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tv   BBC News at Five  BBC News  September 23, 2019 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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today at 5 — the travel thomas cook has collapsed, leaving hundreds of thousands of tourists stranded. the first british tourists are flown back to the uk in what will be the biggest re—patriation in peacetime. many holidaymakers‘ plans are ruined — they range from trips of a lifetime to honeymoons. we've looked forward to this for a long time, had the wedding injuly, so it's been another couple of months waiting for this. yeah, absolutely, just totally gutted. the collapse of one of the world's oldest and largest travel companies puts 22,000 jobs at risk, 9,000 of them in the uk. we'll have the latest from manchester airport and we'll have some expert advice on what to do if you're affected. the other main stories
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on bbc news at 5pm: a brexit showdown at the labour party conference. could jeremy corbyn‘s support for a "neutral" stance be defeated by remain supporters? this is the scene live at the conference now and any short after the session there will be a vote on brexit and then a speech from sir keir starmer who is due to address the conference shortly. we will bring you that live. british talent dominates the emmys. we'll speak to luke jennings, the writer who created killing eve. and wales enjoy a strong start to their rugby world cup campaign, beating georgia by 43 points to m in japan.
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it's 5 o'clock. our main story is the collapse of the holiday giant thomas cook and the measures being taken to help those affected. 0peration matterhorn is the biggest—ever peacetime operation to repatriate those britons stranded abroad. the civil aviation authority has chartered a fleet of jets, to bring home more than 150,000 british holiday—makers. thomas cook is britain's oldest package tour company and went into compulsory liquidation at 2am this morning. its collapse puts at risk 22,000 jobs around the world — 9,000 of them here in the uk. our business correspondent simon gompertz reports. flying back for the last time, the final thomas cook flights bringing home holiday—makers early today. the passengers lucky enough to get on these being brought by staff expecting to lose theirjobs. as soon as we landed, they were all crying.
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it is devastating, it is a legacy that has gone. as i say, i worked for them for ten years and i've got loads of friends who, it is their livelihood, it is tragic. emotional, very emotional. the cabin crew were all crying. a bit sombre, to be honest. for a company that big to be going that long, to be going down, it is devastating. thomas cook's planes are now stuck on the ground, impounded as part of the liquidation — most not available to help with the rescue after frantic negotiations to win extra backing failed early this morning. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel. people were still turning up at uk airports, only to find their holidays cancelled. if they bought a package, they will get a refund, but the money might not be enough or arrive in time to book something else. this is the scene which greeted
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travellers at manchester — not much good if it is your honeymoon. we are absolutely gutted, we have looked forward to this for a long time. had the wedding injuly, so it's been another couple of months waiting for this. yeah, absolutely, just totally gutted. i had a bit of a sixth sense at two o'clock this morning, got up and checked the website and that is when it hit the fan, basically. the shops are closed today. that is more than 500 of them, so more gaps on our high streets and the people who work in shops like this make up a big share of the 9,000 or sojobs and livelihoods which are affected by the collapse. 0vernight, that's it, yeah. livelihood's just gone like that. everyone‘s got kids, mortgages and stuff to pay. it's notjust me, everyone is in the same situation. it's very sad, you know, it's a very awful situation personally, for work as well. i've been here since i was 19, so... yeah, it's very sad. in nottingham, they came in to be told the grim news.
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then the door was locked for the last time. 0ne family in paphos felt abandoned by the company. thomas cook has not paid the hotel yet and they have warned us they have not been paid. we are left in the dark. there is no thomas cook representative helping or anything like that as they have alljust walked out. nobody to contact. now the emergency effort to get people back. this is new york last night... and this is menorca today... passengers who boughtjust a flight and not a package will be included for free, but not if their return is after the 6th of october. we have got about 40 aircraft that we've brought in from around the world and we will, over the next two weeks, run about 1,000 flights. this covers 18 countries and 55 airports. with thomas cook's planes now out of the picture, the first rescue flights provided
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by easyjet, ba, virgin and other carriers. it is a massive evacuation. the aim — to get the holiday—makers back, then count the cost. simon gompertz, bbc news. as we saw, lots of thomas cook passengers stranded at airports unable to fly off on holiday and unable to fly off on holiday and unable to fly off on holiday and unable to return in many cases. our correspondent dave guest who's at manchester airport. that flight came in from any kind came in from new york and the pastures that came of that later told us that they had checked and got that far too getting on the site, then the company went bust and then they were told they were not going anywhere from the time being. they merge from the passengers was just one of relief. this is what some of them had to say to us. we kind of knew that we will get home eventually, but it'sjust
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worrying because we all have work tomorrow and then we don't know what is going to happen. you know, how we're going to get home. i don't feel like i'm here, i feel like i'm on my own world, but it's good to be back. feelvery like i'm on my own world, but it's good to be back. feel very sad because we have them all the time, it's a good company and cheap as well. apart from of course the confusion, lots of jobs apart from of course the confusion, lots ofjobs in this part of the world depended on thomas cook as well. the airline had its main offices here at manchester airport and they had transferred a lot of marketing jobs to manchester in the recent past, something like 3000 people depended on thomas cook in the north—west of england for their livelihoods. they are now obviously wondering what is going to happen to them. the mayor of manchester has launched a task force to try to do something to help them. in the meantime, that of a penetration operation, the biggest in peacetime, continues. 150,000 people have to be
