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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 23, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 2. the biggest re—patriation in peacetime — a massive operation to bring home 150,000 british holidaymakers — after the collapse of thomas cook this couple were about to go on honeymoon — their plans now lie in ruins. we had looked forward to this for a long time. we had a wedding in july so long time. we had a wedding in july so it's been another couple of months waiting for this. absolutely totally gutted. for thousands of thomas cook employees the news they'd been dreading came in early hours of the morning — from the company's boss. with a showdown over brexit divisions looming — labour promises a four—day working week within a decade if they win the next general election.
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it will be a shorter working week with no loss of pay. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — holly hamilton wales have opened their world cup campaign witha wales have opened their world cup campaign with a convincing victory over georgie. we will relive all the tries at 2:30. with rain on the way, some have been looking for a dry place to stay and that rain is brought to us by a weather system that is influenced by what happened in the caribbean two weeks ago. i will tell you more later on. also coming up — by royal appointment: harry and meghan visit a south african township — as they arrive in south africa with four—month old archie for their first overseas tour as a family.
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hello everyone — this is afternoon live. it's called 0peration materhorn and it's the biggest peace time operation to repatriate britons stranded abroad — after the collapse of thomas cook. the civil aviation authority has chartered a fleet ofjets to bring home more than 150,000 british holidaymakers. thomas cook — britain's oldest package tour company — went into compulsory liquidation at 2am. its collapse puts at risk 22,000 jobs around the world — 9,000 of them here in the uk. our business correspondent simon gompertz reports. flying back for the last time, the final thomas cook flights are bringing home holiday—makers early today. the passengers lucky enough to get on these being brought by staff expecting to lose theirjobs. as soon as we landed, they were all crying. it is devastating, it is a legacy that has gone. as i say, i worked for them for ten years and i got loads of friends who, it is their livelihood,
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it is tragic. emotional, very emotional. the cabin crew were all crying. a bit sombre, to be honest. for a company that big to be going that long, to be going down, it is devastating. thomas cook's planes are now stuck on the ground, impounded as part of the liquidation. most not available to help with the rescue after frantic negotiations to win extra backing failed early this morning. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. people were still turning up at uk airports, only to find their holiday is cancelled. if they bought a package, they will get a refund but the money might not be enough or arrive in time to book something else. this is the scene that greeted travellers at manchester. not much good if it is your honeymoon. we are absolutely gutted, we have looked forward to this for a long time.
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had the wedding injuly, so it's been another couple of months waiting for this. yeah, absolutely, just totally gutted. i had a bit of a sixth sense at two o'clock this morning, got up and checked the website and that is when it hit the fan, basically. the shops are closed today. that is more than 500 of them, so real gaps on the high streets and the people who work in shops like this make up a big share of the 9,000 or sojobs and livelihoods which are affected by the collapse. in nottingham, they came in to be told the grim news. then the door was locked for the last time. 0ne family in pathos felt abandoned by the company. thomas cook has not paid the hotel yet, they have warned us they have not been paid. we are left in the dark, there is no thomas cook representative helping or anything like that as they have just walked out. no contact.
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now the emergency effort to get people back. this is new york last night, and this is minorca today. passengers who boughtjust a flight and not a package will be included for free, but not if they return it after the 6th of october. we have got about 40 aircraft we brought in from around the world and we will, over the next two weeks, run about 1,000 flights. this covers 18 countries and 55 airports. with thomas cook's planes now out of the picture, the first rescue flights provided by easyjet, ba, virgin and other carriers are due in soon. it is a massive evacuation. the aim, to get the holiday—makers back, then count the cost. simon gompertz, bbc news. in a moment we'll be speaking to our correspondent dave guest who is at manchester airport, but first let's cross to our international business correspondent theo leggett is at gatwick airport. we have seen the fallout for what
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has been pitted for some time, thomas cook has been in trouble for some time? yes, they have had financial problems for years and some of them are down to short—term things for example they cited the warm weather at last summer as the reason why people were not big holidays, uncertainty over brexit, the fact some traditional holiday destinations have suffered from instability but the fact of the matter is, problems at thomas cook to go back years and part of it is the changing nature of the travel business. 20 years ago it was pretty common people to go into a high street shop and began holiday, flights and holidays and car hire all at the same time. nowadays it's pretty to do that on the internet and that is where thomas cook has had problems because running all those high street shops costs money and that cuts into their profit and customers are going elsewhere. the
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civil aviation authority has this mammoth task to get people back? we have seen some of that today. here at gatwick. there are acres and acres of thomas cook desks which are 110w acres of thomas cook desks which are now closed and a handful of civil aviation authority staff who have been helpfully talking to people who turn upfor been helpfully talking to people who turn up for their flight, people who had not heard about the companies problems or who had travelled long distances, many were very bitter because they said yesterday by the day before, they had been told by thomas cook there was absolutely no reason why they should not travel and everything would be fine. now they get here under told that their flights have been cancelled. that said, most are pretty sympathetic towards thomas cook staff because they say, we have to wait for our money for two months to get money back, we lost our holidays but the staff have lost their livelihoods and that is a much more important thing. most of the people i have spoken to have been sympathetic about that and they have been keeping things in proportion.
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let's speak to our reporter dave guest who's at manchester airport. 3,000 and 9,000jobs 3,000 and 9,000 jobs in the uk have gone oui’ 3,000 and 9,000 jobs in the uk have gone ourfrom the 3,000 and 9,000 jobs in the uk have gone our from the greater manchester area, this will have a huge impact? the thomas cook airline had its main uk based here at manchester airport. there were 18 planes which were permanently based here at manchester. i understand recently thomas cook relocated some of their marketing people to the manchester area so marketing people to the manchester area so about 3,000 jobs. the mayor of manchester is talking about setting up a task force to see what can be done to help all of these people and it is interesting what was said about customers being sympathetic. i spoke to people coming up the last flight here this morning from orlando just before the company went bust. they said the staff on the plane with very emotional but they were very
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professional in the way they dealt with the passengers. the captain came on the intercom to tell what had happened but to wish them well and they said at the staff got off the plate, ground crew formed a guard of honour, so very emotional. sympathy for the staff and also a lot of anger from people saying, we we re lot of anger from people saying, we were told as late as midnight, it is finder go to the airport. they get to the airport today and find total chaos. once they are on the flight, they don't necessarily end up at the airport from where they left? new, when they are repatriating people, they don't know where they will go to. we are expecting the first group of repatriated tourists to arrive here at terminal one this afternoon. it's coming from split in croatia. it's coming from split in croatia. it was due to land here at about 12:45. it it was due to land here at about 12:a5. it was then put back to four. it will be that possibly some of the
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people on that flight may well have come from other airports initially in the uk and will have to be bussed back to wherever they settle from and likewise people who have set off from manchester may find themselves coming back to other parts of the uk, soa coming back to other parts of the uk, so a difficult time for passengers who have gone overseas and are now trying to come back. this is just day one, if you are booked in a holiday in the next couple of weeks, this could go on until the first week of the tour? yes and there are other things. manchester united have confirmed today that thomas cook where their travel partners for two upcoming away games in the europa league. they had fans who booked through thomas cook to those matches. the clu b thomas cook to those matches. the club say they are looking at contingency plans. liverpool football clu b contingency plans. liverpool football club worked with thomas cook selling hospitality packages for home games at anfield. hundreds have put those packages but the club say they are working to find out how many were affected and what will happen to the services they paid
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for. the ramifications of this are going to go on way beyond today. venice, a popular holiday destination, even back in 1898. and in the corner of this famous square, there is thomas cook, already doing business. and the shop front there in the background survived the war years too. go to place for travel. and then came the boom, large numbers of brits started to have enough money to go abroad and thomas cook rode the wave. don'tjust book it, thomas cook it. becoming one of the world's best known holiday brands, opening
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hundreds of high street shops. it merged with the owner of this brand in 2007 to create a european travel giant, but its finances soon became stretched. thomas cook was a business with a huge amount of debt, it almost went bust in 2011 and it has not had the financial resilience to weather the huge changes in the market, with low—cost carriersjet2 coming along, people booking online rather than through traditional high street agents and more recent factors, we have had brexit, consumer confidence has been knocked, weather conditions, all sorts going on and it has added up to a perfect storm for thomas cook. by may this year, the warning lights were flashing, thomas cook slumping to a 1—5p loss. last month, a £900 million rescue plan was hatched. it planned to sell large parts of its business to its largest shareholder, chinese company fosun and then a last—minute demand from the banks for 200 million to keep it going.
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that went up to 250 million over the weekend. the government was as for help but it seems it would only have been a temporary fix. there were real systemic problems there that we felt that if money was put into it, which is not something the government would normally do for a travel company, we would end up with it back and spending more money to repatriate people so it wasn't a goer. the government is now looking into how thomas cook collapsed and how it was managed. executives were paid more than £20 million in bonuses over the last five years. the fallout looks set to be enormous. but who knows what the future will bring? emma simpson, bbc news. labour has promised to reduce the average working week to 32 hours with no loss of pay, if it wins power. the shadow chancellor also told delegates at the party conference he would ban zero—hours contracts. it comes as the party's leader, jeremy corbyn, is facing a revolt over his brexit strategy.
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nick eardley reports. the unions are beginning to show power here? yes, they control half on the conference floor so what they do is crucial and today we have heard the largest union has decided that it does want to go for that much clearer policy saying the labour party going into a general election would say at that point we will campaign to remain in the eu when and if that referendum comes. that is not whatjeremy corbyn ones so it would be a pretty big defeat for him. the question is how the grassroot members decided to vote. many are pro—remain but are also loyal tojeremy many are pro—remain but are also loyal to jeremy corbyn many are pro—remain but are also loyal tojeremy corbyn so it will be a difficult choice for them. brexit has of course dominated this conference so far but there has been a large number of announcements
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today on personal care, that working with as well and my understanding is, it will be a working time commission but they will be lots of people who say, hang on a minute, you will reduce the number of hours people working, give them the same pay, how is that sustainable? this is overa ten pay, how is that sustainable? this is over a ten year period but it's got to be set in the context of lots of people in work are still in poverty. this is part of a package. by poverty. this is part of a package. by the end of a five year period, you would have eliminating that. to focusjust on the you would have eliminating that. to focus just on the 32 hour week you would have eliminating that. to focusjust on the 32 hour week is ok but doesn't tell the full story. lots of people will be focusing on that and wondering how it will work. it will not be the same for every sector per simile, some have more holiday entitlement? that is the
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process that we would have to tease out and try to discuss because yes, there will be different sectors and trying to have a uniform 32 hour week here or there might across the country is not going to work. so it is not a cap? no, an attempt to bring it down but we recognise that sectors operate in different ways. we are in a modern, technological, post—industrial society so clearly a 32 hour week will not work every where but sends the message that peoples working hours should come down. we have some of the longest working hours in europe. the institute of directors are saying put activity is a problem and until you saw that out, you cannot start cutting peoples working hours? yes but that is notjust cutting peoples working hours? yes but that is not just the job of government to deal with productivity. we are 35% less productive than the germans, 20% less than the french so it is a combined effort to get put activity up. if we do get political —— put activity up, that will entice the
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reduction of hours but it has to be a business government approach, not just the government doing it, it's gotta be collective partnership. that is to health care, announcement today about that and this has been an issue which does worry a lot of people. what is the announcement today? personal care is, if you are in your own home, you will get personal care in it if you need. the old days of home help that people had to pay for, we are now saying to anybody who lives in that situation, they will get that paid for at the point of delivery. a bit like the nhs. how about paying for that, we'll let be paid through general taxation? does that mean a rise in tax? no, it is 86 billion pounds a year bill. it will be paid and it
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will all be set aside from general taxation. people will say this sounds too good to be true?m taxation. people will say this sounds too good to be true? it is not because we have set out the figures in our last manifesto. we we nt figures in our last manifesto. we went some way to deal with some issues around social care. local authorities have had about 9 billion since 2010 ticket of their budget so this is trying to redress that. to go further, people are in terrible circumstances where they cannot get ca re circumstances where they cannot get care and we got to provide it to them asa care and we got to provide it to them as a civilised society. care and we got to provide it to them as a civilised societym care and we got to provide it to them as a civilised society. if we could turn to brexit and how that has been dominating here. what is your message to party members about the vote taken today? the message is, keep steady as we go. we have an election, we go to europe, we get a deal and once we get the deal, reported to the people and then the referendum takes place but that is a matter at the time for people to make that determination. in the
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conference hall, more discussion on brexit this afternoon. a ruling on the legality of borisjohnson decision to suspend parliament for five weeks will be announced by the supreme court at 10:30 tomorrow morning. 11 justices have heard argument on behalf of the prime minister that prorogation is not a matter for the courts. the court has also heard submissions that the pm is trying to limit mps' scrutiny of his brexit policy. parliament is currently due to return on 1a 0ctober, with the uk scheduled to leave the eu on 310ctober. it's been a very good night for british stars at the us tv awards, the emmys. phoebe waller—bridge, the writer and creator of fleabag, and jodie comer, the star of killing eve, won two of the night's big prizes. posing for the camera, and parading the purple carpet, hollywood royalty along with the kings and queens of game of thrones, the fantasy
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drama that has dominated the small screen for much of the past decade. ..game of thrones. it was the year's most nominated show and won the night's top award for best drama. but it was fleabag that stole the show. the dark comedy that started as a one—woman play at the edinburgh festival is now the toast of hollywood. the reason that i do it is this! best comedy, director, writing and best actress for phoebe waller—bridge, the show‘s creator and star. jodie comer, who plays a psychopathic assassin in killing eve took the award for best actress in a drama, beating her co—star sandra oh. my mum and dad are in liverpool who i didn't invite because i didn't think this was going to be my time. billy porter made history, the first openly gay man to win for best actor in a drama for his performance in pose. ben whishaw‘s portrayal
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of norman scott in a very english scandal won him the award for best supporting actor. he'd already been celebrating. i'm hung over! there were also awards for chernobyl, the docudrama about the 1986 nuclear disaster, and netflix's black mirror, bandersnatch, the interactive film in which viewers have a say in the storyline. thank you very much. television is enjoying a golden age. tv and film critic siobhan synnot joins us now to discuss the emmys. i want to read your tweet, i'm going to say why we need more women on television. if you look at the handmaids tale which has been garlanded with awards, that is about feminists, a picture article society
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set ina feminists, a picture article society set in a dystopian future, led by a superbly angry performance from elizabeth north. we've also got flea bag of course. she didn'tjust start on it but she also noted. women behind the driving seat is becoming more important. the search is on for writers. i spoke to one writer who is an award—winning playwright. she says amazon and streaming services are desperate for me to work for them. what is going on because those companies ten years ago didn't exist. this is a total change. absolutely and it is not ultra mystic one. what is the audience out there streaming services? rather like podcasting in general, young men between 18 and 2a traditionally courted by networks, they are drifting away. they are playing games, watching dvds but they are not watching television in the same
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way as women. 0ur young women doing it? they do, they watch four hours per week than male counterparts. they are more engaged, more likely to invest in digital platforms and stick with them. this makes women incredible desirable to the services. watching the emmys, recognising british talent and of coursejodie, in that. recognising british talent and of course jodie, in that. the money was on sandra for taking either. great to see new young, female talent. might note about this and about the emmys in general that while it is to see bbc news flea bag during so well, it is british talent involved in international productions that are very making the impact. if you look atjesse armstrong for example. as an hbo production so while it is nice to see so much but is talent getting acclaimed at the emmys, john
