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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 23, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning — welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. our headlines today: thomas cook collapses after last—minute negotiations to try to save the world's oldest tour operator fail. all flights and holidays are cancelled. the civil aviation authority will now start the biggest ever peace time repatriation — bringing home 150,000 british holidaymakers stranded abroad. we'll be live at airports here in the uk and abroad throughout the morning. more than 20,000 jobs are now at risk, including 9,000 in the uk. i'll be finding out what went wrong with the business and explaining
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what your rights are if you've got a thomas cook booking. good morning. the weather is looking rather unsettled. we do have some rain coming in from the south—west with strengthening wins. i will have more later. it's monday the 23rd of september. our top story. thomas cook has collapsed after last—minute negotiations aimed at saving the holiday firm failed. at two o'clock this morning the civil aviation authority said the tour operator had "ceased trading with immediate effect". it's also launched its biggest ever peacetime repatriation, to bring 150,000 holidaymakers back home. customers who are still in the uk
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have been told not to go to the airport. throughout the morning on breakfast we'll be speaking to those responsible for scrambling planes to rescue stranded tourists, and we'll be hearing what the government plans to do to avoid further problems and delays for passengers. with the overnight developments, here's simonjones. grounded, the uk's oldest holiday firm has collapsed after 178 years. a day of frantic negotiations to try to secure its future failed. at 2 o'clock this morning, the end was declared by the civil aviation authority. it has already begun flying a fleet of chartered planes around the world to bring holidaymakers home. this is a huge operation. it's the largest peacetime repatriation — 150,000 people. that's the size of a town such as sort of oxford or huddersfield. we have at least over a0 planes. they will be running flights over the next two weeks. we expect run around about 1000 flights. holidaymakers, like these people who arrived in majorca yesterday, have been told they will be flown home as close as possible to their booked return date.
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but there may be some problems and delays. travel experts believe up to a million more people who had bookings in the coming months would have lost their holiday, though they will get refunds, but that may take a long time. up until the early hours of this morning, the thomas cook website was still offering what it called "fantastic deals", urging people to book now. take a look at the website now and it comes up with this message, saying the business has ceased trading and everything is cancelled. in the end, the firm simply ran out of cash. uncertainty over brexit, last year's heat wave in europe and political unrest in popular destinations are all being blamed. more than 20,000 thomas cook employees, including 9000 based in the uk, are set to lose theirjobs. the government is asking the insolvency service to fast track an investigation into what went wrong. simon jones, bbc news. our international business correspondent theo leggett is at gatwick airport.
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we have correspondence at gatwick and manchester, the two main hubs. how will this plough to people who have bookings? it's pretty phenomenal. we know they mobilised planes. to get them to the places that the tourists are in. they will send these planes out to people who could potentially be stranded because the thomas cook planes are not flying. we think it's about 150,000 people right around the world. they need to be brought home. if you booked a package holiday with thomas cook, you are covered by the scheme that means you will be brought back, your accommodation will be paid for. you should not be
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stranded. it could take, we believe, after two weeks to make sure everybody back from where they are and that really does undermine the scale of the challenge facing them right now because it means planes we re right now because it means planes were in the wrong place, people will be finishing the holidays, others expecting to start them and what i should say is if you are expect to go on holiday with thomas cook, today the next couple of days, do not turn up at the airport. flight will not be happening. and this is gatwick airport when many of those flights would be happening. really important to make sure that if you have a holiday today, do not turn up, that flight, that hotel, that holiday is not happening. very concerning for anybody going on holiday and also the many thousands of people who work the thomas cook. that is what is so important. 20,000 staff, 9000 in the uk. theirfuture now, quite uncertain. it's very
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early stages. clearly lots of doubt about what happens next within reading and talking to a number of people who worked. were still trying to make sure the passengers are dealt with. their future to make sure the passengers are dealt with. theirfuture is to make sure the passengers are dealt with. their future is very uncertain but still trying to help people we need to get home from where they are. we will be talking to lots of people to get to the bottom of what it means. those who work for thomas cook, all the rest of it throughout the programme this morning. speaking directly to the civil aviation authority. we'll give you all the information and speak to the government about what reparations they are making as well. that's all coming up.
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the shape of labour's brexit policy should become clearer today, with members deciding whether the party should back remain in a future public vote, or adopt the leadership's neutral position.attempts to find a consensus behind closed doors failed last night, let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley who's at the party conference in brighton. jeremy corbyn was talking about his sta nce jeremy corbyn was talking about his stance on brexit but it seems within the party, there are divisions. massive divisions. it matters because labour is hoping to be in power. jeremy corbyn is saying if he is in power, there will be another referendum. leave versus remain. he doesn't want to say which side will be back until after the general election. people could be asked to vote forjeremy corbyn to be prime minister without knowing exactly how
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he will campaign in a referendum. as the party's leadership are going to members to back today. the problem is, most labour members are com pletely is, most labour members are completely opposed to leaving the eu and want the party to get behind a staunch unequivocal but expect unequivocal remain position, to stay in the european union. will they be successful, it's not completely clear because the unions have a lot of votes. they seem to be onjeremy corbyn‘s side but it shows the deep divisions in the labour party about how they deal with brexit. some of them are very used to it now. we will be speaking tojohn mcdonald later on breakfast. scientists have warned that the causes and impacts of global warming are accelerating, rather than slowing down. the world meteorological 0rganisation says the past five
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years are on track to be the hottest on record. it comes as world leaders gather in new york for a un climate action summit. the un has urged leaders to turn up to the summit with concrete plans. more than 8 million people are living in unaffordable, or unsuitable homes, according to a new report. the analysis, from the national housing federation, shows overcrowding is one of the most common problems. the government says housing is a priority and that 430—thousand affordable homes have been built since 2010. a series of missteps recently, negative stories about private jet lights, badly handled birth announcement for baby archie, a large bill for the renovation of the new home in windsor are rumours of a falling out with the cambridge is. all in all, the visit to southern africa gives this a chance to re—establish their credentials. so in cape town, there will be a visit toa
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in cape town, there will be a visit to a township where meghan is expected to draw attention to violence against women, a significant issue in south africa and some of the challenges facing young people. after the first few daysin young people. after the first few days in cow —— cape town together, harry will sit alone to botswana, angola and malawi, a chance for him to highlight some of the issues on which he has a particular interest. harry will follow in his late mother diana's steps in angola, it was one of the last cause is taken up by diana before her death. then in malawi, he will see the efforts being made to combat the poaching of big game, efforts are supported by the british military. then back to johannesburg for the final few days of the visit with meghan and four—month—old baby archie. will archie make an appearance at any point? the sussex officials are
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unable to say. it's been a good night for british stars at the us tv awards, the emmys. phoebe waller—bridge, the writer and creator of flea bag, and jodie comer, the star of killing eve, won two of the night's big prizes. game of thrones was also named outstanding drama series for its eighth and final episode. let's take a look at the sport now. it's been a crazy weekend. glued to the television the whole time, it's been brilliant. i'll start this morning with liverpool. there seems to be no stopping them in the premier league. they beat chelsea 2—1 at stamford bridge, making it six wins out of six. real play toyota in —— georgia in toyota city.
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they play georgia in toyota city — and did you know warren gatland's side are the oldest in the competition — with an average age of 28 years and 331 days. they'll be hoping that maturity will help them emulate the comfortable victories of ireland and england yesterday. ireland beat scotland while england overcame tonga. and sebastian vettel won the singapore grand prix. his first victory in more than a year, but his team mate wasn't happy about it. lewis hamilton was fourth. are you already loving the rugby, charlie? well, you know what, it's a beast. that's what it is. 70 games across the weekend. fortunes should evan across the weekend. fortunes should eva n flow. across the weekend. fortunes should evan flow. we've have weeks and weeks them to get through. their
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preparations are also interesting. also, we do have to mention scotland a little bit. where their preparations quite how they could be. we understand thomas cook collapsed overnight and there is an operation to get back all those people who are abroad need to be brought back to the uk. today's the day, the early 80s expect the early hours of this morning, the civil aviation authority started a repatriation scheme. the idea is to get those people away at the moment back to the uk. many more questions about those people who have bookings in place. it's going to manchester airport. dave gast is there for us. manchester airport handles a lot of thomas cook business. give us a sense of what will be happening in
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practice. welcome to terminal1 at manchester airport. these lanes should be full of people checking in. no work, no school tomorrow and no flights today. all flights have been cancelled because basically there were due to be 23 flights leaving from manchester today, carrying around 5000 people. 23 flights due to come in. all of those flights due to come in. all of those flights cancelled. the advice from the civil aviation authority has been, do not go to the airport this morning however there has been some confusion. we been speaking to people who come from various parts of the country which have some conflict in messages. 0ne traveller told us she been told by thomas cook, no, it's fine. we spoke to somebody else was travelling with a thomas cook flight. that lady got to
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the airport. she spent some time on the airport. she spent some time on the phone here and sadly was then told her holiday, and most heartbreaking the there was a party from yorkshire, a bride to be due to player to jamaica for a wedding at the weekend. they too have now been told all that has been cancelled. the difficulty is going to be finding those alternative lights. the cia have launched the biggest peacetime repatriation to get people back from overseas are currently with thomas cook's lots of extra flights have been commissioned and are currently in the air but that's going to make it more difficult for the knock—on the people who are trying to rebook their flights on the holidays that they should have been having with thomas cook. the situation there at manchester airport. let's speak to tim jeans, who was chief executive of monarch airlines from 2004 to 2011. monarch went bust
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almost two years ago. we know there are many thousands of people across the world waiting for flights on thomas cook holidays, and now there is an operation to get them back. how complicated is that? an enormously complex operation. but as they saw when unfortunately monarch went under two years ago, it is extraordinarily efficient. the caa are unfortunately no well practised at these repatriation exercises, and people overseas really need to have no concerns that they are going to get stranded. they may operate, or their flights they are going to get stranded. they may operate, or theirflights home may operate, or theirflights home may operate, or theirflights home may operate at a slightly different time to that originally planned. they might even come back to a different uk airport than they were originally intended to. but get home they will. so they need to have no concerns on that front at all. of course, for those people who were expecting to go on holiday, to take flights, they are not happening, so thatis flights, they are not happening, so
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that is devastating for people, isn't it? well, they are the people other than, obviously, the staff and the operating cruise at thomas cook. it is the people who were due to go today and in the coming months that are the most affected. they will get their money back, if they booked a package holiday through thomas cook stop or indeed through another tour operator, using thomas cook flights. but of course they are going to now have a —— have the disappointment of not being able to take the holiday they originally booked, and all the hassle of rebooking and claiming their money back from the caa or the atol scheme or the other travel company. so there are really no upsides to this at all. it is a huge disappointment for them. 9000 people in the uk have lost theirjobs. and it just shows you in the uk have lost theirjobs. and itjust shows you how in the uk have lost theirjobs. and it just shows you how very difficult the travel industry is at the moment. it is a wonderful industry in which to work, but it has its insecurities, and we have seen those very powerfully today. absolutely.