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brought home. —— that repatriation operation. people are getting back, but they are going to have to accept that there is going to be some disruption because the government has said it does not replacing thomas cook with an identical airline, they are doing what they can with emergencyjets in the air to get people back as quickly and safely as possible. there is the big question about those people who relied on this company for this job that make those people who relied on this company for their jobs. so more than 150,000 british holiday—makers are facing an anxious wait to find out how and when they'll get home. 0ur europe correspondent gavin lee is in palma, majorca, one of the company's most popular destinations. holiday over, now the problems start for passengers arriving at palma airport, unsure of how they'll get home. the yellow—jacketed civil aviation authority and foreign office staff man the aisles to offer reassurance, but can't offer an easy solution of how to get back to the uk. well, this is 0peration matterhorn in action on the ground
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here at palma airport. now, what we're being told is that around 1500 uk passengers trying to get back today, they will be returning today, we're told — not necessary to the airport that they flew out from. instead of going to glasgow, we've been told, so far as far as we know, we're going to manchester at 7.40pm this evening, so we've got quite a long day ahead of us. we're going to birmingham, which is a bit of a kick, but we're going to get home, so it's not the end of the world. where's home? glasgow. we understand now that we're flying to manchester at 7.40pm tonight? and then there's a bus to newcastle. they've told us we're going to birmingham and then a coach trip for six hours from birmingham up to glasgow. i mean, it's really not suitable at all for me, with my disabilities and that, sitting for like 12 hours. part of the departures terminal is now a waiting room for those left here by the collapse. the staff at thomas cook are working too, maintaining professionalism despite losing theirjobs.
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there's another concern, not just for the thousands of thomas cook travellers here and still in the middle of their holidays, but also for those reliant on the money from thomas cook's once reliable income. well, this is the main thomas cook—run hotel in palma and we've been told by staff that everything's ok, but the management won't speak to us and, if you look, they've got security here for the first time. they're quite nervous. this is one of a number of hotels that, we understand, are waiting still to be paid in arrears from thomas cook and, in the meantime, they're still having to look after the customers, too. reception don't know what's happening. they just said, "yes, the hotel is open, at the moment". we just feel like at any moment like we're vulnerable and we could just be asked to leave. back at palma airport, only one scheduled flight has left for the uk so far. the rest are due to leave tonight. it's calm here — contemplation for the loss of a once—loved airline for later. for now, the priority is on getting home. gavin lee, bbc news, mallorca.
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a dedicated website has been set up for thomas cook customers after the firm collapsed. the details are on your screen now, customers can go to www.thomascook. caa. co. uk. and there's a 2k hour helpline. the number is 0300 303 2800. have a look at that website address and makea have a look at that website address and make a note of the number. if you need to call. let's talk about the labour conference. the labour leaderjeremy corbyn is facing a rebellion revolt over his brexit strategy, as members prepare to choose between two competing stances. they will decide whether labour should explicitly back remain in any future referendum or adopt mr corbyn's stance of staying neutral until a later date. in the next few minutes sir keir starmer, shadow
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brexit secretary, is due to speak and then the voting will take place. we will be there for sir keir starmer‘s speech because it will be a very important contribution to the pa rty‘s a very important contribution to the party's debate on this and he will set out his ground, i'm sure. before that, let's join set out his ground, i'm sure. before that, let'sjoin our set out his ground, i'm sure. before that, let's join our chief political correspondent... vicki young political correspondent... if you're going to the general election with the labour party sing we re election with the labour party sing were not going to tell you how to campaign, oryou were not going to tell you how to campaign, or you expressed at that point. he is saying that he would personally campaign to remain, but how much will he stay onside with jeremy corbyn, just minutes ahead of those crucial votes. there has been a lot of policy announcement here
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today, as well as the bios, debates over brexit. let's discuss some of those. i'm joined by dan carterfrom the shadow cabinet. 0n the policies, some people are looking at these and are saying they are pretty radical policies. —— dan cardin. are saying they are pretty radical policies. —— dan cardinlj are saying they are pretty radical policies. -- dan cardin. i hope that people will see the range of policies are setting a new direction and the next general election will bea and the next general election will be a really big choice for the country. which direction that we go. it's a race at to the bottom or adobe invest in our public services and billy rebuild britain? i'm probably most excited about the policies around the national health service and the labour government will deliver free prescriptions. i think the public will see that any positive move towards the right direction and now england will do it as well as scotland and wales. you know what your critics say, they say
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that you never tell us how you're going to play for it and it is going to be in higher taxes, is it not? the labour party is the only party that cited its spending in the last manifesto. we purchased the grey bit with all the figures. the conservatives, the only numbers in their manifesto where the page numbers. so actually, that is not right. john mcdonnell has been shadow chancellor for four years now and he has taken some big decisions, decisions that will transform our country and economy but we always set out how the spending will take place the question is whether they are workable, a four—day working week. we are told it is not a cap, but about trying to encourage people to do it. they will love the sound of that, but also wonder how you can make it work. a shorter working week with the same money? there is a consensus i'iow with the same money? there is a consensus now coming with the same money? there is a consensus now coming about the economy being broken and the financial times saying that we need to be set to capitalism. this is not just a left platform. this is
