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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 22, 2019 8:00am-9:01am BST

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we're gonna go up a mast hopefully, and met people which is amazing, who i wouldn't normally have met. we've all got on well as a team, so yeah — it's been a bonding moment i think for everyone.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. our headlines today: labour promises free prescriptions for all as it tries to put policy back in the spotlight at a party conference overshadowed by internal rows. thomas cook will hold emergency talks this morning as it attempts to agree a rescue deal to prevent it from going bust. three of the home nations
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begin their rugby world cup campaigns this morning. with just minutes to go until ireland take on scotland before england face tonga. good morning. still warm for many of us today and breezy too, but with some rain. in fact, there are some thundery showers around as well this morning. i will have more detail for you in around 15 minutes. it's sunday, 22nd september. our top story, after internal divisions dominated the headlines on the first day of labour's party conference, it's aiming to shift attention back to policy today. it'll announce plans to abolish nhs prescription charges in england and replace ofsted with a new school inspection system. our political correspondent, nick eardley is at the labour conference in brighton. make we will talk about the arguments at the conference any better, but first of all the
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policies. they are quite eye—catching, you can tell there is a general election around the corner. labour want to scrap all prescription charges in england. that has already happened in scotland, wales and northern ireland and at the labour party say that if they are winning power they will bring england into line with the left of the uk. the scrapping of £9 prescription charges when they take office. it will cost about £750 million, so it does not come for free, but the party's arguing that people are going without medicine because of the cost. have a listen to the shadow health secretaryjohn ashworth. you have got a sort of topsy—turvy system. if you have diabetes, you will get your prescription for free, but not if you have arthritis. if your prescribed antidepressants and you are ina prescribed antidepressants and you are in a low—income job, you have to pay for your perception, but you do not have to pay for your prescription if you have hiv. so the
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whole system needs to be completely looked at again. the other big promise today is to get rid of the current schools inspection system, to scrap ofsted and set up a new system and if they were not going to build skills experts will be brought in to look widely at problems. labour is on, look, we have ideas for government. labour types of falling over themselves to say, it is all sweetness and light and unity hangs in the air over brighton. yet, we know that there has been this almighty ding—dong and crucially this is all about brexit and what they're saying on brexit and frankly, they can agree. no, they cannot. when one says that everything is fine repeatedly, it usually means that there is something not so by going on beneath the surface. yesterday it was all about a plan to try and dispose of tom watson as deputy leader. that failed because jeremy tom watson as deputy leader. that failed becausejeremy corbyn got
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involved and he was not too happy that some of his backers were trying to get rid of mr watson. the other big question that labour have to a nswer big question that labour have to answer is brexit. the party's leadership want to have a policy where they will offer another referendum if they win power, but they will not decide what they're going to back in—out referendum until after an election, so potentially we could all be asked about without knowing whether we wa nt about without knowing whether we want —— whetherjeremy corbyn wants to stay in the eu are or leave. the vast majority of members here have put motion verbs want to stay in the eu, but as you say, a lot of arguments and ding—dong is here. parties like to argue over politics and labour is no different. is that little single decker bus glued to the wall beside you? no, it has a leaflet. i will bring one back. in fa ct, leaflet. i will bring one back. in fact, you'rejoining me tomorrow, i'm sure? put it aside if you do not
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mind. i will get to know and i'll put them aside. thank you. in the next few minutes, we'll speak to the guardian columnist, owen jones, and former labour adviser ayesha hazarika. travel company, thomas cook, will meet shareholders and creditors this morning to try to piece together a rescue deal. the travel firm could fall into administration within days unless it finds an extra £200 million. we're joined by our reporter simonjones, who is at a law is taking place. how optimistic can lose tens of thousands of employees and hundreds of thousands of holiday—makers be that this deal is going to be signed? that is the big question and things are very much in the balance. we're expecting this meeting to get an array in our's time. the discussions have been described as the most important in the 178 year
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history of thomas cook. we are expecting the big chinese investor to be here and other creditors. the question is whether anyone is going to be prepared to dip into their pocket and provide thomas cook with a £200 million it is said to need to tide it over what is likely to be a difficult winter period. if the money is not found, the company could go into administration as early as tomorrow morning. that could leave around 150,000 uk passengers stranded abroad. we know that around 10 million british holidays booked with thomas cook every year, for those people have made a booking and are feeling well at this man, what is your advice to them? it is a budding time for people have bookings. for people who are already on holiday, they will be protected because it is a tactic —— it isa protected because it is a tactic —— it is a package holiday so it will be protected by the actual scheme
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evenif be protected by the actual scheme even if the firm goes bust. and the british government the elements and place to make sure they can get home and it would be the big repatriation of betty's people since world war ii. -- the of betty's people since world war ii. —— the biggest repatriation of british people since world war ii. you're likely to get your money through this atoll scheme but you are going to have to look for alternative flights and holidays yourself. if you have just put to flight, yourself. if you have just put to flight, that is not covered by this atoll scheme, but you're likely to be on the climate back through your debit or credit card company or through your holiday insurance. thomas cook is telling passengers on twitter that flights are continuing to operate on the making of the uncertainty of the situation. we did have a difficult situation last night in tunisia where a group of thomas cook passengers were trying to leave their hotel. they were told by hotel bosses that hotel bills we had not been paid by thomas cook,
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they could not and the gates were locked and eventually after a stand—off they were told they could not scratch mentally. —— they were told that they could leave. eight migrants have been picked up by border force off the coast of kent. officials intercepted their small boat in the st margaret's bay area on saturday afternoon. those on board said they came from afghanistan and iran. last month, the home secretary and her french counterpart agreed to intensify action to tackle small boat crossings in the channel. a memorial service will take place in the swiss alps today, to mark the disappearance of a glacier. the pizol glacier has been reduced to a few frozen lumps. scientists warn that 80% of switzerland's 1500 glaciers could disappear by the end of this century, if global warming continues.
