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tv   Afternoon Live  BBC News  September 25, 2019 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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shareholders. given the princely state of the business, including the company wasn't only £415 state of the business, including the company wasn't only £41.5 billion company wasn't only £415 billion half—year loss reported in may, followed by further profit warning in november, this simply was not the case that no guarantee that an injection would have scored the future of the company. in effect, oui’ future of the company. in effect, our concern is that we would put £250 million risk throwing good money after bad, and then still have to pay for the cost of this repatriation. it is quite clear that in the last several years, the company ran intoa in the last several years, the company ran into a number of different problems of trying to expand it self out through investing more in the high street, rather than less, whilst the entire market was moving in at the opposite direction. the lost none the less of an iconic british band with 178 year history, one of the oldest travel companies in the world, is an extremely sad moment. however, they should not be
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seen reflection on the general health of the uk aviation industry which continues to thrive, passenger numbers are up, people are travelling more. the truth is that the way people have come out their holidays has changed an enormous amount over the years but he didn't change as much with the company. never should distract from the distressed experience of the businesses relying on thomas cook passengers and thomas cook employees, who have worked above and beyond, particularly in recent days, during this distressing situation. we have never had a collapse of an airline or holiday company on the skill before, we have responded decisively, right now, our efforts are focused on getting those passengers home and looking after those employees who have lost their jobs. we also need to understand whether any individuals or third in the duties of stewardship within the company. then our efforts will turn to working through the reforms necessary to ensure that passengers
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do not find themselves in at this ridiculous situation again. winter look at the options, not just anything that, but also whether it is possible for airlines to be wound down ina is possible for airlines to be wound down in a more orderly manner. we need to ensure their planes can keep flying so we do not end up having to set up a shadow airline. and this is where we will focus our effo rts and this is where we will focus our efforts in the next couple of weeks, but in order to do this, we will require primary legislation and, dare i say it, a new session of this parliament. in what has been a challenging time, i want to put on record my appreciation for the work and all those involved, in particular the ceo of the caa, along with his team, and my officials and the dft, who have done an
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extraordinary job the dft, who have done an extraordinaryjob so far. i'm also grateful for the support of others including the mayor of manchester who has acknowledged the government's repatriation effort. this has been an unprecedented response to an unprecedented situation. i am grateful to all parties who stepped in to support these efforts, and i commend this statement to the house. i'd like to thank the secretary of state for his timely advanced light of his statement. it's a welcome change. what i do not welcome as the colla pse what i do not welcome as the collapse of thomas cook which is a tragedy for the 178—year—old business, customers and staff. the travel company went other —— under because successive chief executives failed to steer the group effectively or evolve the business. good afternoon from westminster. you're watching afternoon live
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with me, simon mccoy. the shadow transport secretary there answering grant shapps' statement on thomas cook. he has said it was ultimately thomas cook and its directors who took the decision it should close down themselves. he said 48,000 passengers had been repatriated by the end of today, and the government will seek a financial recourse for the cost of those repatriations. we will stay with this and return to what is a very busy day in the house of commons later, but let's turn to andy mcdonald and his statement. airline insolvencies are needed to ensure a strong level of consumer protection and value for money for the taxpayer. this was misleading. the government has done nothing to protect consumer or taxpayer interests. the government has sat back and let the company fold.
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yesterday, governments in scandinavia stepped in to back thomas cook's subsidiaries in that region and the german government also stepped in with a loan of 380 million euros for thomas cook's subsidiary condor to help a company survive. the chief executive of thomas cook airlines has seamlessly just gone to work for condor, and jubilant scenes of the survival of the subsidiary are doing the rounds on social media. can the secretary of state told the house what steps his government took to enter into a joint investment with other interested nation states as it is reported that the governments of spain and turkey quite understandably were willing but seemingly the uk government was not? we are assured that there is provision to return holiday—makers to the uk, but sadly there is no
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provision for the return of thomas cook's staff. the unions unite and the tssa have valiantly fought for their members what this government has done nothing. can he guarantee that all staff will be repatriation at? can he say what provisions he's putting in place to ensure that customers who have lost their planned holidays are fully compensated and are able to make alternative arrangements at no expense to? the government has learnt nothing from the monarch collapsed two years ago. what it cost taxpayers £40 million in repatriated costs, and thomas cook looks set to cost a similar amount or more not to mention redundancy payments. can he give an estimate of what those total costs are likely to be? monarch was a victim of
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financial engineering two years ago and conflicts of interest with the company's and conflicts of interest with the compa ny‘s administrator. and conflicts of interest with the company's administrator. similarly, the collapse of thomas cook raises major questions about the accounting of the firm, never mind the bonuses paid to senior executives. what the secretary of state make clear to those executives that they should return their multi—million pound underserved and unwarranted bonuses, including that of peter, who has had £4.6 million in bonuses since 2014? the government has not acted to protect public interest. nothing has been learnt or done in terms of improving how our insolvency arrangements deal with such circumstances. what is more, the fund has been much reduced by the monarch fiasco and it has had to rely on insurance to make up the shortfall. does he believe the reforms to at toll enacted by his government has been effective? the
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government has been effective? the government must confirm it will immediately guarantee the worker full compensation for unfair dismissal given the lack of proper consultation and that those workers will not have to pursue the matter through the courts. can he confirm that they will be relieved of that burden and stress. in the further site development, we also learned today that northern ireland's last manufacturer right bus has gone into administration with the loss of 1400 jobs. injuly, administration with the loss of 1400 jobs. in july, the administration with the loss of 1400 jobs. injuly, the prime minister said, we will do everything we can to ensure the future of that great uk company. isn't it the case that this government is guilty of the industrial neglect of this country? in contrast to other countries, uk ministers have stood by and let some of our great companies whether an die! this government is engulfed
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with inertia and incompetence. it is not a functioning government because of the brexit chaos and prorogation paralysis it has brought upon itself. the people of britain are paying a high price for their inadequacy. they have failed to reform insolvency rules and failed to improve financial reporting. it isa to improve financial reporting. it is a colossal failure of political leadership in this government. they we re leadership in this government. they were warned but did nothing. it's a shamefulfailure to were warned but did nothing. it's a shameful failure to fulfil their duties and their responsibilities. let me see what we can deal with here. first of all, it is true to say, as the honourable gentleman outlines, that the world had changed. in 2007, thomas cook... we will leave that statement therefrom grant shapps, but hearing if you
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we re grant shapps, but hearing if you were watching a few moments ago, the transport secretary saying that the government has decided to spend £250 million to rescue the travel company and he said that would risk throwing good money after bad pay the cost of the repatriation. he wasjustifying the repatriation. he wasjustifying the decision not to bail out thomas cookin the decision not to bail out thomas cook in those closing hours before the company went into administration. we will keep an eye on that debate for you but as you will know there is plenty of other business here at westminster this afternoon because they have been fierce exchanges during the first session of common sense yesterday. the supreme court ruling that the decision to suspend parliament was unlawful. the government's most senior legal adviser has faced criticism from mps about the move, but he insisted the suspension of parliament was done in good faith and his legal advice had been sound.