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0liverfor getting acclaimed at the emmys, john 0liver for example is an outstanding comedy presenter, we don't own the means of production. we are very much at best, partners. at worst, hand maidens. still a good night? absolutely. if they got more drunk, i'd be all for it! let's cross now to brighton where the shadow foreign secretary emily thornberry is addressing conference. jeremy corbyn, my friend and next prime minister. i want to salute the tea m prime minister. i want to salute the team for all the work they have done to uphold the pledges to nato, to fight for our steel industry and stop military outsourcing, to guarantee our armed forces get therapy, decent housing, better support for their children and a
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proper say in how the forces are run and to ensure that our veterans are not sleeping in the streets but received free education, new career opportunities and proper help with mental health issues. because boris johnson can wrap himself in as many flags as he wants, but true that it is its standing up for our soldiers and our veterans and that is what mia and herteam and our veterans and that is what mia and her team do every day. thank you. i want to salute dan carden and his team as well. the multitasker may columns for continuing the work of ourfriend may columns for continuing the work of our friend kate may columns for continuing the work of ourfriend kate is more understanding up with a one charities including the rnli, who understand that a life is a life
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whomever you are. and they dedicate themselves to helping the most vulnerable people abroad, even when the right—wing media criticise them for doing so and under dan's leadership, we will ensure the overseas aid budget is used to support those charities, to support the pursed people in the world, including three a new unit of public services stop this will help develop countries stand on their own two feet, strengthening their infrastructure, health care and education and help governments in those countries give their citizens the public services they need. because just as labour will build a britain that works for the many, not the few, we must do the same overseas, and as dan has made clear, we will maintain our pledges on spending, continue to pursue solidarity and global justice
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spending, continue to pursue solidarity and globaljustice and keep up our fight against global poverty, inequality and most importantly, climate change. because when we think about nelson mandela's instructions to us to be the keepers of our brothers and sisters across the world, we need to imagine what that great old man would be saying to us today. the same thing a great young woman, greta sundberg, has been saying to the world for months. which is, first and foremost, we must be the keepers of our planet. and we must dedicate ourselves, not just to inspire a green industrial revolution in this country, but to work with every single country in the world, to help them harvest the clea n the world, to help them harvest the clean energy naturally are billable to them. solar power, wind power,
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hydropower, and let every country become a world leader and a job creator in the technology that best suits them. back in february i called this the globalisation of a green new deal so that notjust britain but every country can become a zero carbon economy and i believe it is our historic mission in this century to lead that effort and lead that fight before we reach the point of no return. and let us be clear, comrades, we definitely need that leadership in the world. country by country, election by—election is being consumed by their assertions of the so—called strongman politics. pledger me are killing —— mike vladimir putin killing. boasting
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about killing filipino street children. benjamin netanyahu trying to turn israel into an apartheid state. innocent women being jailed in iran as diplomatic bargaining chips. resident assad, the list goes on and on. wherever we see these strongman politicians, we see the same pattern is coming up and nationalism that trades in lies, hatred and fear and nationalism not defied by love of their country and all of its people, but by the demonisation of our tigers and the attempt to defy their countries population into us and them. where then can be anyone, immigrants, minorities, the lgbt community, all the politicians and journalists who stand up for them. it should shame us in this country
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that these issues are all too prevalent in our own commonwealth of nations. we will keep an eye on that and any news of interest, we will bring it to you. time for a look at the weather. i weather is about to turn and become much more unsettled and wet and windy. it is all down to what is happening in the caribbean two weeks ago. when i going to take a look at these thunderstorms here north of these thunderstorms here north of the dominican republic. they developed and started spinning and, eventually, . .. developed and started spinning and, eventually,... how fast developed and started spinning and, eventually, . .. how fast is that going? this is about five days with. he had a kid knocked out power supplies to bermuda for a time and, from there, —— a hurricane knocked out power supplies to bermuda for a
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time. for the next few days, that is where the low pressure is at the moment. there you go, it was an ex had a cane that is wrapped in with his area of low pressure that is responsible for bringing us and wet and windy weather for the next few days. and i right, today is technically the first day of autumn? people sometimes talk about equinoctial gales. i touch on weather it is by chance or anything else but quite often we get spells of windy weather at about the time of windy weather at about the time of the equinox. it is something that people notice. that looks a bit grim. that is what we have got at the moment stop we have some rain on the moment stop we have some rain on the way right now. and so... you just had to use that again, did you not cosmic i think it is a wonderful picture. a stag do. some people are looking for a place to shelter from the rain before it was then and it is coming in at the moment, so shall we ta ke is coming in at the moment, so shall we take a look at that? temperatures. wales, south—west
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england, we already have the rain heading in right now and it is knocking on the tour of northern ireland too. it will be turning right here over the next hour or two. temperatures, 18 to 21 celsius for most of us and the best chance of keeping the dry weather is across the north—east of the uk through the rest of this afternoon it should be fine here with some sunshine. 0vernight, though, that rain is going to get heavier, particularly across wealth —— wales and south—west england. as it extends its way into north west scotland as well. the heaviest rain will be across parts of wales and western england. that is where we will have a really rotten commute to work tomorrow. the band of rain itself could bring around 15 to 30 millimetres of rain. not too much, it isa millimetres of rain. not too much, it is a wet day, but to idiots could get 70 millimetres and a short space of time. —— but some areas could get 70 millimetres and a short space of time. there could be some localised surface water flooding and the rain combining with the strong winds
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bring the rest of surface spray on the faster roads. the remnants of humberto work across the rest of the way on wednesday bring wet weather across england and wales in particular. there will be some strong winds particular towards the south coast of england. eventually, it pulls through and we start to see a mixture of brighter spells and showers following on behind. a cooler filled to the weather any number of places, highs of 15 celsius in aberdeen. 19 in london, not feeling too bad if we get a little bit of sunshine poking out at times. looking at the weather later on in the week and into the weekend, we continue with that rather u nsettled we continue with that rather unsettled pattern. rain or showers often in the forecast. temperatures coming down, you will notice, over the weekend we had temperatures in edinburgh into the low 20s. looking at the picture over the next few days, we are looking at him just more of around 15 celsius. it's going to be feeling much cooler, windy at times and rain and showers around as well. an unsettled look to the weather over the next few days.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines. the world's oldest tour operator — thomas cook — has collapsed after last—minute negotiations to save the company failed. it's left 150,000 british holiday—makers stranded — triggering a huge repatriation effort. labour promises a four—day working week with no loss of pay, but the party faces a showdown later
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over its brexit divisions. judges at the supreme court will deliver their verdict tomorrow morning on the legality of the prime minister's advice to the queen to suspend parliament. and the arrival of the duke and duchess of sussex to south africa is marked with cheers, song and dance. it's the couple's first official tour with four—month—old son archie. so, more than 150,000 british thomas cook holiday—makers are facing an anxious wait to find out how and when they'll get home. 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee is in palma, majorca, one of the company's most popular destinations. holiday over, now the problems start for passengers arriving at palma airport, unsure of how they'll get home. the yellow—jacketed civil aviation authority and foreign office staff man the aisles to offer reassurance, but can't offer an easy solution of how to get back to the uk. well, this is 0peration matterhorn in action on the ground here at palma airport. now, what we're being told is that around 1500 uk passengers
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trying to get back today, they will be returning today, we're told — not necessary to the airport that they flew out from. instead of going to glasgow, we've been told, so far as far as we know, we're going to manchester at 7.40pm this evening, so we've got quite a long day ahead of us. we're going to birmingham, which is a bit of a kick, but we're going to get home, so it's not the end of the world. where's home? glasgow. we understand now that we're flying to manchester at 7.40pm tonight? and then there's a bus to newcastle. they've told us we're going to birmingham and then a coach trip for six hours from birmingham up to glasgow. i mean, it's really not suitable at all for me, with my disabilities and that, sitting for like 12 hours. part of the departures terminal is now a waiting room for those left here by the collapse. the staff at thomas cook are working too, maintaining professionalism despite losing theirjobs. there's another concern, not just for the thousands of thomas cook travellers here and still in the middle of their holidays, but also
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for those reliant on the money from thomas cook's once reliable income. once—reliable income. well, this is the main thomas cook—run hotel in palma and we've been told by staff that everything's ok, but the management won't speak to us and, if you look, they've got security here for the first time. they're quite nervous. this is one of a number of hotels that, we understand, are waiting still to be paid in arrears from thomas cook and, in the meantime, they're still having to look after the customers, too. reception don't know what's happening. they just said, "yes, the hotel is open, at the moment". we just feel like at any moment like we're vulnerable and we could just be asked to leave. back at palma airport, only one scheduled flight has left for the uk so far. the rest are due to leave tonight. it's calm here — contemplation for the loss of a once—loved airline for later. for now, the priority is on getting home. gavin lee, bbc news, majorca.
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time now for a bbc ask this. we've been taking your questions this morning on the news that one of the world's biggest tour operators, thomas cook, has collapsed after last—ditch rescue talks failed. it puts 9,000 jobs at risk in the uk. 150,000 british holiday—makers are currently abroad. to shed some light on the situation for those passengers and staff we're joined by dan pearce from the trade and travel gazette. and guy anchor who is from money saving expert dot—com. this is from the late elaine, we have five seats booked and paid for in december this year, what should we do? we can alternate as we go along. the advice on that one is pretty straightforward. beyond 0ctober on that one is pretty straightforward. beyond october the 6th, they will be able to apply
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through the credit card to get the refund. so they need to be big everything, in effect, but they will get their money back? it is probably worth adding that you might think you have a flight only booking, but if on the same transaction on expedia, or an e—book is website, you also booked a hotel as well, it actually does count as a package, so dan is absolutely right if it was a flight dan is absolutely right if it was a flight only then they would not be cove red flight only then they would not be covered by at all. even if you have done that separately cosmic if it is one transaction on a website —— on a website like expedia or ebookers, other websites like that, they had booked a hotel alongside their flight, booked a hotel alongside their flight, they would have a toe protection, which means they would get a refund. if that is not the case. then they would have to claim from the card company. lots coming on the sort of thing. that's from alan. i have booked hotel, transfers and flight on travel republic website
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and paid using paypal. when thomas cook ceased trading at 2am, i booked an alternative flight on a different website. how can i recover the cost of the thomas cook flight — will it be abta or atol covered or will i be able to use paypal protection? i will start with you, guy. the paypal issue is recurrent. it depends here. paypal. .. paypal issue is recurrent. it depends here. paypal... if that is a package and the boot hotel, transfer, flights then it might be a package that had at if they did and separate transactions then it is more complex and it can be more difficult. you'd have to try to claim from your credit card company or paypal. in their case it would be paypal. it will not always work. they may be using a credit card that they have of your semi process? they might well do, that is the process of paying on paypal can break the chain of compensation behind the scenes and it might be difficult to get anything back. if it is classed asa get anything back. if it is classed as a package, i would suggest they
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have a look at the booking confirmation, if there is what is called an atoll certificate, thomas kedziora quizzing it it might be at the end, that their sick page, then it would be atoll protected —— thomas cook were saying it might be at the end on the fifth or sixth page. this person booked through a travel republic, that do hold an atoll. you would expect them to put those three elements together as a package. this person has taken upon themselves to rebookjust one element of that package, but i would think that the best advice here would be to apply for the full refu nd would be to apply for the full refund for that package and, u nfortu nately, refund for that package and, unfortunately, then to book the other two elements alongside the flight other two elements alongside the flight that they have already rebooked at two this morning. right. we travelled in the summer with
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thomas cook and had hotel issues. we complained and thomas cook offered us £850 compensation by bacs on friday 20th september. will we get this money, or be able to claim it? from artunc yusuf by email. it is typical thomas cook actually to offer that kind of customer service when receiving a complaint. fantastic and one would assume that is not just because fantastic and one would assume that is notjust because they suspected that they might not be around the following week. i am sure that offer was made in good faith, but in my opinion, i did not think that is going to be very high up the list of priorities when it comes to making claims through the atoll scheme. yes, a very similar theme. i claims through the atoll scheme. yes, a very similartheme. i had claims through the atoll scheme. yes, a very similar theme. i had a tweet from someone who was asking for a flight compensation scheme and thomas cook said it was coming, manchester, and they were asking if they were getting the money? —— last tuesday. if it was coming out of thomas cook's bank account, then it
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is likely they will be getting the money but it not i would not expect a penny. if it has not left the bank account. the liquidators will go through the assets to try to dispute as much as possible and staff and are going to be the head of the queue for people. a lot of people have just lost their jobs, queue for people. a lot of people have just lost theirjobs, have they not? rebecca jordan has e—mailed. i'm paying for my holiday by direct debit monthly and still have one payment left, will the money be taken from my account still and will i have to wait till the holiday is paid in full to be able to get a refund. rebekka jordain by email. my my sense is that they should be stopping the direct debit and then claiming for the atoll scheme when that has kicked open by the caa and a couple of weeks' time. there is not a definitive judgment on this, thatis not a definitive judgment on this, that is my opinion. this is what i would do. when i try to get this confirmed. we have had a few
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questions like this. there is a danger that if you cancel a direct debit, wear it to be atoll protected, you might break the atoll protection. we are not quite sure. it is relatively early days. my view would be, do not do anything just yet, do not rush into it. we will be updating our website and other websites are doing the same with that final intermission. right now, at nearly 3pm on monday. i am not sure. i would at nearly 3pm on monday. i am not sure. iwould not at nearly 3pm on monday. i am not sure. i would not do anything just yet and let's see what the rules are exactly on stopping direct debits. if something was made, today, that isa if something was made, today, that is a trickier one. it has ever dashing effort is in a week or so, you have if you do is to play with arsenal. there's already some quite competitive advice on the special website that the caa have set up which is thomascook.caa.co.uk. there will be more these queries that they will be more these queries that they will have to find answers to. jackie
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has e—mailed. i have seen an identical alternative holiday to the one thomas cook cancelled but it's £4000 more, will my holiday insurance cover the shortfall? it is pretty straightforward here, i'm afraid. it would be very rare for any travel insurance policy to cover their circumstances when a company goes out of business, i'm afraid. so, yeah, i do not think thatis afraid. so, yeah, i do not think that is going to happen. afraid. so, yeah, i do not think that is going to happenlj afraid. so, yeah, i do not think that is going to happen. i agree with that. you tend to have to buy eithera with that. you tend to have to buy either a daily with that. you tend to have to buy eithera daily premium with that. you tend to have to buy either a daily premium policy or a specific airline or hotel or supplier failure cover and lots of people do not do that. even if we we re people do not do that. even if we were to talk about how they travel insurance deal with that scenario, most will not cover that? we booked a caribbean cruise through thomas cook will be taking place cosmic i
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think in first instance this person needs to speak to royal caribbean. at the travel can it today we have seen an at the travel can it today we have seen an outpouring of support for thomas cook and the employees and i know that they want to help it, the other travel companies. the first port of call would be to royal caribbean. sometimes thomas cook would be acting as an agent organising travel with other tour operators, so if thomas cook were the actual tour operator itself but in the package together, that is when the holidays are likely to be cancelled, but if it is atoll protected, one way or another, they will either has a holiday or get their money back. for protection it is great for getting the money back, but it does not take away the worry and hassle that you might be going ona and hassle that you might be going on a slightly different take than you planned. and it can take some time for that to work its way through the system as we have seen in the past. thank you very much. we're getting loads of e—mails in this thank you very much.