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talking of frozen months, i think i would be one of those if i was ever on strictly. strictly coming dancing is back. snazzy outfits, big songs and brave moves. 15 couples did their thing for the first time, including our very own mike bushell and his partner katya jones. mike proved he had rhythm with head judge shirley ballas saying his kick ball changes — which nina will explain — has week eight potential. he was incredibly nervous beforehand so we were he was incredibly nervous beforehand so we were delighted to see how well he did. katya has been saying to me, give me five! give me five! in restaurants, when i was in bed next to my wife... she would say, give me five. give me five, give me five! i like the fact that your wife didn't say five what? but that's good. earlier you said to me i'm on the horse and am getting on it and i mean, the energy level was extraordinary.
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that's the work of katya. the stamina, the. just when i think we're finished for the day, we're going to do it four more times around the room. i wondered how they were going to stop mike from talking because he can go on a bit. you realise how exhausting it must be as well, the sweat! a giant yellow duck, harry potter and a storm trooper were just some of the costumes worn by paragliders running off a cliff edge in the french alps this weekend. i'm not sure i would fancy being strapped to that thing. the skies above the small village of saint—hilaire were filled with colourful, costume—clad pilots for the annual "i carnaval". around 130 people from around the world took part, with prizes going to those wearing the best costumes.
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that look like some bed sheets there. and goodness gracious, look at that! it remains pretty popular. the french village has been hosting regular paragliding contests since the 1970s. freedom. i have never done it, but it is slightly awkward, you said to be strapped to a stranger and making small talk. i felt far more terrified about being strapped to the person behind me than the fact that there were hundreds of feet between myself and the ground that we would have to land on. labour is striving to move attention away from internal divisions and bring the party together after a failed move to remove the deputy leader, tom watson. as the party conference in brighton enters its second day, will his calls for unity be heeded? you only tend to hear these, as nick ea rdley you only tend to hear these, as nick eardley said, when there is no
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unity. let's speak to the guardian columnist and labour activist, owenjones, and former labour adviser ayesha hazarika. we're potentially weeks away from the general election and it is the showcase opportunity for the alternative government to show how they can do things and they are all fighting like rats in a sack. politics, a? yeah, ithink that co nfe re nce politics, a? yeah, ithink that conference only really gets into gear from today onwards and it has to be on the policy programme —— the focus has to be on the policy programme which units most people. and at the green new deal, because of the climate crisis which threatens the species. they are
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talking about scrapping prescription charges today. what they need to do is bring back the spirit of 2017, before the election... does not look like there's much of the 2017 spirit when tom watson cannot even get out of brighton railway station without been the subject of a political drive by shooting as he described it. back in 2016 be for the election, the labour party was being completely torn to shreds and things cannot be worse than that. what they need to do is bang back that spirit because what you saw in 2017 was by their manifesto was leaked originally, it turned out to be a good thing, when those policies about taxing the rich to invest in economy, scrapping tuition fees, public ownership, the radical green policies that they had, public ownership of utilities, that kind of thing which, in much of the media, is seen that you cannot do that, thatis is seen that you cannot do that, that is with extreme, people will not buy it, well, millions of people dead and it brought that kind of
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surge, that sense of, this is —— millions of people did buy it. that we can transform it and build something new. that is an interesting point that he makes that conventionally everyone is following up conventionally everyone is following up with each other but yet there we re up with each other but yet there were plenty of stories about this a few years back and laboured at massively better than so many people thought. sure, but they did not win the election, that the? they did not win the election. the whole point about being in politics is to do all the things that own has said as to sort of transform britain and you do not do that from opposition. your editor to edit and that is the whole point of being a political party and we have started this conference with a real cloud over us. —— you are a it to win it. delegates have spoken toa it to win it. delegates have spoken to a crew from across the political
