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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 21, 2019 7:00am-8:01am BST

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laura kuenssberg retweeted his post about the day's events and pointed maybe it's you, maybe out his political status but that it's someone you know, help is out there. unleashed a wave of protests you can talk to frank, against the bbc‘s political editor which is the nhs's confidential as well as many messages in support advice service for addicts and their carers. of her, including for the man their phone number himself, who said she was and website is below. thank you for watching. stay well. we will see you soon. doing herjob. bbc news have put out a statement in response. it reads... good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. our headlines today:
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thomas cook asks for emergency government funding to stop it going bust and leaving thousands of holidaymakers stranded. infighting overshadows the start of the labour party conference now, in a newspaper publishes as activists try to remove a story which raises serious issues about invasion of privacy, the deputy leader tom watson. to what extent should the bbc follow it up? that was the dilemma posed by the sun's front page on tuesday about events in the family the the deputy leader tom watson. united states is t( of the cricketer at stokes. and the united states is to send troops and military defence systems to saudi arabia after drying and missile attacks on the kingdoms just two days after the final test of the summer, english crickets bigger star finds himself embroiled facilities. in a row against the biggest newspaper in what he condemns the rugby world cup‘s under way, as a immoral and heartless article the defending champions new zealand about a family tragedy that face south africa later, happened 30 years ago, who could rival them for the title, the details of which the bbc has in what's expected to be the most open tournament in years. good morning. it'll be another dry and sunny day for the vast majority of the uk. chosen not to repeat. a little warmer for many of us than yesterday, but windier as well. but there are changes afoot as the day progresses, particularly in the west. that decision not to provide details i'll have more detail for you in around a quarter of an hour. it's saturday the 21st of september. our top story: to the story to which ben stokes thomas cook has asked
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the government for financial help as it tries to avoid collapse. britain's oldest package holiday firm could fall into administration this weekend unless it finds £200 so strongly objected, a policy newswatch is also million pounds to secure following, meant bbc a rescue deal. katie prescott has more. reports on the subject were necessarily incomplete. but one of our viewers pointed out an irony on the output having seen it's low season for thomas cook, in more ways than one. the weak pound makes it more an article on the bbc website. expensive for it to buy the flights and hotels that it pays for in euros and dollars. it's in a competitive market well, we put that to bbc where profits are small and it has a lot of costs — hundreds of shops and 22,000 staff. now heading into the winter period news and they told us... the debtladen company has a cash flow crisis. if we book a holiday with thomas cook, we will pay for it before we go, obviously, but they actually don't pay the hotel until after we back, but what about the decision to run so they pay 60—90 days later, the story at all on any bbc outlets? which means that everybody that went rod gray thought that on holiday through the summer, it's now that thomas cook is beginning to have to pay the hotels. they simply can't and if they can't pay the suppliers, then the company
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faces a pretty tough time. was wrong, e—mailing... the company lenders say it needs an extra £200 million on top of the money it's already i am joined now from salford by secured for a bailout. the bbc head of sportsjournalism. with a vote on that lifeline next can i ask first, when did the bbc friday, the company is hoping it can know this tabloid paper get over the next few days was going to be running this story? to reach that finish. it's a nervous time for customers. i cannot speak for the whole we just don't know what the situation is. of the bbc but certainly, speaking personally i was not aware we'll either have a flight back of it at all until the sun and get back to manchester and be was published that morning. fortunate, orall things could, um, you know, things could collapse in the next, you know, couple of days or hours and we have — we have nothing — we have nothing to go back on. so it is a case of waiting, really. how did you decide to cover it and how much detail to give? initially, actually, nobody in the bbc covered the story if the company goes because ourjudgement was it was not into administration, there are 150,000 uk package holiday the story of public interest, customers who will be brought home, having thought about it, and we thought there were clear privacy issues involved with it and those who have booked holidays will be refunded. so actually there was no coverage katie prescott, bbc news. of the story until ben stokes himself issued an incredibly strong and detailed statement addressing his anger, his upset about it and his views on the whole nature of that kind ofjournalism, and at that stage,
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that potentially affects you or how ijudgement was it became a story you should be planning for the next we should cover. couple of weeks, simon calder, travel expert, will be with us later so, when he spoke out to a nswer publicly that was a story. travel expert, will be with us later to answer any questions you may have would you make of the viewers so to answer any questions you may have so do get in touch with us this morning in the usual way. who felt the bbc should have ignored it all together? i hear that and you know, a fresh bout of labour infighting is overshadowing the start on some levels, in terms of the party's conference today, of obviously the nature of the story after an attempt to remove i ever stammer people are coming tom watson as the party's deputy leader. from but actually, i do think a move by the grassroots group and i think ben stakes momentum to abolish his position thought and that is where he issued this failed to get the majority public statement in great detail, it needed last night. another attempt is expected that he actually wanted to register at the conference in and have reported his genuine anger brighton this morning. here's our political and upset at the story and the repercussions of it and what it meant for him and his family, and by doing so, correspondentjessica parker. he raised what has been a big issue over recent years and an issue of public interest. cheering and applause. what is the line between journalism conferences are supposed to be that is responsible and respectful a chance for a party to showcase its policies and portray and where should we be? unity, especially when a general it has been a huge subject of much debate over recent years election could be around. and continues to be won. there were other stories this past week that spoke to that and in that sense, it felt like that was a really important story we needed to cover across bbc news.