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jet—lagged courtesy of a night over the atlantic, winded courtesy of the supreme court. are you going to apologise to the queen, prime minister? the prime minister's back in the country and mps are back in here too. colleagues, welcome back to our place of work. and straight away, a question from one of the central protagonists in getting parliament going again. urgent question, joanna cherry. to ask the attorney general if he will make a statement about his legal opinion on the advice given to her majesty the queen to prorogue parliament? the attorney general, the government's main legal adviser said... the government accepts the judgment and accepts that it lost the case and at all times, the government acted in good faith and in the belief that... and in the belief that its approach
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was both lawful and constitutional. but, he added... this parliament is a dead parliament. it should no longer sit. it has no moral right to sit on these green benches. why? because... they're too cowardly! cheering. this parliament should have the courage to face the electorate. but it won't. it won't, because so many of them are really all about preventing us leaving the european union at all. in response, take a look at this. no shame today, no shame at all. the fact that this government cynically manipulated the prorogation to shut down this
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house so that it couldn't work as a democratic assembly. he knows that that is the truth and, to come here with his barrister‘s bluster, to obfuscate the truth, and, fora man like him, a party like this and a leader like this, this prime minister to talk about morals and morality is a disgrace! the opposition parties are gathering to discuss tactics and demand the prime minister says sorry to the queen. i think he should apologise, both to her for the advice he gave her but, more importantly, apologise to the british people for what he's done in trying to shut down our democracy at a very crucial time when people are very, very worried about what will happen on the 31st october. making sure there isn't a no—deal brexit at the end of next month remains their priority and arguing...
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we have a prime minister who has abused our democracy, who has been found guilty of breaking the law, unlawfully proroguing parliament. anna soubry. it's only lunchtime, and this place is feeling sparky and today is onlyjust getting going. the prime minister will be here later. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster. smack talk to our cheap killer political correspondence. —— let's. —— let's talk to our political correspondent. that is normally late—night sittings but on this occasion, as soon they get back here it all starts. the government is cornered at the moment and he was lashing out. his language, talking about it being a dead parliament and goad the opposition by saying you are not allowed the government to
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govern, you're too cowardly to call a general election because half of the labour mps don't even want jeremy corbett to be prime minister and you are blocking brexit, c can see the election leaflet already being written, talking aboutjeremy corbyn delaying and blocking brexit, he doesn't want people decide in a general election. so how can the government get out of this? ideally, borisjohnson government get out of this? ideally, boris johnson needs government get out of this? ideally, borisjohnson needs a deal with the eu he can bring forward, but will that happen? possibly not. the second thing he needs and wants as a general election. there was talk about bringing forward a one line bill, setting an election date in law, so that gets around the idea you need to have two thirds of the house of commons voting for it, they would say it gets around the idea that the election could be changed to be after the brexit date. there is still the suspicion they could do that. this would have to be watertight for any other party to go for this. they will not go for it. they say they want no deal taken of
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the table first. what the liberal democrats want to do is use this extra time to bring forward another bit of legislation in whatever form we do not know yet, making boris johnson ask for that delay before the 19th of october. they say, we can't simply sit around waiting to see if he will break the law. by not requesting that delay. so when he comes to the house of commons this afternoon, he will be unrepentant. he will say he accepts the judgment, he doesn't think it was right but he accepts it. and i do not think there will be much in the way of an apology. we have got boris johnson who says, i want an election outcome of the other party saying, no, not yet, because for a no till brexit to be taken of the table, we were exactly where we were a couple of weeks ago! this is true. so what will mps do with this time? they have talked a lot about needing this time. they say they will need it to
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get more documents. we will hear the so—called yellowhammer later on. they are trying to get the legal advice that the attorney general gave to cabinet and to the prime minister about the prorogation of parliament. he is looking to see whether he will publish that. mps wa nt to whether he will publish that. mps want to see the details of what would happen in a no deal scenario, i spoke to one labour mp. she said she is worried about the ports and how medicines will come in. they wa nt how medicines will come in. they want more detail about all of that if that's where we're heading, depending on what borisjohnson does. boris johnson will stand up in the commons sometime after 4pm, all eyes on him. we don't know what he will say. he might make an announcement about bringing forward this for an election, but that is trying to put labour on the back foot, trying to say tojeremy corbyn, you have called for an election for months. but before that, does he apologise?|j election for months. but before that, does he apologise? i don't think he will. we don't know what he
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said to the queen when he had to call her yesterday, that must‘ve been uncomfortable, but i can't imagine he will apologise. he gave his legal advice to the prime minister, so the prime minister advised the queen based on the attorney general‘s own advice, so he did not go there willingly to mislead the queen. they say he did it because it was based on the legal advice he got. the courts did not agree with that, but geoffrey cox says that's how it works sometimes, courts sometimes do not agree with legal advice that is given. good to have you back from brighton, no rest for the wicked! we saw a bit of it in that report but this was one of the moments when there was a raw anger in the house of commons today is the attorney general was questioned by labour's barry shipman. every word he has started, no shame today, no shame at all! the
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fa ct no shame today, no shame at all! the fact that this government cynically manipulated the prorogation to shut down this house so he could not work asa down this house so he could not work as a democratic assembly. he knows thatis as a democratic assembly. he knows that is the truth, and to come here with his barrister‘s bluster, to obfuscate the truth, a man like him, a party like this, and a leader like this, this prime minister to talk about morals and morality is a disgrace! i'm not sure i could discern in that marshmallow of rhetoric any actual question, but insofar there was a question, there is an answer. if the honourable gentleman thinks that the government should no longer be governing, tell his leader to bring a motion of no confidence this afternoon, tell his
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leader to agree to a simple one line statute that fixes the election by a simple majority, and we would be delighted to meet him, wherever he chooses, in front of the electorate. who willjudge whether the marca nations which he supports and the devices he resorts to in order to make sure this dead parliament continues our right or wrong? some angry exchanges already today and more to come no doubt but what are voters making of these latest developments at westminster? we will hear from glasgow which voted to remain back in 2016. it was a scottish court which first said the prime minister's suspension of parliament was unlawful, and scottish government ministers are now calling for him to go. but what do voters here in glasgow think? i keep my politics quite private, to be honest.