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just to bring you some breaking news we've heard that shelly bay and christopher ashford —— they have been jailed christopher ashford —— they have beenjailed for christopher ashford —— they have been jailed for showing photos of the body of emiliano sala. sherry brae. the admitted accessing footage of the third bella's body and his family were left devastated after images relate days after his body was recovered. his body was recovered and a postmortem was taken
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at bournemouth mortuary the next day. sherry bray and her colleague we re day. sherry bray and her colleague were accessing footage of his body and they have been charged. sherry bray has been given 40 months and her colleague christopher has been given —— christopher ashford has been given —— sherry bray has been given 14 months. a little later than usual, it's time for the sport now on afternoon live with holly. wales have got off to a good start in their rugby world campaign. england got off to a winning start too — but they've been on the receiving end of some criticism. this should always have been a routine win for wales —
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georgia have never beaten a tier1 nation — and in the first half it looked like the scoreline coudl‘ve ended up something closer to a cricket score... the first of six tries coming within three minutes. georgia were keeping the best until last however — almost a different side after the break — running in two tries of their own . but tomos williams got to this kickjust in time, to keep wales comfortably ahead — and it was warren gatland's men who had the final say as george north added a sixth. finalresult 43—14 — which means wales go top of their group. sacked rugby union player israel folau is returning to rugby league and will play for tonga at next month's 0ceania cup folau had his contract terminated by rugby australia after writing on social media that "hell awaits" gay people — which breached a players‘ code of conduct. folau has tongan heritage — he'll face a touring great britain side in new zealand before coming up against australia in november. in tennis, british number one kyle edmund has parted company with his coach mark hilton. edmund has lost four matches in a row — most recently at the chengdu 0pen this morning — and he's been knocked
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out in the first round of three successive events. the decision to split from hilton was made last week, and he'll be assisted in the short—term by colin beecher, who coached him when he was in his late teens. with the world championships getting under way later this week, the iaaf president lord coe says that he'd like to see caster semenya return to athletics, but within the regulations. the 800m world chamopion won't be defending her title in doha, because she refuses to comply with the new rules governing testerone levels in female athletes, but speaking to the bbc‘s alex capstick, coe says that he hopes that she hasn't given up track and field forever. we have not said those regulations to exclude people. they are actually there to allow us to maintain the presence of those athletes with that condition at international level. you would like to see her back on 800 metres or 500 metres —— 5000
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metres cosmic within those regulations, of course. that is all the sport for now. on the bbc sport website, including details of the england cricket squads for the t20 and test tours to new zealand. johnny burstow has been dropped from the test squad. we will have more in the test squad. we will have more in the next hour. in a moment the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: thomas cook collapses after last—minute negotiations to save the world's oldest tour operatorfail—150,000 holidaymakers have been stranded — triggering a huge repatriation effort. labour promises a four—day working week with no loss of pay, but the party faces a showdown over its brexit divisions judges at the supreme court will deliver their verdict tomorrow morning on the legality of the prime minister's advice to the queen to suspend parliament. here's your business headlines on afternoon live
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the boss of thomas cook has apologised for the collapse of the 178—year old travel company. it had been struggling for some time but had been brokering a £900 million rescue deal with china's fosun. however, it failed to raise an extra £200mn contingency fund demanded by its lenders. and in the wake of thomas cook's collapse — we look at how other airlines and travel firms are reacting. amid accustations of price hikes, easyjet and tui — have seen their shares receive a boost this morning — this with tui the biggest riser on the ftse 100. and in other news — the job of wework‘s chief excutive adam neumann could be on line, amidst reports that japan's softbank — the office space provider's biggest shreholder is looking to oust him. this after we work‘s planned flotation was suspended, following waning investor interest and tumbling valuations.
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silly blame game is already under way who is to be blamed for the demise —— the blame game is under the under way. it is a mixture of things. the internet came up and provide all sorts of competition and we're buying holidays in different ways. everything from thomas cook brexit and certainly —— brexit uncertainty. 0n brexit and certainly —— brexit uncertainty. on top of your costs they have massive debts and others are saying that this was not managed in the right way for the company that we knew was having problems. they were not living with the times and they were not getting to grips with the ashes. inevitably within such a huge effort to bring people back, —— inevitably, with such a huge effort being pull back there people have woken up and have lost theirjobs. 9000 people here in the country on 22,000 worldwide. many of
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those are staffed by people who have been on thejob those are staffed by people who have been on the job for many years. some really sad situations for them. we can hearfrom really sad situations for them. we can hear from unite really sad situations for them. we can hearfrom unite ‘s diana holland. we'll be getting individual legal advice to everybody because they do have rights to redundancy, rights to be consulted in such circumstances, which they have not had. so they will be entitled to compensation. we are also doing all that we can to look atjob are also doing all that we can to look at job opportunities in other companies because these are skilled people who have worked for a long time in this part of the industry. these are skills that we don't want to lose. 9000 people in this country will be losing theirjobs. people have been dedicated to have given a lot. they are getting support from across the country, but we need to make sure that they are supported right now. so, yes, there will be legal action, but we also need the instant support and that could be in the releasing of the wages as soon as possible. can you provider of
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office space really be worth 36 billion p? you might know his company as we work. it rents out office space and desks, effectively. the flotation went badly wrong because they kept changing their mind about how much the company was worth. 0n changing their mind about how much the company was worth. on top of that, we had investors then, hang on a minute, we're not sure what is going on here and we're not sure where interested. this one is highly controversial and £100 million on buying and selling shares and his management style has been brought into question by the company's biggest shareholder, softbank. let's get more on this. we can go over to new york. vivienne nunis is at the new york stock exchange. quite an unusual day there on the new york stock exchange. what is
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going on with that opening bell? after we had celebrities come down here to ring the bell to begin trading up both straight and today it was millennia trump, the first lady —— stena impero trump and it was to drum up less taper her campaign. she has to take couple of traders on the floor and left pretty quickly, i have to say. let's talk about we work here. a highly unusual boss, is he not, to put it mildly. he is done a lot of things that have raised eyebrows amongst investors on wall street. 0ne raised eyebrows amongst investors on wall street. one of the weirdest things he did is that he trademarked the word 0vi and then lease it back toa the word 0vi and then lease it back to a company to make money but then
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he paid it back under a bit of a cloud. he needed $12 million by buying office space himself that he then leased to we work for it to use. he has sold a stake in the company and made $700 million, so eye brows company and made $700 million, so eyebrows have been raised. in the la st eyebrows have been raised. in the last few days we have also had revelations or accusations that he took marijuana on a private plane from newark to israel. investors are now asking questions about his behaviour as ceo and also that the company itself. — — behaviour as ceo and also that the company itself. —— from new york to israel. lots of questions. the ipo, as we know has been shelved and it was due to take place this week on the nasdaq. unfortunately we are ata at a time. let's get a look at the markets. amongst all of the millennia and talks of —— amongst all the talks of melania. 0ne millennia and talks of —— amongst all the talks of melania. one of the big competitors of thomas cook, their shares are doing very well, up
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by around 7.5% because of competition there. it is good news for them. some reports, competition there. it is good news forthem. some reports, howeverthat they're putting the prices up of the holidays. it is not good news. thank you very much. we're going back to new york because there is a special climate change summit organised by the secretary general and sub—world leaders have been arriving in the first few minutes. you will wreck as many of them of course and, including borisjohnson. many of them of course and, including boris johnson. donald trump not taking part and other world leaders, including donald tusk taking part. —— you will recognise many of them. the new zealand prime minister and angela merkel there, the german chancellor. they will be hearing from activists, including greta thunberg.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. these grey and leaden skies across parts of devon. the rain is all tied in with an area of low pressure and it is going to be very slowly pushing across the uk over the next 30 days. the wet weather is here to stay. the place that will probably stay. the place that will probably stay the driest, longest is north—east scotland, with some sunshine here across the afternoon. i was, living at the afternoon. i was, living avenue across northern ireland, pushing across england and that wet weather will reach scotland. it will turn increasingly heavy towards the end of the night across wales and south—west england. tomorrow morning, a rotten rush hour, i across these western areas, initially with that band of heavy pushing northwards and eastwards. it could be some surface water and spray could be some surface water and spray on the roads. it will also be a blustery day. the heavy rain could bring some localised surface water flooding issues and it stays u nsettled, flooding issues and it stays unsettled, really, through the rest of this week.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 3: the biggest re—patriation in peacetime — a massive operation to bring home 150,000 british holidaymakers — after the collapse of thomas cook. this couple were about to go on their honeymoon — their plans now lie in ruins. we had looked forward to this for a long time. we had a wedding injuly so it's been another couple of months waiting for this. absolutely totally gutted. for thousands of thomas cook employees, the news they'd been dreading came in the early hours of the morning — after rescue talks failed. with a showdown over brexit divisions looming — labour promises a four—day working week within a decade if they win the next general election.
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it will be a shorter working week with no loss of pay. in new york — world leaders — including boris johnson — gather for a special un climate summit — but some key figures aren't taking part — including president trump. coming up on afternoon live all the sport — with holly hamilton — a good day for wales. england have named their squad but no room forjonny bairstow. 0ur weather is turning wet and windy. we will take a look at an old hurricaine that has been partly to blame for our change over the next few days. join me later for that. also coming up — the arrival of the duke and duchess of sussex to south africa is marked with cheers, song and dance. it's the couple's first official tour with four—month—old son archie.
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hello everyone — this is afternoon live. it's called 0peration matterhorn — and it's the biggest peace time operation to repatriate britons stranded abroad — after the collapse of thomas cook. the civil aviation authority has chartered a fleet of jets to bring home more than 150,000 british holidaymakers. thomas cook — britain's oldest package tour company — went into compulsory liquidation at 2am. its collapse puts at risk 22,000 jobs around the world — 9,000 of them here in the uk. our business correspondent simon gompertz reports. flying back for the last time, the final thomas cook flights are bringing home holiday—makers early today. the passengers lucky enough to get on these being brought by staff expecting to lose theirjobs. as soon as we landed, they were all crying. it is devastating, it is a legacy that has gone. as i say, i worked for them
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for ten years and i got loads of friends who, it is their livelihood, it is tragic. emotional, very emotional. the cabin crew were all crying. a bit sombre, to be honest. for a company that big to be going that long, to be going down, it is devastating. thomas cook's planes are now stuck on the ground, impounded as part of the liquidation. most not available to help with the rescue after frantic negotiations to win extra backing failed early this morning. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. people were still turning up at uk airports, only to find their holiday is cancelled. if they bought a package, they will get a refund but the money might not be enough or arrive in time to book something else. this is the scene that greeted travellers at manchester. not much good if it is your honeymoon. we are absolutely gutted,
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we have looked forward to this for a long time. had the wedding injuly, so it's been another couple of months waiting for this. yeah, absolutely, just totally gutted. i had a bit of a sixth sense at two o'clock this morning, got up and checked the website and that is when it hit the fan, basically. the shops are closed today. that is more than 500 of them, so real gaps on the high streets and the people who work in shops like this make up a big share of the 9,000 or sojobs and livelihoods which are affected by the collapse. in nottingham, they came in to be told the grim news. then the door was locked for the last time. 0ne family in pathos felt abandoned by the company. thomas cook has not paid the hotel yet, they have warned us they have not been paid. we are left in the dark, there is no thomas cook representative helping or anything like that as they have just walked out.
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no contact. now the emergency effort to get people back. this is new york last night, and this is minorca today. passengers who boughtjust a flight and not a package will be included for free, but not if they return it after the 6th of october. we have got about 40 aircraft we brought in from around the world and we will, over the next two weeks, run about 1,000 flights. this covers 18 countries and 55 airports. with thomas cook's planes now out of the picture, the first rescue flights provided by easyjet, ba, virgin and other carriers are due in soon. it is a massive evacuation. the aim, to get the holiday—makers back, then count the cost. simon gompertz, bbc news. thomas cook founded his travel company almost two centuries ago, offering short railwayjourneys in the east midlands for a shilling. his company went on to become one of the biggest names
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in the travel industry, with millions of customers every year. now it's collapsed with debts of 1.7bn pounds. so, what went wrong? emma simpson reports. venice, a popular holiday destination, even back in 1898. and in the corner of this famous square, there is thomas cook, already doing business. and the shop front there in the background survived the war years too. go to place for travel. and then came the boom, large numbers of brits started to have enough money to go abroad and thomas cook rode the wave. don'tjust book it, thomas cook it. becoming one of the world's best known holiday brands, opening hundreds of high street shops. it merged with the owner of this brand in 2007 to create a european travel giant, but its finances soon became stretched. thomas cook was a business
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with a huge amount of debt, it almost went bust in 2011 and it has not had the financial resilience to weather the huge changes in the market, with low—cost carriersjet2 coming along, people booking online rather than through traditional high street agents and more recent factors, we have had brexit, consumer confidence has been knocked, weather conditions, all sorts going on and it has added up to a perfect storm for thomas cook. by may this year, the warning lights were flashing, thomas cook slumping to a 1—5p loss. last month, a £900 million rescue plan was hatched. it planned to sell large parts of its business to its largest shareholder, chinese company fosun and then a last—minute demand from the banks for 200 million to keep it going. that went up to 250 million over the weekend. the government was as for help but it seems it would only have been a temporary fix. there were real systemic problems there that we felt that if money was put into it,
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which is not something the government would normally do for a travel company, we would end up with it back and spending more money to repatriate people so it wasn't a goer. the government is now looking into how thomas cook collapsed and how it was managed. executives were paid more than £20 million in bonuses over the last five years. the fallout looks set to be enormous. but who knows what the future will bring? emma simpson, bbc news. a little earlier i spoke to our correspondent dave guest who is at manchester airport, but started by asking our international business correspondent theo leggett, who's at gatwick airport, about the financial difficulties thomas cook has come up against. thomas cook has had financial problems for years and some of them are down to short—term things for example the company has often cited the warm weather last summer as a reason why people were not booking holidays, uncertainty over brexit, the fact that some traditional
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holiday destinations have suffered from political instability, but the fa ct of from political instability, but the fact of the matter is, problems at thomas cook to go back years and pa rt thomas cook to go back years and part of it is the changing nature of the travel business. 20 years ago it was pretty common for people to go into a shop on the high street and bigger holiday, flights and hotels and car hire altogether. nowadays it is pretty easy to do that on the internet and that is where thomas cook has had its problem because running all those hundreds of high street shops costs money and that cuts into profit margins and meanwhile customers are going elsewhere. the civil aviation authority has this mammoth task getting people back. yes and we have seen some getting people back. yes and we have seen some of that today. the check—in desks here at gatwick there are acres and acres of thomas cook check—in desks which are all now closed and a handful of civil aviation authority staff who have been helpfully talking to people who have turned up for their flights,
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people who had perhaps not heard about the problems or had travelled long distances. many customers were very bitter because they said yesterday at the day before they had been told by thomas cook there was absolutely no reason why they should not travel, everything was going to be fine. now they get here and are told their flights have been cancelled. that said, most are pretty sympathetic towards staff because they say, we have to wait for our money, we lost our holidays but the staff of thomas cook have lost their livelihoods and that is a much more important thing and most people i have spoken to have been sympathetic about that and they have been keeping things in proportion. 0ur reporter is at manchester airport because 3,000 jobs are from the greater manchester area, this will have a huge impact? yes because the thomas cook airline had its main uk base here at manchester airport.