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spectrum, including people who are much more to the left, are absolutely dismayed that the fact that you have an opportunity at co nfe re nce that you have an opportunity at conference to show the world, show the public, show the media, the vote rs the public, show the media, the voters that we're a government in waiting. it is a great showcase and yet we have started it with that ridiculous internal fighting. the thing is, we're notjust about policies. we're not and arid think tank and it's about her values, how we treat people so this is an incredibly mad look. i spoke, interestingly, last night spoke to both tom watson and jon lansman and pretty much everyone in between. i think everybody is quite regretful about how this turned out. the problem with the labour party right now is that we've got really good policies, as owen said, but until we stop the circular firing squad. this week we've had harriet harman sought
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to protect and we're sort of deselecting mps, including mps who are good, like diana johnson. deselecting mps, including mps who are good, like dianajohnson. she has been billy joel to jeremy are good, like dianajohnson. she has been billyjoel tojeremy corbyn and has done fantastic things —— she has been a really loyal tojeremy corbyn and has done fantastic things on the blood work. what a lot of comments to realise is that the enemy is not within, the enemy as borisjohnson the tories enemy is not within, the enemy as boris johnson the tories and... just to explain... just a second, owen, john has been one of the senior figures behind the scenes. let's talk brexit because i guess that when a key element in the trial involving tom watson yesterday. as the policy that we now have from labour on brexit syllable on the doorstep? on the face of it, the party ca n doorstep? on the face of it, the party can argue that it is pragmatic and the shadow cabinet ministers making that argument. on the other
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hand, if you know, jaw and someone is asking the policy on brexit and it is likely that the candidate is still standing at the end of newsnight trying to explain it?|j think it is very unclear at the moment and if you're on the doorstep, you need to get a flip chart out and drive culture, that it is very tough and you have lost the person on the doorstep. when getting to the point now where were going to have a general election i would prepare there to be a people's put a referendum before that. it's not going to happen, is it? exactly. i think that is going to be tough, i would like that but it's going to be tough. theirs is going to be a de fa cto tough. theirs is going to be a de facto brexit general election and what we saw from the european elections is that the public are rewarding parties that have clarity on brexit, from the liberal democrats to the brexit party and so i hosted a rally for the people's vocal about people like emily thornberry and other socialist mps,
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very, very supportive ofjeremy corbyn and deliver socialism and the head brexit. the message to later jeremy corbyn is please, do not be neutral on the biggest political issue of a generation. come out and back remain. on that, i do think that sometimes in the media there is a better performance going on in terms of the brexit position of labour, as though it is so complicated and we have to do a full charge. it seems to be very strict forward position to be that there will be a referendum on remain on the ballot paper. the people's campaign that was on set up less than a year ago's position was that any deal with the european union that was negotiated should be put to a confirmatory boat with remain on the ballot and that was labour's position. and the choice that la bou rvoters position. and the choice that labourvoters will have the night section is... on the doorstep... owen, i take your point about what
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you see is a clearer picture on brexit then, perhaps some are suggesting. but if mr corbyn cannot a nswer suggesting. but if mr corbyn cannot answer the question, which happened in an interview eight times, are you pro leave pro remain, you can make a pragmatic case when standing above it, but is not sustainable during a general election campaign cosmic that really is my frustration because this country as grip of a social work. it because this country as grip of a socialwork. it has because this country as grip of a social work. it has been picked up on the one side by brexiteers who say that the only bill brexit is no deal. and on the other side, the goalpost is no deal. and on the other side, the goal post as consul are being shifted and that revoke is the only genuine remain position. wit is going to end? we were on the losing side because we lost the referendum back in 2016. that was better. we both felt that there was a sense of grievance over the last few years because we are excluded from the future of our country, told
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weber set up now, traitor saboteurs, etc. if there is another referendum, we will support remaining, but if we win that, many other voters will do... feel that a triumphalist group had defeated them. we need a government that can straddle the divide. if you do not have a government that says that we speak for remainers and leavers, there is no future for this country. i have to say, i am sick to death, myself, for all of us being stuck in this ridiculous psychodrama for the last three years where there is a burning fire going on and charlatans and shysters fire going on and charlatans and s hyste rs o n fire going on and charlatans and shysters on both sides are putting petrol in it. that is a question with the task. maybe people don't wa nt to with the task. maybe people don't want to ask that. they want to have this constant fight about who can be the most remain and the most leave.