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getting support from different sections in the economy and society. and it is radical, but i think that we cannot afford to not provide free ca re we cannot afford to not provide free care for over 65. we cannot afford to continue to work people into the ground in the wages and poverty pay. we need a change in this country and thatis we need a change in this country and that is why the labour party is putting forward these radical ideas which we will implement as a labour government. the biggest show the day at the moment does remain brexit. and until that assault, the other announcements are getting overshadowed, are they not, by internal rows of all that? some in the shadow cabinet are saying that it is not credible to go into a general election without saying how labour would campaign and a referendum? if we start by looking at the extremes on offer at the moment, you have got the liberal democrats anti—democratic policy to revoke. you have the tory government proposing to crash out at the end of next month. and actually, i think there is room there for the labour
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party to be the middle ground, the sensible centre. we're going to have to wind up to go to sir keir starmer has go to tells more about brexit policy. our members, our trade unions and the whole labour movement for supporting me and my tea m movement for supporting me and my team here and decisions that we had to make. thank you for that. can i thank my team who have worked hard again this year in the house of lords and house of commons, winning those votes on behalf of labour. thank you members my team. applause. conference, what a year it has been. and last year's conference motion, do you remember that? you give us a road map. us does to vote down theresa may's deal and we did. —— you asked us to put down
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theresa's deal. you asked us to do everything we could to prevent no deal and we everything we could to prevent no dealand we did. applause. and you asked us to keep a public vote on the table. and we did. applause. but conference, we now face a very different set of challenges to last year. boris johnson and at the most right—wing government in recent history, a prime minister with no moral compass. no principles, no regard for the truth. john major is taking him to court and david cameron, of all people, sales him dash and him self—serving. i do not believe a word johnson says. and neither
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should you. applause. what did he tell us? he told us that brexit would be good for the nhs. it will not. he told us that shutting down parliament had nothing to do with brexit. it has everything to do with brexit. applause. he told us he could unite the country. nothing could be further from the truth. the truth is this, isn't it, that he has never put anyone's interest above his own? and he never will. applause. with dominic cummings pulling his strings, he threatens us with a no—deal brexit. he threatens us with a no—deal brexit. he threatens us with a no—deal brexit. well no deal may not be a problem for boris
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johnson, jacob rees—mogg and dominic raab, but it would be a disaster for working people across this country. applause. conference, this is not a game. that we're playing. in no—deal brexit will see manufacturing torn apart. after the revival, the service sector desolated, chaos and delay at her birders. vital food and medicines will not get through. eu citizens will be left in limbo and the good friday agreement could be imperilled. the open border in northern ireland is not a technical question about how you get people or goods across a line on the road. it
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has any manifestation of peace. applause. -- it is the manifestation of peace. we will never accept boris johnson's reckless approach. never. and that is why we were right, over the summer, to work on a cross—party basis with jeremy the summer, to work on a cross—party basis withjeremy corbyn bringing together the opposition party leaders to take over parliament three weeks ago and pass a law to prevent a no—deal brexit on the 31st of october. applause. we stick theresa may's government is on the government, but at least she occasionally when you vote. so far with this premise, it is johnson now — six corbyn. —— johnson
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zebo — does it not tell you everything that you need to know about borisjohnson that we had to pass a law to prevent him crashing is out of the ego without a deal? and that his first instinct is to try and break the law. his first instinct is to break that law. no one is above the law. applause. and prime minister, if you think we're going to sit idly by whilst you break the law, you have got another think coming. mark my words. applause. whenever we return to parliament — and the sooner the better — we will be ready. applause
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. despite all that, applause . despite allthat, let's applause . despite all that, let's be honest. preventing no deal is vital, but it is not an end in itself. it is an insurance policy. it will not break the deadlock and the country desperately wants to move on. and we have to find a way forward. we're under a duty to find a way forward. and there is no only one way, whether in this government or the next, put it to the people. applause. conference, too much has happened in the last three years for this now to be decided without the consent of
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the public. we need to ask them a basic and vital question — are you prepared to leave with the best deal can be secured or wouldn't you rather remain in the eu? applause. people must have that final say. a referendum in which remain should and will be on the ballot paper. along with the best leave deal that can be secured. applause. and conference, we owe it to those who want to leave to secure that best leave deal and offer it as an option. applause. but if remain wins, we
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will remain a member of the eu, a full member of the eu. applause. conference, last yeari stood before you and said nobody was rolling out the option of remain. we have come a long way an election is coming. we have got a prime minister with no mandate, no plan and in the majority. we have beaten the tories in parliament and, as and when necessary , we in parliament and, as and when necessary, we will beat them again in parliament. i am determined about that. but soon, soon, we're going to have to beat them at the ballot box.