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something like 18 planes which were permanently based here. i understand recently thomas cook also relocated some marketing people to the manchester area so about 3,000 jobs. the mayor of an manchester is talking of setting up a task force to see what can be done to help all of these people. it is interesting about the customers being sympathetic to the staff. i spoke to people who came off the last thomas cook flight to land here this morning. it had taken off from 0rlandojust morning. it had taken off from 0rlando just before the company went bust. they said step on the plane we re bust. they said step on the plane were in tears but they were also very professional in the way they dealt with the passengers. the captain told them what had happened and said they didn't know what the future would hold but wish them well and they said as the staff got off the plane, ground crew formed a guard of honour. very emotional, a lot of sympathy for the staff but also angerfrom lot of sympathy for the staff but also anger from people saying, we we re also anger from people saying, we were told last night as late as
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midnight, it is fine, go to the airport. they get to the airport today and find total chaos. part of thatis today and find total chaos. part of that is also, once they are on the flight, that is also, once they are on the flight, they don't necessarily end up flight, they don't necessarily end up at the airport from where they left? no, when they are repatriating people, they don't know where they will go to. we were expecting the first group of repatriated tourists to arrive here at manchester terminal one sometime this afternoon. it is coming from split in croatia. it was due to land here at about 12:45, then put back to 1:45. now it will be nearer to 4:00. but it will be possibly that some people on that flight may well have come from other airports initially in the uk and will have to be bussed back to wherever they set from and likewise people who have set off from manchester may find themselves coming back to other parts of the uk, so it is a difficult time for the passengers who have gone overseas and our nile trying to come back as part of that huge operation. this is just day one, if you are
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booked on a holiday for the next couple of weeks, this could go on until october? yes, there are other things. manchester united have confirmed today that thomas cook where their travel partners for two upcoming away games in the europa league. they had fans who booked through thomas cook to go to those matches, what will happen to them? the club say they are looking at contingency plans. liverpool football clu b contingency plans. liverpool football club worked with thomas cook selling hospitality packages for home games at anfield. hundreds of people have put those packages and again the club say they are working to try and find out how many are affected and what will happen. the ramifications of this are going to go on way beyond today. labour has promised to reduce the average working week to 32 hours with no loss of pay, if it wins power. the shadow chancellor john mcdonnell also told delegates at the party conference he would ban zero—hours contracts. it comes as the party's leader, jeremy corbyn, is facing a revolt over his brexit strategy.
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can i ask you to behave with respect to our members and our conference? canjeremy corbyn control his party? 0n brexit, possibly not. he wants to stay neutral until after a general election but some members and key unions are trying to force his hand. are you confident the party will back you want brexit? he might not be in control of the destination soon. labour delegates will decide whether to backjeremy corbyn or pledged to campaign to stay in the european union. some key figures back remain and, this morning, a big union supporter broke ranks to say it would, too. there are very different views in the party. surely if you have negotiations, you don't determine your position beforehand, you wait to see what is negotiated and the deal on the table, the devil that is in the detail, and then you would make that decision. that is the rational way forward. having to decide to be ambiguous now would be a mistake, frankly.
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the one argument used to justify it is to say when you negotiate with the eu, you have to be ambiguous. that is not true. jeremy corbyn has pledged to go along with what members decide but losing a key policy is not what the leadership wants. jeremy corbyn has been trying to keep everyone on site and some have run out of patience. labour would much rather be talking about its plans for power. the shadow chancellor is pledging big changes to the economy, like a shorter working week. their next labour government will reduce the average full working week to 32 hours within the next decade. it will be a shorter working week with no loss of pay. and a pledge to spend £6 billion a year providing free personal care to over 65s in england. expensive policies but labour says tax will pay for it. but the road to power
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is complicated. jeremy corbyn needs to keep his own party on side and the last few days have shown that is often not easy. nick eardley, bbc news. this is the moment whenjohn mcdonnell paid tribute to the labour leader and the conference delegates began singing "0h jeremy corbyn". no matter what the smears and personal attacks by the gutter press, he always responds and embodies the kinder, gentler politics he advocates and i'm so proud ofjeremy corbyn. applause and cheers. # 0h, jeremy corbyn, 0h, jeremy corbyn. 0h, jeremy corbyn # 0ur chief poltical correspondent vicki young joins
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us from brighton now. it isa it is a lively afternoon there? yes, there is obviously huge enthusiasm forjeremy corbyn here and in the hall of course but is question of loyalty will be tested this afternoon because of these votes on the brexit policy that they are still arguing over after all this time. what they are agreed on is they should be another referendum. the question is whether labour goes into a general election saying very clearly which way it would campaign in that referendum. that is what the row will be about later. they are going to try to resolve it later. the chair of the brexit committee is here. john mcdonnell, emma thornbury, diane abbott, the mayor of london, first minister of wales, the leader of the labour party scotland, loads of mps and members encoding delegates here are in
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favour of us remaining in the european union. we have moved on a long way since last year. people we re long way since last year. people were focused on continuing areas of difference but we are now firmly committed to that confirmatory referendum, that was not the case 12 months ago and i welcome jeremy's support and leadership on that. but i think it is not credible in a general election when people say, if given asa general election when people say, if given as a referendum, how will a party you're asking me to vote for campaign and that referendum? i cannot tell you because we haven't made up our minds. i don't think it will survive the first conversation with the voters never mind interviewers such as yourself. 0thers let those people supporting that view say because the idea is that view say because the idea is that labour would get another deal and negotiate another deal, the party cannot say whether it would be for a leave or remain because it depends on that deal. in order for that argument to work, you have to assume there are circumstances in
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which having negotiated a better deal, and i support that is a policy, because the referendum, we may go for a leave. it depends how the british people vote. if we are to lead, it should be to replace that with a closer relationship with the european union, the one boris johnson is proposing. but the idea that the labour party is distinct from the government and you have to go back to 75, there was a distinction between the two when harold wilson was premised. the idea that labour would say after that, we are now with borisjohnson that labour would say after that, we are now with boris johnson and we will campaign to leave the european union. they would say it would be a different deal because it could be a much closer relationship in that binary choice referendum, boris johnson and nigel farage have been saying, at least let us get out. johnson and nigel farage have been saying, at least let us get outlj don't see the labour party campaigning on the side of either of those people. do you thinkjeremy corbyn is prime minister could stay neutral? that is a question for him
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to answer. i think it is hard for a prime minister in the circumstances to say, i don't have a view on such a fundamental question of policy. after all, the great merit of the confirmatory referendum is on the one hand you have a no—deal brexit, disastrous for the country, that is why we have legislated to stop it on the other hand, tear up on those votes, it never counted. in the middle, is compromise which says, we don't like theresa may's deal, that is what my colleagues proposed a year ago but we are prepared put it to the people as long as remainders alongside it and then people choose in the moment you get into that you have a means of bringing this to an end and also every person has a boat and you can try and persuade people and you can try and persuade people and they can try and persuade you but ultimately you go to that pulling both and each of us put a cross on a piece of paper and that
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is the great merit of trusting the people. it doesn't bring it to an end. because how do you know that people accept the result, you have not accepted the first result?m people accept the result, you have not accepted the first result? it is the only way to bringing it to an end that is available to us at the moment given that parliament is deadlocked. we are over three years on, parliament has tried but three times the deal has been rejected by the house of commons because the leave campaign and borisjohnson say, i might take us out without a deal, of which there is no mandate and would be disastrous for the country. i'm sure people will continue to debate and have the country would probably end up disappointed but the great merit of the proposal is it would conclude it because parliament has proved it is not able to do that and since the people began this, by making the decision, then let the people concluded and you say is part of that referendum, whichever way you vote, that is what will then
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automatically happen so there is no question of parliament then going into another three years. it will be over. there was votes will happen sometime after 5:15. if they are close, they go to a card vote and we may not get the results today but there is one novel approach being taken by a union who have decided they will vote in favour of all three options, so that is one way to approach this thorny issue for the labour party. adaptation has therefore become an absolute priority in increasing the resilience of countries and communities and avoiding human suffering. i felt the countries who
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have already made their commitments, in particular those who have doubled their contributions to the green climate fund i call for your bravery. let us move towards a global transformation of financing, financing that is compatible with a carbon neutral world. friends, this summit cannot resolve all of our problems overnight but it should give the necessary stimulus for us to actively implement the paris agreement objectives. the momentum we create today should also feed that future meetings we have, in chile later this year and next year, the conference on sustainable transport in beijing, the conference in lisbon and the conference on biodiversity and the nature summit in new york. let us not be scared of being ambitious, let us not be scared of applying pressure and let
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us scared of applying pressure and let us not be scared, above all, of co nsta ntly us not be scared, above all, of constantly reminding ourselves about the truth and reality of the situation. let us turn to political leaders and those actors and give them the following message, a tra nsfer them the following message, a transfer will lead to better living conditions, better employment and better health, food security and greater equality as well as sustainable growth. if we move together, nobody will be left behind. dearfriends, science tells us our behind. dearfriends, science tells us our current path, we face at least three celsius by the end of the century. i will not be there but my granddaughters will. and your grandchildren, too. i refuse to be in an accomplice in the destruction of their one and only home. i will not be a silent witness to the crime
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of destroying their rights for a sustainable future. it is my obligation, our obligation, to do everything to stop the climate rises before it stops us. time is running out but it is not too late. so let us out but it is not too late. so let us heed the calls of wise leaders and especially young people by taking to the streets to demand we change our relationship with nature now. let us lace up our running shoes and when the climate race for us shoes and when the climate race for us all. thank you. that special climate summit now under way with some key world leaders attending but some key world leaders attending but some not and you can see video featuring greta who will address delegates it on. at the old bailey, a friend of a
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17—year—old girl describes a situation when she was which broke out when she was fatally stabbed in london, in march this year. jodie chesney, was with a group of friends when she was attacked in a park. one of them kasey henderson told a jury it all happened "very fast". four young men deny murder. 0ur correspondent helena wilkinson is outside the old bailey in central london now. thejury the jury has heard from friends who are in the park whenjudy was stabbed in march of this year. one of them, called casey henderson, 18 yea rs of them, called casey henderson, 18 years old, has been telling the jury how he first developed remembers seeing two men come into that park in the evening and the first time he realised they appeared was that he heard what he described as a sound like the ripping of fabric. he thought the men were stealing his bike. he then saw the two men run away, when in fact that noise was
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jodie being attacked. he then said he was still confused and at that point, there was hysteria and panic amongst his friends and jodie's boyfriend started shouting that she had been stabbed in the back. this witness said he went to a friends house nearby and he tried to get help and was in such a shock and terrified that he couldn't return back to the park. the jury has heard from another witness, a 17—year—old girl who we cannot name because of her age and she described how she realised something was happening when one of the group began to shiver in fear and then she saw jodie turning around and she started screaming very loudly. the witness was then asked what happened next? she said she then shown her torch on her phone onto jodie's she said she then shown her torch on her phone ontojodie's back and she was asked by the prosecuting barrister, what did you see? a reply was, a whole, you could clearly see she had been stabbed. at that point
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the witness broke down in tears on the witness broke down in tears on the witness broke down in tears on the witness box. she then went on say thatjodie was a really bad state and she stopped breathing and she fell into the arms of her boyfriend. she was taken by an billions on the way to hospital but was met by a team of doctors and she died at10:26 was met by a team of doctors and she died at 10:26 that evening. it is the prosecution's case thatjodie was entirely blameless and she was a victim, got caught up in some quarrel between drug dealers. there are four men in the dog, all accused of murder and the all deny the charge. time for a look at the weather. it is the most area at the end of a hurricane that is coming. it is this area, we are looking at two weeks
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whether satellite pictures. these are the tops of ap thunderstorms, nothing exciting there, but over the space of five days the storms developed into something more serious. this was a major hurricane that pretty much knocked out all power supplies to bermuda. since thenit power supplies to bermuda. since then it has been working into the north atlantic where it has changed power sources. hurricanes get their energy from the warm seas and these areas of high pressure are a chilly powered by the temperature contrast in the atmosphere where we have warm air moving up from the south and cold air moving down and that collision is what powers these weather systems. a subtle change but nevertheless, some of the hurricane left in a. today, the significance for you as a meteorologist is this is when autumn really starts ? meteorologist is this is when autumn really starts? it is and people talk about gales and it is not unusual to see a spell of windy weather coming in about the time of the equinox. whether that is a comes as a
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coincidence, we don't know. we have had some lovely days up until now. you would have to study at times when it didn't happen. because it is in peoples minds, the public notice it more, that is what i am trying to say. i cannot think of any reason why it should happen. do you want to tell is what is in store ? do you want to tell is what is in store? we have a change in an area of low pressure, the rain is already spreading and, turning heavy as well, for a time across wales, south—west england and northern ireland, too. the driest weather to ta ke ireland, too. the driest weather to take us into the first part of the evening will be across north—east scotland. it will not stay dry in scotla nd scotland. it will not stay dry in scotland for long, as we go through the night time, that first brand of rain pushes northwards and at the same time, we get another area of rain into wales and south england. this turn increasingly heavy towards the end of the night, some surface
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water and spray quickly building up on the roads in the west as we start off tuesday morning. from there, the rain pushes northwards and is resigned many areas will see 15—30 millimetres of rain, a wet day, some areas could see as much as 70 millimetres of rain, that could fall ina millimetres of rain, that could fall in a short space of time, accompanied by some thunder and gusty wind. if we were to get 70 millimetres of rain in the space of six hours, that would likely lead to some localised surface water flooding, so you need to be careful tomorrow. looking at the middle of the week, this is the area of low pressure weakening, that has the re m na nts of pressure weakening, that has the remnants of the hurricane in, and that will be moving across england and wales on wednesday. again, the focus of the heaviest rain and strongest wind will be across england and wales, particularly across southern england and wales, particularly across southern areas. england and wales, particularly across southern areas. further north, quite unsettled, a lot of cloud working at its got on with some showers, maybe northern ireland having a dry dough with some sunshine, those temperatures, 15—19, 19 not feeling too bad in any
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brighter moments. and unsettled looking weather pattern, later into the week and weekend, we have rain or showers in the weather forecast. it will often be fairly windy and also, the temperature is coming down also, the temperature is coming down a little bit. remember, of the weekend in edinburgh, we had temperatures into the low 20s. looking to of the week, highs of around 15 celsius, so much cooler thanit around 15 celsius, so much cooler than it has been, but certainly a change, much more unsettled conditions on the way.