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i don't think having parliament down for five weeks when everything's happening's a good idea because it stymied the debate and it shortens the time that we've got to get a deal. i think it does make a difference because so many people are upset about the decision up here. so, i think people feel they've been heard and that's the important part — that it doesn't feel like politicians get to do whatever they want. legally, i don't know, it's probably correct, but ijust think it's another setback to brexit. we have to leave and if it means leaving with a deal and actually starting to build things from that point of view, let's do it, because they are getting nowhere fast doing it this way. and the papers in scotland take a distinctive line, both the scotsman and the herald using that headline "unlawful" to describe the prime minister's behaviour and even the scottish edition of the sun has a different headline from the newspaper elsewhere in the country. it's a lot for lunchtime customers
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at this city centre cafe to chew on. it's a bit embarrassing, isn't it? it's a bit of a shambles, yeah. i'd like the tories out of government, yeah. i'd like borisjohnson out of government. i don't think you can have a prime minister who has broken the law. well, i'm delighted! 0h! i think he deserves everything he gets. imean, bye! get rid of him! but it's pretty clear, at this point, the prime minister has no intention of standing down. the question which can't easily be answered is whether all this makes scottish independence more or less likely. james shaw, bbc news, glasgow. the mean while the people of stafford voted to leave the eu. —— meanwhile. 150 miles from the clamour of westminster, easier listening
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for shoppers at stafford street market, but residents of this ancient county town are not in harmony when it comes to the brexit countdown and the events of the past 24 hours. so, what do you think should happen now? i think borisjohnson should take the bull by the horns and come out of europe. that's what the people voted for, it's taken them three years and it's ridiculous. he should resign. why do you feel so strongly about that? because he's inept. it's an embarrassment to the uk. he may say that he respects the decision that's been made by the judges, but he clearly doesn't because he is still defending his actions. he's not fighting against the people that voted to remain, he's fighting against the politicians who actually didn't want it as well. how realistic is it — he said he would rather die in a ditch that not leave on the 31st october? well, if i find him in a ditch, i'll bury him! it's such a mess at the moment,
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isn't it, everything? do you think it's realistic we will leave the eu as we are due to do on the 31st october? i personally don't feel that. no, idon't, no. ijust don't feel that. i mean, i hope there is a turnaround and a resolution to everything, but i don't feel that there will be. as a country, we need to go one way or the other. yes, i'd like it to and then we can get out of europe and stand on our own two feet. there's wishing and believing it will happen, what do you think? i don't think we will. 56% of voters here opted to leave the eu. three years on, frustration and uncertainty are all too apparent. robert hall, bbc news, stafford. we are keeping an eye on what is happening in the house of commons. the transport secretary is facing
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questions on thomas cook. he said arrangements are in place to bring back hundred and 50,000 people from 50 different countries. he said passengers should complete their full holidays with a total of 16,500 passengers being repaid treated today on 70 flights. he has also said new laws will be needed after the collapse of thomas cook so travel firms can be wound up in a more orderly fashion in future. he has faced questions from mps, many of whose constituents will be involved in this. we will keep in numberand involved in this. we will keep in number and were torn to the house of commons little later on. —— keep an eye on that and return. donald trump is facing an impeachment inquiry after allegations he asked that u grade knee and government to dig dirt on his rivaljoe biden. —— ukrainian. it is the start of a process that could ultimately see the president. office. ——. from
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office. calls to impeach the president began within months of his taking office, but until now, democrats have been wary of getting bogged down in a process which could help donald trump galvanise his political base. the tipping point was the revelation of a phone call he made injuly, after blocking military aid to ukraine. he's alleged to have asked ukraine's new leader, volodymyr zelensky, to help him politically by reopening an investigation into the business activities there of hunter biden, his fatherjoe is the frontrunner to be the democrats' presidential candidate. the democrats say mr trump has abused his office. the actions of the trump presidency revealed the dishonourable fact of the president's betrayal of his oath of office, betrayal of our national security and betrayal of the integrity of our elections. therefore, today, i'm announcing the house of representatives are moving forward with an official impeachment inquiry. this was, said the president,
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nonsense, another witchhunt. when you see the readout of the call, which i assume you'll see at some point, you'll understand. that call was perfect, it couldn't have been nicer and even the ukrainian government put out a statement that that was a perfect call, there was no pressure put on them whatsoever. to be removed from office, congress must convict a president of high crimes and misdemeanours. there have been only two previous impeachment, of andrewjohnson in 1868 and bill clinton in 1998, but both kept theirjobs after being acquitted in the senate. president nixon resigned before impeachment got fully under way. donald trump's alleged target is all too aware this is a gamble which could backfire on the democrats, but he's backing it all the same. i can take the political attacks, they'll come and they'll go and, in time, soon be forgotten. but if we allow a president
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to get away with shredding the united states' constitution, that will last forever. the murky business of washington politics has just accelerated to a new level of intensity. richard lister, bbc news. a new un report by leading scientists say climate change is devastating our seas and ice caps as never before and threatening humanity. according to the panel on climate change sea levels are rising, ice sheets are melting in species and threatening humanity. according to the panel on climate change sea levels are rising, ice sheets are melting in species are moving habitat. —— and. the seas have played an invaluable role for humanity in the battle against climate change. they have soaked up huge amounts of carbon dioxide, they have taken up much of the heat generated by humans since the 19705. they are also taking on board massive amounts of melting ice. this landmark report from an international team of scientists has shown how the run—off from ice sheets
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in greenland and antarctica is driving up sea levels the world over. it will have serious impacts for people everywhere. when i look at this report, i see a report about water. water at the highest mountains in the glaciers, water in the polar regions, water in the deepest parts of the sea. and water is really the lifeblood of this planet, so there is no place where water is not important, whether you're inland, in the middle of the continent, or on the coastal regions. in the worst case, the seas could rise by over a metre at the end of the century, threatening the homes of hundreds of millions of people in low—lying countries. other extreme events are on the rise as well. the once—in—a—century storm might come in once—a—year threat by 2050. marine species all over the planet face widespread and increasing impacts on their survival. in this lab, researchers are trying to understand how corals are affected by rising temperatures. the creatures face a bleak future.
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even if emissions are cut rapidly, some 90% of them will die. it's like losing all the trees in a forest. if you cut all the trees down in a forest, remove the trees, there are no birds, there is no insect life. it's losing the base to an ecosystem. already, that's a tragedy at the environmental level. if you go a bit further than that, these coral reefs provide important services for humans. the ipcc report paints a very bleak picture for the future of creatures like these corals. it is a stark thought that, without massive cuts in carbon emissions, creatures like these may only be found in labs or public aquariums. the new report is perhaps the bleakest assessment yet on the future of the oceans in a warming world, the scientists caution against despair. massive emissions cuts can avert the worst. the power is still in our hands to change the future. matt mcgrath, bbc news, monaco. looking at long—term climate change there. looking at shorter term
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climate change, it is matte with the weather. good afternoon. there is a mooring to come through the rest of this week. never be too far away from that rain jacket wherever you are. at the moment we have plenty of showers around across parts of the south wales, south midlands, towards east anglia. some of these areas of the south—east are still damp. in between those areas, a lot of dry weather. pleasant enough in the sun, but going into tonight that showers could get heavier across scotland. dry elsewhere for a time and then more lengthy and persistent bursts of heavy rain work their way from west to east, tending to clear spells in northern ireland later. a cool night again, winds from the south—west keeping to —— keeping temperatures in double figures. outbreaks of rain to begin with. lasting longest in the north—east of
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scotland. there will be a scattering of showers tomorrow, they will be on the heavy side. more of a breeze pushing them through, and temperatures in the sunshine 15 to 20 degrees.