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it isa have to beat them at the ballot box. it is a stark choice. if we lose, we risk another wasted a decade. in no—deal brexit, a hard right agenda stripping away rights and protections and selling off public services. but if we win, if we win labour can pull this country back from the brink. applause. labour can end austerity. rebuild our public services, invest in our communities. the stakes could hardly be higher. and so, i can tell you today, an incoming labour government will legislate for a referendum immediately on taking power and hold that referendum within six months. that is our
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commitment. and i have a simple message, if you want a referendum vote labour. applause .if applause . if you want a final say on brexit, vote labour. if you want a fight for remain, vote labour. applause jeering cheering i have said many times that i will campaignfor i have said many times that i will campaign for remain.
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but let me be very clear. i respect all of those who argue the other way. and conference, let us go into this crucial period of history with oui’ this crucial period of history with our eyes open. we campaigned in 2016 for remain because of our values, because of our values. we are internationalists. we stand in solidarity with our friends and neighbours in europe. we profoundly believe in peace. in reconciliation, in human rights and collaboration across borders. and we'll never put peace in northern ireland in jeopardy.
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applause. conference, those are our values — socialist values then and now. i don't let them guide us through this next period of history. —— and then let them guide us. conference, we didn't just —— and then let them guide us. conference, we didn'tjust campaign to remain. we campaigned to remain and reform. remain and otherfirm. —— remain and every firm. the labour party cannot and should not defend the status quo in europe and at home. we have to make the case of a radical reform. we are the largest socialist party in europe. it is our duty to lead. let's bring our sisters parties together across europe and host an international conference to forge our shared plan for a social europe with the uk at
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the heart, not sitting on the sidelines, leading, not pleading. but conference, we also need to recognise that brexit is deeper and bigger than the simple question of oui’ bigger than the simple question of our relationship with the eu. and we will never get past brexit if we do not understand why, in 2016, millions of people said they wanted change. they did notjust speak, they shouted. they told us that the political and economic system was not working. and they were right about that. applause the status quo is bust. we see
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inequality and injustice everywhere. we desperately need a fundamental shift. in power, and wealth, and an opportunity. that is where is our oui’ opportunity. that is where is our our 2070 manifesto was so popular and we must build on it. —— 2017 ma nifesto and we must build on it. —— 2017 manifesto was so popular. 0nly labour can end child poverty. applause. 0nly labour can confront the moral disgrace of homelessness. applause 0nly labour can transform our economy and insecure work, raise wages and create good jobs across the country. 0nly labour will invest and rebuild our nhs and public services. applause
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and only a labour government will tackle the climate emergency so that we can look the next generation in the eye and say, "we did not let you down". applause conference, the tories have failed. they have wrecked our economy. they have wrecked our public services. they have wrecked our welfare state. and now they are wrecking our international reputation. their time is up. applause we have to beat them. and we will. we have to beat them. and we will. we have to defeatjohnson and we will. we have to defeat his
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politics, and show that decency can triumph. we have to deliver a radical labour government and give people the final say on whether to remain in the eu. let's get on with it. thank you, conference. cheering and applause thank you, conference. be seen at the labour party conference in brighton, said keir starmer, the shadow brexit secretary, delivering his address, in this very heated debate on where the parties should stand on brexit, should they tell voters when the next election comes, possibly within weeks or months. sir keir starmer clearly saying that there will be a referendum proposed and put in effect within six months ofa and put in effect within six months of a labour government coming to power. you know, pinning his colours to the mast because we know he is a big supporter of remain.