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this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the world's oldest tour operator thomas cook has collapsed after last—minute negotiations to save the company failed. it's left 150 , 000 british holiday—makers stranded — triggering a huge repatriation effort. labour promises a four—day working week within a decade with no loss of pay — if they win the next general election. meanwhile, jeremy corbyn faces a battle over labour's brexit policy — members will choose between two competing strategies at the party's conference later. at a climate summit in new york, the un secretary general says the world is losing the race against climate change — but that it's a race we can win. and the duke and duchess of sussex arrive in south africa with their young son, archie, for theirfirst official tour as a family.
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sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. wales have got their rugby world cup campaign off to a good start — yes, i went for wales for their opening game, and to be honest, it should have been a routine wind for wales, they have beaten georgia. in the first—half, it looked like it could have ended up like a score. the first of six tries coming within three minutes. afterjonathan davies and justin tipuric crossed the line — josh adams who was running rampant in the opening quarter scorched overfor wales third. and here's the bonus point — number four coming from liam williams just before half—time. georgia were keeping the best until last however — almost a different side after the break — running in two tries of their own, but tomos williams got to this kickjust in time, to keep wales comfortably ahead — and it was warren gatland's men who had the final say as george north added a sixth. final result 43—14.
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i think we came out of the blocks in that first half with the intent and replication of the training week we have had, we were very positive. probably slightly disappointed in the second half with regards to taking our search of the gas, particularly in the 22. but pleasing points for us from the game itself, the set piece scram and line—out functioned well, it is just letting those opportunities go in the second half. wales are top of their group for the moment, just above australia in points difference, and they play australia next on a sunday. the next stop for england is new zealand, but one world cup player not in the squad. england's selectors have named their squad for the upcoming tour of new zealand. there are a few new faces on there — but one glaring omission. jonnie bairstow has been axed from the squad —
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his poor form with the bat had led to speculation that he might miss out — it's likely thatjos buttler or 0llie pope will keep wicket in his place. meabwhile warwickshire opener dominic sibley has been rewarded for his remarkable summer with a first england call—up. bairstow has been included in the t20 squad for the series starting on 1st november. the two—test series begins on 21st. essex have made a good start as they bid to seal cricket's county championship in the final match of the season. they need to avoid defeat against title chasing rivals somerset at taunton. somerset batted after winning the toss but have struggled with the essex bowling — and somerset were 75 for 4 when rain stopped play. british number one kyle edmund has parted company with his coach mark hilton. edmund has lost four matches in a row — most recently at the chengdu 0pen this morning — and he's been knocked out in the first round of three successive events.
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the decision to split from hilton was made last week, and he'll be assisted in the short term by colin beecher, who coached him when he was in his late teens. sacked rugby union player israel folau is returning to rugby league and will play for tonga at next month's 0ceania cup. folau had his contract terminated by rugby australia after writing on social media that "hell awaits" gay people — which breached a players‘ code of conduct. folau has tongan heritage — he'll face a touring great britain side in new zealand before coming up against australia in november. with the world championships getting under way later this week, the iaaf president lord coe says that he'd like to see caster semenya return to athletics— but within the regulations. the 800m world chamopion won't be defending her title in doha, because she refuses to comply with the new rules governing testerone levels in female athletes. but speaking to the bbc‘s alex capstick, coe says that he hopes that she hasn't given
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up track and field forever. we haven't set those regulations to exclude people, they are actually lured to allow us to maintain the presence of those athletes with that condition at international levels. you like to see her back in 800 metres or... yes, within those regulations, of course. that's all the sport for now. i'll have more for you in the next hour. the duke and duchess of sussex have arrived in south africa —— let's go to the un, the climate change conference, greta thunberg took that hazardous journey by sea took that hazardous journey by sea to get there to avoid playing. you say you hear us and understand the urgency, but no matter how sad and angry i am,i but no matter how sad and angry i am, ido but no matter how sad and angry i am, i do not want to believe that, because if you really understood the
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situation and still kept on failing to act, then you would be evil, and that, i refuse to believe. the popularity of cutting our emissions in half in ten years only give us a 50% chance of staying below 1.5 degrees, at the risk of setting of irreversible chain reaction is beyond human control. 50% may be acceptable to you, but those numbers do not include tipping points, most feedback loops, hidden by toxic air pollution of the aspects of equity and climate justice, they also rely on my generation sucking hundreds of billions of tonnes of your c02 out of the air with technologies that barely exist. so if 50% risk is
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simply not acceptable to us, we who have to live with the consequences. to have a 67% chance of staying below a 1.5 degrees of global temperature rise, the best odds given by the ipcc, the world had 420 gigatons of c02 left to emit back in january... today, that figure is already down to less than 350 gigatons. how dare you pretend that this can be sold with just a business as usual and some technical solutions? with today's emission levels, that remaining c02 budget will be entirely gone within less than eight and a half years. there will not be any solutions or plans presented in line with these figures here today, because these numbers
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are too uncomfortable, and you are still not mature enough to tell it like it is. you are failing us, but the young people are starting to understand your betrayal. the eyes of all future generations are upon you, and if you choose to fail us, i say, we will never forgive you. applause we will not let you get away with this. right here, right now, is where we draw the line. the world is waking up, and change is coming, whether you like it or not. thank you. cheering and applause soa so a strong message there from greta
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thunberg to un delegates at that climate action summit, just opened in new york. some very strong words, and greeted with applause and we will continue watching that, the output from that summit in new york and we will bring that to you. the duke and duchess of sussex have arrived in south africa with their four—month—old son archie. it's their first official tour as a family. during the trip prince harry will pay tribute to his mother princess diana's campaign against landmines. let's speak now to our reporter pumza fihlani who is with the royals on their. how has their visit gone down so far? they only arrived a few hours ago. they sure did, and a very bright first place they visited was a township here, which is considered to be the murder capital of south africa. they are, they wanted to see a project that is part of empowering young women and giving them self
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defence classes, but also teaching children about how to access the justice system. currently where we are, we are at an area called district six, a former residential area where people of colour and mixed heritage lived for about 100 yea rs mixed heritage lived for about 100 years until they were forcefully removed by the apartheid government, this was declared a white only area. the duke and duchess will be arriving shortly, and what they will do here is full that heritage and learn about that history. when she addressed the people gathered at the township earlier, she mentioned it was particularly important for her, asa was particularly important for her, as a woman of colour, to be able to experience the history of south africa and look at ways that lessons can be learned about how to live a better across communities. how much coverage is this getting in south africa, given that we are not talking about the air or second in line to the throne here? —— heir. talking about the air or second in
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line to the throne here? —— heinm has been a welcome distraction for that south africans in the last couple of weeks. we have had very grim reports of violence, so it is a welcome break for a lot of people here. i don't know if you can see behind me, hundreds of people have lined the streets, hoping to catch a glimpse of them as they make their way to the district museum. it is also a moment some people are talking about whether they will be able to see archie or not, there is no indication of that at the moment, but a lot of people are excited to know that they are in town and will make their way through the streets of cape town. ok, in south africa with the latest on that visit, they have arrived in cape town, we will return there a little later on. two colleagues who worked at a cctv monitoring company in wiltshire have been jailed for illegally accessing video footage from the autopsy of footballer emiliano sala. sala's body was found in the wreckage of a plane earlier this year. sherry bray was jailed for 14 months. her colleague christopher ashford was given five months. in a victim impact statement
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emiliano sala's sister romina 0ur correspondentjohn kay has been following the story from swindon crown court. a shocking case at so many levels. it is, that is reflected in the judges words in court, when he was sentencing this pair, and also by the police and crown prosecution service who have been giving their reaction in the last few minutes. thejudge said they reaction in the last few minutes. the judge said they had been driven by morbid curiosity and had behaved in quite an appalling way. he said as well that this was truly appalling, the cps describing their behaviour as deeply offensive. perhaps the most impactful words of all came from the family of emiliano sala. his sister submitted a victim impact statement to the court, which was read out by thejudge, in which she described the impact it had had on them as a family when images from
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the postmortem went viral on the internet and she had to see pictures of her brother's body in the autopsy and seeing comments that follow them as it went viral around the world. thejudge as it went viral around the world. the judge stressed that this pair we re the judge stressed that this pair were not responsible for the uploading of that image or even the taking of that image. but knowing that they had taken and had viewed this material themselves had caused the sala family great distress, great upset, she described their actions as evil and being wicked. she said she will never be able to raise from her mind what she now knows happened in that mortuary room. she said she was very distressed, she tried to shield other relatives and her parents from what had happened, but clearly, this isa what had happened, but clearly, this is a highly unusual case, it is a story of our times in many ways, involving technology and privacy and all sorts of access rights and how the world around us is changing.
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these are very new kind of offences, there are new sentences. sherry bray sentence to 14 months in prison, christopher ashford to five months. thank you, john. ravi this have been opening a climate change summit in new york, faced with a stark warning, the sea levels and temperatures are rising atan levels and temperatures are rising at an accelerating pace. they are expected to reach 1.2 celsius in the next five years. joining me now from new york is andrew morlet, chief executive of the ellen macarthur foundation. you published a report on how the economy tackle climate change, the bottom line is i haven't even got the time we thought we did. bottom line is i haven't even got the time we thought we didlj bottom line is i haven't even got the time we thought we did. i think what is interesting is that the urgency is clearly raising. most of the focus has been on renewable energy and energy efficiency to
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date, but what we are trying to really demonstrate with our new report is that in fact, the material economy, the way we produce and use products actually represent about 55, 45% of the solution space. the energy reduction in efficiency is 55% of the answer. so we actually need to connect this in people's minds and get a much more focus on the material economy and keeping products and materials and keeping those in the system for much longer, so we those in the system for much longer, so we lower the energy demand of the system. but it is very late for us to be taking this message on board, when it would appear that climate change is overtaking us. well, i think it is light, perhaps, but it is interesting —— it is late. the circular economy had an enormous pick—up of the last several years, and people are starting to make
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these connections, that the relationship between things. there isa relationship between things. there is a lot that can be done in the circular economy space, it represents a huge opportunity both for climate, but also for rethinking the way in which businesses operate and the way in which we provide and get services for people and products, in the ways they need them that are not as wasteful and as energy demanding as they have been in the past. we have just heard from greta thunberg, a very powerful speech from a young lady, is that they way that people are going to start listening to the debate on climate change? well, it is clearly a really important part of it, i think that the movement of youth and the raising of public attention on this is really important, and i think what we are starting to see is that there businesses, and governments are starting to act, but we need much more. what is
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interesting about the circular economy approach is that it represents a way of creating new value that is in fact going to deliver the targets in a very helpful way, and that is a new connection and a new way of thinking about this, that it is a solution oriented and it is driven by business information and economic opportunity, it is not about reduction, we can create new growth and we can do good for the climate and we can do good for the climate and for the natural systems, in the world more generally by innovating and finding new approaches for meeting people's needs. thank you, andrew. in a moment, we'll have the latest business news. first, a look at the headlines on afternoon live: thomas cook collapses after last—minute negotiations to save the world's oldest tour operatorfail—150,000 holiday—makers have been stranded — triggering a huge repatriation effort. with a showdown over brexit divisions looming — labour promises a four—day working week within a decade if they win
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the next general election. at a climate summit in new york — the un secretary general says the world is losing the race against climate change — but that it's a race we can win. here's your business headlines on afternoon live: the boss of thomas cook has apologised for the collapse of the 178—year old travel company. it had been struggling for some time but had been brokering a £900 million rescue deal with china's fosun. however, it failed to raise an extra £200mn contingency fund demanded by its lenders. and in the wake of thomas cook's collapse, we look at how other airlines and travel firms are reacting. amid accustations of price hikes, easyjet and tui have seen their shares receive a boost this morning — with tui the biggest riser on the ftse100. and in other news — the job of wework‘s chief excutive
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adam neumann could be on line, amidst reports that japan's softbank — the office space provider's biggest shreholder is looking to oust him. this after wework‘s planned flotation was suspended, following waning investor interest and tumbling valuations. we and tumbling valuations. know what is happening v thomas we know what is happening with thomas cook, we don't necessarily go y. it depends on who you are, because thomas cook has been a troubled company for a number of yea rs, troubled company for a number of years, not for the whole 178 troubled company for a number of years, not for the whole178 years, but look at back over the next five or ten years, and but look at back over the next five orten years, and it but look at back over the next five or ten years, and it is clear that things have not been easy. the share price lost over 90% of its value over the last five years before its collapse. part of this is down to its very large debt mountain. we have had a number of factors which have had a number of factors which have attacked it from all sides, the heat wave that we saw last summer, high fuel costs, brexit uncertainty, a slowing of global growth generally, on top of that, there are
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lots of accusations about poor management, and the fact that we have lots of other factors coming into play here, and it hadn't came out —— kept up with the edge of the internet, with people going online booking their own holidays rather than turning to brochures. —— booking own holidays. use the term is around collapse all the time, liquidation, insolvency, administration, cva, we haven't talked about that more than a year ago. all this time is coming into play, and what does this mean? hotels keeping guests bear until they know the bills have been paid. let's talk to duncan swift, the president of r3, the insolvency trade body. good afternoon, remind us trade body. good afternoon, remind us what liquidation means. liquidation is the orderly close—down of a company's business and affairs through a formal insolvency process. it is one of four or key processes, this one is
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designed, essentially, to wind it down to a conclusion, most likely without a sale of business. and in practice, people are looking at those pictures of planes sitting on tarmac and thinking, why can't they be used to bring people home? this is part and parcel of the arrangements that happen under liquidation, isn't it? let's start at the beginning, this is a significant group that is over 200 companies in all, it has 22,000 staff, 9000 of whom are employed in the uk, it has over 150,000 customers out there, there is never a good time for this process to happen. the group has run out of funds, as soon as it has run out of funds, as soon as it has run out of funds, as soon as it has run out of funds, a process needs to be brought to bear to bring order to what might be potentially otherwise chaos, and that process is compulsory liquidation. do you think that process , liquidation. do you think that process, as it stands, is fit for purpose? there has been all sorts of
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concerns about perhaps it's not being the right thing in the interest of customers, and also suppliers out there as well. things are very difficult, because you have people far away, also assets in far—flung places, you have over 100 planes, i think the timing of this was to ensure that the planes were on the ground and ideally, under the control of the group at the time that the compulsory liquidation started. going to your earlier question, there is not necessarily an opportunity to get the consent of the planes ultimate owners, because they may well be leased, to actually fly in such circumstances, because thatis fly in such circumstances, because that is why in these circumstances to give certainty and keep things simple, the orderly closure appears to have been driven in the way that it has. a sad day all round, thank you forjoining us. meanwhile, happy news. yes, the ringing of a bell is a tradition, we have rather given it away. i was going to have a big lead
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up... melania trump to do down. away. i was going to have a big lead up... melania trump to do downlj brought that in for a treat for you, thatis brought that in for a treat for you, that is what happened. two 30p an hourtime, a that is what happened. two 30p an hour time, a little earlier, that is when the new york markets opened on the floor. —— 2:30pm. when the new york markets opened on the floor. -- 2:30pm. lets have a listen. bell rings. i think we can call that symbolic more than anything else. did you see the children with hands over their ears? it is a noisy place in the new york stock exchange, you can't blame them. thank you. spoiler alert, gone. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. the weather is turning unsettled, partly what happened in the
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caribbean two weeks ago. we had these storms that started to spin just off the north coast of the dominican republic, these then turned into this, hurricane, knocking out power supplies in bermuda as it crossed just to the north—west of the island. since then, it has turned into a normal area of low pressure that has been racing across the north atlantic, it is currently sat to the west of the british isles. this will bring bands of rain across the uk over the next few days, but some strong wind at times as well. with rain on the way, some have been looking for a dry place to stay. looking at the weather picture through today, we already have signs of that change to more unsettled weather with rain getting into wales, south—west england, not far from northern ireland, and the wet weather will continue to dry northwards and eastwards, the best chance of staying dry this afternoon and into the early evening will be across north—eastern areas of scotland. 0vernight tonight, the first positive rain pushes its way northwards, it will turn wet in scotla nd northwards, it will turn wet in scotland for a time, then a band of
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heavy rain will move across wales and the south—west of england as well. the wind will pick up, not a cold night, but certainly a white one. looking at the forecast for tomorrow, heavy rain will push eastwards and north—eastward across the country. some areas will pick up about 15—30 millimetres of rain, so about 15—30 millimetres of rain, so a wet day, but others could see up to 70 millimetres with rain coming down in quite a short space of time. that rain could cause issues with localised flooding, could be a lot of water building up on some roads with surface water and spray certainly an issue. looking into wednesday, the area of low pressure moves wednesday, the area of low pressure m oves a cross wednesday, the area of low pressure moves across england and wales, and with that, there will be more rain and this time, strong wind as well. these will rattle through the south coast. towards the north, a mixture of sunshine, may be rained out across parts of scotland for a time as well during wednesday, so another u nsettled as well during wednesday, so another unsettled day. temperatures for most of us between 16—19 on wednesday.