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this is bbc news. our latest headlines: parliament gets back to work for the first time since the supreme court said it was unlawfully suspended. the attorney general tells the commons ministers admit defeat. the government act sets —— accepts thejudgment the government act sets —— accepts the judgment and accepts that it lost the case, and that at all times the government acted in good faith. from the airport, the prime minister's motorcade headed straight to westminster — as oppostion mps raised questions over funding given to an american businesswoman while he was london mayor. is the prime minister of sufficient character to occupy high office and disperse public funds? is he suitable? we'll have all the latest on the return to parliament here on bbc news. across the atlantic, political peril for president trump —
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now facing an impeachment inquiry. the transport secretary says the government will be running a shadow airline to repatriate the 150,000 passangers left stranded after the collapse of thomas cook. the task before us represents the largest peacetime repatriations ever undertaken in the uk. some disruption and delay is therefore inevitable. we will return to the commons a little bit, but now the sport. good to see you. the australian winger will miss the match against wales at the rugby world cup. he has been banned for the next three matches, cited for a dangerously high tackle during an opening match injapan.
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high tackle during an opening match in japan. world rugby high tackle during an opening match injapan. world rugby has criticised the standard of officiating so far in the tournament. hodge will miss the remaining full games. fiji have lost again, this time in the biggest shock of the world cup so far stopped they lost to uruguay in a thriller that finished 30—27. it was a fantastic match. it was played in a fantastic match. it was played in a town that was almost wiped off the map by the earthquake and tsunami. the quarter finals look unlikely for fiji. tomorrow morning, england will face the usa in kobe. our sports correspondence is with the england team. welcome to kobe stadium, where englund had been training for the
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final time ahead of tomorrow's match. it is pretty hot and humid here at the moment. it was interesting to hear them talking about the ball—handling being on the slippery site. conditions could be challenging under the roof tomorrow. that said, include's players did have a training camp in mia zaki, where it is also humid, to prepare for these kind of conditions. with a four day turnaround since their game against tonga, eddie jones four day turnaround since their game against tonga, eddiejones has not surprisingly freshened up his team. there are ten changes to the starting line—up, with george ford captaining the side was among those on the bench is a scrum—half ben youngs, who if he comes on will win his 91st cap, equalling jonny wilkinson's record for an england back. it is nice. hopefully get some time tomorrow on the pitch. i guess it's nice for my family. for me, it's nice for my family. for me, it's just another game. it's one
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that i'm looking forward to. interestingly, eddiejones said playing the usa would be like playing the usa would be like playing 15 donald trumps. whatever that means, he will be looking for an improvement on england's slightly scratchy win over tonga as they look to make it two wins out of two. andy swiss reporting there. nicola adams is preparing for the events of her flyweight —— for the defence of her flyweight title. this is definitely the biggest fight of my career as a pro so far. i haven't taken my eye off the ball. i have stayed focused, stay dedicated. this is one more step in the right direction for me to be able to unify the whole flyweight division. direction for me to be able to unify the whole flyweight divisionm direction for me to be able to unify the whole flyweight division. it is the whole flyweight division. it is the men's time trial in the cycling world championships in yorkshire. no geraint thomas, he withdrew because
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he wasn't in peak shape. the time trial started in northallerton and finishes in harrogate, and you can catch up with all the action from that on bbc two right now, and the bbc sport website. that is all from us for now. simon, back to you at westminster. welcome back to westminster where there have been angry exchanges during the first session of commons business since yesterday's supreme court ruling that the government's decision to suspend parliament was unlawful. this is the scene in the commons at the moment, the continuing discussions over the thomas cook collapse, and grant chaps made a statement and is taking questions from mps about that collapse. there he is was that we will keep an ion that for you. he has been saying that the government will try and recoup the cost of repatriating tens of thousands of thomas cook customers following its collapse on monday. as
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you can see, still updating mps. he says that buying out the troubled therm would have been throwing good money after bad. another 6500 holiday—makers have been flown home as part of the repatriations programme. many resort hotels and businesses have not been paid and may struggle as a result. we have a report from spain. a holiday in the sun — it's meant to be an escape from all anxieties, but not this trip, not for thousands travelling on thomas cook's tours, still soaking up the warmth in spain. charles and barbara, regular travellers, were here in andalusia when monarch airlines went bust. they were repatriated then, so they say they're unfazed, they know they'll be brought back, just not when or how. one year 11 months ago, we were sitting when the same thing happened with monarch. in this hotel?
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in this hotel. but this isn't going to spoil your holiday? together: no! you feel sorry for the young girls, who are the reps, because they have no idea what they're going to do. they don't even know if they're going to get paid. you feel sorry for the staff who work on the planes and in the shops — it's their livelihoods. they're the ones you feel sorry for, not people like us, because we know, eventually, we will get home. thomas cook was the firm that helped create the modern tourist age, the organised holidays tens of millions now take. it shaped our leisure time and entire economies, like here, in spain. getting people home is one concern, then there's the impact on jobs and hotels around the world. here on the spanish coast at that hotel, 10% of its clients come from thomas cook. this one here, it's 40%, and they're worried in this area. and if thomas cook couldn't keep pace with the world it created, what will the death of the firm mean
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for those who rely on this trade? the problem is, what's going to be without thomas cook, what's about the death of thomas cook now? which could be quite serious for your business? always, because thomas cook has been a huge company and it makes a lot of money, not only with us, all our colleagues here from the area and also from all around spain. the demise of an icon won't change the desire of britons to travel, or the joys of a holiday abroad, but it does mean uncertainty, an unknowable impact on incomes and livelihoods far and wide. damian grammaticas, bbc news, almeria, in spain. a young woman who says she was caught up in a grooming gang and was persuaded to give evidence in court, has described how she's been left feeling mistreated and abandoned after the case
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collapsed due to police failings. in an exclusive interview for the bbc‘s inside out programme, she and her mother explained that they would never trust the police again. northumbria police has accepted failings and says it is carrying out an internal investigation into what went wrong. the victim's words have been spoken by an actor. alison freeman reports. i would be given drinks and more drinks, and then suddenly i could be hit and dragged into a bedroom and sometimes multiple men came in, and sometimes multiple men came in, and sometimes it was just one. sometimes multiple men came in, and sometimes it wasjust one. these are the words of a young woman we are calling chloe. the police believed chloe was one of three children who agreement by a gang of 13 much older kurdish men. they met the girls after school in newcastle, they say they were taken two houses where they were taken two houses where they were taken two houses where they were plied with alcohol and abused. chloe pot case came to the
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attention of the police. the investigation began when another child told the police she was a victim of the grooming gang. child told the police she was a victim of the grooming ganglj child told the police she was a victim of the grooming gang. i was promised that they would never see the light of day. many times they said they would go to prison for a very, very long time. the trauma chloe put herself through was to all be in vain. her case collapsed when a senior detective admitted in court that they had failed to record the enquiries in an official way, through a notebook. this failure undermined the whole investigation was top it resulted in the trial being abandoned, and the men chloe says abused her walking free. chloe and her mum were promised there would be a full investigation by northumbria police into what went so wrong, and why. northumbria police are investigating matters themselves. there is no independent investigation. i think every thing possible needs to be done to ensure
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public confidence. if i was the chief constable of northumberland police, i would chief constable of northumberland police, iwould be chief constable of northumberland police, i would be throwing open my door and asking for an independent investigation to ensure no stone is left unturned. we asked northumbria police for an interview, they declined the offer. in a statement, they said they had been to visit the victims to apologise for what were described as the falls's failings. the statement went on to say that because the review of the case is under way, it would be inappropriate to comment further at this stage. so what effect has this all had on chloe? i have that much lack of trust, i don't think i could ever ring the police again if something happened. i don't trust them to do an investigation right. alison freeman, bbc news, newcastle. and you can watch alison's full report from inside out north east and cumbria — it's available
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across the uk now — via the iplayer. all this week, the bbc‘s "we are stoke—on—trent" series is focusing on stories from the city, hearing what matters to people there, and bringing those issues to a wider audience. staffordshire university is one of the smallest in the uk and it offers some unusual degree courses. from theme park management to comic book art — students are getting a unique experience. lucas yeomans reports. student life has its ups and downs, especially with degree courses like this one. people might think, like, "oh, it's just about roller coasters, but it's more than that, isn't it? it's a lot more than that. it's a business, it's a behind—the—scenes look. it's strategy, it's kind of everything all in one. on staffordshire's theme park management course, students split their time between lectures on campus and alton towers theme park. do you get people being sceptical, perhaps? inevitably, you're going to get that from the study of visitor attractions and resorts, but they are such a key part of the leisure industry that we need people on resort,
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in attractions who understand how they work and how to operate them. from real thrills to the virtual world, esports, basically competitive gaming, is the newest course at the university. it prepares students for work in the world's largest and fastest—growing entertainment sector. the esports industry, if you look at the gaming industry, it's bigger than music and film — combined. we're consistently talking to industry. we're looking at the next growth, the next sort of strategy that's being built, in terms of esports. the course is hugely popular, with more than 100 undergraduates a year. it's nothing to do with games, playing them, it's more learning how to bring them to an audience in a way that they'll enjoy and have fun watching. one course here might actually welcome being called a mickey mouse degree. the first lecture of cartoon and comic arts is a get together at the pub and shows how students can gain much more than practical skills.