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the problem is, though, in an ideal world we would. this is the political side of her generation, the general election is coming down the general election is coming down the track is going to be a brexit general election and the labour party... it cannotjust be a brexit general election. it is going to be, own, i general election. it is going to be, own, lam general election. it is going to be, own, i am afraid. we're general election. it is going to be, own, lam afraid. we're not general election. it is going to be, own, i am afraid. we're not going to be able to do next and if we do not when a general election. and jeremy corbyn is going to have to pick a side. you cannot just corbyn is going to have to pick a side. you cannotjust try corbyn is going to have to pick a side. you cannot just try and corbyn is going to have to pick a side. you cannotjust try and be all things tall people and end up being nothing anybody. you need to bring the country together at some point. he cannot even bring his party together, owen. unity in brighton! may be the first that we've seen of it. thank you very much to both.|j like to see that. making up at the
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end. i'm not have a look at the weather. the weather has not been able to make up its mind today. it is drying up make up its mind today. it is drying up and then it is rain again. it is actually very, very different today compared with yesterday. very much a tailor to house this weekend. this is what we are going to have, not just today, but for the week ahead. we've had that taste of late summer sunshine and now we have this array of weather fronts across the uk. most of us will see some much—needed rain because it has been dry this september. particular across southern and eastern areas. the gardens are looking a little bit brown and did they do need them in, and it is coming on its way and it is coming to quite heavily and we have thunderstorms and this kind of been following a bang. she was at the western side of scotland and across eastern areas it is lovely and sunny still. it is all heading
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its way, progressively eastwards. if you have started with this engine, it will cloud over, initially, just a few shows around. you saw there, pretty heavy, but this next persistent band of rain trundles its way northwards as well. concerns that we could see some surface water flooding. that's where the french players onto the wing that we've had overnight. still quite windy, but 80 scratching easing. still some sunshine around, it is not a washer, but much more unsettled than we've become used to because of the high pressure that we had coming off the atlantic. bad weather beaches scotla nd atlantic. bad weather beaches scotland through this evening and overnight and behind it will dry up free time. as we projected the mercer entire atmosphere, we'll see some the central problems tomorrow morning. the necks weather system is waiting in the wings, this next at nantyglo. they will queue up this
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week, a actually. warm air holds more rain. for the south—west, wales and northern ireland, but one still been clears and men in scotland, we will actually have for scotland, much of central and eastern england, it isa much of central and eastern england, it is a tomorrow. it will feel warm, temperatures between 19 and 20 celsius. that is not too different from what we had met last week. then at the arena med centre. eight were moving quite quickly to monday night and lingers on tuesday. that area of low pressure throws a strong wind our way. at this stage, it looks like england and wales might see the heaviest and most persistent of the rain, but it is going to be quite difficult to pinpoint the detail because that low pressure, as i say, is going to continue to dry in bands of showers and longer spells of rain for much of the week. looking the senate last week, it was sunny spells for this week and it is a different complexion this week. it is not cold and it will not be as
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cold by night, but we will have some much—needed rain. cold by night, but we will have some much-needed rain. thank you. the playpen is getting quite a work—out on your graphics. your ability to look on the bright side is astounding! writer and broadcaster angela epstein is here to tell us what's caught her eye. this is a story that was in the sunday times and it says that cambridge university are looking to if you are buying from an arts degree from cambridge from an arts degree from cambridge from an arts degree from cambridge from a private school, you may have to get three esters. this is a proposal, not set in stone. if you're coming from a skill, it will bea you're coming from a skill, it will be a star, an a&e bill. for me it is just kind of rampant social engineering because, what it does,
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it feels that the claims that they are discriminating against private school pupils. they may be part of you that says, diddums, but it is not always as clear cut. you may have a middle income family her grafting like mad to send their child to a private school. i went to a private school on a scholarship. my a private school on a scholarship. my parents would not have been able to afford it otherwise. there is a lwa ys to afford it otherwise. there is always more to the study than that. yes, we want bright pupils to have an opportunity, but there seems like an opportunity, but there seems like a very blunt instrument by cambridge to do it this way. it is so tricky around blunt intimates. 93% of children go to state schools and in colleges it is 50% and 50% for state and private. so they have to do something there. we want to give all children are opportunities and that is why we should bring back state—sponsored grammar schools and we had to been to nourish that. the sort of gimmickry is not the way forward. let's move on. residents
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are calling on mps to legislate against the rise of one of weekend air bnp rentals. they know my weekends would be ring —— air b and b. there are a large number of ordinary houses that are being let out for one—off events. ordinary houses that are being let out for one-off events. the people that live nearby to them, if it is happening every weekend, and air b and b say that they do not tolerate they are looking for ways to legislate some kind of registration scheme to stop this from happening.