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election could be around the corner. but the news of this effort to oust tom watson by abolishing the job people found it very confusing he was elected to has sparked to watch as a result. a spectacular clash as members there was references to it. if you were going to cover gather in brighton. the motion was tabled last the story, should you not have night byjon lansman, thought we should say to some extent the founder of momentum — a movement supportive ofjeremy corbyn‘s leadership. as a last—minute proposal, it failed to gain the necessary what story is or what it is about. support at the national executive committee. but it's now officially on the agenda for another meeting of labour's ruling body, we actually had that discussion, later this morning. we had it a number of times if successful, the motion could then go to the conference floor with even and occasions across bbc news because you are right. some allies of tom watson not overly it was by its very nature a little optimistic about his chances. bit incomplete because we do not because he has his fair give people all the information share of critics — those who believe that the deputy we might have done that would help has repeatedly undermined them judge that story. we were at last, as we often are, the leader, not least with a difficult decision to make. there was not a perfect outcome by straying on brexit policy. in that sense and we have to make that —— we had to bounce back need for it getting detail however, a number of labour mps against ourjudgement of the nature are furious at what's happened of the story in the first place overnight, describing which was when we felt was not it all as a farcical destruction and self—destructive. in the public interest, jessica parker, bbc news. it was very much a matter that let's speak now to our political reflected on ben stokes's family. correspondent susana mendonca, it was not about him at all, who joins us from our it was about events that happen before he was born. london newsroom.
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good morning to do. this is interesting, isn't it? infighting, a tabloid papers do sometimes do quite position that the deputy leader has regularly run very controversial but true stories about celebrities, sporting celebrities. been, that position has been there the gareth thomas story was running this week. does the bbc need to have a clear since 1900, i think? it is standard strategy about how been, that position has been there since 1900, ithink? it is a position that is well entrenched to handle them all or should within the labour party and elected it be a case by case? it is hard to have a real position and tom watson himself was clear open and shut case. elected by around 200,000 labour we are not setting a long—term policy with this decision. members. so it is a significant it really was about this particular story at this particular context decision if they choose to abolish at this particular time. it was a debate, not everybody the post. also it is about the agreed with what we did. timing of this. it is the eve of the even in the bbc, never mind outside. that was a judgement on this particular occasion, labour conference, this is a time we felt we needed to take. when they are supposed to be talking my sense of my time in journalism about party unity and i suppose is the goalposts have moved a little bit. there was a time when most media setting themselves aside from other outlets felt if they could report political parties and instead people it, if they knew it i knew it to be are not talking about policies what right, then they should. they will talk about in their i think we are now in a place, conference, they are talking about the public is any place, labour divisions and also i suppose it does not give them the high and our audience, where they expect us to think more deeply and not ground they had over the conservatives when of course we saw report everything we might know, conservative dissenters dispelled regardless of legal, from the party by borisjohnson. but even editorialjudgements, when it comes to privacy and to the public interest. there is no doubt we'd take that very seriously, just recently, and labour were talking about that being a negative we think about that a lot in all of the things we do thing. here we have labour's own and we will always try to strike
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example of an attempt to, i suppose, the balance between the need to know, what is in the public silent somebody who is not in interest, but where appropriate, respecting people's previously. keeping with what the leadership has been saying. but certainly we will see what happens with this, we understand that jeremy corbyn see what happens with this, we understand thatjeremy corbyn was not aware that this was happening and that he did not have, did not give consent to jon and that he did not have, did not give consent tojon lansman for this we will see what happens and whether 01’ we will see what happens and whether or not it does make it to the floor but certainly, for labour, this is not what they want to be talking about just ahead of their party conference. indeed, but it is thank you very much. exactly what we are talking about! thank you for all your thank you very much. and we'll be speaking to one of tom watson's shadow cabinet comments this week. colleagues, dawn butler, just after 8:10am. the us has said it will send tell us your opinions military forces to saudi arabia after drone and missile attacks on the kingdom's oil facilities. washington has blamed iran for the attack, as david willis reports. on what you see here. having initially pronounced the united states "locked and loaded," president trump now and to have a look at previous favours defence of attack.
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interviews on our website. that is all from us. we will be back to here the president has approved the deployment of us forces, your thoughts about bbc news which will be defensive in nature coverage again next week. goodbye. and primarily focused on air and missile defence. the number of additional troops being deployed to the middle east will be decided over the weekend in talks with the saudis. the attack on two of saudi arabia's largest oil installations last weekend forced the kingdom to shut down half of its production and prompted the largest rise in crude oil prices in a single day. the trump administration branded it an attack on the global economy. yet, although the saudis believe the wreckage recovered from those attacks is that of iranian drones and cruise missiles, they have yet to pinpoint precisely where the weapons were fired from. mr trump also announced sanctions on financial institutions, including iran's national bank which, he says, is fuelling money to iranian—backed terrorist organisations.