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let's talk about those 9000 people, because obviously that is going to have a huge impact on them, their families, et cetera. i understand when monarch collapsed, many of the staff were able to find jobs elsewhere, but presumably, is this a shrinking market now? well, u nfortu nately, shrinking market now? well, unfortunately, as we may have heard this morning, unfortunately many people who lost theirjobs when monarch went past found employment at thomas cook. —— went bust. so there will be many operating cruise this morning, cabin crews, pilots, who found a new career and a new company to work for in thomas cook, who are now out of a job again for the second time in two years this morning. —— operating crews. of course, wider than that, there are other thousands of people who worked in the 550 high st branches of thomas cook and the several hundred who worked in thomas cook's head office in peterborough. so the implications and the upset for
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families will spread all across the uk, and beyond, to the huge operation, for example, thomas had in germany. could i ask you one last question? what should the government to be doing at this point? well, the government's agency in this instance is the caa. and they are organising the repatriation of nearly 150,000 people from overseas back to the united kingdom. people have asked the questions and will ask the question, whether the government should have stepped in to save thomas cook. i think the question that needs to be asked, was thomas cook saveable? was its business model simply going to mean that even if the government had put into hundred million to save it today, would the same problem have re— occurred this time next month, all this time next year? —— put in £200 million to save it today. i think the answer, unfortunately, is yes. the government's responsibility is to get people home and then the
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travel industry will take care of the new holidays people will need to ta ke the new holidays people will need to take in future. thank you very much for joining take in future. thank you very much forjoining us. and among those big questions about the industry, the travel industry more generally, there are individual stories we are going to find out about this morning on holiday plans that are not happening, people who are overseas trying to get home. lots of reassurance this morning but that will happen stop it is just a procedural thing. we will keep you up—to—date on that and catch up with some of those who are directly caught up in it. let's also do what we always do here on breakfast, look at the weather. carol is back, hello! hello! the weather this week will be fairly unsettled. rain showers at times, some sunshine, gusty winds as well. today for many we will start off on well. today for many we will start offona well. today for many we will start off on a dry node before the wet and windy weather sweeps in from the south—west later. —— dry node. the other thing to look out for its dense fog this morning, especially across parts of aberdeenshire and
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northumberland. low cloud and fog and other parts of the uk as well, especially in the north—east. we have our first waterfront going through, bringing in rain across the northern isles. the second one is enhancing the showers. this deep area of low pressure contains the re m na nts of area of low pressure contains the remnants of ex— hurricane humbert stop —— humberto. that will bring in strengthening winds later in the day, but we will lose the mist and fog. afair day, but we will lose the mist and fog. a fair bit of sunshine and showers across scotland as the rain pushes steadily into the northern aisles. this band of rain will be happy. as we go through the evening overnight, it will also start to contain some thunder and lightning. temperatures 13—20, around where we should be at this stage in september, with some just a little bit above, but really feeling cooler thanit bit above, but really feeling cooler than it has done lately. through this evening and overnight, there goes that rain. first band, second band goes that rain. first band, second ba nd follows goes that rain. first band, second band follows on hot on its heels. remember, we will see some heavy rain from this, particularly across wales and south—west england. also
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thunder and lightning in wales and south—west england, potentially the midlands and central and southern england as well. not a cold night, though. most of us in double figures. so if we pick up that bad again, here it is, moving steadily north and east through the course of tomorrow. still depositing some heavy rain, and then later on, another area of low pressure comes oui’ another area of low pressure comes our way. 0vernight and into tuesday, and on tuesday itself, we are looking at heavy rain and gusty winds across southern england and wales, and this could very well lead to some travel disruption. so bear that in mind if you have any travel plans. here is tuesday. during the day you can see still a lot of rain, continuing to push north and east. heavy rain at start. a bit of an interlude in between, some brighter skies, then we've got our next area of low pressure coming our way. i mentioned the wind was also a feature of the weather. just to give you an idea of what to expect, we're looking at gusts in land of 28 maybe 30 miles an hour, around wales, southwest and the english channel,
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we are looking at gusts of up to a0 01’ we are looking at gusts of up to a0 or possibly higher than that as well. amid all the speculation about a general election, the bbc is taking a look at some of the battlegrounds across the uk. this week we are focusing on stoke—on—trent. we have been discovering stories about what makes that city tech. brea kfast‘s graham satchell is there. good morning, graham. good morning, charlie. we are at the university of staffordshire. the bbc will be here on stoke—on—trent broadcasting all week, talking to ordinary people and trying to get under the skin of the city. it is an interesting place, rather defined by its past, pits and pots, the coalmining and ceramic industry, most of which is now com pletely industry, most of which is now completely gone. if you talk to ordinary people here, they are rather frustrated by the ordinary people here, they are ratherfrustrated by the perception of stoke is one of those places that
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is caricatured as left behind. is that fair? is that right? we will be talking to the head of the ymca here in stoke—on—trent, danny flynn. this was his view of the city. 0h, oh, you are from stoke? it is a bit ofa oh, you are from stoke? it is a bit of a dive. what do you think of stoke ? of a dive. what do you think of stoke? post—industrial place? brexit capital of britain? the bbc used the words exactly, "those uneducated, white working—class communities like stoke—on—trent have voted brexit". what do you think of stoke? welcome, welcome, welcome! you are youth ambassadors? you are going to change stoke—on—trent, aren't you? my name is danny flynn. i am chief executive of the ymca north staffordshire and i feel i of the ymca north staffordshire and ifeel i am of the ymca north staffordshire and i feel i am the most privileged and blessed person in the world. what is your passion? what do you like doing? we like helping people. i
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like this young one! i am with you, all the way. what we try to do is get kidsjobs, set all the way. what we try to do is get kids jobs, set people up all the way. what we try to do is get kidsjobs, set people up in new lives, get kids thriving. this place has given me a great opportunity and took me off the streets and helped me to get back into work. every single 16—year—old kid i talked to wa nts to single 16—year—old kid i talked to wants to be something. when i wander around stoke—on—trent, i see things on the up. i see the younger generation not hamstrung by the old industrial past. that's it, absolutely brilliant! everybody tends to be negative about stoke. yeah. yeah. on the up, hopefully, anyway. come in, if you want, guys. come in. we have always been passionate aboutjust come in. we have always been passionate about just getting people proud of the city. yeah. just have a bit of pride in where you live. you can make your own opportunities in the city. i'm not sugarcoating this.
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we see people with so little money, literally living day—to—day, not week to week, not month—to—month. there are some tough challenges in stoke—on—trent. where stoke's strength is is in its community, in its heartbeat, in its people, and what i'm trying to do is unlock those warm hearts and grow those hearts together and grow the city and unlock all the good stuff that's here. i love stoke—on—trent. well, i do! that was danny flynn with an infectious, and if i'm being totally honest, slightly exhausting sense of optimism and enthusiasm about stoke—on—trent. brilliant to spend a day with him. we have a couple of guests here at the university, nick gratton and terry alden. you have been running a community project here, looking at the hardship in stoke—on—trent. let me ask you about the perception of the city. do you share his frustration?”
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the perception of the city. do you share his frustration? i appreciate why people are frustrated with the perception of stoke as being left behind, absolutely, yes. does that feel like something, when you walk around the town, the people generally feel? that people have got stoke wrong? i think so, yeah. you know, i'm not denying their issues. i think we have to be realistic about it, as our hardship researchers found out. but let's move together in the right direction. so we are not sugarcoating this. what are the main findings of the report? so, we found from our research that we realised some of the causes of hardship and poverty, particularly around unemployment and break down of families. we also talk about the effect of poverty and hardship, stigma is a big one. we realised stigma is a big one. we realised stigma stops people from talking about some of the issues. terry, you area about some of the issues. terry, you are a key part of collating some of this research. you have had your own difficulties in the past. what difference does it made, being part
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of this project? it has been absolutely incredible, from start to finish. i have come back from, i have come from a broken family, from university, and homeless myself. i suffer from post—natal depression and anxiety, and from all of that, coming and seeing this advertise, you needed monetary community organisers, researchers, just being able to go out and share my story and be able to hear, notjust on my own, there are lots of organisations and people like staffordshire university that can help. brilliant to see that you are trying to turn your life around, and that is working. thank you very much indeed. we will be here all morning, the bbc will be here all week talking to people in stoke. now it is time for the news, travel and weather where you are this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm alpa patel. a london based charity says more needs to be done to support young people who witness violent crime. ‘peace in the streets' claims hundreds of child witnesses
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are suffering trauma as a result of what they've seen, and are themselves at risk of being lured into gangs. despite the government piloting a project to help child witnesses, the charity says more help is still needed. 0ur our support is aimed at actually supporting survivors, going into schools, helping children, they get depressed, they stop planning, most of the young boys i speak to tell you if they live to 18 and 21, that's a big deal, now. and you can see more on that story on inside out london. that's tonight at 7:30, here on bbc one. the chancellor's again being urged to ease the burden of business rates, after it emerged councils are using bailiffs to collect arrears. westminster city council made more than 3,000 referrals to debt collectors in the last year — and haringey, barking & daggenham and lewisham boroughs sent bailiffs to a large number of businesses.
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there were more than 1,200 sexual assaults on the tube in the last year — a rise of a0% in the last four years. more are reported on the the central line than any other. british transport police say they expected an increase, because of a campaign urging victims to come forward. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tube this morning. all thomas cook flights to and from gatwick and stansted airports have been cancelled as the company has gone into administration. 0n the roads, the aa piccadilly underpass due remains closed, out of town towards knightsbridge, due to gas mains repairs. in the city: a201 new bridge street is closed southbound from ludgate circus to queen victoria street due to gas mains repairs. now the weather with kate kinsella.
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good morning. a lovely mild start this morning, and a bright one. plenty of sunshine around through the morning itself. don't be fooled, the morning itself. don't be fooled, the journey home may not be quite as glorious, heavy rain expected as we head towards the end of the day. this morning, enjoy the sunshine. the wind gradually starts to strengthen today and during the afternoon we will notice the cloud increasing, and then the heavy rain arriving. maximum temperature today, 20 celsius. the met office has a yellow weather wanting in place for this heavy rain, from midnight onwards. really affecting parts of surrey. we will get the heavy rain everywhere. you may have some rumbles of thunder through the night and into tuesday morning. frequent lighting, temperatures remaining mild between 13 and 15 celsius. so, it is going to be a rather what started tuesday. it stays unsettled, we are likely to hear some thunder, frequent lightning, and that rain will be quite persistent. temperatures tomorrow getting up to 19. it is going to stay unsettled for much of this week, and temperatures remain similar. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom
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in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and louise. bye for now. hello — this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast, there are lots of questions for thomas cook holidaymakers this morning. 0ur travel expert simon calder will bejoining us in the next few minutes, to give us a step—by—step guide on what happens next. first year university student ed farmer died, it was announced by the civil aviation authority in the early hours of this morning. first year university student ed farmer died, after taking part in a society bar crawl. his parents are now helping to raise awareness about the dangers
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of "initiation—style" events, which involve excessive alcohol. and we'll be catching up with mike and katya, after their strictly debut this weekend. good morning, here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. thomas cook, one of the world's biggest tour operators, has collapsed — after last—ditch talks to save the business failed. the civil aviation authority has launched an unprecedented operation to bring home 150—thousand british tourists. the government said the demise of thomas cook was "very sad news", and has demanded a swift investigation. the firm employed 9,000 people in the uk. in the last few minutes, the boss of thomas cook — peter fankhauser — has been speaking about the collapse of the company, let's take a look at what he's had to say. this is a statement i hoped i would
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never have to make. following a decision by the board late last night, the uk government official receiver was appointed in the early hours of this morning, the 23rd of september, to take control of thomas cook. despite huge efforts over a number of months and further intense negotiations in recent days, we have not been able to secure a deal to save our business. i know that this outcome will be devastating to many people and will cause a lot of anxiety, stress and disruption. first, i want to apologise to my 21,000 colleagues who i know will be
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ha rd 21,000 colleagues who i know will be hard broken. you all fought so hard to make thomas cook a success. secondly, i would like to say sorry to all our customers, those who are on holiday with us now, and those who have walked with us in the coming months. my colleagues will be working with the cia to help with the repatriation. finally, iwould like to apologise to the many thousands of hoteliers and suppliers who have stuck by our business in good times and in bad and to now face difficult financial choices of their own. it has been my privilege to lead thomas cook. it is deeply
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distressing to me that it is not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. thank you. that is the boss of thomas cook speaking in the last hour or so. the apologies you heard there, a statement he said. our international business correspondent theo leggett is at gatwick airport. the boss of thomas cook there. take us the boss of thomas cook there. take us through some of the immediate practical implications. there are about 150,000 british practical implications. there are about 150 , 000 british people practical implications. there are about 150,000 british people on holiday with thomas cook and several thousand from other countries. in terms of the people, the british people abroad, the civil aviation authority has launched a major operation to make sure they can get home. thomas cook sold package tours
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which benefit from protection and that means the people already on holiday shouldn't really have too much to worry about. their hotels will be paid for, they may have to move but they will still have a roof over their heads and they will be brought back again. the same goes incidentally for people who simply bought flights by thomas cook was make airline. although they are not covered, the civil aviation authority says as it did with monarch a few years ago, when they went bust, it will bring those people home as well but those waiting to go on holiday, including people turning up to gatwick today, those flights have been cancelled, they have been told to stay at home, don't come to the airport, your flights will not be taking off. also, peter frankhauser talking about the staff. as hotels and organisations that his company has worked with. absolutely, a major operation. 9000 staff in the uk.
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they will be hoping that some kind of last—minute deal could be done in the small hours of the morning and will be disappointed that there is a lot of uncertainty and thomas cookbooks hotels all across europe. those hoteliers are going to wonder whether bookings come from in future. we will leave you there for now and we will try to catch up with some of those holidaymakers at gatwick a little later on. the shape of labour's brexit policy should become clearer today, with members deciding whether the party should back remain in a future public vote, or adopt the leadership's neutral position. attempts to find a consensus behind closed doors failed last night. at least two trades unions will also decide their brexit position this morning. labour will announce plans today to introduce free personal care for people over the age of 65 in england —
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if it wins the next election. the party wants to end means—testing for home visits and residential help, which it says would more than double the number of eligible pensioners. the plan will initially cost £6 billion a year — which the party says will be covered by general taxation. scientists have warned that the causes and impacts of global warming are accelerating, rather than slowing down. the world meteorological 0rganisation says the past five yea rs are on track to be the hottest on record. it comes as world leaders gather in new york for a un climate action summit. the un has urged leaders to turn up to the summit with concrete plans. the duke and duchess of sussex — and their four—month—old son archie — will arrive in south africa today, for their first official tour as a family. during the ten—day trip, prince harry will visit malawi, botswana and angola, where he'll highlight his mother's work to tackle landmines. the duke and duchess will give presents that are donated to archie, to an african charity that trains and employs women living with hiv.