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i know where you're going, chris. you're twitching. i am twitching to talk about my favourite headline of this morning. very briefly, this is the cost of enthusiastic rabbits, i should say, which is something else entirely. full marks to the mail on sunday subeditor. you should get a knighthood sir or madam. the pet rabbit, that known scourge of terrifying behaviour are costing around £50 million to fittings and furniture. they are cutting through cables, but these are the ones that are behind this outrageous vandal —like behaviour. who knew that a rabbit could do such a thing? people are keeping them inside their living rooms? hours was a was inside the garden. maybe rabbits are new on
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paint. —— the new untrained pet. keep them in the garden. stay with us. keep them in the garden. stay with us. headlines coming up. what is brexitcast? i am in westminster, i am what is brexitcast? i am in westminster, iam in what is brexitcast? i am in westminster, i am in brussels. we tell you everything we need to know. shall we try... what is brexitcast? brexitcast, thursday nights, bbc one, and listen to the podcast on bbc sounds. hello, this is breakfast with chris mason and nina warhurst. here's a summary of this morning's main news. after internal divisions dominated
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the headlines on the first day of labour's party conference, it's aiming to shift attention back to policy today by promising to abolish nhs prescription charges in england and replace ofsted with a new school inspection system. deputy leader tom watson is calling for unity after he survived a plot by some members to remove him. here's our political correspondent, iain watson. jeremy corbyn was given a rousing reception last night at the opening rally of the labour conference. this is the show of support he wanted to see, close to a snap election. but elsewhere, unity was fragile and beginning to shatter. first of all, jeremy corbyn had to stop an attempt by some of his usual allies to oust his deputy, tom watson, who some thought hadn't been loyal enough to the leader. then, members of his top team said the party should campaign to remain in the eu at the next election.
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what do you think of the idea of labour campaigning for no brexit? he wants the final decision to be delayed until after the election. grassroots activists have sent more than 60 motions to the conference, also calling on the party unambiguously to remain. one staunch supporter ofjeremy corbyn called on remainers in the party to back down in the interests of unity. i'm confident that at this conference we will emerge united behind the policy that the labour leadership wants and will go into an election able to offer hope. labour's leaders hope they can come together in other areas and they plan to unveil ambitious policies on the environment and working hours. labour members will have to put some clear blue water between themselves and their opponents, rather than between each other, if they are to have a chance of sweeping to power.
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iain watson, bbc news, brighton. travel company thomas cook will meet with shareholders and creditors this morning in a final attempt to piece together a rescue deal. the travel firm could fall into administration within days, unless it finds an extra £200 million. there are reports that some holiday resorts are concerned about being paid. the british travel association, abta, says thomas cook is operating as normal and all package holidays are protected. a memorial service will take place in the swiss alps today to mark the disappearance of a glacier. the pizol glacier has been reduced to a few frozen lumps. scientists warn that 80% of switzerland's 1,500 glaciers could disappear by the end of this century, if global warming continues. strictly coming dancing is back. snazzy outfits, big songs and brave moves. 15 couples did their thing for the first time, including our very own mike bushell
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and his partner, katya jones. mike proved he had rhythm, with head judge shirley ballas saying his kick—ball changes had week—eight potential. mike was not optimistic about week two because he was the favourite of the bookies to go out first. look at him go. look at that. when it comes to energy, i think all of the different sports he tries every week on bbc breakfast... his saturday morning freaky sports slot, an official title i just made morning freaky sports slot, an official title ijust made up, terrific training. that is a freaky sport, the way he is dancing. terrific training. that is a freaky sport, the way he is dancinglj loved sport, the way he is dancing.” loved his football and scoring the winning goal sliding along the floor. quite something. well done,
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mike. very impressive, in my expert opinion, i know nothing about dancing. and his turn was very even —— tan. dancing. and his turn was very even -- tan. think about it like a bbc breakfast sports broadcast with more glitter. fancy footwork, ireland and england will be looking to have some of that in the rugby world cup opener. i keep looking at my imaginary watch excavation are still not there. it is bizarre. —— imaginary watch. i am getting nervous, i don't know about other fans. huge build—up. between scotland and ireland, there has been a friendly rivalry, but it gets less friendly every time. so, in around ten minutes' time, ireland scotland lock horns in their opening pool game. the irish beat the scots
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the last time they met in the six nations earlier this year, but both camps believe there'll be little between them this time. i think it will be very exciting, we are excited to go up against their forward pack. we have a strong forward pack as well, and i think at the away game in georgia, we were tested and we did well. we know that'll be the case against ireland as well so we're ready for that. i don't think there's a huge amount between the two teams, so whoever does get the bounce of the ball or is a little more efficient than the other, it mayjust tip the balance. then, it's england's turn to get their world cup campaign under way. they take on tonga at the sapporo dome. our correspondent, andy swiss, is there for us. andy, this stadium is a pretty