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the president and first lady played host to a state banquet tonight — a celebration of 100 years of mateship, so it was said, between the united states and australia. scott morrison said the us had no more sure and steadfast friend than australia. next week at the united nations, mr trump will attempt to harness friends and allies in a diplomatic coalition against iran. david willis, bbc news, washington. the teenage activist greta thunberg has hailed the global day of protests she inspired as the "biggest climate strike in history". millions of people around the world have taken part in demonstrations over the last 2a hours, ahead of a summit in new york next week. the teenager addressed people in the city, praising them for taking part in what she called "a wave of change". we all live here, it affects all of us, and we will notjust stand aside and watch.
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we are united behind the science and we will do everything in our power to stop this crisis from getting worse. a master plan to protect and improve england's national parks has called for every school child to spend a night under the stars to connect with nature. the major review, published today, sets out ways to to get more people —— the major review, published today, sets out ways to get more people to spend time in areas of outstanding natural beauty. 0ur correspondent phil mackie has more. the first national parks and areas of outstanding natural beauty in england were created 70 years ago. they include some of the nation's most beautiful landscapes, like the lake district. the problem, according to the review, is that too few people are enjoying them and when they do go, they don't spend enough time there. it says that every schoolchild in england should be given a chance to visit one of the ten parks and 3a aonbs and to spend a night there under the stars.
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it says it has a big, bold plan which includes 27 recommendations. among them, it says there should be a new national landscapes service to bring the national parks and areas of outstanding natural beauty together, programmes to increase the number of visitors from black and minority ethnic communities, and the creation of a housing association to build affordable homes within the parks. it also wants park rangers to be introduced, similar to those who patrol national parks in the united states. in addition, it says the forest of dean in gloucestershire should be designated as a national landscape, the cotswolds, in dorset, should be upgraded from aonbs to national parks, and a national forest should be created in nottinghamshire. its desire is that england's most cherished places should become more important parts of people's lives to help to make the nation greener, healthier and happier. phil mackie, bbc news.
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fears that thousands of people could storm the top—secret us military base known as area 51 last night turned out to be unfounded. more than three million responded to a facebook post injune, calling for people to raid the facility in nevada in an attempt to uncover evidence of extra—terrestrial life. in the end, though, only around 75 people turned up, many of them in costume. dressed in green. two of them in green. no—one actually attempted to enter the site, which has long been the focus of conspiracy theories. a bit ofa a bit of a damp squib. what happened? were a bit of a damp squib. what happened 7 were they a bit of a damp squib. what happened? were they intercepted? who knows! let's return to our top story now. this will cause all sorts of issues for a lot of people and it is important we look at it in detail. thomas cook has asked the government for financial help as it races against time to avoid collapse. britain's oldest package holiday firm needs to find £200 million to secure a rescue deal.
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we're joined now by the travel editor of the independent, simon calder. good morning to you. at the moment, people who are on holiday with thomas cook are fine? a very fine, i have checked all the departures from the airports the uk, and chester, glasgow, bristol, gatwick, all of the flights going off normally. thomas cook is a going concern so thousands of people are flying away and thousands coming back. and then around 150,000 people who are enjoying another day in the mediterranean sunshine and everything is going to be normal as well in thomas cook travel agents which open up at about nine o'clock, except there may be slightly more people than usual asking questions about their forward bookings. 0k, but there is a deadline looming and the company has been told it needs to find the extra funding and is now asking the government for it, so it is in trouble? most definitely!
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terrible trouble! we last saw them having problems in 2011 and the share price collapsed and all kinds of things went badly wrong for it. but i think this looks more serious. we have deadlines coming up next friday when all of the stakeholders involved in an incredibly complicated rescue bid need to agree that that is going to go through and it involves the chinese company which owns club med and wolverhampton wanderers putting in a lot of money, the lender is transferring some of their debt that they are owed into shares in the company, and lots of other people involved in giving it the say—so. but the banks have said unless you have got another £200 million available to see you through winter, we will not go ahead with this and furthermore, just to make things even more lively, at the political party conference season, first of 0ctober, one week on monday, thomas cook their license becomes due for
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renewal. and they cannot really continue as a package holiday company without it. lots of deadlines, lots of talks. changes the mood because even if technically planes are taking off and coming back this morning, if you are a customer and you have booked a holiday or are away at the moment and you hear all of this about money and you hear all of this about money and licenses, you will think limey! what should i do? if you are away the best thing you can do is sit by the best thing you can do is sit by the pool, order a drink and relax u nless the pool, order a drink and relax unless you have to get back for work 01’ unless you have to get back for work oran unless you have to get back for work or an appointment and then you will be worried! i have spent the last few hours studying what happened after the monarch collapse which was almost two years to the day. 98% of the people who were supposedly stranded abroad actually flew back on the day they were intended to fly back. some, yes, had to go to manchester rather than birmingham and geta manchester rather than birmingham and get a bus for a couple of hours but it isn't the end of the world. the idea is they set up a really sophisticated shadow airline. you