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jodie comer, the star of killing eve, and phoebe waller—bridge, the creator and writer of fleabag, are among the big british winners at this year's emmy awards. the ceremony took place in los angeles last night. game of thrones was also named outstanding drama series for its eighth and final season. those are the main stories this morning. sally is here with the sport. it's been a busy weekend. liverpool maintained their perfect start in the premier league beating chelsea 2—1 at stamford bridge. trent alexander—arnold opened the scoring with this well—worked free kick, before roberto firmino doubled the lead. n'golo kante did pull one back for chelsea in the second half, but liverpool held on and still have a 5 point lead at the top of the table. we have to be ready that we can do what we are really good in and
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that's based on improvement, it was a good game, a really good game and at moments, brilliant but there are at moments, brilliant but there are a lot of things we can improve and that's what they are trying to work on, the small periods between the games. west ham were 2—nil winners at home to manchester united, aaron creswell with the pick of their goals. manchester united haven't won away from home in the league since february. pierre—emerick aubameyang's stunning free—kick helped arsenal come from behind twice to beat aston villa 3—2 at the emirates. they are fourth in the table while villa stay in the relegation zone. in the scottish premiership, celtic are still top of the table by three points after maintaining their 100 percent record, they came from behind to beat kilmarnock 3—1 at home. (00v)second placed rangers beat stjohnstone a—nil. —— second placed rangers beat stjohnstone a—nil. all the goals came in the second half. jermaine defoe came off the bench to score twice.
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and hearts beat hibs 2—1 in the edinburgh derby. sebastian vettel won the singapore grand prix, but his first race victory for more than a year was branded as "unfair" by his team mate. charles leclerc was leading the race from pole, but because ferrari brought him in for a pitstop after vettel, the german was able to leapfrog him into the lead. leclerc was then ordered not to challenge vettel for victory. lewis hamilton extended his championship lead to 65 points despite finishing fourth. wales start their world cup campaign injust a few hours, taking on georgia in their first pool match. wales have never made it past the semi—finals, but they'll be hoping to rediscover the form that helped them win the six nations earlier this year. they'll be the overwhelming favourites in the game against georgia which kicks off at quarter past eleven this morning. we've been out just we've been outjust over a week as well and not being here and not having a game, theyjust can't wait, a lot of training going on to get a
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game in that way and looking forward to it. meanwhile england got their campaign off to a winning start with a bonus point victory over tonga. tries from luke cowan—dickie, jamie george and a double from manu tuilagi helped them to a 35—3 victory. and ireland comfortably beat scotland to kick off their campaign in style. tries from james ryan, rory best and tadhg my my brain was working in the end. very busy weekend. we will see you inafew very busy weekend. we will see you in a few minutes. talking about thomas cook, let's get the opinion of passengers. here is what manchester passengers have been saying. we were told to come here now to find out my flight has been cancelled with three kids. my son
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has adhd, and autism, and they are suffering their hearts out in the cot. we got in touch with thomas cook and they said yesterday, everything has gone through. we booked a package holiday over a year ago so yesterday, i checked everything was going ahead as normal. and that we put put on another plane. as to whether thomas cook entered liquidation. we've been givena cook entered liquidation. we've been given a duty of care number and told the holiday can't go ahead because there are no plans available. the book through sandals so we presumed the flights wouldn't be affected so it's not until this morning when we've seen an email and itsjust said, no flights. incredibly frustrating for people and what happens if you're a thomas cook customer? so many questions to get
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answered. travel independent editor simon calder is here. what's the latest? it's really sad out there. this is a company that's been going for 178 years, revolutionised trouble, democratised —— democratised it and help people see the world and overnighted two o'clock, the company has gone out of business. still trading until almost mid night. i boughta package business. still trading until almost mid night. i bought a package to see if it was going just before mid night. clearly i won't be going on that much more importantly, 9000 staff in the uk have lost their jobs, getting on for a million people. people will not be taking those holidays. 155,000 people who are away at the moment are in a relatively comfortable place, although it possibly doesn't feel like that at the moment. that issue of how information was passed on.
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they were checking late into the night. still being told. after midnight on the twitter defeat of thomas cook. what do you have that information? this is what people who arrive at manchester airport are given. it will be replicated at gatwick, bristol, cardiff and so on. thomas cook fight — my flights are cancelled as the airline has ceased trading. eca and uk government are organising flights back to the uk, basically, if you have turned up for yourflight, sorry, basically, if you have turned up for your flight, sorry, you're basically, if you have turned up for yourflight, sorry, you're not going to have a holiday. let's talk about everybody‘s rights. we understand the 150,000 will be brought back, that's right? yes. they will, you know, they will be able, actually, just to enjoy their holiday, if it is anything like the monarch rescue, that only 2% didn't come back on the right day. and sure, some will be flown back to cardiff when they wa nted flown back to cardiff when they wanted to be in bristol and will
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need to get on a bus. times might be shifted by an hour or two. it is going to work pretty well for them. really, the worst thing you could possibly do is think, oh, no, the airline has gone bust, we'd better rush to the airport. no, stay next to the pool and order a drink. just ona to the pool and order a drink. just on a practical note, they would have been thomas cook representatives and those hotels and in those locations, presumably, i mean, they have stopped work, haven't they? that's finished. 0f stopped work, haven't they? that's finished. of course. 0ur stopped work, haven't they? that's finished. of course. our hearts go out to them. one day they are doing a really good job in the next day they are out of work. but the civil aviation authority has a great deal of detail. so it will be getting in touch with all the hotels saying, first of all, we are going to cover the bills for the people staying there, so don't make them pay again. secondly, we know you have flights going to newcastle, to birmingham, to glasgow, tell your clients that this is the time they need to take off. similarly, you will be able to go online if you are abroad and say, well, i was on flights mt205, i am
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now on this flight leaving at this time. so many things to ask you. we will be asking you more aboutjobs and the impact on people later, but also, this happened at two o'clock in the morning. they will be people waking up thinking, i am on a flight, waking up thinking, i am on a flight, do i go? and all those future flights, are they covered? look, everybody will more or less, will get their money back. there will get their money back. there will be a few odd cases, unusual ways of booking a trip, usually a flight ways of booking a trip, usually a flight only, we might not. everybody will get their money back. but that is not the same as getting holiday you wanted. it is so sad, people turning up at manchester this morning, not having heard, having set off at one o'clock in the morning when it was still a going concern. and people going right through half term, of course, christmas and new year break, many people have been hearing from customers who have been looking next yea r‘s customers who have been looking next year's holiday and will now have to find alternatives, and inevitably the price will increase, because if one supplier is taken out of the
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market, particularly one as big as this, demand will be soaring, so you can already see fares surging. simon, you will be with us through the morning. thank you very much. people are already sending in various questions and we will be asking you and everybody else we have on the programme about that as well. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, everybody. this week's weather is looking more unsettled thanit weather is looking more unsettled than it was last week, and it will also be much cooler than it was last week or even also be much cooler than it was last week 01’ even over also be much cooler than it was last week or even over the weekend. at times it is going to be wet, at times it is going to be wet, at times it is going to be wet, at times it will be windy. but we will also see some sunshine in between. first thing this morning, dense fog, especially across parts of aberdeenshire and also northumberland. so if you are travelling, the visibility is a very poon travelling, the visibility is a very poor. to take that into account. we have got a weather front which is moving north—east and getting into the northern isles undertaking some rain. this weather front enhancing showers. this area of low pressure
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with its attendant coming our way, introducing wet and windy weather through the course of the day. we start with low cloud, mist and fog across parts of the north—east of the uk. that will lift. showers across scotland, northern ireland, parts of northern england under north wales, they will all be replaced for some of us buy this rain sweeping in from the south—west. as you can see, there will be a lot of dry weather and sunny intervals ahead of it. temperatures between 13 and 20 degrees. the wind also strengthening as this weather front approaches, especially across the coastlines of south—west england and wales. now, oui’ south—west england and wales. now, our first band goes through the course of the night to the east. a second band of rain comes in. this one is also likely to be heavy. and boundary. thundery across parts of wales, south—west england, the midlands, for example. it is not going to be a cold night, most of us staying in double figures. here is oui’ staying in double figures. here is our weather front that is responsible for this heavy rain, and through the course of tuesday it will continue to advance a standdown hot on its heels we have another one coming in. the isobars tell you it
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will also be windy across southern england and wales. so that's what could happen, or this is what could happen on tuesday. heavy rain and gusty winds for southern england and wales. that could lead to some disruption. now, through tuesday and the daytime, you can see how the rain continues to push north and east. still happy, with thunder and lightning in it. a bit of a lull, a temporary one, because that our next system temporary one, because that our next syste m co m es temporary one, because that our next system comes in, and that will also bring in heavy rain and also some thunder and lightning. temperatures ranging from 13 in the north to about 19 ranging from 13 in the north to about19 in ranging from 13 in the north to about 19 in the south. that is half the story, because the wind will also be featured, as i mentioned that, in southern england and also wales. gusting inland, 28, possibly 30 miles an hour. around the coastline we are looking at between 30 and a0. for some of us, between and 50 miles an hour. again, that is something you will notice. and as we head into wednesday, eventually we lose that rain from the south—east,
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a dry day, some sunny intervals, fewer showers, and temperatures once again roughly where they should be, 01’ again roughly where they should be, or slightly above. we are looking at 13- 20 or slightly above. we are looking at 13— 20 degrees. lots of our coverage this morning is dominated by the collapse of thomas cook. and will be looking at some of the bigger questions about the industry, beyond the immediate practical implications. yes, and also how a firm founded in 18a1 could get into such a mess, causing such a problem for 70 people, not least those who are travelling, but for the staff at the firm. that problem for so many people. good morning. that's right. it all began with one train trip from leicester to loughbrough in 18a1. millions of holidays later and now the company is no more. so how did things end up here? russ mould from the stockbroker firm aj bell has been closely watching the company for a number of years.
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a really sad morning, isn't it, the end ofan a really sad morning, isn't it, the end of an era as far as thomas cook is concerned. just talk us through this recent history, because many will be surprised. it is a familiar name. many people will travel with it. many will know it. they will wonder how a firm of this size can go under like this. i think it is the same old story. firms initially go bust very, very slowly, and then very, very quickly. there was a long—standing problem with the business, very thin profit margins, lots of competition, and lots of debt in the business. this is the third time in a decade it has been trying to get itself out of this tangle of debt refinancing and extending the loans. twice it managed it, this time it hasn't happened. the debt has always been there. what has been the problem in there. what has been the problem in the short term was fuel prices going up, which had vli business. the british pound went down after the brexit boat, which made lots of british people think, you know what, i'll stay at home. and after last yea r‘s i'll stay at home. and after last year's summer i'll stay at home. and after last yea r‘s summer heat i'll stay at home. and after last year's summer heat wave lots of people decided to stay in the uk. so there just was not the cash coming
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into the business to help it funded stats. and that idea of the perfect storm, because a company like that with such a global reach, whatever happens, whatever it is in the world, they are going to feel it, aren't they? you touched on things like the falling pounds... also, this is the same week when airbnb, an 11—year—old company which has just announced it is looking to come to the american stock market with a valuation of more than £20 billion, thomas cook shares have now been declared worthless. it is an indication of how the travel industry has changed, how we shop and book our holidays is changing, and book our holidays is changing, and again, because of the debt, thomas cook didn't have the fronts it needed to reinvent itself and reinvest and send off some of these newcomers. “ reinvest and send off some of these newcomers. -- funds it is needed. just looking at the scale today, we have been looking at the figures, we understand 16,000 people idea to come back on those flights today. the operation to rescue and bring those people back, the want of a
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better word, it really does underline the scale of the business, but now also the challenge. you've got 22 million customers a year, if you look at the annual report. just to give you the narrow perspective of the financials, a profit of £250 million, but is £11 per customer. it shows you how little margin for error that was in the business, if the fuel price went wrong all the pounds dropped. it is a massive exercise. the great news is that the civil aviation authority with the government will be getting these people home safely. and as close as possible to when they were going to come home, so they can enjoy their holiday. you spoke about some of those headwinds, those challenges. that business model as well, the idea of those really expensive stores on the high street, where you go in and you look at a fancy brochure, those were a real weight on the business, won't they? yes, and they actually added that this decade. so it has almost been going the other way, when you have airbnb or some other brands that we can all name, that people can just log onto. they have a lower cost base, they
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can come in and undercut you, and that made life hard for thomas cook, when it had to pay the interest on its debt and had to pay the leasing fees on its aircraft. those were bills it had to pay no matter how much profit it was i wasn't making, and that is one of the reasons it has now collapsed. thank you. we should remember, in all of this, there are some 9000 or so staff who we re there are some 9000 or so staff who were working at the firm, 20,000 employed around the world, 9000 here in the uk. theirfuture is of course very uncertain this morning. we will be speaking about that more after seven o'clock. and you are talking about operation to get everybody back to the uk. we will be speaking on the next 15 minutes or so to the civil aviation about exactly that. thank you. —— civil aviation authority. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm alpa patel. a london—based charity says more needs to be done to support young people who witness violent crime. ‘peace in the streets' claims hundreds of child witnesses are suffering trauma as a result of what they've seen, and are themselves at risk of being lured into gangs. despite the government piloting a project to help child witnesses,
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the charity says more help is still needed. our support is aimed at actually supporting survivors, going into schools, helping children, they get depressed, they stop planning, most of the young boys i speak to tell you if they live to 18 and 21, that's a big deal, now. and you can see more on that story on inside out london. that's tonight at 7:30, here on bbc one. the chancellor has again being urged to ease the burden of business rates, after it emerged councils are using bailiffs to collect arrears. westminster city council made more than 3,000 referrals to debt collectors in the last year. haringey, barking & daggenham and lewisham boroughs sent bailiffs to a large number of businesses. there were more than 1,200 sexual assaults on the tube in the last year — a rise of a0%
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in the last four years. more are reported on the the central line than any other. british transport police say they expected an in increase, because of a campaign urging victims to come forward. let's take a look at the travel situation now. there's a good service on the tubes this morning. at the airports, all thomas cook flights to and from gatwick and sta nsted airports have been cancelled, as the company has gone into administration. 0n the roads, the aa piccadilly underpass remains closed, out of town towards knightsbridge, due to gas mains repairs. in the city: a201 new bridge street is closed southbound from ludgate circus to queen victoria street due to gas mains repairs. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a lovely mild start this morning, and a bright one. plenty of sunshine around through the morning itself. don't be fooled, the journey home may not be quite as glorious, heavy rain expected as we head towards the end of the day. this morning, enjoy the sunshine. the wind gradually starts
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to strengthen today and during the afternoon we will notice the cloud increasing, and then the heavy rain arriving. maximum temperature today, 20 celsius. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for this heavy rain, from midnight onwards. really affecting parts of surrey. we will get the heavy rain everywhere. you may have some rumbles of thunder through the night and into tuesday morning. frequent lighting, temperatures remaining mild between 13 and 15 celsius. so, it's going to be a rather wet start to tuesday. it stays unsettled, we are likely to hear some thunder, frequent lightning, and that rain will be quite persistent. temperatures tomorrow getting up to 19. it's going to stay unsettled for much of this week, and temperatures remain similar. take an umbrella if you are heading out. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and louise.