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comics help people identify who they are. it seems like something so fun. i'd never heard of it and i was like, "wow, it actually exists?!" it's a lot broader and a lot more in—depth than a lot of people imagine and understand. when you open up your ikea set, there's a list of instructions there. a map is like a comic book, to a certain extent. three very different degrees but all with one thing in common, they're rooted in growing industries. so, for these students, the sky should be the limit. lucas yeomans, bbc news, stoke. a43—year—old woman after being attacked by two dogs in cheshire. officers were called to a house in widnes yesterday afternoon where the woman died of her injuries. she's been named locally as elayne stanley — herfamily have been informed. one of the dogs has been destroyed. one of northern ireland's biggest manufacturing firms has gone into administration, putting 1,500 jobs at risk. the company, which is based in county antrim, is best known for building london's
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new routemaster double—decker buses. the duke and duchess of sussex's son archie has made his first official appearance of the family's tour of africa. the couple took their four month old to meet archbishop desmond tutu. our correspondent pumza fihlani has spent the day in cape town. a lot of people have been asking whether we will get to see archie at all during this visit, and we saw that during the visit to the arches foundation here in south africa. it is an important moment for the royal family, because he is somebody that was very family, because he is somebody that was very close to princess diana's heart, and they wanted to mark their visit here by bringing archie and introducing him to this man who has been widely regarded as the moral compass of south africa was not the
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foundation got an opportunity to present a few gifts to him, which include some handwritten books by archbishop desmond tutu as well, as well as a bible, and they are hoping that this will be something that he will treasure as he grows, and he understands the impact that this man had intensive reconciliation efforts here in south africa in various parts of the continent. we are still waiting for a statement from borisjohnson, we are still waiting for a statement from boris johnson, we we are still waiting for a statement from borisjohnson, we are that at around 5pm. we are getting an update on operation yellowhammer and preparations for a no—deal brexit. the transport secretary is still taking questions on the demise of thomas cook, let's rejoin the hearing now. and they also give my thanks to the staff from hmrc as well as caa who
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have been absolutely tremendous throughout the world working in airports everywhere. people in greater manchester have lost their jobs including many in wigan the scandinavian subsidiary of thomas cook is still flying, the german division are still flying. the government hasn't just division are still flying. the government hasn'tjust failed to provide financial assistance necessary to keep those companies going, but it has failed to bring forward legislation which would enable those airlines to continue flying in protective administration. it didn't have to be like this. this government has barely brought anything to this house over recent months, and they don't need a queen speech in order to do this. they should do it right now. the honourable lady confuses two points. it is absolutely true as i have said many times that we need a new administration regime, but the fundamental difference that she refers to any scandinavian and german examples is the profitability of the underlying business in those markets due to different influences in their particular markets in the
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way the business has been run at some level. does my right honourable friend agree that we should always be cautious about bailing out private sector businesses, particularly those with the £1.9 billion debt and struggle to make money even in a good year? we should also look at our competition policy and try to avoid business is getting so big that when they feel they have such a widespread effect on uk consumers. my right honourable friend makes a very good point indeed. we do get back to this fundamental point that i know is causing some concern on the opposite side, that business has to be underlying profitable otherwise there is nothing to bail out or lend money to. when money is being lost at that sort of rate, the idea that yet more taxpayer money is pumped into something which will lose it any matter of weeks or months seems to me to be crazy. what advice does the secretary have for my
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constituent alan patterson, stuck right now in ibiza who hadn't realised he was entitled to a repatriation flight home, but he wa nted repatriation flight home, but he wanted to get back for his newjob this weekend, and has spent hundreds of pounds on his flights which he didn't need to buy in the first place. klm are now refusing to refu nd place. klm are now refusing to refund him that money. don't they agree that is mean—spirited and they shouldn't be profiting out of this disaster. i am very sorry to hear about the example, the situation for his constituents. no airline should be trying to profit out of the situation. particularly the uk airlines have really tried to assist once we got over this issue of initial surge pricing that seem to kick in. they have for the most part been extraordinarily helpful, lending aircraft, cutting some of the prices and i am very concerned to hear about this case. we are living through a digital age and businesses which don't adapt well struggle, but can i thank the
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government for thinking about the people who have been affected here. what assistance is likely to be for people who have bought flights or holidays that haven't yet started? large number of people will have bought holidays which have yet to start. if they were package holidays, they are at all protected and they will simply get that back, whereas flights only they do not automatically get that money back and they will want to refer to their credit cards and debit cards and holiday insurance and sometimes alternate travel agents. there are legal differences between the uk and germany but there is a big difference in political well as well. the secretary of state keeps mentioning air berlin so i have one little general knowledge question. the german government loan that was provided to air berlin that enabled its operations to be transferred on a planned manner and to other
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companies, has it been paid back or not? the big difference with other airlines which are surviving and even some surviving within this group are the profitability of the airlines themselves. we have gone round is quite a few times. i am in agreement with the honourable lady that we do need to have an airline administration system which enables airlines to continue flying. those two differences, profitability and the ability to be an administration are fundamental differences to the situation that existed here, and so the idea, which is the third option she was trying to inject into this, but somehow, for some crazy reason, the government wouldn't want to do anything possible to try to save a 178—year—old british icon, is that is grant chaps on the demise of
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thomas cook. let's pick up on this day. a momentous day, and we haven't seen the main player, which will be boris johnson, who has to come here after a huge day yesterday. yeah, and cutting short of that trip to the un, having to fly back and face mps, having been told his actions were unlawful. lots of opposition mps say, in normal times, he would have been forced to resign. as you know, we are not in normal times. what you are going to see is more of what we saw from the attorney general, it is how they are framing this whole thing. he seemed to be plastering this out, will we see more of that? i don't think there will be an apology, he will say, this is the government and borisjohnson say, this is the government and boris johnson trying say, this is the government and borisjohnson trying to deliver on the will of the people, trying to deliver brexit and being thwarted by what they would call parliament and the courts, who are elitist, and trying to make sure that the people don't get their way. that is how they are 20 frame it. because of that, they are trying to say to the