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let's rejoin our chief political correspondent vicki young who's at the conference. what was notable for you? he is staying loyal to whatjeremy corbyn is saying because he is using a form of words that i've heard john mcdonnell, the shadow chancellor use, which is to say, when the referendum comes, "i will personally campaign to remain, you know my views on this but i respect the way that other people have voted". he is just about staying on the right side of things because the row here, and we are about to find out whether they can resolve it with these votes, the row is about what the labour party does in that referendum. does jeremy labour party does in that referendum. doesjeremy corbyn, if he is prime minister at that time, lead the campaign to remain or does he stay neutral or does he lead the campaign to leave? that is what they are fighting over. sir keir starmer focusing on the change, really, the journey the party has had since this time last year when they were still growing about whether they should back a second referendum. —— still row in. he said last year conference voted there should be a referendum and now it has been adopted as
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labour policy. what he is trying to do as are others in the shadow cabinet is to try to focus on that, the notion that the labour party will be offering a second brexit referendum, so his rallying cry is if you want a referendum, vote labour, and if you want to fight for remain, vote labour. that is the closest he has got to suggesting that he thinks labour should vote to remain. thank you forjoining us. vicki young with the latest in brighton where sir keir starmer has just been addressing the conference. the time is 5:34pm. we will take a pause and catch up with the day's sport including a pretty good win for wales in the rugby world cup with gavin. wales ran in a total of six tries as they convincingly beat georgia in their world cup opener, 43-14 the georgia in their world cup opener, 113—14 the final score, a result which moves them top of their group just above australia on points difference. from japan, katie gornall sent this report. injapan, the railways are an institution. in
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wales, rugby is like a religion, and these fans making their pilgrimage to the world cup where letting the train take the strain. they arrived here, as they seem to do at every tournament, brimming with confidence and national pride. these wales fans have enjoyed a smootherjourney here than their team. it's been a difficult build—up for warren gatland's side after assistant coach rob howley was sent home for allegedly breaking rugby‘s betting laws. this is wales' most experienced team yet at a world cup and it is unlikely to knock them of course. with a record equalling 129 caps, alun wyn jones course. with a record equalling 129 caps, alun wynjones is well versed in harnessing the passion of an occasion like this. and after two minutes, the welsh fans were singing again, jonathan davies allowed to saunter over the line. dan biggar usually finishes these in his sleep. he would have plenty of chances to make amends. georgia were sent one way and then the next. justin tipuric with a second and wales a well oiled machine. a third try
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followed before liam williams secured the bonus point with a flourish before half—time. georgia 29 points down at the break. georgia's strength is in their pack but only in the second half did they show it with a textbook drive to cut wales' lead. it proved to be my no more than a consolation as wales wrestled back control. warren gatland's side are up and running, a step closer to the prize they crave more than anything else. katie gornall, bbc news, toyota. in cricket, jonny bairstow has been dropped from the test team for the england tour of new zealand this winter. jonny bairstow was poor with the bat during the ashes which led to speculation he might miss out. he averages 20.25 in test matches this year. warwickshire opener dominic sibley has been rewarded for his remarkable summer with a first england call—up. bairstow will be on a flight to new zealand, though, having been included in the t20 squad for the series starting at the beginning of november. squad for the series starting at the beginning of novemberlj squad for the series starting at the beginning of november. i thinkjonny ba i rstow has beginning of november. i thinkjonny bairstow has the potential to be a top test match player. he's already one of the best white ball players
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in the world. seven years ago, he was picked to play test match cricket as a batsman for england. seven yea rs cricket as a batsman for england. seven years on, i believe he can have a terrific spell back in the side when he's had a bit of a reset. he's had a very busy summer and it is an opportunity for him to step back for a moment, reset, work on some things and come back better. the world athletics governing body have confirmed russia will be banned from the world athletics championship, which starts at the end of the week. russian athletes we re end of the week. russian athletes were suspended in 2015 after a report found evidence of widespread doping in the sport. the iaaf confirmed the decision, four days before the start of the competition in qatar, after hearing a report from its task force. british number one kyle edmund has parted company with coach mark hylton. edmond has lost four matches in a row, most recently at the chengdu 0pen lost four matches in a row, most recently at the chengdu open this morning and has been knocked out in the first round of three successive events. the decision to split was made last week and edmund will now be assisted in the short—term by
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colin beauchamp, who coached him when he was in his late teens. rugby‘s international governing body has denied giving clearance to israel folau out for his return to the sport. he had his contract terminated by rugby australia after writing on social media that hell awaits gay people, which breached a players' code of conduct. the tonga national rugby league said he had been cleared to play for the country at next months's 0ceana cup but the rl iss at next months's 0ceana cup but the rl 155 that at next months's 0ceana cup but the rl iss that is incorrect as the organisation has not been formally asked to consider the matter. that is all for now. more in sportsday at 6:30pm. we will see you then. thank you, gavin. more now on the labour party conference, where the party's stance on brexit is being debated. as we have just seen, a few minutes ago. the party leaderjeremy corbyn wants to go into the next general election in a "neutral" position, offering voters a choice
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in a referendum. that would be within six months of coming to power. but there appears to be growing support for a rival motion. we will find out very soon, what happens with it, it is urging the party to campaign happens with it, it is urging the party to ca m pa ig n clearly happens with it, it is urging the party to campaign clearly to remain in the eu. let's go back to the labour conference now in brighton and speak to the senior labour mp hilary benn, who chairs the brexit select committee in the house of commons. good to talk to you once again. what do you... what do you make of the debate you have heard so far on where labour should be? welcome it has been an impassioned debate here in the conference hall this afternoon. —— well, it has been. we have moved on a long way compared with last year because labour is now committed to a confirmatory referendum which will put two options to the british people. if we managed to secure power at the next general election. the debate, however, has been about what