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bye for now. two large good morning — welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: thomas cook collapses after last—minute negotiations to save the world's oldest tour operator fail. it is deeply distressing to me that it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved bands —— brands and travel. all flights and holidays are cancelled. the civil aviation authority will now start the biggest ever peace time repatriation — bringing home 150,000 stranded british holidaymakers. we'll be live at airports here in the uk and abroad throughout the morning. more than 20,000 jobs are now at risk, including 9,000 in the uk.
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i'll be finding out what went wrong and explain your rights if your travel plans are affected. it's 6 league wins out of 6 for liverpool. they win 2—1 at chelsea and stay five points clear at the top of the table. british success at the emmys in los angeles overnight. comedy fleabag stole the show, winning four awards. a bright start to many as we lose the mist and fog. we also see some heavy rain and gusty winds pushing in from the south—west. heavy rain and gusty winds pushing in from the south-west. more later. it's monday the 23rd of september. our top story. thomas cook has collapsed leaving over 150,000 uk holidaymakers stranded overseas. at two o'clock this morning the civil aviation authority said the tour operator had "ceased trading with immediate effect".
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it's now in charge of the biggest ever peacetime repatriation. planes are already in the air, heading to tourist destinations. 0n breakfast this morning, we'll hear from those co—ordinating the plan and ask what your rights are if you're affected. with the overnight developments, here's simonjones. we understand the first flight is leaving new york in a few minutes' time. there will be 6a different flights today. people are being reassured they will get home. at the same time, some people have been turning up at our ports in the early hours of this morning, expecting to go because they have yet to receive information. simonjones, go because they have yet to receive information. simon jones, first. grounded, the uk's oldest holiday firm has collapsed after 178 years. a day of frantic negotiations to try to secure its future failed. at 2 o'clock this morning, the end was declared by the civil aviation authority. it has already begun flying a fleet of chartered planes around the world to bring holidaymakers home.
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this is a huge operation. it's the largest peacetime repatriation —150,000 people. that's the size of a town such as sort of oxford or huddersfield. we have at least over a0 planes. they will be running flights over the next two weeks. we expect run around about 1000 flights. holidaymakers, like these people who arrived in majorca yesterday, have been told they will be flown home as close as possible to their booked return date. but there may be some problems and delays. travel experts believe up to a million more people who had bookings in the coming months would have lost their holiday, though they will get refunds, but that may take a long time. up until the early hours of this morning, the thomas cook website was still offering what it called "fantastic deals", urging people to book now. take a look at the website now and it comes up with this message, saying the business has ceased trading and everything is cancelled.
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it trading and everything is cancelled. is deeply disti’l it it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. thank you. do you take personal responsibility? in the end, the firm simply ran out of cash. uncertainty over brexit, last year's heat wave in europe and political unrest in popular destinations are all being blamed. more than 20,000 thomas cook employees, including 9000 based in the uk, are set to lose theirjobs. the government is asking the insolvency service to fast track an investigation into what went wrong. simon jones, bbc news. a lot of people expecting to go on holiday. let's speak to our reporter dave guest who's at manchester airport — thomas cook's biggest uk hub. we've seen people there very upset. what is the latest? these lines should be full of —— full of people but they are empty here in terminal
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1 this morning. some people were being told by thomas cook that things were normal until midnight. people who came here with their three children. she is turned up to the airport to be told no, there are no flights. that story being repeated time and again. 23 flights would you are from manchester. we we re would you are from manchester. we were speaking to a music professor from boston who was desperate to our to get back. people trying to get what they can. they should have been having with thomas cook because you said this airport was the largest hub, more from here than any other uk airportare hub, more from here than any other uk airport are in a number of those 9000 job losses will appear in manchester. thank you very much for
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the moment. so what does this mean for customers stranded abroad? let's speak to now to our europe reporter gavin lee, he's at palma airport in majorca. tell us what the situation is there. iam inside tell us what the situation is there. i am inside the departure lounge. the light came on this morning. the staff have turned into work. this is the place we the most people on package holidays here, alitalia in turkey. the situation at the moment is, people are being told in the distance, it says those flights are delayed. people are being told there isa delayed. people are being told there is a flight for them but the yellow jackets you will see as i walk around, they are advising people to go to around, they are advising people to gotoa around, they are advising people to go to a different check—in area. working out whether iberia can cover it. a couple of people here. one of
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the staff said to me, she is devastated. she will also look at how to get home to the uk. you can see the staff who are advising people what to do. good morning. are you travelling with thomas cook this morning? no. the sense here, people are worried and think they will fly back today but overall, flights back to birmingham, gatwick, manchester. they think it's going to be ok but ultimately, it's right at the start of the day they are trying to sort something out. the message we are getting is that this is an operation they have been planning for our and everything will be set in place. they can finish their holidays, like
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in majorca, and they can come back as normal. is that the picture you are getting? there are a few thomas cook passengers who might be coming past. you've turned into work, knowing your job is past. you've turned into work, knowing yourjob is gone. it's great that you are here helping people. can you give a sense of importance of being here for you? no comment. we thought they might say that but some people have said they wanted to come in, they wanted to help out, evenif come in, they wanted to help out, even if they are not getting paid for today. the other issue to bear in mind is the hotels. there are people who came yesterday on the last flights of thomas cook into palma and they have a two weeks but the hotels of we understand it are back paid. six week or so in arrears they will be waiting for money. we saw the situation in tunisia yesterday, where people have to pay
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the counter. let's turn very briefly. gavin and the bbc, nice to meet you. tell me your situation. we have gone back on easyjet but our reps work with thomas cook. we are lucky to get back today. it's a shame what's happened. ijust feel sorry for what's happened. it sounds like you are going to be ok this morning. it's going to get busier throughout the morning. things happen very fast this morning. it was 2am the announcement came in from the civil aviation authority and immediately, aircraft were put on the right place to get people back to the uk. so many of you
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getting in touch. such sad news for all the staff and customers. such a shame that it's collapsed. to tell us shame that it's collapsed. to tell us your questions because we're trying to get to the bottom of what it means everyone. 0ur let's get you up—to—date with the rest of the day's news. the shape of labour's brexit policy should become clearer today, with members deciding whether the party should back remain in a future public vote, or adopt the leadership's neutral position.attempts to find a consensus behind closed doors failed last night, let's speak to our political correspondent nick eardley who's at the party conference in brighton. i suppose the party is divided on this, isn't it? yes, absolutely. this matters because if labour is going to win power and potentially a few weeks' time, they are going to ta ke few weeks' time, they are going to take a different route to the one the government is at the moment. jeremy corbyn is promising there will be another referendum on brexit
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but he's not saying which side he would back if that referendum happens. there are some members here in summerjeremy corbyn's top team who don't think that is good enough. they think labour should be campaigning completely disdain the european union instead of trying to force his hand here today at the conference. some are going to be unequivocally behind remained but whether that succeeds is not there at the moment. the unions have a lot of votes and at the moment, it looks like they are behind jeremy corbyn but there is a big argument coming over that this afternoon. labour will announce plans today to introduce free personal care for people over the age of 65 in england — if it wins the next election. the party wants to end means—testing for home visits and residential help, which it says would more than double the number of eligible pensioners. the plan will initially cost £6 billion a year which the party says will be covered by general taxation.
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scientists have warned that the causes and impacts of global warming are accelerating, rather than slowing down. (tx 00v)the world meteorological 0rganisation says the past five years are on track to be the hottest on record. ha ha it comes as world leaders gather in new york for a un climate action summit. the un has urged leaders to turn up to the summit with concrete plans. more than 8 million people are living in unaffordable, or unsuitable homes, according to a new report. the analysis, from the national housing federation, shows overcrowding is one of the most common problems. the government says housing is a priority and that a30—thousand affordable homes have been built since 2010. the duke and duchess of sussex — and four—month—old son archie — will arrive in south africa today, for their first official tour as a family. during the ten—day trip, prince harry will also visit malawi, botswana and angola, where he'll highlight his mother's work to tackle landmines.