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beyond that, heading through thursday and into the latter part of the week and weekend, it will stay u nsettled the week and weekend, it will stay unsettled with rain or showers, feeling quite cool at times, highs of 15 in edinburgh. that is your weather.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live — i'm simon mccoy. today at 4: the first plane arrives back in manchester as part of the biggest re—patriation in peacetime — after the collapse of thomas cook which has left 150,000 holiday—makers stranded. this couple were about to go on their honeymoon — their plans now lie in ruins. we have looked forward to this for a long time. we had a wedding injuly so it's been another couple of months waiting for this. absolutely totally gutted. for thousands of thomas cook employees, the news they'd been dreading came in the early hours of the morning — after rescue talks failed. in other news — with a showdown over brexit divisions looming — labour promises a four—day working week within a decade if they win the next general election. in new york — world leaders — including boris johnson — gather for a special un climate summit. the teenage activist greta thunberg accused them of betraying her generation
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through their inaction. the eyes of all future generations are upon you. and if you choose to fail us, isay are upon you. and if you choose to fail us, i say we will never forget you. coming up on afternoon live, all the sport with holly. there has been a glaring omission, jonny bairstow will not feature in a new look setup. thanks holly, and we'll bejoining you for a full update just after half—past. chris fawkes has all the weather. the weather is looking wet and windy and there could be one or two issues, i will have more to on. also coming up — the arrival of the duke and duchess of sussex to south africa is marked with cheers, song and dance. it's the couple's first official tour with four—month—old son archie.
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hello everyone — this is afternoon live. it's called 0peration matterhorn — and it's the biggest peace time operation to repatriate britons stranded abroad — after the collapse of thomas cook. the civil aviation authority has chartered a fleet of jets to bring home more than 150,000 british holidaymakers. thomas cook — britain's oldest package tour company — went into compulsory liquidation at 2am. its collapse puts at risk 22,000 jobs around the world — 9,000 of them here in the uk. our business correspondent simon gompertz reports. flying back for the last time, the final thomas cook flights are bringing home holiday—makers early today. the passengers lucky enough to get on these being brought by staff expecting to lose theirjobs. as soon as we landed,
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they were all crying. it is devastating, it is a legacy that has gone. as i say, i worked for them for ten years and i got loads of friends who, it is their livelihood, it is tragic. emotional, very emotional. the cabin crew were all crying. a bit sombre, to be honest. for a company that big to be going that long, to be going down, it is devastating. thomas cook's planes are now stuck on the ground, impounded as part of the liquidation. most not available to help with the rescue after frantic negotiations to win extra backing failed early this morning. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. people were still turning up at uk airports, only to find their holiday is cancelled. if they bought a package, they will get a refund but the money might not be enough or arrive in time to book something else. this is the scene that greeted
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travellers at manchester. not much good if it is your honeymoon. we are absolutely gutted, we have looked forward to this for a long time. had the wedding injuly, so it's been another couple of months waiting for this. yeah, absolutely, just totally gutted. i had a bit of a sixth sense at two o'clock this morning, got up and checked the website and that is when it hit the fan, basically. the shops are closed today. that is more than 500 of them, so real gaps on the high streets and the people who work in shops like this make up a big share of the 9,000 or sojobs and livelihoods which are affected by the collapse. in nottingham, they came in to be told the grim news. then the door was locked for the last time. 0ne family in pathos felt abandoned by the company. thomas cook has not paid the hotel yet, they have warned us they have not been paid.
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we are left in the dark, there is no thomas cook representative helping or anything like that as they have just walked out. no contact. now the emergency effort to get people back. this is new york last night, and this is minorca today. passengers who boughtjust a flight and not a package will be included for free, but not if they return it after the 6th of october. we have got about 40 aircraft we brought in from around the world and we will, over the next two weeks, run about 1,000 flights. this covers 18 countries and 55 airports. with thomas cook's planes now out of the picture, the first rescue flights provided by easyjet, ba, virgin and other carriers are due in soon. it is a massive evacuation. the aim, to get the holiday—makers back, then count the cost. simon gompertz, bbc news. thomas cook founded his travel
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company almost two centuries ago, offering short railwayjourneys in the east midlands for a shilling. his company went on to become one of the biggest names in the travel industry, with millions of customers every year. now it's collapsed with debts of 1.7bn pounds. so, what went wrong? emma simpson reports. venice, a popular holiday destination, even back in 1898. and in the corner of this famous square, there is thomas cook, already doing business. and the shop front there in the background survived the war years too. go to place for travel. and then came the boom, large numbers of brits started to have enough money to go abroad and thomas cook rode the wave. don'tjust book it, thomas cook it. becoming one of the world's best known holiday brands, opening hundreds of high street shops. it merged with the owner of this brand in 2007 to create a european travel giant,
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but its finances soon became stretched. thomas cook was a business with a huge amount of debt, it almost went bust in 2011 and it has not had the financial resilience to weather the huge changes in the market, with low—cost carriersjet2 coming along, people booking online rather than through traditional high street agents and more recent factors, we have had brexit, consumer confidence has been knocked, weather conditions, all sorts going on and it has added up to a perfect storm for thomas cook. by may this year, the warning lights were flashing, thomas cook slumping to a 1—5p loss. last month, a £900 million rescue plan was hatched. it planned to sell large parts of its business to its largest shareholder, chinese company fosun and then a last—minute demand from the banks for 200 million to keep it going. that went up to 250 million over the weekend. the government was as for help but it seems it would only have
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been a temporary fix. there were real systemic problems there that we felt that if money was put into it, which is not something the government would normally do for a travel company, we would end up with it back and spending more money to repatriate people so it wasn't a goer. the government is now looking into how thomas cook collapsed and how it was managed. executives were paid more than £20 million in bonuses over the last five years. the fallout looks set to be enormous. but who knows what the future will bring? emma simpson, bbc news. the first british tourists are being flown back to the uk following the collapse of the travel company thomas cook. about 150,000 people are believed to have been left stranded overseas. 9,000 jobs are at risk after attempts to negotiate a bailout package failed. operations to bring people back to the uk are being handled by the government and the civil aviation authority. the transport secretary grant shapps has been giving an update on how the operation is going.
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i have just returned from an emergency cobra meeting where we have been working through exactly where we are up to with the 45 aircraft available to us. 150,000 people to return. we should get about nine aircraft in the air and we shall get several thousand of them back today. we are not asking people to come back early from their holidays. they should leave on the date they were supposed to leave, having first checked the thomas cook website before they leave for the airport. do you think the senior executives of thomas cook should hand back their bonuses?” executives of thomas cook should hand back their bonuses? i know the business secretary has asked for a very urgent quickly progress investigation of all of that, the situation that has led to this insolvency so i know that is being looked into but for today, my interest is making sure we get this huge repatriate programme, everyone
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getting back to the country i've checked in on the details with the emergency cobra meeting this afternoon and we are on track so far. can you provide reassurances for members of staff who have lost theirjobs who fear for members of staff who have lost their jobs who fear they for members of staff who have lost theirjobs who fear they may not be paid for the previous month of work? the insolvency practice will be on the straightaway and making sure the correct rules are followed. 0bviously correct rules are followed. obviously a very tragic day for people who have worked for thomas cook, a company with a very long history and track record but i want to make sure that we get people back into the country and my colleagues across the government to set up a task force as a result of the emergency cobra this afternoon and a task force will be helping with their welfare and looking after having people into jobs their welfare and looking after having people intojobs for the 9,000 people in this country who will have lost theirjob because of what has happened. how long do you think it will take to get everyone back to the uk? we will run this
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shadow airline for a two—week period and then we have discussed the progress of that. everything is running smoothly at the moment though when i say smoothly, people will experience delays, we are not running the original airline but we intend to get this done all within the next two weeks and end this phase of the rescue. as thousands of workers at the company face losing theirjobs, these workers at the company's hq in peterborough have been reacting to the news. it is not just it is notjust a job but a family. we all love each other. is this the last day for you? for me personally, yes, i'm not coming back. they have been several meetings today so it is what it is and it cutting but we hope something will happen and maybe some of the business comes back. there's a lot of life in this business. it's got a great following so business. it's got a great following
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so hopefully something will come back. i got a mortgage to pay and kids to look after but right now, i got kids at home. i've never been on benefits so i don't know what to do. i'm not the only one. imagine the 50 who have been working here for years. let's speak to our reporter dave guest who's at manchester airport. the problem here is 9,000 jobs, 3,000 are from the manchester area as well so the impact at knock—on effect from this is massive? it is. 0ver my shoulder you can see the thomas cook logo on that hunger because the airline business actually had its main uk office here in manchester. they had something like 18 aircraft which were based here at manchester. those aircraft have all been granted today. in addition to that, i understand they transferred a lot of e—marketing jobs into the manchester area and
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recently so it has been a major blow for employment in manchester. the mayor has this afternoon said that he is setting up a task force to try and sort out alternative employment for those who have been affected in this region. the first flight from new york has arrived in the nasty minutes? yes within the past after our comet was a charter flight which landed have an hour ago. the thomas cook passengers on that flight had got through check—in in new york and then the company went bust and so they were not able to get onto their thomas cook plain, they had to wait for one of the planes to be made available and the touchdown at about 3:40 and are going through customs formalities and are hoping to speak to them later. the next did you hear is from split in croatia. this was a plane due to arrive at 1:30 this afternoon, then put back. we think it will be here at about, actually
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four: 20. any time now. they are not running the normal airline, they are running the normal airline, they are running an emergency shadow airline survey are getting people back as quickly as they can buy kerry there will be a lot of disruption and uncertainty for people to. labour has promised to reduce the average working week to 32 hours with no loss of pay, if it wins power. the shadow chancellor john mcdonnell also told delegates at the party conference he would ban zero—hours contracts. it comes as the party's leader, jeremy corbyn, is facing a revolt over his brexit strategy. can i ask you to behave with respect to our members and our conference? labour has promised to reduce the average working week to 32 hours with no loss of pay, if it wins power. the shadow chancellor john mcdonnell also told delegates
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some key figures back remain and, this morning, a big union supporter broke ranks to say it would, too. there are very different views in the party. surely if you have negotiations, you don't determine your position beforehand, you wait to see what is negotiated and the deal on the table, the devil that is in the detail, and then you would make that decision. that is the rational way forward. having to decide to be ambiguous now would be a mistake, frankly. the one argument used to justify it is to say when you negotiate with the eu, you have to be ambiguous. that is not true. jeremy corbyn has pledged to go along with what members decide but losing a key policy is not what the leadership wants. jeremy corbyn has been trying to keep everyone on site and some have run out of patience. labour would much rather be talking
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about its plans for power. the shadow chancellor is pledging big changes to the economy, like a shorter working week. their next labour government will reduce the average full working week to 32 hours within the next decade. it will be a shorter working week with no loss of pay. and a pledge to spend £6 billion a year providing free personal care to over 65s in england. expensive policies but labour says tax will pay for it. but the road to power is complicated. jeremy corbyn needs to keep his own party on side and the last few days have shown that is often not easy. nick eardley, bbc news. this is the moment whenjohn mcdonnell paid tribute to the labour leader and the conference delegates
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began singing "0h, jeremy corbyn." no matter what the smears and personal attacks by the gutter press, he always responds and embodies the kinder, gentler politics he advocates and i'm so proud ofjeremy corbyn. applause and cheers. # 0h, jeremy corbyn, 0h, jeremy corbyn. 0h, jeremy corbyn # and we'll be live at the conference, hearing from our chief political correspondent vicki young shortly. you're watching afternoon live, these are our headlines: thomas cook collapses after negotiations fail. 150,000 holiday—makers have been stranded, triggering a huge repatriate effort. the showdown over brexit, labour
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promises a lesser hours awake they win the general election. it isa win the general election. it is a race we can win. coming up, the duke and sussex arrive for their first official tour asa arrive for their first official tour as a family. in sport, wales upon their rugby world cup campaign with a convincing victory over georgia. they ran in six tries as they move to the top of their group. jonny bairstow has been dropped from england's test tour of new zealand. selectors announce their squad for the two—man series in november. british number one kyle edmund is looking for another coach after parting company with mark hylton following his fourth straight defeat this morning. i'll be back with other stories at 4:30. a ruling on the legality of boris johnson's decision to suspend parliament for five weeks will be announced by the supreme court at
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10:30 tomorrow morning. 11 justices have heard argument on behalf of the prime minister that prorogation is not a matter for the courts. the court has also heard submissions that the pm is trying to limit mps' scrutiny of his brexit policy. parliament is currently due to return on 14 october, with the uk scheduled to leave the eu on 310ctober. a 20—year—old—man has been arrested on suspicion of attempted murder after two police officers were hit by a car in west sussex. the officers had been carrying out a routine drugs check in littlehampton when they and another man were "deliberately" struck. all three people are being treated in hospital for their injuries which are not said to be life threatening. at least seven children have died and almost 60 injured after a classroom collapsed this morning at a primary school in the kenyan capital nairobi. the wooden structure at precious talent top school, collapsed just minutes after the start of the school day. rescue workers and parents had to lift blocks and dig through the rubble of the flattened two storey building in search of survivors.