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position we should take now about how labour will campaign in that referendum. i am just seeing that the nec statement has been carried but there is also another motion and i don't think the vote on that has quite yet been result. my own view is that labour has been a remain party in this long debate about brexit. we have the shadow chancellor, the shadow foreign secretary, the shadow home secretary, the shadow home secretary, the shadow brexit secretary, the shadow brexit secretary, the shadow brexit secretary, the mayor of london and the leader of the welsh assembly, the leader of the welsh assembly, the first minister of wales, we have the first minister of wales, we have the labour scottish leader, all in favour of campaigning for remain. i think we might as well be honest about that because i think it is very ha rd to about that because i think it is very hard to be knocking on doors during a general election, and when people say, "what is the labour pa rty‘s people say, "what is the labour party's position on the single most important question facing the cou ntry", important question facing the country", to say, "we haven't quite made up our minds yet, can we come back to you in about three months' time?"| back to you in about three months' time?" i don't think that is going to work. but i understand the
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motivation to try to bring people together. but i think we do that through the commitment to a confirmatory referendum which is the compromise between the extremities ofa compromise between the extremities of a no—deal brexit which we are fighting hard to prevent because it would damage the economy, and the lib dems policy of cancelling the referendum result, throwing all of those votes in the bin which i think is not supportable either, we will go back to the people and say, "this is the real choice", it's the right, proper and i think moderate thing to do and its now they never bite —— mega labour party policy and i welcome that and jeremy's support for it. on the leader, given you have mentioned him, are you not concerned that his credit ability will be undermined if he is known preferred option here is defeated —— of his credibility will be undermined. that he will have to go with an option that he is clearly not very happy with in terms of where labour should be very clearly. iam where labour should be very clearly. i am wondering how a party campaigns ina i am wondering how a party campaigns in a general election on the biggest policy of the day if the leader is known to be uncomfortable with the sta nce known to be uncomfortable with the stance the party has taken. one of
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the defining characteristics of jeremy's leadership of the labour party has been the fact that he says, "i will abide by the decisions of the labour party conference". i mean, he is a democrat. of course, all leaders throughout the history of the labour party and all political parties want to try to ensure that the policy they support gets through their party conference. but he is a democrat and i think he will accept the democratic outcome. my will accept the democratic outcome. my concern is broader than that. it is about, how do we maximise the chance of winning that general election for labour, and my fear is, if we are not clear about which side the labour party, as distinct from the labour party, as distinct from the government... you know, there's a way out of this which is to go back to what happened in 1975, for those old enough to remember, when the government had a view about whether we should remain in the common market, but the labour party at the time had a different view
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from that of the government, and decided that it wanted to campaign, bya margin decided that it wanted to campaign, by a margin of two to one, to leave. there is a way of reconciling these things. in the referendum campaign, if we get to that point, individual members of the party and individual mps can campaign on whichever side they think is right, taking account of their own views and the views of their constituents. it seems to me thatis their constituents. it seems to me that is democratic and right approach to take but as a party, i think we have to be honest about where our heart lies. just to clear up where our heart lies. just to clear up what we think is going on at the moment, i am looking at the wires. it says "uk labour conference votes against deciding immediately to campaignfor against deciding immediately to campaign for remaining in the eu in a second referendum". i am just looking at the second bit of copy, bear with me. it is basically saying it votes against deciding immediately, in other words, it votes against deciding immediately, in otherwords, it would be deciding after an election?
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what sense would that make? as i said a moment ago, i think that is going to be a difficult position to sustain, because in an election, people ask candidates and political parties and party leaders, "what is your view on the big issues of the day?" ijust think, i'm sorry that is the outcome but that is the decision of conference. it is difficult to see how you can sustain that in the face of the question that in the face of the question that will come from journalists like you and millions of voters on the doorstep you will want to know, from those who are seeking their support, where the labour party stands. since we have such a very large number of front bench labour mps and others in the party who say, "i will campaign for remain", that is why i think we should be open and honest about where it is that we stand but i am sure the debate will continue. hilary benn, once again, good of you tojoin us. hilary benn, once again, good of you to join us. thank hilary benn, once again, good of you tojoin us. thank you. hilary benn,
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the senior labour mp, at the labour conference, there. it is 5:44pm. more now on the collapse of thomas cook. emma coulthurst is a travel expert from the holiday price comparison site, travelsupermarket. thank you forjoining us. 0k, thank you forjoining us. ok, this is affecting many thousands of people. we have been talking about it most of the day, the kind of response that has been put in place, what kind of protection people have. how would you sum up where we are right now because yellow people are coming home, the repatriation scheme is now under way, flights are being put in place to bring people back and they are leaving within ten minutes or sometimes within a couple of hours. if people are not going to the original airport they flew from, transport is being provided by the caa to take them home. anyone in the next two weeks, whether they are flight next two weeks, whether they are flight only or on a package, the government has stepped in for the flight