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have got planes basically mirroring the thomas cook airline schedule, they had 60 aircraft, 2a airlines, flying to 33 different... do they play for those? if you go to the civil aviation headquarters they effectively turn into an airline hq and have different carriers charted in from across the world and they are flying across the world and they are flying a shadow of the thomas cook airlines schedule. so they are just mirroring the whole thing and bringing people back when they were expecting to be brought back. so if you are abroad you are in a pretty strong position. what if you are here and have a holiday coming up tomorrow or in a week and think i don't want to get stuck. they want my money back now. anybody who thinks i am not liking these headlines, this doesn't look good to me, they want my money back, and marches into a thomas cook shop
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today will get shorter. the company is still trading. if you want to cancel that means normal terms and conditions apply and you will lose some 01’ even conditions apply and you will lose some or even all of your money. we will talk to later in the programme and also talk to a family who booked flights only. there is an issue with that just slightly different. flights only. there is an issue with thatjust slightly different. we'll talk about that later. ok, thank you. thank you. it is a 17 minutes past seven. a glorious, sunny day. helen is going to tell us all about it. there you go. they have put your bad ending in for you. going to the med next week. next week looking rather turbulent. looking autumnal in time for the autumn equinox. let us in time for the autumn equinox. let us try and enjoy this lovely sunny day. this is sunrise on the east coast. today, as you have already said, it looks warm and sunny. it is
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windy today. that will take the edge of the feel of things, particularly on the east coast. the wind coming up on the east coast. the wind coming up from the south or south—east, all tied in with the high pressure which is keeping things right. you can see the weather fronts are starting to make inroads. we are tapping into this feed of warm air coming right the way up from africa, across the mediterranean to our shores, but we will revert back to the atlantic lucerne. it will not be cold. it will turn more unsettled. but we have across north—east scotland is with us this morning drifting into the east of scotland, it will enter potentially in the northern isles. asa potentially in the northern isles. as a day goes on, devon and cornwall police four scattered thunderstorms, possibly pembrokeshire and northern ireland. —— are in full. widely 25-26. if ireland. —— are in full. widely 25—26. if you shelter from that strong gust the wind. 0vernight 25—26. if you shelter from that strong gust the wind. overnight at the risk of thundery showers wales and england, into northern ireland. a little bit cool in the north, but
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substantially warmer tonight the south. very mild indeed compared to the nights we have had. really chilly. temperatures dipping everything in spots. what about further afield as we go into tomorrow? i am talking rugby and home games for ourselves, ireland, scotland, and with a tropical storm close by. yokohama not too far away from tokyo. england's match against tonga should escape all the wet and windy weather. lots to watch across the other side of the globe as well. back to our shores, the changing weather, and to sunday when we have the risk the prospect of some thundery showers scattered around central pulse of england, heading northland centre dockland through the day. then this more distinct band of weather. the weather front that will give us perhaps 15—20 millimetres as it passes slowly across wales, southern england, northern ireland, north—west england. it could be that scotland
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sees some warmth and is mainly phi and drained and is depositing them. for many of us is a change. that change by monday, the weather front sitting across the north of scotland —— mainlyfine sitting across the north of scotland —— mainly fine and dry. we have the re m na nts of —— mainly fine and dry. we have the remnants of hurricane humberto. nowhere near the ferocity of the winds. we will see some moisture. things were not cool down significantly. we are still 18— 20 celsius stop it is warmer. this time the warm air is entrapped within low pressure, so the warm air is entrapped within low pressure, so wet and windy weather as well. please enjoy the day. back to you. thanks very much. 20 past seven. it's thought more than a million people will soon be living with the symptoms of dementia in the uk — but, despite this, new research suggests there's still stigma around the condition. as part of world alzheimer's day, campaigners are calling for more of us to recognise the needs of those living with dementia. katharine da costa has more.
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tenerife is my favourite, our favourite. holiday. we like that. sex ago andrew wei was diagnosed with early onset dementia, a rare form of the condition —— six years ago. she is an active life and struggles with everyday tasks. i hate it. when i am saying things to himi hate it. when i am saying things to him i am obviously saying the wrong things and stuff. it is horrible. dementia is like an elephant in the i’ooiti. dementia is like an elephant in the room. when you meet other people, nobly likes to talk about it. people try to ignore it. oh, don't like to mention it. maybe because they don't wa nt mention it. maybe because they don't want to hurt you or maybe because they don't want to know or maybe because they don't understand it. every year more than 200,000 people are diagnosed with dementia in the uk. but‘s three every minute. it's estimated the number living with the condition will reach!