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they will give presents that were donated to archie to an african charity that trains and employs women living with hiv. it's been a good night for british stars at the us tv awards, the emmys. phoebe waller—bridge, the writer and creator of flea bag, and jodie comer, the star of killing eve, won two of the night's big prizes. the ceremony took place in los angeles last night. game of thrones was named outstanding drama series for its eighth and final season. the overnight collapse of thomas cook has left 150,000 holidaymakers overseas. let's talk to the chair of the civil aviation authority, dame deirdre hutton. before your time this morning, i know it's a busy morning. 2am this announcement came in. tell me about what procedures are now in place.|j certainly will and it is an enormous operation. can i start by
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recognising this is a really sad day for thomas cook, the world's oldest travel company started by a cobbler in nottingham. there are 9000 jobs in the uk affected. 0ur in nottingham. there are 9000 jobs in the uk affected. our thoughts go out to those people. very worrying for passengers. anybody who is proposing a was proposing to travel out for a holiday, don't go to the airport because there were no thomas cook flights. i'm afraid those holidays are not going to happen. those 150,000 people abroad, we will be bringing them back when they have finished their holiday. so they should go to our website which is thomascook.caa.co.uk should go to our website which is thomascook. caa.co. uk and you should go to our website which is thomascook.caa.co.uk and you will find all the details and a lot of other information. can you give us
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the big picture as to whether bulk of these 150,000 people are. we've got about a0 aircraft with 1a from around the world. and we will over the next two weeks, this covers about 55 airports so predominantly europe, stretching out to turkey but some long haul to the states and the caribbean and cuba so a really big operation and for that, although i am very confident we will be bringing everybody home, on the day they were going to come home or very close to it, there will inevitably bea close to it, there will inevitably be a few lumps and bumps on the way we ask people to bear with us. i understand some of those flights to bring people back are already in the hour? it is already beginning, i would say. as i speak to you, our
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first plane in new york city, which isajumbo first plane in new york city, which is a jumbo jet, is first plane in new york city, which is a jumbojet, is bringing people back and is due to take off very shortly. the plane is being loaded and will be pushing back soon. so the programme is getting under way. i wonder, perhaps, the programme is getting under way. iwonder, perhaps, if the programme is getting under way. i wonder, perhaps, if you the programme is getting under way. iwonder, perhaps, if you have the programme is getting under way. i wonder, perhaps, if you have got friends and relatives watching your programme, you know, they might send a whatsapp or a facebook message to their relatives who are on holiday, just to make sure they get the message about going to this website. ifi message about going to this website. if i repeated. thomascook.caa.co.uk. there have been some concerns that those people who already on their holidays, in hotels, were getting some pressure from hotels but they would have to pay extra money. there was some kind of problem, as they we re was some kind of problem, as they were trying to check out. what exactly is the situation in relation to the bills at hotels for people already abroad? well, look, there are different arrangements for different destinations. so it is quite complex. they should go to
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that website which will give them information about the nature of hotels and how that should be organised. they certainly should be handing the credit cards over to hotels. so no money should be exchanged? shouldn't be paying any extra money in relation to what has happened, if they are in residence? if they are already thomas cook protected, atol protected, they should not be paying any more money. 0ver should not be paying any more money. over the course of the next few days we will be contacting all the hotels to tell them that the hotels are guaranteed by government. this is obviously quite a distressing time if you have future plans as well with thomas cook. how are people fixed in relation to those bookings? well, again, they should go to the website, because we put detailed information on the website about refunds. clearly at the moment our focus is on disused repatriation
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exercise. as soon focus is on disused repatriation exercise. as soon as focus is on disused repatriation exercise. as soon as that is over in a couple of weeks, we will be starting on refunds. i would suggest people do not put in refunds in the next few days, we will not be able to deal with it. in a couple of weeks we will be starting a refunding programme and we expect to com plete refunding programme and we expect to complete start within two months. dame deirdre hutton, from the civil aviation authority, thank you for your time this morning. bca is obviously the organisation in charge of that operation, which swung into action at 2am this morning, as the announcement came in that thomas cook had indeed collapsed. —— the caa. we know also that the labour party conference is going on. let's talk to the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell. but i would actually like to talk about thomas cook, first of all. the government has not bailed out this company. what do you think should have happened ? company. what do you think should have happened? i am disappointed. when this crisis first started i said to the government that they should intervene, because, if only to stabilise the situation wildly
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real plan for the future the company could be addressed stop —— while the real plan. i am worried for the holiday makers and i really feel for them, but also, 13,000 people will lose theirjobs as a result of this. ijust think the lose theirjobs as a result of this. i just think the government should have been willing to just do more, and actually intervene, stabilise the situation, and allow a longer term plan to develop. it has been a long—standing problem, this is the third time in a decade the company has been in trouble. why should the government invest in a company which is having issues like this, and where does that line stop? is having issues like this, and where does that line stop7m is having issues like this, and where does that line stop? it is interesting, isn't it? because this company was once in public ownership, and as a result of privatisation it has had real problems over the years, i think because of the issues around management and the lack of long—term planning. the government's intervention could have enabled us to just stabilise the situation, give it breathing space so that there would be proper consultation with the workforce in particular,
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about how to go forward. because it is clear that the holiday industry will continue on, there will be continued demand. if it is about changes, product, just to consult the staff and consumers and then develop a plan, but to just stand to one side and watch this number of jobs go, and to so many holidaymakers, having the holiday ruined, ijust don't think holidaymakers, having the holiday ruined, i just don't think that is wise government. what kind of president woodhead said, if you bail out this company and then it is in trouble again in a couple months? do you go on bailing out every company? well, what the government has done elsewhere, you can look at what has happened in the steel industry, the government has intervened. what you do is intervene to stabilise and allow the development of a plan to be brought forward, and then you can give it a long—term future, to any sector or any company. i think they should have been a bit more willing to intervene. the logical reason
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they didn't is because they don't wa nt to they didn't is because they don't want to see the state engaged in planning and developing sectors of our economy. i think they should have overcome that ideological bias in the interests of the holidaymakers under the workers themselves, and then assisted in finding a route through this current crisis, and as i say, stabilise for the longer term. let's talk about something else but obviously people need to find a route through. i want to talk to you about brexit, and labour's position on brexit. can we talk to you about sequencing? you seem talk to you about sequencing? you seem to be talking about a general election, then negotiating a deal, then taking the bastille to a referendum? is then taking the bastille to a referendum ? is that then taking the bastille to a referendum? is that right? yes, exactly that. it is a sort of logical process, really, which is about having that general election, making sure we elect a labour government. that government can then bring forward the negotiations with the eu. and then have a referendum on the two options. 0ne the eu. and then have a referendum on the two options. one will be what is on offerfrom on the two options. one will be what is on offer from the on the two options. one will be what is on offerfrom the eu, and the other will be to remain. i think thatis other will be to remain. i think that is a logical process, which
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will eventually allow the british people themselves to make the final decision and bring the country back together again. how do you negotiate a deal? and the bastille, we heard jeremy corbyn talking about that yesterday? how do you negotiate when you are already telling the eu you are going to have another referendum on bastille? because when we were in conversations and discussions with the government, and then with you as well, the eu has indicated that actually, the ideas that labour was bringing forward about a permanent customs union and a close relationship with single market, they were willing to look at those asa they were willing to look at those as a constructive link, because they saw that as a way forward as well. so the idea is to just sit down and see what the bastille is that can be achieved in those negotiations. the eu will not want a bad deal, even if the people in this country vote for leaving, they will still want a deal thatis leaving, they will still want a deal that is actually able to deliver for them and for us the best
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opportunities we can get the opportunity —— for our economy and forjobs. the key issue is to let the people decide. so then you, and i think you have said this on the record, would campaign against the very deal that you have negotiated? again, that is democracy, isn't it? what i have said is that i cannot see we can get a better deal than remain andi see we can get a better deal than remain and i would campaign for remain. but others think they can get a deal that would be acceptable to the british people, and that is democracy. i think the key issue here is to let the people decide. this is a huge issue for ourfuture. the option should be laid in front of them and i think at that point in time, that is the opportunity we don't have, as i say, to bring the country back together again. jeremy corbyn has said he is remaining neutral on this point. is that sustainable? is that the right thing he should be saying? what he is saying is exactly to follow that logical sequence, which is, once a labour government is elected, make
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sure that we have a sensible deal, negotiate with the eu, and then put it before the british people. he has said whatever comes out of that referendum, as prime minister, he will implement. i think that is right. i think we want a government that will lead the wishes of the people when they have their final say. and what jeremy people when they have their final say. and whatjeremy corbyn has said is that he willjudge, he willjudge and that referendum on the basis of what deal is negotiated with the eu, as against remain. i think that is com pletely as against remain. i think that is completely logical. john mcdonnell, thank you very much for your time here on breakfast. that was the shadow chancellor. 0ur programme is very much dominated by the news that came in at two o'clock this morning, the official announcement, much talked about in the last week or so, the civil aviation authority announcing thomas cook has collapsed. there is a major operation under way. we were hearing a moment ago from the civil aviation authority themselves, saying that planes will be in the, almost immediately, to bring those people back so that their holidays can
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continue and they can come back as normal. we understand a5 planes are already in the air, and will be used today. do keep your questions on that topic coming in. shall we catch up the weather? i think we should, because this week it will be much more unsettled weather than we have been used to. rain at times, showers, sunshine and gusty winds. it is also going to feel cooler than it has done lately. today we have got a weather front moving across the north—east of scotland, bringing some rain. the second weather front will enhance for showers. and this area of low pressure, with its attendant fronts, will bring in rain through the morning and into the afternoon. some of that will be happy. the wind will also strengthen. when we lose this morning's low cloud, mist and fog from the north—east, there will be a fair bit of sunshine around. if few showers across scotland, northern ireland, northern england and wales before the rain comes in and wipes
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them out. temperatures, 13— 20 degrees. now, through this evening and overnight, our first degrees. now, through this evening and overnight, ourfirst band of rain moves over to the east, then a second one rain moves over to the east, then a second one sweeps rain moves over to the east, then a second one sweeps and right behind it. this one is going to be heavy and also thundery. in fact, we could well see some thundery downpours. as a result it isn't going to be particularly cold, with overnight low staying in double figures. tomorrow we still have this band of heavy and thundery downpours, moving over towards the east. there will be a lull behind them before we have the next system coming in, again with strengthening winds. like today, tomorrow is going to be windy, but tomorrow, more of us will see the gusty winds. to give you an idea, these other kinds of wind gusts you can expect inland. 28 or 30 miles an hour, maybe a0—50 as we push along the coastline. thanks very much, carol. see you later. you are watching breakfast. we will keep you up—to—date with the latest
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touch thomas cook. this is what passengers at manchester airport are being hounded. it collapsed overnight. time now for the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london. i'm alpa patel. a london—based charity says more needs to be done to support young people who witness violent crime. ‘peace in the streets‘ claims hundreds of child witnesses are suffering trauma as a result of what they‘ve seen, and are themselves at risk of being lured into gangs. despite the government piloting a project to help child witnesses, the charity says more help is still needed. our support is aimed at actually supporting survivors, going into schools, helping children, they get depressed, they stop planning, most of the young boys i speak to tell you if they live to 18 and 21, that‘s a big deal, now. and you can see more on that story on inside out london. that‘s tonight at 7:30, here on bbc one. the chancellor has again being urged to ease the burden of business
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rates, after it emerged councils are using bailiffs to collect arrears. westminster city council made more than 3,000 referrals to debt collectors in the last year. haringey, barking & daggenham and lewisham boroughs also sent bailiffs to a large number of businesses. there were more than 1,200 sexual assaults on the tube in the last year, a rise of a0% in the last four years. more are reported on the the central line than any other. british transport police say they expected an in increase because of a campaign urging victims to come forward. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. there‘s a good service on the tubes this morning. there are minor delays on the circle line. at the airports, all thomas cook flights to and from gatwick and sta nsted airports have been cancelled, as the company has gone into administration. 0n the roads, this is blackwall lane. long queues towards
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the blackwall tunnel. in the city, a201 new bridge street is closed southbound from ludgate circus to queen victoria street due to gas mains repairs. now the weather with kate kinsella. good morning. a lovely mild start this morning, and a bright one. plenty of sunshine around through the morning itself. don‘t be fooled, the journey home may not be quite as glorious, heavy rain expected as we head towards the end of the day. this morning, enjoy the sunshine. the wind gradually starts to strengthen today and during the afternoon we will notice the cloud increasing, and then the heavy rain arriving. maximum temperature today, 20 celsius. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for this heavy rain, from midnight onwards. really affecting parts of surrey. we will get the heavy rain everywhere. you may have some rumbles of thunder through the night and into tuesday morning. frequent lighting, temperatures remaining mild between 13 and 15 celsius.
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so, it‘s going to be a rather wet start to tuesday. it stays unsettled, we are likely to hear some thunder, frequent lightning, and that rain will be quite persistent. temperatures tomorrow getting up to 19. it‘s going to stay unsettled for much of this week, and temperatures remain similar. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now, though, it‘s back to charlie and louise. bye for now. it stayt and louise minchin. —— hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. here‘s a summary of this morning‘s main stories from bbc news. thomas cook, one of the world‘s biggest tour operators, has collapsed — after last—ditch talks to save the business failed. the government said the demise of thomas cook was "very sad news", and has demanded a swift investigation. the firm employed 9,000 people n the uk. the civil aviation authority has launched an unprecedented operation to bring home 150,000
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british tourists. got about a0 aircraft to be brought in from around the world and we will over the next few weeks one about a thousand flights covering 18 countries and 55 airports. predominantly in europe, stretching out to turkey, but some long haul to the states and the caribbean and cuba. a really big operation. in the last few minutes, the boss of thomas cook — peter fankhauser — has been speaking about the collapse of the company, let‘s take a look at what he‘s had to say. this is a statement i hoped i would never have to make. following a decision by the board late last night, the uk government official receiver was appointed in the early hours of this morning, the 23rd of september, to take control of thomas cook. despite huge efforts over a number of months and further intense
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negotiations in recent days, we have not been able to secure a deal to save our business. i know that this outcome will be devastating to many people and will cause a lot of anxiety, stress and disruption. first, i want to apologise to my 21,000 colleagues who i know will be hard broken. you all fought so hard to make thomas cook a success. secondly, i would like to say sorry to all our customers, those who are on holiday with us now, and those who have walked with us in the coming months.
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my colleagues will be working with the cia to help with the repatriation. finally, i would like to apologise to the many thousands of hoteliers and suppliers who have stuck by our business in good times and in bad and to now face difficult financial choices of their own. it has been my privilege to lead thomas cook. it is deeply distressing to me that it is not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. thank you. it is passengers at manchester airport have been saying this morning. we got told to come here
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now to find out my flights been cancelled with three kids. my sons got adhd and autism and his sister, and they are sobbing their heart out. we got in touch with thomas cook yesterday and everything has gone through, there is nothing to worry about. we turn up at the airport and think it‘s normal. worry about. we turn up at the airport and think it's normal. we booked a package holiday over a year ago and we had flights yesterday contacted to make sure things were going out as normal and they said under no circumstances with the holiday be cancelled and we be put on another plane regardless of whether thomas cook went into liquidation. we were given a duty of ca re liquidation. we were given a duty of care numberand there liquidation. we were given a duty of care number and there are no planes available. we booked through sandals so we available. we booked through sandals so we just presumed that the flights wouldn't be effect did so it's not until this morning that we have seen an emailand itsjust until this morning that we have seen an email and itsjust said no flights. those people are trying to
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checkin flights. those people are trying to check in at manchester airport. they now need to sort out the immediate problems, don‘t they? now need to sort out the immediate problems, don't they? the civil aviation authority says they will be flying 1a,000 people back in foreign destinations today alone. i‘ve just been down to the thomas cook check—in desk and it‘s actually rather calm at the moment. the message does seem rather calm at the moment. the message does seem to be getting through that thomas cook has gone out of business and people should not turn up at the airports of the first flight from here was due to leave shortly after six o‘clock. that obviously hasn‘t happened. there are people turning up, a few of them, but they are largely outnumbered by civil aviation authority staff. i‘ve spoken to a couple of people. one couple who decided they wanted to go to corfu for a week. they had to leave early
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in the morning and had no choice. by the time they got here, the company had gone out of business. they said to me, it‘s fine, they‘ve lost a holiday but people here have lost theirjobs and that is really striking as well. you go to the chicken ali, check—in desks, it‘s all entirely deserted, there is nobody there, just signs saying all flights are cancelled. so many of you getting in touch, a lot of you really feeling as well particularly for the staff involved, 9000 of them here in the uk no longer withjobs this morning. we‘ll keep you right up—to—date of the situation this morning. the shape of labour‘s brexit policy should become clearer today, with members deciding whether the party should back remain in a future public vote, or adopt the leadership‘s neutral position. (tx 00v)attempts to find a consensus behind closed doors failed last night. at least two trades unions will also decide their brexit position this morning. labour will announce plans today to introduce free personal care for people over the age of 65 in england — if it wins the next election.