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labour party and jeremy corbyn, you keep calling for a general election, and yet you won't vote for one, so i wonder whether they will try to bring forward another attempt to have that general election. will they do that as early as tomorrow? they will have to table something before they go away tonight in order to do it tomorrow. there is talk of a one night bill, changing the law so you don't have to have two thirds of mps voting for it, because that would not get through. he would have a one line bill, saying we want and election in october. they are trying to go to the opposition. they would say a general election doesn't solve this, because it doesn't necessarily mean it will be about brexit. and it doesn't take no—deal brexit off the table. they want that extension before you get into the scenario of a general election, something he won't do because he knows that at the ballot box he has gone against
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upping he said he would do. before borisjohnson gets upping he said he would do. before boris johnson gets up upping he said he would do. before borisjohnson gets up to his feet... you are not going to go to far away? no. i will be back with the headlines in a few moments, but let's get a look at the weather with matt taylor. thank you. good afternoon. lovely there at west mist in the sunshine. there will be some sunny spells around, but never drift too far away from the rain jacket and around, but never drift too far away from the rainjacket and umbrella, because there will be more in the way of wet and 20 weather heading our way at times. if i show you the jet stream, it has been a typical autumn position, right across the mid—atlantic. right autumn position, right across the mid—atla ntic. right across autumn position, right across the mid—atlantic. right across the uk. at the northern edge of that, we transport areas of low pressure, we build them up and fire them towards us. we see one area of low pressure after another this week, bringing rain and strong winds. we have some rain and strong winds. we have some rain around today, it has been damp across northern england, some
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showers for the south midlands and southern counties of england, continuing into the evening rush—hour. temperatures hold up quite nicely, into the mid or high teens as we finish the day and start the night. into tonight, heavy showers across scotland. tries out across eastern areas, then longer spells of heavy rain pushed in from the atlantic across the west, reaching the eastern parts by the time we start tomorrow morning. clear skies across some areas in the morning. temperatures holding up quite nicely. these are the areas of low pressure to the north—west of us, the weather fronts low pressure to the north—west of us, the weatherfronts bringing low pressure to the north—west of us, the weather fronts bringing a damp start. it could be a bit of a miserable commute for some. that gets out of the way for all but the far north—east of scotland. tomorrow, more sunshine around in the afternoon. but that will be punctuated by occasional showers pushing through on the breeze. temperatures like today, high teens
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and low 20s. friday, heavier spells of thundery rain from west to east, it will be slightly cloudier and wetter tha n it will be slightly cloudier and wetter than tomorrow, and it will be a more breezy one, and the winds will reach gale force at times. that will reach gale force at times. that will temper the feel of things, feeling cooler, especially across the north and west. looking at saturday, some indications that there will be a wet weather day, but more sunshine and showers will stop you can see more persistent rain saturday night into sunday. this next area of low pressure is one we will have to watch because it will bring some wet and windy weather. the exact position of that is uncertain at the moment but we will keep you updated right here on afternoon lie. —— afternoon live.
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hello, you're watching afternoon live, i'm simon mccoy. today at 3: parliament gets back to work for the first time since the supreme court said it was unlawfully suspended. the attorney general tells the commons ministers admit defeat the government accepts that the judgment and accepts that loss the case and, at all times, the government acted in good faith. for a man like him, a party like this, and a leader like this, this prime minister to talk about morals and morality, is a disgrace! questions are asked over funding given to an american businesswoman by borisjohnson while he was london mayor. the government insists
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the pm had no role in it. these are honourable people doing the right thing, and they should not be, their reputation should not be, impugned in the way that he seeks to do so. across the atlantic, political peril for president trump — now facing an impeachment inquiry. the transport secretary says the government will be running a shadow airline to repatriate the 150,000 passangers left stranded after the collapse of thomas cook. and archie — meet desmond. harry and meghan introduce their son to the elder statesman of south africa. coming up on afternoon live: all the sport with gavin. in sport, we'll have the news which could give wales the advantage in their rugby world cup match against australia. and we hear from nicola adams ahead of her first title defence. thanks, gavin, and matt taylor has all the weather. wherever you are across the uk, keep a rainjacket
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wherever you are across the uk, keep a rain jacket handy, wherever you are across the uk, keep a rainjacket handy, you wherever you are across the uk, keep a rain jacket handy, you will need it, as i will show you in the next half hour. good afternoon from westminster. there have been fierce exchanges during the first session of commons business since yesterday's supreme court ruling that the government's decision to suspend parliament was unlawful. the government's most senior legal adviser — the attorney general, geoffrey cox — has faced angy criticism from mps about the move. but he insisted the suspension of parliament was done in good faith and his legal advice had been sound. mr cox also indicated the government would, for the third time, try to call a general election as he accused opposition mps of cowardice. the prime minister will address the house this afternoon at around 4.30pm. at the moment, the transport secretary is responding to questions about his statement on the collapse
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of thomas cook. you can see continuous coverage of that on the bbc parliament channel. meanwhile, here, with more about the resumption of parliament, here's our political correspondent chris mason has more. jet—lagged courtesy of a night over the atlantic, winded courtesy of the supreme court. are you going to apologise to the queen, prime minister? the prime minister's back in the country and mps are back in here too. colleagues, welcome back to our place of work. and straight away, a question from one of the central protagonists in getting parliament going again. urgent question, joanna cherry. to ask the attorney general if he will make a statement about his legal opinion on the advice given to her majesty the queen
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to prorogue parliament? the attorney general, the government's main legal adviser said... the government accepts the judgment and accepts that it lost the case and, at all times, the government acted in good faith and in the belief that... and in the belief that its approach was both lawful and constitutional. but, he added... this parliament is a dead parliament. it should no longer sit. it has no moral right to sit on these green benches. why? because... they're too cowardly! cheering. this parliament should have the courage to face the electorate.