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government officials have opened an investigation into the cause of the accident. the teenage climate activist, greta thunberg, has told world leaders at the united nations climate summit that they had stolen her childhood with' empty words'. in an impassioned speech at the opening of the conference in new york, the 16 year old was highly critical of politicians‘ who she says are not doing enough to protect the environment. there will be no solutions or plans presented in line with these figures here today. because these numbers are too uncomfortable and you are still not mature enough to tell it like it is. you are failing us but the young people are starting to understand your betrayal. the eyes of all future generations are upon you. and if you choose to fail us, i say, we will never forgive you. we
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will not let you get away with this. right here, right now is where we draw the line. the world is waking up draw the line. the world is waking up and change is coming, whether you like it or not. thank you. borisjohnson has refused six times to answer questions on whether he failed to declare a potential conflict of interest in how money was given to a us businesswoman when he was london the sunday times said jennifer arcuri attended trade missions with mrjohnson and was given over £26,000 of public money. the prime minister refused to address the claims when pressed byjournalists during a flight to new york. two colleagues who worked at a cctv monitoring company
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in wiltshire have beenjailed for illegally accessing video footage from the autopsy of footballer emiliano sala. sala‘s body was found in the wreckage of a plane earlier this year. sherry bray was jailed for 14 months. her colleague christopher ashford was given 5 months. in a victim impact statement emiliano sala‘s sister romina said: "i couldn‘t believe there were people so evil and wicked who would do that." the duke and duchess of sussex have arrived in south africa with their four—month—old son, archie. it‘s their first official tour as a family. during the trip prince harry will pay tribute to his mother princess diana‘s campaign against landmines. 0ur reporter pumza fihlani has been with the royals on their tour — she brought us up to date. the very first place they visited is considered to be the murder capital of south africa. there they wanted to see a project that is part of empowering young women and giving
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them self defence classes but also teaching children about their rights and how to access the justice system. currently we are at an area called district six which is a former residential area where people of colour and mixed heritage live for about 100 years until forcibly removed by the apartheid government and this was declared a wide area. they will arrive shortly and what they will do here is follow their heritage and learn about their history. when she addressed the people earlier, she stressed it was important for her as a woman of colour to be able to experience the history of south africa and look at ways that lessons can be learned about how to live better across committees. how much coverage is this visit getting in south africa given that we are not talking about the airorthe given that we are not talking about the air or the second in line to the throne here? it has been a welcome
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distraction for south africans in the last few weeks. we have had very grim reports they return to violence so grim reports they return to violence so it is a welcome break for lots of people here. you can see hundreds of people here. you can see hundreds of people have lined the streets, hoping to catch a of them as they make their way to the district. it is also a moment when people are talking about if they were crt or not. a lot of people excited to know they are in town and they will be making their way through the streets of cape town. let‘s return to our top story now, the collapse of thomas cook —— we can cross live to manchester airport now, where the first of the 155,000 british tourists, stranded overseas after the travel agent went bust, have started arriving back at home. this plane has been coming from split in croatia. the uk civil
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aviation authority coordinating this repatriation describes it as the biggest in peacetime. after the tour operators ceased trading. more passengers returning home but not necessarily to the airport of their departure. 0ne necessarily to the airport of their departure. one of the issues that many have been campaigning about is that they are having to make long journeys once the land to get to their airport of departure. that is their airport of departure. that is the latest. we saw a plane coming from your york and short time ago but those repatriation flights are now under way and a mission over the next two weeks is to get 150,000 people back home. it‘s been a good night for british stars at the us tv awards, the emmys. phoebe waller—bridge, the writer and creator of fleabag, and jodie comer, the star of killing eve, won two of the night‘s big prizes. here‘s our north america correspondent peter bowes.
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posing for the camera, and parading the purple carpet, hollywood royalty along with the kings and queens of game of thrones, the fantasy drama that has dominated the small screen for much of the past decade. ..game of thrones. it was the year‘s most nominated show and won the night‘s top award for best drama. but it was fleabag that stole the show. the dark comedy that started as a one—woman play at the edinburgh festival is now the toast of hollywood. the reason that i do it is this! best comedy, director, writing and best actress for phoebe waller—bridge, the show‘s creator and star. jodie comer, who plays a psychopathic assassin in killing eve took the award for best actress in a drama, beating her co—star sandra oh. my mum and dad are in liverpool who i didn‘t invite because i didn‘t think this was going to be my time. billy porter made history, the first openly gay man to win for best actor in a drama
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for his performance in pose. ben whishaw‘s portrayal of norman scott in a very english scandal won him the award for best supporting actor. he‘d already been celebrating. i'm hung over! there were also awards for chernobyl, the docudrama about the 1986 nuclear disaster, and netflix‘s black mirror, bandersnatch, the interactive film in which viewers have a say in the storyline. thank you very much. television is enjoying a golden age. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. skies over an indonesian province turned red over the weekend, thanks to the widespread forest fires which have plagued huge parts of the country. every year, fires in indonesia create a smoky haze that can end up blanketing the entire south east asian region. the unusual sky is caused by a phenomenon known as rayleigh scattering, when haze moves away from hot spots and filters out the sunlight.
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now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. although some of us will keep drier weather as they go through the rest of this afternoon, there is a slow slide into much more unsettled weather conditions. some people have been looking for a dry place to stay ahead of the change. the unsettled weather is brought to us by this area of low pressure with these weather fronts pushing area of low pressure with these weatherfronts pushing into the south—west at the moment bringing outbreaks of rain so it is turning wet and that rain will be heavy at times but this afternoon‘s rush—hour home from work. across the north—east, it is most likely to stay dry. 0vernight rain will continue to push my northwards and eastwards, turning more persistent and increasingly heavy as well. it will be a mild night but tomorrow, a really wet start to the day across wales and south—west england with this area of heavy rain extending
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northwards and eastwards. some getting 30 to 50 monitors but there could be a few places that get 70 metres of rain, bringing the risk of some glazed flooding. that is the latest weather. this is bbc news — our latest headlines: the first plane arrives back at manchester airport as part of the biggest re—patriation in peacetime — after the collapse of thomas cook leaves 15,000 holiday—makers stranded. the government has held an emergency cobra meeting to discuss its response to the filing. for thousands of thomas cook employees the news they‘d been dreading came in the early hours of the morning — after rescue talks failed. labour promises a four—day working week within a decade with no loss of pay — if they win the next general election. meanwhile jeremy corbyn faces a battle over labour‘s brexit policy — members will choose between two competing strategies at the party‘s conference later this afternoon. borisjohnson has refused six times to answer questions on whether he failed to declare a potential conflict of interest
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in how money was given to a us businesswoman when he was london mayor. in new york, world leaders, including borisjohnson, gather for a special un climate summit. the teenage activist greta thunberg accused them of betraying her generation through inaction. the eyes of all future generations are upon you. if you choose to fail us, i say, we will never forgive you. the duke and duchess of sussex arrive in south africa with their young son, archie for theirfirst official tour as a family. let‘s return now to the labour party conference in brighton where jeremy corbyn is facing possible defeat over his brexit policy. the labour leader wants to go into the next general election in a "neutral" position, offering voters a choice in a referendum, but members are pushing for the party to support remain. 0ur chief poltical
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correspondent vicki young joins us from brighton now. it is also the voice of the union that are perhaps most effective here. yes, the union's controlled half of the vote on the conference floor, so what they decide to do is important and cut like unison have said today that they will back that idea of very firmly saying that labour would campaign to remain. there has been a shift in policy over the last year, this time last year, the party was still arguing about whether there should be another referendum or not. they have accepted that, the big question is, what does jeremy accepted that, the big question is, what doesjeremy corbyn do going into a general election? can he a nswer into a general election? can he answer the question, are you for staying or leaving the eu? let‘s discuss this now with the labour mp with me. you are signed up for another referendum of course, you have campaign for that. just explain what is wrong with the party saying we will renegotiate a deal and once we will renegotiate a deal and once we find out what the deal is, we
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will then decide what we want. we need to be very clear with the people of the country. we need to be saying, when we go into our second referendum, our final xi, which saying, when we go into our second referendum, ourfinalxi, which i think we must have then we need to be saying which way we will campaign. —— our final say. be saying which way we will campaign. —— ourfinal say. for me and many of my members, from any of my constituents, for people across the country, they understand that they need labour to be saying, we will campaign for remain, four remaining as part of the european union. that way, we protectjobs, protect our public services, jobs and livelihoods across my constituency and across the rest of the country, that is what is critical, and that is why we need that leadership and a clear stance. by that leadership and a clear stance. byjeremy corbyn and his allies would say there are a large number of people who voted to leave, and he is thinking about them as well, and he wants a credible alternative on
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that ballot paper. it is right for him to negotiate a new deal. if he says now, i will campaign for remain, there is no way he will get a good dealfrom the eu. remain, there is no way he will get a good deal from the eu. we need to be clear about what we want, and we know, and the governments own papers, the research that has been done, shows clearly, categorically, that leaving the eu is going to make us poorer. that leaving the eu is going to make us poorer. it will not and make us poorer, but it risks the break—up of the uk, it also putsjobs and livelihoods at risk. that is why as a party, we are campaigning, we want equality, socialjustice, we are standing up for my constituents across my constituency, cardiff north, for theirjobs, livelihoods, workers' rights, environmental rights, all of which were hard fought for within the european union, and that is what we need to be clear that we are doing. people in clear of another referendum say quite often, we need to finish this
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one way or another, but the idea that a second referendum is actually going to finish this is not truth. what if it is the same result? a reverse result but just what if it is the same result? a reverse result butjust as close? how do we know you will accept the next one if you didn‘t accept the first one? it is not a matter of not accepting the first one, that referendum is three and a half years ago now, and it was fought on the back of lies, both sides were very poor campaigns, but not only that, nobody knew what leaving the eu actually meant. very few people. now, we have seen the difficulty. this is -- now, we have seen the difficulty. this is —— this is not a clear—cut case of getting out of the eu are staying in, this is much more involved in that. —— involved than that. our communities are in the benefits of staying in the eu, all of our communities across the country, that is why we need to be staying in, for those benefits.
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being an internationalist, outward facing nation, not isolationist and not bowing to borisjohnson's right—wing populist tune. not bowing to borisjohnson's right-wing populist tune. thank you very much. those votes will happen we think some time after a 5:15 p m. thank you for that update. sport now on afternoon live with holly hamilton. the next stop for england‘s cricketers is new zealand, but one world cup winner won‘t be in the test team. that is right. it‘s been a busy summer for england‘s cricketers — but after that rather lacklustre ashes performance. there have been some repercussions — with one glaring omission in the squad. jonnie bairstow has been axed — his poor form with the bat had led to speculation that he might miss out. he averages 20.25 in tests this year, sojos buttler will take the gloves. there are a few new faces in there as well — warwickshire opener dominic sibley has been rewarded for his remarkable summer with a first england call—up. bairstow will be on a flight
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to new zealand though — he has been included in the t20 squad for the series starting on 1st november. the two—test series begins on 21st to end a busy year for engand. isn‘t it just. let‘s isn‘t itjust. let‘s talk about by, isn‘t itjust. let‘s talk about rugby, the world cup of course. a wales start with a victory, but many we re wales start with a victory, but many were saying they should have done. this is the thing, where a lot of teams are beating others by huge amounts, a high level of expectation, just like we saw with england and tonga yesterday. wales ran in a total of six tries as they covincingly beat georgia in their world cup opener. 43—14 the final score. and that result moves them top of their group just above australia on points difference. from tokyo, our correspondent katie gornall sent us this report. injapan, the
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in japan, the railways injapan, the railways are an institution. in wales, rugby is like a religion, and these fans making their pilgrimage to the world cup we re their pilgrimage to the world cup were letting the train take the strain. they arrived here, as they seem strain. they arrived here, as they seem to do at every tournament, bringing confidence and national pride. these wales fans have enjoyed a smoother journey here pride. these wales fans have enjoyed a smootherjourney here than their team. it has been a difficult build—up —— build up for warren gatland as a sitting coach was sent home for allegedly breaking the betting laws. but this is wales most experienced team yet in a world cup, and they are unlikely to be knocked off course. with a record equalling 129 caps, alun wynjones is well versed in harnessing the passion of an occasion like this. after two minutes, the welsh fans were singing again. jonathan davies allowed to saunter over the line. dan biggar usually finishes these in his sleep. but he would have plenty of chances to make amends, as georgia were sent one way and the next. justin to break with a second, while is a well
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oiled machine. a third try for the bid for a liam williams secure the bonus point with a flourish before half—time. georgia 29 points down at the break. georgia‘s strength is in their pack, but only in the second half today show it, with a textbook drive to cut wales‘ lead. it was no more than a consolation as well wrestle back control. warren gatland‘s sider up and running, a step closer to the prize then they crave more than anything else. british number one kyle edmund has parted company with his coach mark hilton. edmund has lost four matches in a row — most recently at the chengdu 0pen this morning — and he‘s been knocked out in the first round of three successive events. the decision to split from hilton was made last week, and he‘ll be assisted in the short term by colin beecher, who coached him when he was in his late teens. rugby league‘s international governing body has denied giving clearance for israel folau to return to the sport. folau had his contract terminated by rugby australia after writing on social media that "hell awaits" gay people — which breached a players‘ code of conduct.