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remarkable one which england football fans may remember. that is right, behind me you can see the sapporo dome in all its glory. it isa the sapporo dome in all its glory. it is a pretty extraordinary venue. you can probably see the area of concrete at the front, normally, it is used for baseball, the stadium. on the area of concrete, they grow the grass pitch which they wheeled infor the grass pitch which they wheeled in for the rugby. an amazing setup. england fans may remember it because it is worth england's footballers beat argentina in the 2002 world cup. you might remember the david beckham penalty giving them a 1—0 win over argentina. the rugby players hoping for a similarly successful result here later on. plenty of england fans here already soaking up the atmosphere, we are expecting 40,000 spectators here in total and the england fans will be
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hoping to see their team get off to a winning start. you can just imagine the 40,000 fans under the closed roof, that will be noisy. you've been with the england team for the last few days, what's the mood in the camp? they should be feeling pretty confident. i think there is certainly a quiet confidence, they are the overwhelming favourites for this match, they had a very good series of warm up matches to the tournament, record—breaking win over ireland in the warm up games, pretty much full strength team. in tonga, one of the real outsiders of the world cup. thrashed by 92 points in their final warm world cup. thrashed by 92 points in theirfinal warm up world cup. thrashed by 92 points in their final warm up game world cup. thrashed by 92 points in theirfinal warm up game by new zealand a couple of weeks ago. england fans will remember only too well what happened at the last world cup when they were knocked out in the group stage, utter humiliation. they will not be taking anything for granted. even so, they should be
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confident of getting england's world cup campaign off to a successful start. england will be trying to forget about the world cup four yea rs forget about the world cup four years ago. we're joined now by former england international and 2007 finalist mark cueto. how are the nerves? not too nervous, bit easier sat on the safer than being out on the field. i am excited. —— sat on the sofa. the players will be raring to go, training camps are tough and long, they go through a huge amount of training physically and mentally. they will be ready to go and hopefully get their world cup after a good start. 2007 final, you know exactly how they are feeling, what is the range of emotions you go through in the final hours? massive roller—coaster. you go through the highest highs in your career and some of the lowest lows. the rugby
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world cup is one of the biggest sporting competitions in the world. the boys will be massively excited, bit of nerves, but without sounding too overconfident, tonga quite a nice game to start off with, not like the all blacks and south africans yesterday, one hell of a game to kick off the world cup. massively heavy favourites, cannot expect anything but an england win. one thing is for sure, playing against the south sea island boys, the following day, it is like being ina car the following day, it is like being in a car crash. lehman's question, peace in the sunday times this morning, talking about one player nicknamed big ben, 23 stone... that is the winger. combined weight is 255 stone, and indian rhinoceros. my
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question is, how much does it matter being vague? you might feel a bit rough the day after, but how much does it matter? —— being big. rough the day after, but how much does it matter? -- being big. in all sports, speed and weight, natural elements, always give you a slight advantage. i think in this case, england will be too good. strength and depth, quality of players, take nothing away from tonga, skilful by nothing away from tonga, skilful rugby players, naturally physical, they love the physical aspect of the game, and if nothing else, they will make sure they get a few shots on england boys today and they will be sought in the morning. do you think england can go all the way? —— they will be sore in the morning.” england can go all the way? —— they will be sore in the morning. i do think they can go all the way. more recently, warm up games, to beat wales and ireland at home the way
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they did, importantly, they have a few key guys that need to stay fit, like any team. owen farrell, these guys, like any team. owen farrell, these guys, if they keep those fit, they have a team to go all the way. that is where a big bash from thai could be influential. six, eight weeks could be key. quick turnaround. —— area big could be key. quick turnaround. —— are a big bash from turn. keeping eve ryo ne are a big bash from turn. keeping everyone fit, that is key. thinking back to four years ago, so much expectation, england become the first host nation to go out in the group stages, they have something to prove. massively. a lot of guys still in this current england squad, owen farrell, george ford, ben young, all of these players were in
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2015, disappointing memories, they will be itching to get out for many reasons, one being hopefully to put the disappointment of 2015 to bed. you can just imagine the the disappointment of 2015 to bed. you canjust imagine the noise in the stadium, closed roof, that noise, such a huge impact as well on the players and the fans. the stadium looks incredible, almost like a stadium looks incredible, almost likea mini stadium looks incredible, almost like a mini millennium stadium, principality stadium, sorry. can't wait for the game today. before that, scotland and ireland. you can tell i am excited. we could sit and talk about the rugby all day. away from the rugby world cup and after defeat by norwich last weekend and a defensive injury list, there was talk of a crisis at manchester city. but pep guardiola's side reacted in emphatic style with a devastating 8—0 victory over watford. it took just 52 seconds for david silva to set them on their way at the etihad.