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government has stepped in for the flight only travellers, and everyone else's at all protected and part of the caa scheme and is coming back. —— everyone else is atol protected. have you ever seen anything like this? no, is unprecedented, monica a couple of years ago was around half the number of people and this was considered the biggest operation but this is doubled it. 150,000 people on holiday at the moment must be brought back so the caa have said, "please be patient and we will try to bring you back on the right day and is close to the time as possible. " if you were expecting a coach from your hotel, it will turn up coach from your hotel, it will turn up if that was part of your package and what you were expecting. up if that was part of your package and what you were expectinglj up if that was part of your package and what you were expecting. i want you to respond to some of the viewers who have got in touch with us viewers who have got in touch with us if that is ok. ok. rebecca caitland and herfiance steve were due to fly to mexico to get married in november. they booked an all—inclusive wedding package with thomas cook. we can speak to her now via webcam in plymouth. commiserations, first of all. when did you find out, first thing this morning? hello, yes, we have
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literally been watching the news consta ntly literally been watching the news constantly over the weekend, and yeah, it was pretty much this morning, the same as everybody else, we found out it is not going to be going ahead. we are devastated. how long have you been planning?‘ going ahead. we are devastated. how long have you been planning? a very long have you been planning? a very long time. we started planning last november for the trip, and then we have obviously had things booked and we have literally been doing a countdown, every day, on our phones and on the thomas cook app which i'm sure lots of people have. it is absolutely devastating, as i can imagine it is for lots of other people in the same situation as us. just bear with us, rebecca, so please come in on that, emma, what are rebecca's writes? i'm so sorry, rebecca, it's absolutely awful for you. devastated for you. you have booked a package with thomas cook and it had a flight with it as well? yes. obviously, all the planes have been grounded but you will get a
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refund, but bcaa are saying they will put all the details on their website, the thomas cook caa website by next monday, and then refunds will be given on package holidays because you have got the atol protection. but i appreciate you are going in, and you talk about the countdown, you are going in six and a half weeks' time. who knows if that refund will come through? they have said because they have got half a million forward bookings, and i know this does not help you, they are going to take some time and it might bea are going to take some time and it might be a while, perhaps up to 60 days to get the refund. let's hope you get the money first. 0ne consolation is, if you want to still go away, think about the fact it is early november that you want to go. it is shoulder season so there should be some good packages out there and i would encourage you to see what is available online but also speak to companies and say, "this is our situation". there are things called rescue flights being put on by other airlines and there
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should be some 0k fares and also, november is a good time to go long haul which is what you are doing. i honestly mean that, there should be some good prices. i really hope you can go away. i suppose, rebecca, it isa can go away. i suppose, rebecca, it is a matter of if you have the funds available to start researching other options because it is not an easy thing to do, is it? know, exactly, and whenl thing to do, is it? know, exactly, and when i was speaking to the producers earlier, we have a small timescale which we can get married in because my partner is in the armed forces. we have been given a set amount of time that we could go away because he is due to be deployed at some point next year. that is why we planned in november because that was the set time we we re because that was the set time we were given. as i'm sure many people understand, obviously, the needs of the service come first but now we are potentially looking at not being able to get married for quite a long time. obviously, we are possibly not going to be able to meet this window by november. yes, that is the added
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pressure and lots of viewers will sympathise with the fact that clearly, the armed forces are pretty strict with leave and the window is pretty limited, isn't it? but i would like to say, while i have the opportunity, a massive thank you to the people in our local branch in plymouth, who were absolutely fantastic, trying to do everything they could to get us our dream wedding. it isjust like so many other people in the same position. it was a holiday we never thought we would be able to have and we put everything into it, with it being our wedding so we are gutted. where we are staying, we did not expect it at all, we had reassurances from staff on saturday in the store. they we re staff on saturday in the store. they were convinced this was not going to happen. there were people even booking holidays on saturday when we we nt booking holidays on saturday when we went in, in the store. the kind of be where we are at now, i think my frustration as well is, especially when you are seeing everything which is coming out with the ceo ofs, with
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the bonuses and things they have had, that this could be allowed to happen and there are so many people now that are not going to be able to manage, with their livelihoods, and they are in complete limbo. it is not obviously just they are in complete limbo. it is not obviouslyjust us, it is devastating that we have got such a short time scale to sort something out and obviously, the added pressure of my partner'sjob. he's not here at the moment so we are trying to communicate as well on the phone. we are not even together at the moment either. that is quite hard. that is tough and i know i speakfor all of hard. that is tough and i know i speak for all of our viewers when i say that we hope you get something fixed up. good luck to you. thank you for talking to us. thank you very much, appreciate the time. quick thought, that, as she generously said... very generously. they are just one case among many thousands but clearly, all of the emotional excitement and investment in planning a wedding and all the
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rest of it with a small window of opportunity... what about those people who are not part of a protected package and everything else? are we reallyjust saying that it is down to them, they have to find their own way? if you are not pa rt find their own way? if you are not part of a package deal, then if you have got a flight only forward booking, you need to go through the credit card route, the section 75 of the consumer credit card that, for most people, you can claim the legal guarantee but if you paid on a debit ca rd guarantee but if you paid on a debit card or it cost less than £100, you need to go through the voluntary chargeback scheme but i'm pleased to say, that is an arrangement with a credit card companies and it is kind of enshrined in their customer service rules. i have had cases of people being told they will get their money back that way in the next couple of days so fingers crossed. very good of you to come in and good of you to have your advice. thank you forjoining us. thanks to emma to give —— for giving