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estimated the number living with the condition will reach 1 million x 2021. good girl, well done. mick is hoping to break down some of the barriers for patients like angie. he hopes to advise the nhs and businesses on how they can improve their care and services. katharine da costa, bbc news. just one story there. we're joined now by kathryn smith, ceo of the alzhiemer‘s society. good morning, thank you for coming in. it seems to be a bit of a conflict. huge numbers of people, nearly 1 conflict. huge numbers of people, nearly1 million in the uk, living with dementia of one kind or another. but there is still a stigma attached to it. does that surprise you when you see the contrast with yellow absolutely. we have known for some time there is a stigma but this new survey shows some time there is a stigma but this new survey shows it is still there despite all the work to improve and increase awareness, it is quite astounding. and obviously we need to doa astounding. and obviously we need to do a lot more to reduce that stigma so do a lot more to reduce that stigma so people living with dementia are able to go about their lives without
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feeling stigmatised or isolated. what is the stigma look like? for many people living with dementia, it isa many people living with dementia, it is a global issue, in some countries in the world there is no word for dementia. some people say to something they have to be ashamed of and they have to hide from, some see it as and they have to hide from, some see itasa and they have to hide from, some see it as a natural part of ageing. but it as a natural part of ageing. but it isa it as a natural part of ageing. but it is a disease of the brain. like any other disease it needs support and treatment and more funding. we have had stories of people that have experience, for example, they have not been able to access a disabled toilet because people don't recognise they have dementia or they have been accused of being drunk or some of theirfriends have been accused of being drunk or some of their friends or family can start to pull away from them because they don't know what to say to them and they are worried they won't be remembered. very isolating. one of the concerns when someone has dementia is the ability to communicate, sometimes, what is wrong with them medically, almost as well, and physically, and get that translated. and it takes longer,
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doesn't it, it is about training from the other side as well to deal with people with dementia. yes. the survey that alzheimer's disease international have done for wild 0ats xi missed a found that even in the uk there are still people who think over 50% of people think there are not enough dementia awareness or training amongst health and social professionals and that they don't necessarily know how to communicate all workers was suddenly affected by dementia. that can feel very frustrating and isolating for the person with dementia who, of course, might be finding a more difficult to get across how they are feeling or what they need. and if the person that caring for them doesn't know how to work for them as well, it is doubly frustrating. is there an embarrassment factor, may be particularly among traditionally uptight brits, that we feel worried about what we should say or how we should react and we don't quite understand it, so we say nothing, ignore? i think that is absolutely spot on. i think people are quite embarrassed. they say they don't
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know what to say, they don't know how they will find the person are used to. if you have had a dementia diagnosis today, by the same person you were yesterday. if somebody is to speak to you and chat you they should carry on doing that. nothing has shakespeare. i remember anai was speaking to not too long ago and he was quite happy to say i have dementia and speak to people about it. -- dementia and speak to people about it. —— nothing has changed. this wife was quite embarrassed about it and did not want to tell anybody. she did not have dementia. she didn't. she was embarrassed for her husband was that we need to talk about this more. we need to get domains out there and part of our everyday language. it affects only people. it is more than talking about it. there are some practical tips and things that everyone, with 01’ tips and things that everyone, with or without dementia can use. we heard from angie in our report that people can actuallyjust be rude to her, because she's forgotten something, and almost dismissed her out of hand. how do you cope with that? and, also, if you don't have
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dementia and you have not been with anyone with dementia, how do you recognise it? people can be quite impatient. if you see somebody in a shop that is struggling and taking time you think i have got to get to work or do this, people can be quite impatient. you don't know what the person in front of you is dealing with stop i think a bit more patience is one thing. we are really reaching other people to think about signing up to the dementia friends programme. we have 3 million across the uk. but millions across the globe. but we need more. what do they do? adama jeff randall do an awareness session. i they do? adama jeff randall do an awareness session. i did one in a school yesterday was children —— a dementia friend. what dementia is and how it affects the person with dementia and the people around them. negative actions you can take to support people in the community. —— what kind of actions. it is about being patient and kind, visiting or keeping in touch with somebody with dementia, maybe volunteering,
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spreading the word, talking about dementia and being an ambassador for dementia and being an ambassador for dementia in your local community. they have to give a shout out, i was ata they have to give a shout out, i was at a fundraiser yesterday, 80% of the employees have signed up to be dementia friends. and if the rest of the corporate world, the communities, everybody else could sign up to that aspiration the world would be a better place for those affected by dementia. ok, thank you very much indeed. the department of health say they have invested nearly 500 million in early detection of dementia over the last couple of yea rs dementia over the last couple of years and they say they are doing more and more to improve access and diagnosis. 27 minutes past seven. from northumberland to snowdonia, from the broads to dartmoor, there are ten national parks in england and today we're being asked how we can make them greener and more open to everyone. jayne mccubbin is out in the glorious derbyshire countryside with the author of a new report.