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and byjust the 18th minute, nicolas otamendi had made it 5—0. that's the quickest any team has got to that margin in the premier league. bernardo silva went on to claim the match ball with a hat—trick as city cut liverpool's lead at the top to two points. the video assistant referee played a pivotal role as tottenham lost 2—1 at leicester city. spurs would have taken a 2—0 lead after serge aurier‘s goal, but var ruled son heung—min was offside in the build up. leicester then levelled, before a great strike by james maddison turned the game round. the 2—1 win for leicester moves them up to third. spurs manager mauricio pochettino said he had no complaints about the technology, despite the defeat. elsewhere, there were wins for burnley and sheffield united, while newcastle and brighton finished goalless. there's four matches today — all in london. the pick of them sees leaders liverpool face chelsea at stamford bridge. leaders celtic and rangers are both in action today
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in the scottish premiership. aberdeen moved up to third on saturday after a 2—0 win away at livingston. andrew considine gave the visitors the lead. a second goal from the penalty spot gave them all three points and stretched their unbeaten run to five, whilst livingston dropped down to sixth. elsewhere, ross county won at motherwell, while st mirren and hamilton finished goalless. the essex eagles are cricket's t20 blast champions after a thrilling climax to the competition at edgbaston. it all came down to the final ball. they needed two to win and captain simon harmer scored a boundary off the final delivery as they beat worcestershire rapids by four wickets. chasing a worcestershire total of 145—9, harmer came in to hammer 18 from just seven deliveries to give essex their first—ever t20 title. what a day we have ahead of us. enjoy the rugby in an entirely
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neutral way. entirely neutral, enjoy the rugby in an entirely neutralway. entirely neutral, of course. this is the weather in perpetually sunny salford. not so much! not quite as glorious as the rest of the week has been. shall we ta ke rest of the week has been. shall we take a look at central london. see if it is better. the roof of my usual workplace. not raining at least yet. helen, full forecast, lots of blue on your maps today, i don't mean the sea, i mean the rain. as the rugby is just about to kick off, exciting ireland, scotland, england, wales tomorrow, taking a look at the fly in the ointment, severe storm, tropical stone, close to the western side ofjapan —— tropical storm washi. looks as if they could be rain around not from yokohama, but further north, it should stay largely dry. here in the
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uk an array of weather france around the country. if you have not already seen the rain, it is on its way —— weather fronts. lovely sunshine, don't be surprised if the rain arrives, thundery showers pushing through northern england into southern scotland, so east anglia and north—eastern parts of scotland, holding onto the dry weather the longest. showers and sunshine behind it. still breezy. not feeling as warm as yesterday. it was 27 in anglesey, the warmest it has been so late in the year since 2011. we will see 22, 23 today, despite the breeze. the breeze eases off overnight. the rain moves north to scotland, clearing skies elsewhere, turning misty and foggy, warm air,
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moisture as well, mist and fog potentially monday morning. monday, next band of rain knocking on the door, sandwiched between two weather systems, quite a large area of low pressure dominating the northern atlantic. the remains of hurricane converter, tropical air, warm air holding more moisture —— humberto. it has been dry, and we are balancing the books over the next few days. once the rain clears from the north of scotland, dry weather elsewhere through the day. not a bad day in the quite warm, 20, 21. monday night, tuesday, the rain moves in, this time followed by quite a lot of showers, strong winds around the area of low pressure, quite difficult to pinpoint the detail but we will do so day to day. it looks like england and wales see
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a lot of rain on tuesday. fairly warm rain coming in off the atlantic with tropical air mixed in. low pressure dominates this week bringing further spells of rain, not a wash—out, spells of drier and brighter weather in between but not the prolonged spell of fine weather we had yesterday and for the last week. back to you, have a great weekend. thank you for your insight. we will pack everything possible on our way to brighten for the next few days. i don't think you will need the hat and gloves just yet. i days. i don't think you will need the hat and glovesjust yet. i have learned the difference between a raindrop and the pacific ocean. thank you. for people affected by domestic abuse, making the decision to leave a relationship can be complicated. abusers exert control by targeting the things that survivors care about, including, often, their pets. a survey by the dogs trust suggests
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that fears about the safety of pets actually prevents some people from leaving. we're now joined by the charity's clara kivlehan and by gemma willis who left an abusive relationship. thank you for coming in, especially you, gemma, to talk about your experience. it is not something that comes to mind how much a pet might suffer within the context of domestic violence but that it can almost be used as an weapon by an abusive partner. tell us about your experience. my pet was hit with shovels, planks of wood, penned in the shed and beaten. yeah. he went through a lot, dusty. at the same time, ican through a lot, dusty. at the same time, i can tell from your tone of voice, understandably, you were concerned about the welfare of your pet and your own but not wanting to leave the dog, makes it harder for
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you to walk away as well. of course. some people are very fortunate, it does sound silly, but they are, they have a friend and family to attend to, you have got someone to pick you up. ididn't, to, you have got someone to pick you up. i didn't, so when i was crying, it was dusty, it wasn't arms around me, it was my dusty. really hard to see dusty suffering. how common is this? unbelievably common. so far the statistics showing that... it is half and half, half get killed, half get beaten, too close to the point where it is going to be above... this is where you step in, talk as to exactly what you are doing and the difference it is making. we set up the difference it is making. we set up their freedom project in 2004 for
