoon, that was still lingering. the sunnier skies for shetland, and across the board, temperatures getting into the high teens to low 20s, may be 24 inland aberdeenshire. it will be very windy around the coastline of the headlands of cornwall, gusts of wind up to 50 mph. that will likely continue into the night time and into saturday as well. otherwise, it will be a breezy night, not as much mist and fog as we have seen recently, there will still be a few patches around in some valleys, may be through the vale of york, and still chilly in the countryside, temperatures into low single figures. for saturday, south—easterly winds will drag in warm aircoming from south—easterly winds will drag in warm air coming from france, and that will tend to boost the temperatures even further. so, saturday, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunny weather, early morning mist and fog will clear quickly, but we could see some showers breaking
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out late in the day across western parts. before they arrive, look at the temperatures, 24 in cardiff, 25 in london, 22 in edinburgh, so it will feel warm in the sunshine. there will be further changes in the weather picture as we head through the rest of the weekend. there is weather front will come across the uk, showers or thunderstorms initially working their way in, but then, a more potent band of rain will work into the west as we go on through the night. from there, on sunday, the rain will push northwards and eastwards. still a degree of uncertainty about how far north it will get, but the best chance of staying dry will be across the far north—east of the uk. temperatures down on recent days, around 19 celsius what parts of wales and south—west england, around 18. next week, low pressure in charge, that will bring us spells of heavy rain and spells of strong wind, so temperatures will continue to slide into next week. highs of 15
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celsius in edinburgh towards the middle of the week, and heavy rain around at times, too. that is your weather.
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today at five — millions protest around the world — demanding greater action on climate change. schoolchildren lead the way in the uk — with thousands out on the streets in glasgow, manchester and london. similar demonstrations take place in cities across the globe — calling for ‘an end to the age of fossil fuels‘. the younger a person is, the more that the changing climate will impact them as they grow and the less of a voice they are given today. just because right now we don't feel the difference does not mean there are other people in poverty and a third world countries that are not feeling that difference. it's up to us to put a stop to it. we‘ll have the latest from our correspondents in sydney, nairobi, paris and new york. the other main stories on bbc news at 5.

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