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hello. good morning to you. good morning everybody. we have had the most magnificent... a tiny peak of the magnificent sunrise we have had this morning. it has been golden and peach and yellow. and now it is just great. never mind. we are at munsell head in the peak district. let me give you a tiny slice of history to get into this. just over the horizon isa get into this. just over the horizon is a place called ken—do scout, back in 1930 it was the scene of a mass trespass, the workers got on their feet and said it was wrong that the landed gentry had a monopoly of these beautiful areas and they were marching for the right to roam. fast forward 70 yea rs marching for the right to roam. fast forward 70 years and we have the act in place setting up all of these national parks, saying that we do have a right to roam. that was a gift to the servicemen and women coming back from the war. but not enough people have taken up that road to rome. this is the problem we are discussing this morning. julian
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glover, thank you for meeting us. you are the report author trying to get on top of this problem. what is going on? good morning. 70 years since we set up these wonderful national parks in areas of outstanding beauty, 44 places across england, magnificent places. we have done a massive report and it has got to do two things, one is to do more for people. some people come here, love enjoyed, it will be busy in a minute. not everyone understands why these bases are amazing. we have to reach out and involve more people. —— places. and we have to do a lot more for nature. we have a crisis of nature, we saw the proteas yesterday, the threat of climate change, people want action. national parks has to help restore nature, notjust parks has to help restore nature, not just conserve what we have got, but turn it around, bring back the birdlife species, insects, tree cover making britain greener and better. if people love it and take
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ca re of better. if people love it and take care of it. come and meet yvonne, a champion of the peak district. lovely to meet you this morning. 27 recommendations to get people out. wings like park rangers, 1000 of those, things like one night under the stars for every child in britain. why are you a champion of the parks? isil very passionate about getting people outside enjoying the park. national parks everyone involved — —in enjoying the park. national parks everyone involved ——in very passionate. just look at the scenery, passionate. just look at the scenery, do something recreational like swimming, cycling, walking, horse trading. you bring people out, you are from sheffield, who have never set foot in a national park. what reactions you get from the kids? some of the kids love to come back more often and to do it again. you take them a certain place on the river and theyjust you take them a certain place on the river and they just don't you take them a certain place on the river and theyjust don't want to get out of the river because they love it. it is not something they used to doing on a daily basis where
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they come from sheffield. it is good to see them getting out and getting into the water and doing things and just loving the atmosphere and enjoying the things around them. our message this morning is get out more. get out more. the question is whether the government will adopt any of the 27 recommendations. we will discuss it more in excel. back to you. glorious views as well. --in the next hour. helen will have the weather for is coming the next hour. helen will have the weatherfor is coming up. it looks like a weekend of two halves. but first we have the news headlines in a moment. stay with us, headlines coming up. --bl s:/startfeed --bl.
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hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and naga munchetty. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. thomas cook has asked the government for financial help as it tries to avoid collapse. that's emergency financial help. britain's oldest package holiday
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firm could fall into administration this weekend, unless it finds £200 million to secure a rescue deal. if the company fails, the cost of bringing home passengers is estimated to be around £600 million. a fresh bout of labour infighting is overshadowing the start of the party's conference today after an attempt to remove tom watson as the party's deputy leader. last night, a motion put forward by allies ofjeremy corbyn to abolish his position failed to get the majority it needed, but another attempt is expected this morning. mr watson has increasingly been at odds with the leader over labour's stance on brexit. the us has said it will send military forces to saudi arabia after drone and missile attacks on the kingdom's oil facilities. washington has blamed iran for the strikes. secretary of defence mark esper told reporters the deployment would be "defensive in nature". total troop numbers have not yet been decided. the teenage activist greta thunberg has hailed the global day of protests she inspired as the "biggest climate strike in history".
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millions of people around the world have taken part in demonstrations over the last 24 hours, ahead of a summit in new york next week. the teenager addressed people in the city, praising them for taking part in what she called "a wave of change". we all live here, it affects all of us, and we will notjust stand aside and watch. we are united behind the science and we will do everything in our power to stop this crisis from getting worse. a master plan for a shake—up of england's national parks has called for every school child to spend a night under the stars to connect with nature. the major review, published today, sets out ways to get more people to spend time in areas of outstanding natural beauty. suggestions include introducing park rangers similar to those who patrol national parks in the us.
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a good excuse to do this for some glorious views, as we saw injayne in derbyshire. lovely out there. if you want a weekend of sport, in fa ct, you want a weekend of sport, in fact, how many, six, eight weeks? seven weeks of the world cup. fact, how many, six, eight weeks? seven weeks of the world cupm fact, how many, six, eight weeks? seven weeks of the world cup. it is fantastic and it kicked off yesterday. japan did it well, eventually. a bit of a ropey start! a mist up and under. but they came back to when and now we have some great matches the tournament organiser clearly wanted to have the big games at the start of the tournament to get people interested. we are doing this at the wrong time, really, aren't we? iwant we are doing this at the wrong time, really, aren't we? i want to be watching australia against fiji right now! a shaky start for them but they have overturned it, australia, and they should run out multiple winners. i know, you were backing fiji. they could have surprised a few people. they have
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the quality but australia have the experience which certainly counts.|j a lwa ys experience which certainly counts.|j always go for the underdogs. 39-21. yeah. you have it as well? fiji was leaving at half—time. yeah. you have it as well? fiji was leaving at half-time. they were. they were. look, it'll be great tournament. 20 of great action to come today. japan —— plenty of great action to come today. japan are up later. the rugby world cup got under way yesterday, the hosts japan opening with a win. no doubts what the game of the day is in yokohama — the defending champions new zealand up against south africa. the all blacks have never lost a pool game since the world cup started in 1987. but no team that's lost their opening match has gone on to win the world cup. something for new zealand to bear in mind. head coach steve hansen says there's plenty to be confident about. and the one thing i know, though, if we — if we play to the best of our — our ability, and doesn't matter who we play, it's gonna be — you know, they're gonna have to play really well to beat us and if they do so,
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then, you know, well done to them and we have to accept that. if they do not, then they may have to accept the consequences. what about the home nations? scotland and ireland face each other in their opener tomorrow. scotland have only beaten ireland once since the last world cup. but on their day, they can beat anyone, and who can forget that brilliant comeback against england in the six nations? a match which finished in a draw. head coach gregor townsend is aware of the dangers ireland pose. we have to take the opportunities and we have to limit the opportunities that ireland get, because they've shown over the past two or three years that they do take opportunities. they get into the opposition 22 and they come away with points. england also play tomorrow. not many happy memories from the last world cup, when they became the first host nation to go out at the group phase. but they have some genuine world beaters in their side and they will need those players to stay fit. plenty of emphasis on youth as well. eddie jones doesn't think inexperience will be an issue.