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but it won't. it won't, because so many of them are really all about preventing us leaving the european union at all. in response, take a look at this. no shame today, no shame at all. the fact that this government cynically manipulated the prorogation to shut down this house so that it couldn't work as a democratic assembly. he knows that that is the truth and, to come here with his barrister‘s bluster, to obfuscate the truth, and, fora man like him, a party like this and a leader like this, this prime minister to talk about morals and morality is a disgrace! the opposition parties are gathering to discuss tactics and demand the prime minister says sorry
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to the queen. i think he should apologise, both to her for the advice he gave her but, more importantly, apologise to the british people for what he's done in trying to shut down our democracy at a very crucial time when people are very, very worried about what will happen on the 31st october. making sure there isn't a no—deal brexit at the end of next month remains their priority and arguing... we have a prime minister who has abused our democracy, who has been found guilty of breaking the law, unlawfully proroguing parliament. anna soubry. this place is feeling sparky and today is only just getting going. the prime minister will be here later. chris mason, bbc news, at westminster.
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the trump administration are under pressure with calls for the impeachment proceedings under way. donald trump has admitted discussing joe biden with the ukrainian foreign minister and we are now hearing the white house has agreed to release the transcripts of that discussion. the president has denied exerting pressure on the president to investigate his political rival, although mr trump has confirmed that military aid to the ukraine had been withheld but said he had done this to pressure european nations to increase their contributions to the country, nothing to do with any pressure regarding joe biden and his son. the transcripts being released, we will have a look at those and more on that and live in washington later. joining me now is maddy thimont jack, senior researcher from the institute for government. here we are, outside parliament. this time two days ago, you would
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put money on not being, but boris johnson will come here this afternoon, and what you think he will try to do? he is in a really difficult position. he wanted parliament to be suspended, the courts have said it hasn't been, he wa nts a courts have said it hasn't been, he wants a general election, and mps are not willing to give him that. mps have also legislated to say if you cannot get a deal approved by the 19th of october he will ask for an extension to the article 50 deadline, which again he doesn't wa nt deadline, which again he doesn't want do. there was some suggestion earlier that may be the government will try to pass some kind of one line build to get to a general election, although that in itself is tricky. that gets out of the hole, doesn't it? they say, we will call an election. the problem is, people do not trust him, they think that can be fiddled. you need a majority for your one bind bill, and can be fiddled. you need a majority foryour one bind bill, and i can be fiddled. you need a majority for your one bind bill, and i don't think there is any indication from parties whether they are ready yet
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to support the government in getting an election before knowing he has asked for the extension. the other challenges, you have to get through both the house of commons and house lords so they can amend we have a majority to a different date. is there some form of words which means it cannot be got at? not in terms of amendments from parliament. that is just the legislative process. it has to go to the commons in the house of lords. what is challenging is if he has set a later election date, the opposition parties... you consent to the opposition, you've got me, i will ask for an extension if i don't have a deal approved, so surely you can trust me there, but the government has already suggested there may be ways around this and he no deal bill passing, but it feels like a long time ago.
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joining me now from washington is our correspondent gary o'donoghue. this was the 30 —— this was the 30 minute phone call back on the 25th ofjuly. it seems to confirm that the president did ask the president for help in looking into corruption allegations surrounding joe biden and his son, hunter. it says the president would like some help with that. the president thinks the whole thing is horrible. the president of ukraine also seems to agree to that request for assistance in the investigation, and the president responds by saying, we will get to the bottom of it. he also says he will ask his personal lawyer and the
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attorney general to get in touch with the president of ukraine, although the attorney general here says he was never asked by the president to never did that, but we do know from reports in the us media that he was trying to run some kind of shadow ukraine policy that may have involved getting information aboutjoe biden. joe biden is the leading contenderfor aboutjoe biden. joe biden is the leading contender for the aboutjoe biden. joe biden is the leading contenderfor the democratic presidential nomination. in some of the head—to—head polls, he is leading president trump. if it comes toa leading president trump. if it comes to a fight next november. you can see that argument that democrats will make. what we have not seen so farfrom this will make. what we have not seen so far from this transcript, and it has only come out the last couple of minutes, is any evidence that there was a quid pro quo between military aid to ukraine, which the president had held up, nearly $400 million of it, any connection between that and his request for help on the biden
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circumstances. but the democrats will feel they have enough to go with her. the justice will feel they have enough to go with her. thejustice department will feel they have enough to go with her. the justice department of said there is no infringement of intelligence issues here. the other thing we have learnt is the complaint made by the whistle—blower related to campaign finance electoral law, in other words a suggestion this president was seeking a contribution in kind from the ukrainians to help him with his three election, not money, but help, and that could come in the form of dirt onjoe biden. thejustice department say they have looked into that and there is no case to answer that. lots to go. we will get the detail of that whistle—blower‘s complaint in the next couple of days as well. that whistle—blower whose identity a secret is wanting to give evidence to congress. that will be a
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big moment when that happens, but from this today, the president will feel he is exonerated, perfect, as he put it, whether democrats will look at this and say, here is your evidence, the president went looking fordirt on evidence, the president went looking for dirt onjoe biden from a foreign government. perhaps no smoking gun, but it does not smell good. how much trouble does this cause? the impeachment process will gather pace. the six committees will pool their resources. nancy pelosi seems persuaded that the case has been made. is there a likelihood that the president would be removed from office? i don't think there is. you need a two thirds vote in the senate to convict him, and the republicans have a majority. he would need 20
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republicans to switch sides in effect to get a conviction, and that ain't going to happen, certainly not in an election here. the democrats' game is political. they will say of course and believe it that this is about violations of the constitution, the president seeking personal electoral gain using his office, and the case will be made for that, but it is also true that they know that impeachment and removalfrom they know that impeachment and removal from office is they know that impeachment and removalfrom office is unlikely, so what they are hoping is that in an election year, this inquiry and investigation, this idea of the phone call, is a simple straightforward example in their view of a president behaving unconstitutionally, and that will damage a man they hope is only at 43% approval ratings. the white house is saying this is a memorandum, a collection of people's memories, this is not actually a
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transcript, that may cause him some problems. that will complicate the matter. that is not what they promised. they promised a transcript of the call, and unredacted transcript, a declassified transcript. if that is not what we have got, then there will be some hell to pay, and that will be demanded as part of the whole process of the impeachment inquiry. we will see how that plays out. but we do have what looked like quotes from that call, and there seems to bea from that call, and there seems to be a nugget in there, that key nugget of the president asking celebs key to do something in terms ofan celebs key to do something in terms of an investigation with biden. that is what we will focus on. it is that sentence, there is a lot of talk about biden's son, and people want to find out about that. whatever you
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can do about the attorney general would be great. biden bragged that he could stop the prosecution. it sounds horrible to me. that is what eve ryo ne sounds horrible to me. that is what everyone will focus on. and just after that, it goes on to suggest that the president agreed, he would look into it, and trump said he would get his personal lawyer to get in touch with the president. the justice department have said he was never asked to do that by the president, in fact, never asked to do that by the president, infact, never did. a bit further on down, you also see the president saying, we will get to the bottom of this. there is a clear amount of determination on the part of president trump to raise this issue and to push at home, and it raises serious questions for