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the party wants to end means—testing for home visits and residential help, which it says would more than double the number of eligible pensioners. the plan will initially cost £6 billion a year which the party says will be covered by general taxation. scientists have warned that the causes and impacts of global warming are accelerating, rather than slowing down. the world meteorological 0rganisation says the past five years are on track to be the hottest on record. it comes as world leaders gather in new york for a un climate action summit. the un has urged leaders to turn up to the summit with concrete plans. the duke and duchess of sussex and their four—month—old son archie will arrive in south africa today, for their first official tour as a family. during the 10—day trip, prince harry will visit malawi, botswana and angola, where he‘ll highlight his mother‘s work to tackle landmines. the duke and duchess will give presents that are donated to archie, to an african charity that trains and employs women living with hiv.
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jodie comer, the star of killing eve, and phoebe waller—bridge, the creator and writer of fleabag, are among the big british winners at this year‘s emmy awards. 00v)the ceremony took place in los angeles last night. —— the ceremony took place in los angeles last night. game of thrones was also named outstanding drama series for its eighth and final season. it's it‘s been a busy weekend of sport, hasn‘t it? it‘s been a busy weekend of sport, hasn't it? we will bring you plenty of it over the next couple of minutes. liverpool maintained their perfect start in the premier league beating chelsea 2—1 at stamford bridge. trent alexander—arnold opened the scoring with this well—worked free kick, before roberto firmino doubled the lead. ngolo kante did pull one back for chelsea in the second half, but liverpool held on and still have a 5 point lead at the top of the table. we have to be ready that we can do what we are really good in and that‘s based on improvement,
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it was a good game, a really good game and at moments, brilliant but there are a lot of things we can improve and that‘s what they are trying to work on, the small periods between the games. west ham were 2—nil winners at home to manchester united, aaron creswell with the pick of their goals. manchester united haven‘t won away from home in the league since february. pierre—emerick aubameyang‘s stunning free—kick helped arsenal come from behind twice to beat aston villa 3—2 at the emirates. they are fourth in the table while villa stay in the relegation zone. in the scottish premiership, celtic are still top of the table by three points after maintaining their 100 percent record, they came from behind to beat kilmarnock 3—1 at home. second placed rangers beat stjohnstone a—nil. all the goals came in the second half. jermaine defoe came off the bench to score twice. hearts beat hibs 2—1 in the edinburgh derby.
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sebastian vettel won the singapore grand prix, but his first race victory for more than a year was branded as "unfair" by his team mate. charles leclerc was leading the race from pole, but because ferrari brought him in for a pitstop after vettel, the german was able to leapfrog him into the lead. leclerc was then ordered not to challenge vettel for victory. lewis hamilton extended his championship lead to 65 points despite finishing fourth. wales start their world cup campaign in just a few hours, taking on georgia in their first pool match. wales have never made it past the semi—finals, but they‘ll be hoping to rediscover the form that helped them win the six nations earlier this year. they‘ll be the overwhelming favourites in the game against georgia which kicks off at quarter past eleven this morning. we‘ve been outjust over a week
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as well and not being here and not having a game, theyjust can‘t wait, the build—up‘s started, ceremonies, a lot of training going on to get a game in that way and looking forward to it. when 20 year old student ed farmer moved away to university, it was supposed to be the start of a huge new chapter in his life. but it ended in tragedy after he took part in a so—called "initiation—style" bar crawl.ed died from the toxic effects of alcohol, after a society night out. his parentsjeremy and helen are part of a new awareness campaign, to coincide with fresher‘s week. we can talk to them now. it's it‘s a terrible loss that your family suffered. telus of little bit about, if you don‘t mind, what happened with ed. he took part in
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the initiation. during the period of the initiation. during the period of the evening and ended up consuming probably a litre of vodka within two hours. that was it. he was a dead man walking by the end. if you‘ve got that amount of alcohol in you, if you don‘t get rid of it, you are struggling. what did you learn about the events leading up to his death? i know that was the inquest, it must have been very difficult for you hearing that sequence of events. well, we had an insight into it because at‘s brother will head been to newcastle and taken part in the initiation, it wasn‘t a surprise to us. what it has done is to inspire you some guidance to other people.
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there will be young people possibly going on similar events this evening or this weekend. what have you learned and what are you passing on? from our perspective, spirits are very dangerous. you can overdose. steer away from spirits and also, your fellow students, they need to have an awareness of the signs of someone have an awareness of the signs of someone that is notjust drunk but ina someone that is notjust drunk but in a life—threatening situation. you also the cctv of him in the metro. if someone is in that state, possible medical intervention is necessary. a series of guidelines you want universities to sign up to. about that. the vice chancellor of
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newcastle has chaired a steering committee for universities uk where guidelines have been brought in. trying to regulate them a little bit. but from our perspective, a number of people watching this programme, they will know people that are heading off to university. just highlight make them know about consuming a large quantity of errors. the signs that somebody is ina errors. the signs that somebody is in a life—threatening state —— state and not just drunk. in a life—threatening state —— state and notjust drunk. there is a balance between young people at this particular time. they will get involved in something along these lines. is there a balance between having fun and, you know, possibly pushing the limits a bit, and something that becomes much more
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dangerous? we all push the limits. but i think they need to realise the risks of drinking large quantities of spirits. there could potentially bea of spirits. there could potentially be a life—threatening situation. thank you for your time this morning, jeremy. thank you very much, it‘s been a privilege. morning, jeremy. thank you very much, it's been a privilege. what a nice thing to say under those circumstances. there will be a lot of people involved in those kinds of events. a word of warning for many people. here‘s carol with a look at this morning‘s weather. good morning. it is looking u nsettled good morning. it is looking unsettled this week, certainly compared to the last week we have had. it is also going to feel that
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bit cooler than lately. at times we will have rain showers. dusty winds as well. in between they will be some sunshine. what is happening today as we have a weather front moving across the north—east of scotland. the weather front behind is also producing showers as this area of low pressure will bring rain and from the south—west, pushing north—east as we go through the next 2a hours or so. some of that will be happy. some of it will also be thundery. so we are starting off with some fog across the north—east of the uk, particularly dense across parts of aberdeenshire and northumberland. when data lifts, many of us will have a dry day with some sunny many of us will have a dry day with some sunny spells. still some sunny showers across parts of scotland. we have got them at the moment across northern ireland, northern england and wales. lots of them will be replaced by this band of rain coming in with its gusty winds. the strongest winds will be along the south—west coast and also the coast of wales. temperatures today, 13— 20 degrees. yesterday‘s top temperature
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was in braeburn in north norfolk, temperature reached 27.7. we can say goodbye to that kind of level for a time. we are more likely to see values like this as we go through this week. through this evening and overnight, the first band of rain continues to move steadily north and east. the next run comes in behind it. but will produce heavy, thundery downpours as we go through the course of the night. it is not going to be cold. we are looking at overnight lows between 11 and 15. so, this is the weather front responsible for the heavy thundery downpours, and it will continue to advance north and east through the course of tuesday. later on another area of low pressure comes our way. tuesdayis area of low pressure comes our way. tuesday is looking pretty wet. that could lead to disruption with standing water. wind is going to be feature. after this lull we have this next system coming in from the south—west. that is introducing more cloud, rain and strong winds. parts of north—west scotland are getting away with a mostly dry day. we talk
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about the winds inland. looking at gusts as much as 30 miles an hour. along the coast, we could have between a0 and 50 miles an hour locally and possibly even a bit more. that is certainly something you will notice. that is worth mentioning once again, if you are out and about overnight, monday into tuesday, and during the day on tuesday, and during the day on tuesday, we are looking at thundery downpours and gusty winds, and that could well lead to some disruption across southern england and also wales. let‘s return to our top story. the collapse of thomas cook, the world‘s oldest travel operator. millions of current and future holidaymakers affected. let‘s get more on your rights with ben. we are trying to get a handle on how thatis we are trying to get a handle on how that is affecting people on the ground in various locations. we understand about 16,000 people are actually booked to come back today, a5 different planes have been charted under the civil aviation authority is planning 6a different flights today. let‘s talk to
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somebody who is affected by this. fatima is visiting tunisia. good morning. i know you are not supposed to be coming back for a couple of days, but what has been going on in your hotel? it has been a bit of carnage going on. on saturday night, guests were trying to leave the hotel, and the owner basically panicked and ordered management here in the hotel to not let anybody leave. they closed the front gates under the back gates. people were trying to walk up to the gates with their luggage to get on the coach. the coach was turned around three times. they were not let out. the thomas cook representative was here, and was trying to help people get out and negotiate with the hotel, and in the end, i thinka out and negotiate with the hotel, and in the end, i think a compromise was made hours after. the atmosphere has definitely gone down in the hotel. the whole day yesterday, nobody knew what was going on. it seems like today, reception has been 0k seems like today, reception has been ok but we do not know what is going
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to happen when the next lot try to check out. we don't know whether the flights are on at the moment. we don't know if the thomas cook representative will show up. so it isjust the representative will show up. so it is just the unknown. representative will show up. so it isjust the unknown. whether we are going to be let out of the hotel. nobody is really worried about the flights and getting back home, we know we are protected. it is whether or not they will open the gates for us, that is what we are concerned about in this hotel, that is all. people reacting? it must be unsettling, but also upsetting? how we re unsettling, but also upsetting? how were people? unsettling, but also upsetting? how were people ? there unsettling, but also upsetting? how were people? there were people in tears, people stressing, a group of men contemplating going up and fighting the security guards. some people try to call the local tunisian police. tempers were flaring up, people are going mental and shouting, demanding to be let out. especially those who had their flight out. especially those who had their flight due last night. 0thers
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out. especially those who had their flight due last night. others were just, you know, there is nothing we can do, we have to pay. 0thers just, you know, there is nothing we can do, we have to pay. others were intervening saying, no, don't pay. we have already paid, why should we pay again? it was a mix of emotion. all sorts of stuff going on here, we didn't know what was going on. we didn't know what was going on. we didn't know what was going on. we didn't know what was holding us up. they had turned off the wi—fi so we can check with the outside world what was going on. at that moment we we re what was going on. at that moment we were completely left in the dark stop fatima, best of luck to you. were completely left in the dark stop fatima, best of luck to youlj stop fatima, best of luck to you.” know you don‘t know that don‘t leave for a couple of days, but thank you for a couple of days, but thank you for speaking to us on breakfast. the tunisian tourism ministry did actually responded out. they said the tourists were not detained. rather, procedures for the departure from the hotel were delayed for a short time at the request of the owner of this tourist institution. the civil aviation authority, we spoke to them a short time ago and they were saying that people should not be handing over any extra money in relation to those hotels, if they are already in situ and about to leave, as you had a moment ago.