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some response. it's been a good night for british stars at the us tv awards, the emmys. phoebe waller—bridge, the writer and creator of fleabag, and jodie comer, the star of killing eve, won two of the night's big prizes. here's our north america correspondent peter bowes. jodie! jodie, on the right, right here! posing for the camera, and parading the purple carpet, hollywood royalty, along with the kings and queens of game of thrones, the fantasy drama that has dominated the small screen for much of the past decade. the cast of game of thrones. it was the year's most nominated show and won the night's top award for best drama. but it was fleabag that stole the show. the dark comedy that started as a one—woman play at the edinburgh festival is now the toast of hollywood. the reason that i do it is this! best comedy, director, writing and best actress for phoebe waller—bridge, the show‘s creator and star. jodie comer, who plays
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a psychopathic assassin in killing eve, took the award for best actress in a drama, beating her co—star sandra oh. my mum and dad are in liverpool who i didn't invite because i didn't think this was going to be my time. billy porter made history, the first openly gay man to win for best actor in a drama for his performance in pose. ben whishaw‘s portrayal of norman scott in a very english scandal won him the award for best supporting actor. he'd already been celebrating. i'm hungover! there were also awards for chernobyl, the docudrama about the 1986 nuclear disaster, and netflix's black mirror: bandersnatch, the interactive film in which viewers have a say in the storyline. thank you very much. television is enjoying a golden age. peter bowes, bbc news, los angeles. with me now is lukejennings,
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author of the villanelle novels, which the series killing eve is based on. it must be a very proud moment for you. it is wonderfulwhen it must be a very proud moment for you. it is wonderful when you have created fictional characters, to see them as wonderfully realised as our cast have done. to seejodie winning the emmy award, she and sandra could not both win it but to seejodie when it is absolutely wonderful. when you look at the representation and we are seeing some of the familiar scenes from the adaptation here, did it differa familiar scenes from the adaptation here, did it differ a lot from the way you had envisaged the character and the way you had created the character? did she recreate the character? did she recreate the character in her own way? the funny thing was was thatjodie was exactly asi thing was was thatjodie was exactly as i imagined the character. right from her first screen test, when she
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came out with that russian— french accent, she was perfect, straight out of the box, really. that's amazing. for me. that is an incredible thing because often, the author sits here and says, "they something different with it and it was brilliant but different to what i'd conceived". in this case, a perfect match. yes. what about the way the production itself was put together? the pace, the texture, how true was that to the original?” think there is always going to be a difference, because a novel is a solo project, and it takes 200 people to make a tv series. so there's always going to be a difference but in tone, i think, it was very difference but in tone, i think, it was very faithful. which is essential. which is essential, yes. i wanted to turn that around a bit. one of the most gratifying things i
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imagine for you is that people having thoroughly enjoyed the tv version, killing eve, that has encouraged them to go back to the original villanelle novels, which is a very special compliment to the author. to what extent do your, sort of, are you aware of the fact that the novels themselves have picked up massively, even though they have done brilliantly before? secondly, what does it say to you as an author whose yellow well, it is just what you hope to happen, really. whose yellow well, it is just what you hope to happen, reallym whose yellow well, it is just what you hope to happen, really. it is very nice that the tv series is so good that it makes people keen to read the books. that is just very, very gratifying. we mentioned it was a good night for the brits and i mentioned phoebe waller—bridge and others, too, and we got a sense of it, there. put this in context, with us, what happened at the emmys and the other award ceremonies, about the other award ceremonies, about the state of creativity within the
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british tv industry, based on some great works of literature. where does it put us at the moment? well, i think it puts us in a very strong position, and to see flea bag and phoebe waller—bridge winning all of those awards is absolutely fantastic. it is fantastic for women writers in particular, forfemale screenwriters. it puts them really at the top of the list. welcome just at the top of the list. welcome just a bit of fleabag, there, to remind us a bit of fleabag, there, to remind us of that brilliant series, and as you say, underlining a lot of the new female talent and lots of it emerging and being encouraged, but in this case, with villanelle, that is very much your work and congratulations on it. thank you very much. nice to have you here. and congratulations on the success because without you, it wouldn't have happened. thank you very much. thank you. thank you forjoining us. huw thank you. thank you forjoining us. hquennings, thank you for coming
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sophie raworth has the news at six. now it's time for a look at the weather with stav. a big difference to the weather this week compared to last week, with high pressure and lots of sunshine, but chilly nights, this week, low pressure dominating and it is going to be unsettled with spells of rain and wind but the knights will be milder, certainly than last week because we have got south—westerly wins, low pressure to the west of the uk, strong winds and heavy rain, one band of rain already affecting central southern areas which will move northwards and it will be followed by further very heavy rain for wales and the south—west overnight. temperatures no lower than 12—15. this area of low pressure will be dominating through tuesday. one batch of rain moving eastwards. the next feature will contain the remnants of what was hurricane humbert oh. it will bring some very strong hurricane humbert oh. it will bring some very strong winds, particularly to southern england and wales later on tuesday. some disruption possibly
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for the wind but also the rain, a very wet day for much of england and wales on tuesday, staying unsettled as we head through the week, maybe turning cooler across northern parts of the country. 9,000 jobs are now at risk in the uk alone. very emotional, the cabin crew were all crying, a bit sombre, to be honest. it's devastating, it's a legacy's gone. trying to find another way out of majorca — the company's collapse has forced the uk to launch the biggest peacetime repatriation in history. it is deeply distressing to me that it has not been possible to save one of the most loved brands in travel.

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