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if you look at what this team's been through over the last probably five or six years, not all of them, you know, they've won a lot, they've lost a lot, they've had some extraordinary tough situations and they've had some great situations, so all of that accumulated experience probably counts more than caps. he certainly has his game face on, hasn't he? watch out for this goalkeeping blunder as bournemouth beat local rivals southampton. that's in the premier league. southampton had got themselves back into it at 2—1, only for this to happen. callum wilson sparking wild scenes — that win has taken 66 years as they won there for the first time. reporter: when the points were sealed with that third goal, it looks like it was a bit like pandemonium down on your bench — with delight. yeah, it was a nice moment. i think you very rarely get those moments in football. we've had, probably in my ten years of management, a handful where you have that pure emotion and joy for a few seconds, and then you start thinking about
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next week and west ham very quickly. cricketerjofra archer, one of the stars of summer, has been rewarded with a new england contract. he only made his international debut four months ago, and the deal covers all forms of the game. we spoke about him so much during the world cup because of the speeds he bowls at, in excess of 90 mph and those around him believe he can get faster. i thinkjofra's capable of anything. i did have a chat with his dad, actually, at the 0val and he told me he thought he'd hit 100 mile an hour next year, so i said i'd take that! but it's important we look after him. it's not easy to bowl that pace consistently. and he's a fine asset for this team. you would want to be with their —— you would want to be there when he does that, bowls at 100 miles an
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hour! he doesn't believe he's back to his bestjust yet but he's showing signs of getting there after danny willett moved into a share of the lead at the halfway stage of the pga championship at wentworth in surrey. he is the former masters champion, but saw form and fitness dip after that win. he's on 11 under par alongside spain'sjon rahm after a second round of 65. rory mcilroy narrowly made the cut but is 12 shots behind. i think it's my 10th straight year here. i've had a couple of nice finishes. and the game is in good shape, it has been for a while, and it's just nice to come back, the crowds have been amazing for two days. you get the good weather, the golf course in great condition, so, um, you know, this week, you're gonna have — you're gonna have a have a real good leaderboa rd and fortunately, we've put ourselves in a position to be right up there. super league champions wigan warriors beat salford red devils 18—12 in their qualifying final. they scored three tries, including this one from george williams, but it was in defence where they were most impressive. it means they are nowjust one win away from the grand final at old trafford. and lewis hamilton's form was as hot as the weather during practice
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for the singapore grand prix. the championship leader said it felt like a sauna in his mercedes car as he clocked the quickest lap at the marina bay street circuit. the briton was just under two tenths of a second quicker than red bull's max verstappen, but almost a second ahead of the ferrari of sebastian vettel in third. qualifying gets under way at 2 o'clock. after you have been watching all of the rugby this morning, of course! argentina against france gets under way a little bit later on and then i think about 11 o'clock or ten o'clock we see new zealand in action against south africa. it is almost like you are planning your entire weekend. i have to get out of here! when would you like to do the next sports bulletin? can we move forward half—an—hour? sports bulletin? can we move forward half-an-hour? whoever has worked out the scheduling for these matches has done a really good job. yes, you see the favourites and the second favourites on the first day. we will see you later, when you can be
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bothered! it was a daring but flawed plan. 75 years ago today, allied troops mounted what was the largest airborne assault of the second world war. the resulting battle of arnhem, in the netherlands, claimed the lives of more than 1,500 british soldiers and saw 6,000 more captured. 0ur defence correspondent, jonathan beale, has been attending the commemorations. 75 years ago, it was his relative preparing tojump into arnhem. today, he'll be doing the same. major tim efstratiou is the link between the present and the past. carrying a photograph of his great uncle, leonard plant, along with his medal. he was killed in action atjust 22. he jumped in on the first wave into arnhem and the following day was killed. this is one of the last opportunities to do it whilst perhaps we still have veterans who would've been there on the day, are still around to share that experience with us. this week, hundreds of british and nato troops have been preparing
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to mark the 75th anniversary of operation market garden. go! a bold but flawed plan to seize a series of bridges to break through to germany and bring an end to the war. this, a tiny fraction of what was on that september day in 1944, one of the largest airborne assaults in history. file: and the red devils of the skies do not count the cost. they proudly offer life itself in their bold attempt to strike the short route to berlin. the british furthest north at arnhem soon ran into trouble. more than 1,500 were killed and 6,500 taken prisoner. among those captured wasjotheffries. he's now 97 but he returns each year to remember his band of brothers. every year, i come back, because i like to know, when i come back, that i go to
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the graves and it's memories that... so many men wiped out. i couldn't believe it. the goal of capturing the bridge here at arnhem ultimately failed. the british were outgunned and outnumbered. but it's their extraordinary bravery against the odds that's still remembered here, 75 years on. oh, thank you! the surviving veterans are fewer each year, but generations of dutch have never forgotten. schoolchildren still visit the graves, laying flowers to remember. the sacrifice of men like leonard plant means the past will always be present. jonathan beale, bbc news, arnhem. ms parachute drop today, they should