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the tonga national rugby league said he had been cleared to play for the country at next month‘s 0ceania cup. but the rlif says that‘s incorrect as the orgnaisation has not been formally asked to consider the matter. just one other line — the iaaf have confirmed that russia will be banned from the world athletics championship which start at the end of the week. the russia‘s athletics was suspended in november 2015 after a report found evidence of widespread doping in the sport. more on that story on the website. that‘s all the sport for now. gavin ramjaun is here after 5 — bye from me. now on afternoon live, let‘s go nationwide and see what‘s happening around the country in our daily visit to the bbc newsrooms around the uk. let‘s go to beccy wood
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from bbc midlands today, who is out in stoke—on—trent today as part of a bbc—wide project — we are stoke. it is one week long, i‘ll be with you injust a moment. and in cardiff, bbc wales today‘s steffan messenger is going to be talking about how trees are revealing the impacts of climate change. so beccy, how is the first day of we are stoke going? it has gone very well, welcome to stoke—on—trent, i don‘t know how much you know about stoke—on—trent asa much you know about stoke—on—trent as a city itself, it is one city made up of six unique towns. we are currently in a shopping centre in the class city centre. we are asking people to come and give their story ideas, and it is filling up. we have lots of people suggesting things already. i grew up in this city, sandwiched between and birmingham, and at times, there can be a perception that most of the headlines surrounding stoke have a negative connotation, whether it be
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brexit with a drug monkey dust. we thought as a part of this project, we would chat to young people in this city and find out what they made of it. the residents of stoke voted to leave the eu. stoke—on—trent was firmly for brexit. hi, my name is adi. hi, i'm chris, from stoke. i, and emily. ithink the media portrayal of stoke and so unfair. asign the media portrayal of stoke and so unfair. a sign that there is so much more than these negative labels.|j understand stoke's history regarding ukip and everything else and the links that they have with brexit, but i think times have moved on. links that they have with brexit, but i think times have moved onfi is annoying to see it in the headlines, everyone vote ukip in stoke, but it doesn‘t correlate to the views of the everyday person in
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stoke. it is hard to remove the label once you have been given it. i tell everyone all the time, robbie williams is from stoke. is a legend, the greatest? i don't know. his mum used to live down my road, he was a lwa ys used to live down my road, he was always in the pub by my house, it is pretty funny, everyone says robbie williams is coming in today, and eve ryo ne williams is coming in today, and everyone would go to the pub. everyone isn‘t just everyone isn‘tjust walking around on monkey dust. it hasn't come from stoke—on—trent itself, it is from outer cities and brought into stoke. stoke is thriving of it because the people are struggling. focus more on the people who i've got clean. mate, sausage, bean and cheese, that is the one. it's so hard to describe, if you say it's a savoury pancake, thatis
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if you say it's a savoury pancake, that is not appealing. but they are delicious. i am one for trying stuff, i'll be honest, but you not entertained apples?” stuff, i'll be honest, but you not entertained apples? i recommend oak xto entertained apples? i recommend oak x to everyone. i should be a brand ambassador oatcakes. if anybody sees how friendly we are. stoke is not doing well, shops are closing down... the people in stoke are actually counteracting all of that. everyone knows everyone, we know our neighbours. a we really need to focus more on people who are making stoke an incredible place for the future. so there we have it, that is what they think, but we want to hear what you think. if you live here, tell us your stories. 0n middens to tonight, we will make sure that we cover that issue. —— midlands today. the issue of charity has been popping up, a lot of people saying the work they do and is spectacular, we will look at micro—charities tonight and have
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at micro—charities tonight and have a round—up of today. i know you are here on thursday with me, simon, i have an oatca ke here on thursday with me, simon, i have an oatcake for you, we will try it, whether you want a tuner or tinned peaches, you let me know, i'll tinned peaches, you let me know, i‘ll sort it out for you. tinned peaches, you let me know, i'll sort it out for you. just bring both, becky, it‘s quite simple. see you on thursday. and steffan, how can the rings inside oak trees tell us about what the climate was like in the past? this is a fascinating research project, led by swansea, they have been analysing samples from hundreds of oak trees, right across the uk. and looking in particular at the rings that form inside the trunks, year on year. we all that is how you find out how old a tree is, but did you know it is also a natural archive of climate data, of the weather that that tree was exposed to during its lifetime. 0ak trees in particular are very sensitive to how wet or dry particular are very sensitive to how wet ordry our particular are very sensitive to how wet or dry our summers have been, and that affects the chemical make—up of the rings in the oak tree. scientists have been able to
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analyse all of those examples and create a really detailed, intricate picture of summer rainfall in the uk, stretching back tojust picture of summer rainfall in the uk, stretching back to just over 800 yea rs uk, stretching back to just over 800 years ago, so uk, stretching back to just over 800 years ago, so back to the 1200s, so way beyond any official records that we have held by the wrecked met 0ffice. we have held by the wrecked met office. what do the findings show? festival, they support what they met 0ffice festival, they support what they met office and others have said that the summers in the uk are getting wetter, since around the 1960s, and what they say is really good about having this really long detailed picture of summer rainfall in the uk, is that they can sight to see how unusual that is. they are also able to delve back in time, to pinpoint periods in our history, where we have had years or decades of bad weather, and to match that to historical accounts of problems, famines and droughts. they say that a cts famines and droughts. they say that acts as a warning to us about the threat that climate change poses. here is professor mary gage and from
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swa nsea here is professor mary gage and from swansea university‘s tree ring research group to explain more. there are huge lessons for us about what happens to our society is when our climate deteriorates. in the past, and happened naturally, due to the natural changes in the environment, now in the near future, thatis environment, now in the near future, that is happening at our hands. the chances of having more extreme events in our summer are chances of having more extreme events in our summer are increasing all the time. we are still an agricultural country, when we have wet summers, it is really hard to grow crops. in the past, in the 12th century, that resulted in famines that took out 20% of the population of europe. as the climate starts to deteriorate, we have more control over our societies now, but we can still expect life to get really hard. now, we have some very good feetin hard. now, we have some very good feet in stoke, but i‘ll stay with you, because we are looking at records of uk rainfall on display for the public, and they are going to do this in a new unusual way, and they? that's right, the team has turned this into a nine metre long
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wooden jigsaw with a piece for every year of rainfall, that will go on display at wales national waterfront museum in swansea this autumn. the idea is that it starts a conversation with the public about climate change. i should say finally, this research has also led to another significant discovery, because it was as well at looking at the rings inside trees, they also looked at timber, oak timber, in old historic buildings. they have discovered a new method of dating those buildings by looking at the chemistry inside the rings. so these oak tree rings telling us new things we didn‘t know about our climate history, but also filling in some of the gaps in terms of the age of some of our historic buildings as well. it really is fascinating, and i‘m sure there will be plenty more on bbc wales later. thank you, stefan. i will see you on thursday, becky, in stoke—on—trent, definitely wants to come and say hello, please do so. we are putting on some sort of show, i know ensure —— i‘m not sure what it will be, to but be great.
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if you would like to see more on any of those stories, you can access them via the bbc iplayer. we go nationwide every weekday afternoon at 4:30pm on afternoon live. a quick line of iranian breaking news, the steiner in perak, british tanker, is free to leave after the completion ofjudicial tanker, is free to leave after the completion of judicial and legal process. “— completion of judicial and legal process. —— stena impero is free to leave. this is the ship that was held by iranians in the strait of hormuz, but as we are seeing there, the stena impero is now allowed to move on. the seven crew members have been freed already, they were freed on humanitarian grounds. iran are
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the vessel at the time of violating international maritime rules, this siege are coming two weeks after an iranian tanker was held off gibraltar with the help of the royal marines. that was the agent daria, and that has been allowed to depart, and that has been allowed to depart, and it would now appear that iran is also allowing the british tanker to leave its territorial waters. the ste na leave its territorial waters. the stena impero are free to leave after the completion of judicial and stena impero are free to leave after the completion ofjudicial and legal process. no indication as to what that means and how long it will take, but it does appear to be a positive move from the iranian ambassador to the uk. more than 150,000 british thomas cook holiday—makers are facing an anxious wait to find out how and when they‘ll get home. the first groups have begun to arrive back in the uk, as part of a mass programme. the uk‘s civil aviation authority is co—ordinating the repatriation, the biggest in peacetime. these passengers were flown back
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from zante to glasgow airport. can‘t really say anything about the flight, it can‘t really say anything about the flight, it was fantastic. what else can you say? the airways were brilliant, about a 35 minute delay, that was it, other than that, brilliant. there were 20 people on our flight when we got on, so they left 20 people behind. they are still sending out e—mails to tell us to check in, telling us the flight was still on. it was bbb —— bbc news that we saw the airline was without business and flight had been cancelled. that is when people from home told us and we jumped in a taxi. i do feel once your home? relieved, but there are a lot of people on the other side, the greek staff were brilliant, they kept everyone informed on what was going on, it was flawless.
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in a moment, we will have the latest business news. first a look at the headlines on afternoon live: thomas cook collapses after last—minute negotiations to save the world‘s oldest tour operatorfail—150,000 holiday—makers have been stranded, triggering a huge repatriation effort. with a showdown over brexit divisions looming — labour promises a four—day working week within a decade if they win the next general election. at a climate summit in new york, the teenage activist greta thunberg accuses world leaders of betraying her generation for failing to tackle the crisis. here‘s your business headlines on afternoon live: the boss of thomas cook has apologised for the collapse of the 178—year old travel company. it had been struggling for some time but had been brokering a £900 million rescue deal with china‘s fosun. however, it failed to raise an extra £200mn contingency fund demanded by its lenders
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and in the wake of thomas cook‘s collapse — we look at how other airlines and travel firms are reacting. amid accustations of price hikes, easyjet and tui have seen their shares receive a boost this morning — with tui the biggest riser on the ftse100. and in other news,thejob of wework‘s chief excutive adam neumann could be on line, amidst reports that japan‘s softbank — the office space provider‘s biggest shareholder is looking to oust him. this after wework‘s planned flotation was suspended, following waning investor interest and tumbling valuations. the collapse of thomas cook marks the end of an era, the biggest tour operator ever. a lot of people are saying, could anything have been done? that is a question being asked by many, the government refused to step in over the weekend to lend them a hand, but what they are now doing, we have had in the last half an hour, is masterminding the
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operation to bring back 150,000 british travellers from their holiday destinations. the minister described it as running a shadow airline. 0ver described it as running a shadow airline. over the next couple of weeks, with 45 planes bringing those passengers home, but that is a big question, could anything have been done? many were saying it was the perfect storm, if you look at what has affected thomas cook, from blaming brexita... from has affected thomas cook, from blaming brexit a... from the weather, to fuel costs, but frankly, how much of this could have been avoided? let‘s see if we can get a markets guest to answer that for us. this is a really intriguing one, isn‘t it? if you look at what happened to thomas cook, 0k, isn‘t it? if you look at what happened to thomas cook, ok, the 200 million demand was the final straw, but ultimately, this was a company that had a really troubled few yea rs. that had a really troubled few years. it has, however, it has an amazing brand and in terms of could anything have been done, everyone knows points to the government, if i might put on my evil capitalist
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hedge fund manager had, then i would say, well, actually, when companies like this have problems, it is not for the government to step in, because otherwise, we will be consta ntly because otherwise, we will be constantly bailing companies out. having said that, if you are a bank, you get a free bailout, that will cost the government a heck of a lot of money to support these people if they end up redundant. if i might also add, the one thing that hasn't been covered today on this story is there will be a lot of people who are incredibly well trained and talented from thomas cook who are going to be hitting the jobs market. i hope some of these other airlines will be looking around to hire some of these people, i would assume, at good salaries to the market. that all depends, we have been covering job cuts and quite a lot of detail, that all the pens of the demand is out there for those skills, which we certainly hope there is. —— that all depends. let‘s talk about another company which has had its fair share
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of strife in recent years, and that is marks & spencer, because sunday morning is not normally a time to put out an announcement to say that your chief financial officer is moving on. what is going on there? sorry, the audiojust cut out. i think it is quite surprising that of all the people they sat around the marks & spencer sandwiches and thought to get rid of would be the chief financial officer. the positive news with marks & spencer is they make about £1000 in profit every single minute. i think they are particularly good buyer at the moment. their share price today is what it was back in 1990. they have dropped 50% in five years. given their profitability, not a bad one to possibly pick up as a speculative buy at the moment. despite lacklustre sales with the competition on the high street? there are many options out there and marks & spencer doesn‘t seem to be
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making the grade. you are saying lacklustre sales, they were only down a few percentage points, just, profits were down 10%, but profitable nevertheless. food very much in demand, and they are doing something, turning the ship around. lam quite something, turning the ship around. i am quite positive about them. and just briefly, wework, a company in the news for the wrong reasons recently, and now it looks like the biggest investor once the boss out. titillating shenanigans at wework. it wasn't the fact that the ceo was doing drugs, our former prime minister was doing the same marijuana as well, but it is the fa ct marijuana as well, but it is the fact that it was overvalued, and thatis fact that it was overvalued, and that is why the market didn't like it. funds like mind didn't like it, they said, we will not pay those prices at ipo, now that we smell blood, the ceo will have to go, because that is what evil capitalists like to do, we like to get rid of people like that. we
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don't like the look of him, they wa nt don't like the look of him, they want to get rid of the ceo. we will have to wait and see if that happens. put money on it. if he says put money on it... look at those, marks & spencer, despite what we are saying there, the market doesn‘t like this news. who knows what they are thinking out there, but it is perhaps not the right move. it has been a long hustle to get marks & spencer back on track, and that use doesn‘t impress them. the ftse100 not having a good day either. when there are losers like that, there are always winners. tui at the bottom up 2%. now it‘s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. some of us will keep dry weather for this afternoon, but there is some
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u nsettled weather later, some people are looking for a dry place to stay. the u nsettled looking for a dry place to stay. the unsettled weather is brought by low pressure pushing into the south—west, bringing outbreaks of rain. turning wet and the ring will be heavy at times for this afternoon‘s rush hour home from work. across the north—east, that is where it will stay dry with further spells of sunshine this afternoon. 0vernight, rain will push its way north and eastward, turning more persistent and increasingly heavy as well. it will be a mild night, but tomorrow, a really wet start to the day across wales and south—west england, with an area of heavy rain extending northwards and eastward, some getting around 15—30 millimetres, but a few places that get up to 70 metres of rain, bringing a risk of some localised flooding. —— 70 millimetres. and if a thing. mcguinness i don‘t
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feel like i‘m here. i still feel like i‘m in my own
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today at 5 — the travel thomas cook has collapsed, leaving hundreds of thousands of tourists stranded. the first british tourists are flown back to the uk in what will be the biggest re—patriation in peacetime. many holidaymakers‘ plans are ruined — they range from trips of a lifetime to honeymoons. we‘ve looked forward to this for a long time, had the wedding injuly, so it‘s been another couple of months waiting for this. yeah, absolutely, just totally gutted. the collapse of one of the world‘s oldest and largest travel companies puts 22,000 jobs at risk, 9,000 of them in the uk. we‘ll have the latest from manchester airport and we‘ll have some expert advice on what to do if you‘re affected.

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