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then, a lot of questions this morning, some of them about the practicalities, as we have on hearing. —— ben. some about the bigger picture. yes, and those practicalities, many people will be confused this morning, about what they should do, but they shouldn‘t do, whether they will get any money back and watched our rights will be. in the next few minutes will be trying to break that down and make it clear to everybody. this has been described as the largest ever peacetime repatriation of british citizens. it is now under way. the civil aviation authority is ringing holidaymakers back, but lots, or about a million future bookings of people that are due to go away, who have had their travel plans disrupted, as we know, those holidays will not now happen. don‘t had to be airport. importantly, in all of this, you might well be protected. megan french is a consumer expert at money saving expert. good morning, megan. let‘s break this down and be really clear about what people need to do here. first of all, let‘s start with if you were
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away. if you are already on holiday, you might have friends or family who are away. what should they be thinking about right now?“ are away. what should they be thinking about right now? if you are away and you are due to fly home with thomas cook over the next two weeks, the government has said you will get home free of charge. now, it might be on a special caa plane. if you are further afield that might be with a different airline. but if you are worried, the important thing is to head to the thomas cook caa website. what you need to do is click "i‘m currently abroad". it then has a list of destinations. you click the airport you were due to fly home from. it will have the information. 0bviously fly home from. it will have the information. obviously this has been updated as we go. but the key is to keep checking information. if your family orfriends keep checking information. if your family or friends were at home, hopefully they can help you as well. it is all about checking that flight. it is all about checking that flight. 0ne it is all about checking that flight. one that is available, make sure you get to the airport at least three hours early, because you are probably going to have to check in manually. no suggestion here you need to curtail your holiday or come back sooner. those flights will operate, we believe, at the end of your holiday when you are due to come back. so if you are currently
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away, you can continue. but there might bea away, you can continue. but there might be a question about your accommodation? yes, the flights are generally going around the same time. they have said they could be slightly earlier so keep doublechecking. you can also update your contact details with the caa, obviously there is no harm in doing that. as you say, accommodation might be more tricky. what the caa is saying is that if you have a package holiday, this means when you have a flight, for example, you are atol protected for your hotel as well. they say that if you are asked to pay again, contact the caa instead. don‘t just pay to pay again, contact the caa instead. don‘tjust pay the money. under the atol scheme, you are entitled to finish a holiday and get home. they will sort this out for you. quickly, let's talk about whether you are due to go away, but is the important thing as well, lots of people waking up this morning expecting to go away today over the next couple of weeks. what happens to them? will they get their money back? there are lots of protections to check if you are covered. firstly, if you have this atol protection, it is a package holiday with a flight. you will have been sent a atol certificate. if you book
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with thomas cook that will be on the back page of your documents. have a look for that. this means you are entitled to a full refund. as we have heard, that scheme is not open yet. we expected in the next week. we have been speaking to the caa this morning. ijust want we have been speaking to the caa this morning. i just want to we have been speaking to the caa this morning. ijust want to have a listen to what they told us, it is important to get the timetable right. this is bcaa explaining to us earlier about the timetable for getting your money back. clearly our entire focus at the moment is on this huge repatriation exercise, and as soon as this huge repatriation exercise, and as soon as that is over in a couple of weeks, we will be starting on refunds. so i would suggest that people don't kind of put in refunds in the next few days and expect, you know, we won't be able to deal with it. but in a couple of weeks, we will be starting a refunding programme and we expect to complete that within the next two months. just a word, if you have only booked a flight, because many people will not have booked that package
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holiday, which means you are atol protected. what do you do if you are not, if you havejust protected. what do you do if you are not, if you have just booked a flight? it is worth noting that some flights may be atol protected. jack, if you have a certificate. if not, not be covered under the atol scheme, which entitles you to a refund. so have a look at your travel insurance. hopefully you booked it as soon as you book your trip. check if it covers this kind of supply of failure. if not, have a look at how you booked a flight. if you booked it on a credit card directly and it was more than £100 you may well be covered by your credit card provider. alternatively, if you are not covered over that scheme, if the flight was less than £100 or you booked on your debit card, you might be covered by the chargeback scheme. now, unlike the section 75 credit card protection, this is not a legal protection, but it is monitor customer service premise, and we have seen it work in the past. megan, really good to see you. thank you for explaining all about, really clear advice there. just a reminder, all of that advice is on our social media. had to bbc brea kfast is on our social media. had to bbc breakfast on twitter, facebook and all the rest, and the advice is
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there for you. there will be more from me after eight o‘clock. and so many people are getting in touch, particularly offering sympathy for all those people who worked for thomas cook. now it is time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i‘m alpa patel a london—based charity says more needs to be done to support young people who witness violent crime. ‘peace in the streets‘ claims hundreds of child witnesses are suffering trauma as a result of what they‘ve seen, and are themselves at risk of being lured into gangs. despite the government piloting a project to help child witnesses, the charity says more help is still needed. our support is aimed at actually supporting survivors, going into schools, helping children, they get depressed, they stop planning, most of the young boys i speak to tell you if they live to 18 and 21, that‘s a big deal, now. and you can see more on that story on inside out london. that‘s tonight at 7:30,
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here on bbc one. the chancellor has again being urged to ease the burden of business rates, after it emerged councils are using bailiffs to collect arrears. westminster city council made more than 3,000 referrals to debt collectors in the last year. haringey, barking & daggenham and lewisham boroughs also sent bailiffs to a large number of businesses. the number of sexual assaults reported on the tube has risen by more than a0% in four years. more are reported on the the central line than any other. british transport police says it had expected a rise following a drive to encourage victims to report unwanted sexual behaviour. campaigners say incidents are still under—reported. let‘s take a look at the travel situation now. minor delays on the circle line wi reless minor delays on the circle line wireless signalfailure minor delays on the circle line wireless signal failure liverpool street is fixed.
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0n the a13 in dagenham there‘s queueing traffic into town through the goresbrook interchange. in the city, a201 new bridge street is closed southbound from ludgate circus to queen victoria street due to gas mains repairs. aa piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. good morning. a lovely mild start this morning, and a bright one. plenty of sunshine around through the morning itself. don‘t be fooled, the journey home may not be quite as glorious, heavy rain expected as we head towards the end of the day. this morning, enjoy the sunshine. the wind gradually starts to strengthen today and during the afternoon we will notice the cloud increasing, and then the heavy rain arriving. maximum temperature today, 20 celsius. the met office has a yellow weather warning in place for this heavy rain, from midnight onwards. really affecting parts of surrey. we will get the heavy rain everywhere. you may have some rumbles of thunder through the night and into tuesday morning.
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frequent lighting, temperatures remaining mild between 13 and 15 celsius. so, it‘s going to be a rather wet start to tuesday. it stays unsettled, we are likely to hear some thunder, frequent lightning, and that rain will be quite persistent. temperatures tomorrow getting up to 19. it‘s going to stay unsettled for much of this week, and temperatures remain similar. i‘m back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it‘s back to charlie and louise. bye for now. good morning and welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and louise minchin. 0ur headlines today: thomas cook collapses after last—minute negotiations to save the world‘s oldest tour operator fail. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one
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of the most loved brands in travel. all flights and holidays are cancelled. the civil aviation authority will now start the biggest ever peace time repatriation, bringing home 150,000 stranded british holidaymakers. we‘ll be live at airports here in the uk and abroad throughout the morning. more than 20,000 jobs are now at risk including 9000 in the uk. i‘ll be finding out what went wrong and explain your rights if your travel plans are affected. it‘s 6 league wins out of 6 for liverpool. they win 2—1 at chelsea and stay five points clear at the top of the table. british success at the emmys in los angeles overnight. comedy fleabag stole the show, winning four awards. this week‘s whether it‘s looking fairly unsettled, with mist and fog to lift and then rain sweeping in from the south—west accompanied by
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gusty winds. i will have more later. it‘s monday the 23rd of september. our top story. thomas cook has collapsed leaving over 150,000 uk holiday—makers overseas. at two o‘clock this morning the civil aviation authority said the tour operator had ceased trading with immediate effect. it‘s now in charge of the biggest ever peacetime repatriation. the first flights to bring uk tourists home are already taking off. with the latest developments, here‘s simonjones. grounded. the uk‘s oldest holiday firm has collapsed after 178 years. the empty check—in desks at manchester airport tell the story. the end declared at 2 o‘clock this morning by the civil aviation authority. it has already begun flying a fleet of chartered planes around the world to bring holiday—makers home. we‘ve got about a0 aircraft that we brought in from around
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the world and we will over the next two weeks run about 1000 flights. this covers 18 countries and 55 airports, so predominantly in europe, stretching out to turkey, but some long haul to the states and the caribbean and cuba. so a really big operation. holiday—makers like these people who arrived in majorca yesterday are being told they will be flown home as close as possible to their booked return date but there may be some problems and delays. travel experts believe up to a million more people who had bookings in the coming months will have lost their holidays, though they will get refunds but that may take a long time. up until the early hours of this morning, the thomas cook website was still offering what it called fantastic deals, urging people to book now. take a look at their website now and it comes up with this message saying that the business has ceased trading and everything is cancelled. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible
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to save one of the most—loved brands in travel. thank you. do you take personal responsibility? in the end, the firm simply ran out of cash. uncertainty over brexit, last year‘s heatwave in europe, and political unrest in popular destinations are all being blamed. more than 20,000 thomas cook employees, including 9000 based in the uk, are set to lose theirjobs. the government is asking the insolvency service to fast—track an investigation into what went wrong. simon jones, bbc news. just to give you a sense of the scale of the operation that is now under way, speaking to the civil aviation authority this morning, who are in control of what happens next, and they are saying that 16,000 people are due to come back to the uk today. 6a flights, they think, will take place, and there are a5 planes being used to get people back here from all over the world. a lot
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of people coming back from turkey in particular coming back. let‘s get a sense of manchester airport, where our reporter dave guest is this morning. a lot of thomas cook passengers would usually be using manchester airport, wouldn‘t they? that is right. they would be at terminal one, queueing up to go to their various destinations. the check—in desks behind me are closed and they have even switched off the thomas cook sign that was illuminated over there. 5000 people due to fly out of manchester airport today, the biggest up operating thomas cook flights, and in fact the airline had its main office here in manchester airport and they relocated some of their digital marketing team to manchester recently. apart from passengers there is a lot of distress for the people working for the company here in manchester. behind the numbers are human stories of course, people trying to get out on their holidays he will not be able to do so. here are some their stories.”
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he will not be able to do so. here are some their stories. i got up at six o'clock this morning to come to the airport and with no notification i find out thomas cook have ceased trading. you had no warning? no warning whatsoever. there are no staff, no planes, no nothing. we booked a package holiday through sandals, so we just presumed the flights wouldn‘t be affected. it is not until this morning when we have seen an not until this morning when we have seen an email and it hasjust not until this morning when we have seen an email and it has just said no flights. well, the very last ever thomas cook flight is due to arrive here at terminal one at 8:a1am this morning, coming from orlando, and they were in the air when the company went bust, which is why it is playing. meanwhile they are expecting those repatriation flights to arrive here at terminal one in manchester somewhere around lunchtime today. despite the warnings over the weekend, people are still turning up at the airport
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desperately trying to find out what is happening and whether they will be able to get a flight to wherever they are going to, but at the moment they are going to, but at the moment the prospects don‘t look terribly good for them. that is a picture in manchester. thank you. one of the problems is that the official announcement only came in at 2 o‘clock this morning, and people might have checked at midnight, and at that point the official line was that the operation was still running. and you could still booked up running. and you could still booked up until midnight, book another holiday. so many people affected by this are still abroad. gavin lee is at palma airport in majorca, where people were presumably expecting to be able to get home today. what is going on? the situation in palma, and turkey, the two biggest destinations for thomas cook, there we re destinations for thomas cook, there were flights to the east midlands, manchester, gatwick, and what you can see is operation matterhorn in
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action. british and commonwealth officials offering reassurance and advice to people checking in. there are dozens of workers wearing yellow vests from atol, the civil aviation authority, telling people that they will get home today that it might not necessarily be with the destination point that they flew out from, but you will get home. people arriving here today have been telling me that they are confused. many are frustrated. many are annoyed that this is the end of their holiday. it is a young woman‘s from newcastle birthday today and she told me it had utterly ruined her day but some people are pragmatic that they will go home. we can speak to someone who is trying to get back to glasgow today. diane, tell me your situation at the moment. we got picked up this morning at 6:30am and ourflight moment. we got picked up this morning at 6:30am and our flight was supposed to be 9:30am into glasgow. we have got here now and they have told us we are going to birmingham and then a coach trip for six hours from birmingham up to glasgow. it is
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really not suitable at all for me with my disabilities, sitting for 12 hours on different stages of my journey. it is not fair. theyjust askedif journey. it is not fair. theyjust asked if i was in a position to buy other flights and claim asked if i was in a position to buy otherflights and claim back asked if i was in a position to buy other flights and claim back the money. you know! is this yourfirst thomas cook holiday. have you but many times with them?” thomas cook holiday. have you but many times with them? i have booked with thomas cook for 30 years with no problems at all. they are great. this is the first let down. but it isa this is the first let down. but it is a very big let down, isn‘t it? you feel sorry for all the people who have lost theirjobs. you came in on their coach this morning from the hotel. what with the atmosphere? everybody was fine because they thought the civil aviation authority would get at home. you know what i mean? calm. what time were you hoping to get home tonight? they don‘t honestly know. they don‘t know what time the coaches leaving birmingham. that is as far as i know. i don‘t even know what time i am getting home yet. good luck. we appreciate you talking to us this
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morning. best of luck. i spoke to an amateur football player before, chris, and he was saying that you have got to roll with the punches here. they knew it would be a difficult day. spare a thought for people arriving yesterday. some people arriving yesterday. some people i spoke to arrived here, expecting two weeks, and they are hoping that this operation matterhorn repatriation effort, 5000 people around the globe, 500 people every single day, they are hoping this continues. it is relatively calm that people are frustrated here. we completely understand. we will keep you up—to—date. thank you for the moment. let‘s turn our attention to other news now. the shape of labour‘s brexit policy should become clearer today, with members deciding whether the party should back remain in a future public vote, or adopt the leadership‘s neutral position. attempts to find a consensus behind closed doors failed last night. let‘s speak to our political correspondent nick eardley who‘s