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be some amazing pictures later. —— a mass parachute drop today, they should be some amazing pictures later. surely show you some wonderful photos from derbyshire, a whole view of just how photos from derbyshire, a whole view ofjust how wonderful it is there. crew three is there today, talking about hitting more people out to the national parks and experiencing nature and just getting out there. if you did it today, there is sunshine on the way so you would be getting it right. a lovely morning and lots of places but not sure it will last! the good news and then the bad news, helen. early good morning. they have done a lot of walking in the peak district. just bear in mind that the wind is strong. as you go
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up that the wind is strong. as you go upa hill that the wind is strong. as you go up a hill the wind get stronger and gusty. it will feel colder. that is a bit ofa gusty. it will feel colder. that is a bit of a hazard when you have a strong and gusty wind that you come over the top of a peak and suddenly get a big gust of wind hitting you. that aside, a lack of wind this morning. in chesterfield, just a little further north from where we we re little further north from where we were a moment ago. we have a little fog around this morning, not unusual as we move into september that it lingers into the rush hour. it is fairly limited. for most of us it will be dry, warm, and sunny again. the exception is what is happening towards the south—west with the approach of this low pressure system. we will start to see a few showers triggered, even some thunderstorms. that is because we have been tapping into this warm air coming across the mediterranean and europe. temperatures above where they should be for this time of year. tempered by that wind. strong and gusty. particularly temperature was near the east coast. there is the fog moving northwards. here is the fog moving northwards. here is the risk for devon and cornwall this morning, perhaps pembrokeshire this afternoon and northern ireland was
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the evening. a heavy downpour or even a thunderstorm. not for all. it is an increasing risk through the day. low 20s and mind away from the coast. 25 — 26 across the eastern side of england, 24 in the highlands of scotland. a fine evening for most of scotland. a fine evening for most of us. again, just the increasing risk, wales, southern england, northern ireland, suffer scotland as we go through the night of thunderstorms popping up. later a more persistent band of rain. look at the temperatures tonight. we have some chilly nights. temperatures near freezing. chilly in the highlands of scotland. as was much milder. temperatures tonight more akin to what they should be during the daytime at this time of year. it isa the daytime at this time of year. it is a little warmer as we had across the other side. let us head off to japan. yokohama today mostly dry. we have the approach of a tropical storm. that'll give some heavy rain. for england's mass, further north, it looks set to stay dry. near tokyo
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there could be some heavy rain around —— match. back home, as we go into sunday, it is all change. the transition day. it still stays largely fine and dry for scotland during daylight. many other areas, the north—east of scotland, there will be showers elsewhere, we have this band of more persistent rain coming in. we could see up to 20 millimetres before the end of play. not a washout. it is clearly a very different complexion to the weather. it certainly is. thank you very much. we willjust rerun those pictures from the peak district all weekend. time now for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. borisjohnson confronted by an angry father on a visit to a hospital and the bbc faces criticism too over how it covered the story. and can you report cricketer ben stokes's distress over newspaper stories about his family without telling the audience what that story was? it has been a week of tricky
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editorial dilemmas for bbc news as editors have decided how to cover some sensitive subject matter and how to allocate airtime in the news agenda. for much of the week, the news channel has been broadcasting live the argument from the supreme court over the prime minister's suspension of parliament earlier this month but after the first hour or so of this, it became clear that not everyone was hooked. here is trevor skingle. but other viewers applauded the coverage and expressed their disappointment when this afternoon on the news channel, this happened. we will pull awayjust for a moment because there are other things
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going on, particularly in bournemouth where the liberal democrats are holding their conference and we are going to hearfrom jo swinson. david fairfield was watching and had this response. well, it was 40 minutes before afternoon live did return to the supreme court afterjo swinson's conference speech had finished and that had left this telephone caller as another unsatisfied customer. i tuned in to watch the live coverage of the supreme court proceedings and bbc in its wisdom are covering the liberal party conference in bournemouth on three channels, parliament, afternoon live and also on bbc two politics live.
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why are you doing it three times? the prime minister's awkward encounters with unimpressed voters have regularly made the news in the past couple of weeks and none more so than this wednesday on a trip to a university hospital in london to which the news media had been invited by number ten. the nhs is being destroyed, it is being destroyed and now you come here for a press opportunity. there is no press here. what do you mean there is no press here? you are these people? that was the father of a sick child being treated at this hospital who later described that encounter with the prime minister in a tweet. he describes himself on his twitter profile as a labour activist and that fact was mentioned when the bbc reported the story. but how relevant was it to the points he was making? or to mrjohnson's response? 00:52:01,954 --> 4294966103:13:29,430 for terryjohnson...
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