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this reason. we were aware many people were trying to escape domestic abuse but their pets were pa rt of domestic abuse but their pets were part of the domestic abuse, being used as part of coercive control, to control the victim to stay in the home and not leave. we had lots of incidents of that. we wanted to make sure there was something there for people to know their pets were safe when they went into a refuge, we set up when they went into a refuge, we set up the freedom project, pet fostering service. then people can go intoa fostering service. then people can go into a refuge knowing their pets are safe until they are able to be resettled into a permanent home. we are a welfare charity, we know there are a welfare charity, we know there are huge welfare issues for the pet and of course also for family members. the statistics, 2018, 2 million people experienced domestic abuse, adults alone, in england and
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wales, extraordinary numbers. imagine the amount of families and children witnessing what is going on to their mum or dad. that is without speaking about abuse kids go through. it is too quiet. it really is. 7596 of the families we help through. it is too quiet. it really is. 75% of the families we help have children and we know in those situations when they move away from the area, they start a new life, huge upheaval for families and children. knowing their pets are somewhere and they will be reunited with and really helps that family. especially for children. definitely. we are able to keep in touch and let them know how their pet is doing.“ there still a sense of this being a hidden crime because it happens behind closed doors? the figure is extraordinary. one might assume meeting someone like you it would be quite rare to meet someone who is a victim of domestic abuse, but with those figures, we are seeing them every day, on the bus, train. silent sufferers. you don't know what goes
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on behind closed doors and given the way life is now, nobody really seems to ca re way life is now, nobody really seems to care either. i do and i will not stay quiet, sorry. good for you. we admire your bravery coming on to talk about it. it is great to see dusty doing so well. thank you. you can find more information about the freedom project by visiting the dogs trust website. details of organisations offering information and support with domestic violence are available at bbc.co.uk/actionline. this is where we say goodbye to chris who is going to read the news for the andrew marr show. i know this will upset you, you will miss our next item. # you fired up my heart
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and made me smile. # i'm a different person # turn my world around...# # do you love me? do you love me? # do you love me now that i can dance? # she is all you'll ever want. # she's kind of girl i want to take to dinner. # honey, honey # hold me, baby you are outstanding. this hunk is on fire! eight. it's an eight. eight. # football's coming home
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# it's coming home.# cheering and applause iam smiling i am smiling and cringing in equal measure. we're nowjoined from our london newsroom by showbiz reporter kevin hughes. that morning. every year when you watch the first one, you think, will it steal my heart in the same way? it always does. absolutely. you are thinking, like the first day of school, thinking, can they dance? big opening show last night, interesting bruno made the comment he thought it was the strongest opening show he has ever experienced in15 opening show he has ever experienced in 15 years of working on strictly, quite the compliment. the mike busheu quite the compliment. the mike bushell bounce! we did not expect it from him, he was incredibly nervous, a favourite of the book is to go out first. on a technical level, how do
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you think he performed? seriously impressive. thejudges you think he performed? seriously impressive. the judges were impressed with his kickbacks, score of 22, you have probably been privy to seeing him throwing shapes on the bbc dance floor, the nation got to see him last night and he can move. a little bit of pressure last night, on fifth, but he delivered. that of dad dancing, some of the comments from people on twitter. got to be feeling proud of him today. one thing you can always say about him, he gives his all, whatever he is doing. any last night, sorry to ask, who disappointed, who you thought might have perform better?” who disappointed, who you thought might have perform better? i guess it is early days and you are obviously assuming things will improve for all of the contestants. last night james cracknell suffered last night with nerves, looks deflated and disappointed by the comments of the judges. first experience, from rowing at the
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olympics, stepping out on the dance floor. the comedian chris was hoping for a higher score. the pressure was on. the nation embraced anneka rice. quite something. she was absolutely gorgeous. herself depreciation in the lead up to it, she said she had never even danced at a family party, it meant we were willing her to do well, she looked a bit wooden, but technically, the steps were great. there is a dancer in there somewhere and they paid homage to her treasure hunt 80s tv show, jumping out of the helicopter in a jumpsuit. hunt 80s tv show, jumping out of the helicopter in ajumpsuit. last night social media frenzy, seriously sizzling samba from an emmerdale character. so saucy. those hips don't lie, highest score last night, top of the leadable, 32, and he was a last—minute addition last year
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after an injury. memorable performance, lovely to see you, we will tune in for the results programme. that's all from us for today. charlie and louise will be here tomorrow from six. until then, enjoy the rest of your weekend. goodbye.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines at 9am: labour promises free prescriptions for all as it tries to put policy back in the spotlight at a party conference overshadowed by internal rows. thomas cook will hold emergency talks this morning as it attempts to agree a rescue deal to prevent it from going bust. this couple are due to get married in las vegas but are unsure if it will happen or not... you know, we do not know what we're going to do, i sound a bit flippant, but obviously it is emotional and it is an emotional time for any bride and we've had a nightmare, recently, with me having to? ijust want to marry andrew and i want her friends to be there. live pictures here of protesters gathering

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