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at the party conference in brighton. that looks like a beautiful morning in the sunshine. tell us what has happened today. there seems to be a confused picture emerging. indeed. it isa confused picture emerging. indeed. it is a lovely morning here but the big question labour has got to a nswer big question labour has got to answer today is whether it can unite its different sides behind brexit policy. this really matters. if there is a snap general election in there is a snap general election in the next few weeks, as many people think likely, whatever labour decides will be its policy going into a general election. jeremy corbyn wants to other people another referendum on brexit, on the final deal versus the option of staying in the eu. the problem that some people haveis the eu. the problem that some people have is that he is not going to decide what he supports until after a general election. there are a number of members here who want labour to be unequivocally behind the idea of staying in the european union. there are some injeremy corbyn‘s top team who agree. we heard john mcdonnell in the last
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hour saying he will vote to remain and you can‘t see any deal that would be better than staying in the eu. they are going to try and force jeremy corbyn‘s hand on this on the conference floor today. it is complicated and it is not guaranteed to succeed because the unions seem to succeed because the unions seem to be at the moment on mr corbyn‘s side. this is a reminder that brexit divides everybody, including the labour party. thank you very much for the moment. it is 8:12am and we wa nt to for the moment. it is 8:12am and we want to keep you up—to—date today on this ongoing situation. at 2 o‘clock this ongoing situation. at 2 o‘clock this morning thomas cook basically collapsed with many thousands of people affected by what has happened, not just those people affected by what has happened, notjust those who are abroad but people planning to go on holiday. and the 9000 people in the uk withjobs holiday. and the 9000 people in the uk with jobs with thomas cook. transport secretary, grant shapps, joins us now. thank you forjoining us. when did you hear this news? the same time as us? yes, at 2 o'clock they went bust, although had been working with the company to find out
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what was going on for some time. i actually directed the caa to get hold of planes a week ago this was coming up in order that we could get them as far as possible in the right places to bring all these people home, about 150,000 people around the world who need to come back to the world who need to come back to the uk in the biggest peacetime repatriation ever. a very old company. why did you choose not to bail it out? the problem for the company was they had 1.7 billion of debts. i suppose they haven‘t moved with the times. lots of people book online and put together elements of their holiday and this is a company that still had quite a package holiday set—up, which had gone somewhat out of fashion. putting aside the fact that the british government is not in the business of running travel companies, actually i think the problem was that it
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possibly could have been only a matter of weeks before we would have been right back where we are today. the company was looking for £250 million of the port and itjust didn‘t seem like the whole thing was going to stack up, i‘m afraid. didn‘t seem like the whole thing was going to stack up, i'm afraid. john mcdonnell on this programme is that the government should have done more to intervene, stabilise the situation and allow a longer term plan to develop. what is your response? it is a nice idea. u nfortu nately response? it is a nice idea. unfortunately he doesn‘t have the fa cts unfortunately he doesn‘t have the facts and figures. i still figured that the weekend suggesting it would cost £600 million to repatriate people and while we don‘t know the exact cost of this, moloch which went down, that cost about £50 million to bring people back. this is probably 50% bigger than malik. look, if it were possible, and there was a way of doing it, that would be great. they didn‘t have the confidence of their own shareholders and creditors, so unfortunately their private deal was the bit that really collapsed here. no amount of
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bail outs was going to rescue them. the important thing now is to bring all of those 150,000 people home in the next few weeks, but on the day that people were due to leave so they can still enjoy their holiday, and of course do everything we can to look after the 9000 british employees of thomas cook who will be devastated this morning. that is what i particularly wanted to ask you about. so much concern for the star from you about. so much concern for the starfrom our viewers, actually. 9000 people lose jobs effectively? we have swung into action with cross government departments coming together to form a task force, particularly in the locations where they have head offices, because that is where a large number of the staff are, and then there are shops around the country, so it is quite a spread picture, and we will be providing all the help and support we can to help them find new employment in record high employment times, so we can reassure people that they will
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be able to find newjobs. can reassure people that they will be able to find new jobs. it is not just the difficulty of getting people home. we spoke to people on this programme he will end up in the wrong place. they is having a huge impact on people‘s lives. wrong place. they is having a huge impact on people's lives. it is. look, i had a decision to make because a lot of people are not covered at all. people with atol insurance, you will be familiar with this if you have booked a package holiday and you are atol insured, they will be able to get home but they will be able to get home but the other half of people were not going to be able to get home at all u nless we going to be able to get home at all unless we put some kind of rescue package in place. i took the decision to do that because i didn‘t wa nt to decision to do that because i didn‘t want to leave people stranded in a far worse position than just being in the wrong airport, stranded abroad without the capacity there in the whole international flight system to be able to book a ticket and pay for it and book a ticket and get home. i took the decision to make sure that we were leasing aircraft. the caa is essentially running a shadow airline for a few weeks to bring everybody home at the right time so people can get back to
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theirjobs and their right time so people can get back to their jobs and their families right time so people can get back to theirjobs and their families and so on. so there will be some disruption. i have just on. so there will be some disruption. i havejust heard on. so there will be some disruption. i have just heard the report of the person you were interviewing then coming back to the wrong airport. as far as possible we try to make sure the flights go where they should be going but this is not thomas cook running this. this is the government and the caa, and we are just asking for people to be patient while we try and get them home. we will get them home. if they go to the wrong airport, we will get them home. and as far as possible we will be trying to arrange the flights to go to the right places. this is an enormous task, the biggest ever peacetime repatriation and it will not all be plain sailing. the transport secretary, grant shapps, thank you for your time on breakfast. we have been listening very carefully to everything said about thomas cook this morning and here is a couple holding hands right next to me. andrew aitchison and sharon cook are here.
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you are getting married in las vegas on the 2nd of october. we are due to fly on sunday morning with 19 of our closest fa m ily fly on sunday morning with 19 of our closest family and friends and it is not going to happen now and we are not going to happen now and we are not wealthy people so we can‘t afford to pay for them all again. we are ina afford to pay for them all again. we are in a situation where we have booked our ceremony and our reception, and everything we are doing out there. as much as we love our food, doing out there. as much as we love ourfood, i don‘t think doing out there. as much as we love our food, i don‘t think we doing out there. as much as we love ourfood, i don‘t think we can eat 19 of everything to make up for this. it is so sad not to have a bridesmaid, our best man, his mum. just explain to us, we have been hearing about compensation schemes that are in place. is that not applicable to your situation? we paid for the flights, i managed the group booking, so we paid for a certain numberof our group booking, so we paid for a certain number of our family and then other people have gone through me and! then other people have gone through me and i booked group booking through thomas cook on a debit card and because it was flight only, it
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is not atol protected. what sums of money are we talking about? about £9,000 just for the flights and then there is everything that we have spent expecting everyone to be there which we are contracted for in las vegas. their wedding ceremony and the food and everything. we can both see that you are devastated. let‘s get some information from simon calderfrom the get some information from simon calder from the independent. get some information from simon calderfrom the independent. people whose holidays are covered by atol will be covered, but this would not be covered? there is something called a chargeback scheme, which is if you have paid with a debit card, visa or mastercard, then you can say that i wish to make a chargeback, and they have this voluntary scheme. there is no absolute guarantee that you will get it, but clearly they will not be delivering the product, you will not go to airport and board
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a thomas cook flight to las vegas, so a thomas cook flight to las vegas, soi a thomas cook flight to las vegas, so i think you will get your money back. the crucial thing is you will not get it back by sunday. what you are going to have to do, i am really sorry, is to stump up for new flights and see who can help have a whip round to get those together. there will be so—called rescue fares going into the market. these always come up. the other airlines mostly do them to get people back from where they are at the moment but there will be some who say if you have got a booking to the us, just show us your confirmation and we will give you a special airfare. evenif will give you a special airfare. even if i am wrong and that doesn't happen, you are still all right. it is low season, relatively speaking. there is plenty of space across the atlantic. you will be able to find tickets. they will probably not be nonstop and they might cost 50% more than you paid, and you might have to change planes in newark or chicago, but you will get there. and you will be able to go through with your
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wonderful wedding ceremony. but at the moment i canjust imagine that it feels like the worst thing you could possibly find when you wake up and your holiday, your wedding, has gone wrong. can i ask about travel insurance? did you have any travel insurance? did you have any travel insurance? not for the group booking. individuals will have insurance for travelling. not for the group. travel insurance, if some of your guests have really gold—plated of your guests have really gold— plated travel insurance, of your guests have really gold—plated travel insurance, that will cover them for scheduled airline failure, and many policies do not have that. it tends to be an extra that you have got to pay more for. that might be an answer but for most problems with thomas cook, insurance is not the answer. it is getting something back from your bank or atol. this isjust getting something back from your bank or atol. this is just one getting something back from your bank or atol. this isjust one of getting something back from your bank or atol. this is just one of so many of hundreds of stories that will be out there. these are people‘s holidays, people trying to get back to work. it is so personal. what is your top tip for people affected by it? if you are out in a
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resort and watching this and thinking, crikey, my airline has gone bust and i must get to the airport, don't. resist the urge. sit by the pool and have a lovely day in the sunshine. you will probably be brought back pretty much on the day that you were supposed to be, and it is very unlikely that you won't be. if you are due to go off on an instant holiday, manage your expectations. you will not get your money back quickly and you will not get something at the same price as you paid, probably. if you are desperate to get somewhere and you have a little bit of time in place, wait for these rescue fares to be offered. they will be better value than you will get. airfares are surging at the moment because of this almighty spike in demand. andrew and sharon, everyone will sympathise with your situation. i can tell you that that man sitting there knows all possible avenues, so whatever simon has said should help toa whatever simon has said should help to a degree. keep us posted on how
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it worked out. we will do. thank you for listening to us. thank you, simon. so many people will be in a different but similar situation. it is 8:22am. let‘s take a moment to say good morning to carol. take us through the weather. good morning, everyone. we are looking at a settled day for some, and some sunshine in the forecast, but generally this week will be u nsettled, generally this week will be unsettled, wet and windy and feeling cooler than it has done. yesterday we hit 27 celsius in a way then in norfolk and this week the top temperature is likely to be about 20 degrees. this weather front is bringing rain across the north—east of scotla nd bringing rain across the north—east of scotland and the second one is enhancing showers and this area of low pressure with its attended weather fronts are bringing low pressure with its attended weatherfronts are bringing rain into the isles of scilly and into cornwall. we will see the wind strength increased through the day with that. mist and fog slowly lifting this morning, leaving a fair bit of sunshine for many parts of
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scotla nd bit of sunshine for many parts of scotland and also england, but still some showers in the north and showers at the moment across northern england, northern ireland and parts of wales. most of them will be killed off by this band of rain coming in. the temperatures will be 13 to 20. we are looking at gusty winds across the south—west of wales and england. especially along the coast. through the evening and overnight the first band of rain continues to push northwards and eastwards, with another hot on its heels. this will have heavy and thundery downpours connected with it. as a result of all of this and gusty winds, we are not looking at a cold night with temperatures generally in double figures. that leads us into tomorrow. this is the culprit bringing the heavy rain and boundary downpours our way. it will continue to push eastwards tomorrow and then later on another weather front comes in from the west. tomorrow morning we start on a largely wet note with the heaviest rain moving over to the east and thunder and lightning in that. a bit ofa thunder and lightning in that. a bit of a lull with brightest guys coming
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through in the west. 0ur of a lull with brightest guys coming through in the west. our next area of low pressure comes our way bringing more rain, gusty winds back row, and also some thunder and lightning. to focus on the wings for a second, they will be largely across southern england and wales, which is where we will have the highest gusts. inland, about 28 to 30 mph and in coastal areas a0 to 50 mph, locally even a bit more than that. that is something you will certainly notice. as we go through the course of the day, it is worth noticing that on tuesday because of the heavy and thundery downpours and gusty winds, there might be some disruption to travel across southern england and wales, where keeping an eye on. on wednesday we say goodbye to that band of thundery downpours and then we have a quieter day ahead, with sunny spells and some showers around, and variable amounts of cloud as well. temperatures ranging from 13 in the north to about 20 in the south—east.
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ranging from 13 in the north to about 20 in the south-east. carol, i was going to apologise to you because we came to you extremely late. i am very sorry. it is because we we re late. i am very sorry. it is because we were talking about thomas cook. pleasure. it is a 20 5am and time to get the news, travel and weather where you are. —— 8:25am. hello, good morning. temperatures over the weekend got to 27, 20 8 degrees, the last blast really of summer degrees, the last blast really of summer warmth. through most of this week, we‘ve lost that and we are much more autumnal now often quite wet and windy through this week and it‘s going to feel much cooler as well. the remnants of former hurricane in brazil, setting out to the west, the area of low pressure and whether fronts moving the way
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eastwards today, some drizzly rain across northern areas this morning, continuing to push its way into the northern isles, then there will be lots of dry weather, sunshine before the cloud thickens in the south—west and you can see the weather fronts here, the remnants of the hurricane, moving in, giving us some wet weather for northern ireland, moving in, giving us some wet weatherfor northern ireland, wales, the south west of england. temperatures much lower and yesterday especially across eastern areas, 28 degrees yesterday in a way boring, 21 degrees today. through tonight, the rain continues to spread north and east, the wind picking up around these southwestern areas of the uk, you can see a very wet night to come from most of us, temperatures down to about 1a, 15 degrees it will not be cold as we move into tuesday morning. but it will be a wet and windy start to the day, we have still got the remnants of the hurricane across the uk and even out towards the west, whether systems waiting in the wings for the rest of the week. wet and pretty
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windy conditions are bursting on tuesday morning, particularly around these western areas but the rain spreading north and east, there could be some thunderstorms embedded within the rain as it moves towards eastern areas so a within the rain as it moves towards eastern areas so a lot of surface water spray, there could be some pretty tricky driving conditions and the wind gusts, a0—50 miles an hour particularly around wales, the south—west of england, maximum temperatures on tuesday around 16-19d. that's temperatures on tuesday around 16—19d. that‘s all for me, have a good day. goodbye.
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this is business live from bbc news with sally bundock and alice baxter. thomas cook — one of the world‘s oldest and biggest travel firms collapses — as it fails to reach a rescue deal with creditors. live from london, that‘s our top story on monday the 23rd of september. after last ditch talks failed — the biggest ever peacetime repatriation is about to start with 600,000 passengers currently on holiday. we‘ll be hearing from the uk‘s regulator — about what people can do to try and get home as quickly

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