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vladimir zelensky himself. he said, can't be pressured for anyone, the only person who can pressure me as my six year son. it looks like he does take things on board when asked to do so by the president of the us. —— six—year—old. i'm joined now by our chief political correspondent, vicky young. grant shapps is still taking questions on thomas cook, the agenda seems to be slipping, but what are we expecting this afternoon? we will hear from we expecting this afternoon? we will hearfrom michael gove, that would be the next statement, and that is about no deal preparations. there has been a big row about the document, the so—called yellowhammer. and mps want to get their hands on the full documentation showing how ready the
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government is. they will leave without a deal, but a lot of mps wa nt to without a deal, but a lot of mps want to see that in black—and—white, so they might even try to use parliamentary devices to get their hands on those documents. then after that, there is a statement on the run, then we will hear from the prime ministerfacing run, then we will hear from the prime minister facing mps after being told he acted unlawfully, so he will face a barrage of criticism. he will try and come out fighting, geoffrey cox did that today, trying to put the pressure back on the opposition by saying, you're not letting us govern that you're not letting us govern that you're not letting us govern that you're not letting us have a general election either because you are cowards. he said it is a dead parliament and he said it is a dead parliament and he said you have no moral right to sit here. it could well be that that is the approach that borisjohnson might take. to someone watching who does not understand how this works,
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if borisjohnson says, i will bring ina one if borisjohnson says, i will bring in a one line motion to call an election, why would the opposition say no to that? they said they don't trust him, they say he might change that date. we would be in the middle ofan that date. we would be in the middle of an election campaign where parliament is dissolved, then we would potentially leave without a deal. they are saying their main aim here is to make sure that no deal does not happen. that is the liberal democrats, snp, labour, and those dissident tories. the once booted out of the party. they say they want to leave but with the deal, so how does borisjohnson to leave but with the deal, so how does boris johnson get to leave but with the deal, so how does borisjohnson get out of this? there is another act of parliament which forces him by law to ask the eu for a delay to brexit. that has gone through, on the 19th of october, but what they are worried about as he can somehow wriggle around that. he can send a letter to
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the eu, asking for a delay, then send another letter saying, i don't wa nt to send another letter saying, i don't want to delay or give me a delay of six hours. they are suspicious of what is going on in downing street, they think downing street is going to do things, so all bets are off. borisjohnson does to do things, so all bets are off. boris johnson does not to do things, so all bets are off. borisjohnson does not want to do it because he knows if he goes into election having to lay brexit, there isa election having to lay brexit, there is a certain nigel farage waiting to scoop up those folks who want brexit to happen. that is why we are where we are because neither side is willing to go along with what is on the table in front of them. this was one of the moments when there was raw anger in the house of commons, as the attorney general, geoffrey cox, was questioned
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by labour's barry sheerman. the fact that this government cynically manipulated the prorogation to shut down this house so that it could not work as a democratic assembly, he knows that is the truth, and to come here with his barrister‘s bluster, to obfuscate the truth, and for a man like him, a party like this, and a leader like this, this prime minister to talk about morals and morality... michael gove has just got on his feet with the latest on the operation yellowhammer. the government is determined to secure a good deal with our eu partners. negotiations to be led by the prime minister, the brexit secretary and foreign secretary. those negotiations have seen significant movement over recent weeks. until recently the eu has maintained the withdrawal agreement was sacrosanct, but now they have acknowledged it can be changed, and up until this
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point, the european union have also said the backstop was inviolable, but european leaders have said they are not emotionally attached to the backstop, and there are other ways of ensuring we can safeguard the gains of the good friday agreement and also ensure the smooth trade flows across ireland. i want to commend the prime minister and his collea g u es commend the prime minister and his colleagues for the proposed gas made in these negotiations, and i hope eve ryo ne in these negotiations, and i hope everyone will agree that it is better for all of us if we can leave the eu with a withdrawal agreement in place. the government needs to be prepared for every eventuality, and since the pm took office he has created a new cabinet structure in order to ensure that we take all the steps necessary to prepare for exit, a new cabinet committee has met 48 times and brought greater focus on urgency to preparations. our top economic priority is to ensure we can maintaina economic priority is to ensure we can maintain a smooth and efficient flow of goods and people from the uk into the eu and vice versa. we need
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to make sure businesses already in new customers requirements. there are goods that require notjust customs checks but the procedures, particularly foods and products of animal origin, and we have been working with deaf to ensure that those businesses are ready. we also ta ke those businesses are ready. we also take seriously our responsibility to ensure the rights of eu citizens in this country are protected, and we are also working with our european partners to ensure that uk nationals and eu nations have their rights are safeguarded. the committee is also taking steps to safeguard and enhance national security, and the operation of our criminaljustice system to enhance the free flow of data across borders, to ensure we can support devolved administrations, and to support the northern ireland civil service in its vital work. with your permission, i would like to go into more detail about how we can facilitate the free flow of goods across borders. i would like to explain the role of project yellow
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hannam in the government's planning. —— yellowhammer. if the uk leaves without a withdrawal agreement, there will be a third country. exports will be subject to new customs and sanitary cheques. these are unarguable facts and pose challenges and constitute the best scenario with which we all have to work. the government's civil contingency secretary active use these facts to develop a reasonable worst—case scenario of what might happen including in cases of appropriate mitigation is not put in place and readiness measures not implemented. that reasonable worst—case scenario and the steps required other work undertaken under the name operation yellowhammer, and as the national audit office reported in march, workers been going on since june reported in march, workers been going on sincejune 2018, and they made clear then that departments are working on the basis of a reasonable worst—case scenario. many of the
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challenges that operation yellowhammer identifies are flow at the border, careful estimates of how flow might be affected through a range of factors including steps to make businesses ready, that's why this government has taken steps in order to ensure that businesses are ready. specifically, in adjusting to this new situation, we know that businesses require support to deal with this new procedures and hmrc has acted to support traders. importers will have access to simplify procedures which ensure that businesses have time to adjust to new duties. businesses exporting to new duties. businesses exporting to the eu will need a specific economic registration number from hmrc, and hmrc have already allocated numbers to 88 vat registered businesses which currently trade with the eu and not beyond it. we also account for imported vat and access to the common transit convention showed
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that goods can continue to flow across international borders without the payment of any duties until they reach theirfinal the payment of any duties until they reach their final destination. we have established new transit sites in order to ensure that trucks can cope flow freely, carrying goods into france and beyond. we can provide tailored information through a range of sites across the country to ensure the greatest level. we funded business representative organisations to share information, they are preparing for exit. we have also worked with the authorities in both dover and calais to smooth trade. i want to take this opportunity to thank the french authorities for the work they have done to ensure the operation of a smart board in calais said that consignments should experience no delay. the steps were taken is designed to ensure that businesses are ready for exit without a deal, but it is also the case that these steps will in any case be necessary for life outside the single market and the customs union when we secure
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and the customs union when we secure a new free trade agreement with the eu. work undertaken under the previous government and accelerated under this administration and many businesses are well prepared. the any business that is in any doubt about what is required the department for business, energy and industrial strategy is conducting the trips and visiting distances and their premises, the website provides all the information required. there are specific additional requirements for those who are exporting food and products of animal origin, sanitary and fight tracks, trainers will require health certificates for food and fish, that's been trained to issue the certificates and additional personnel certified to support them. the french authorities have taken support them. the french authorities have ta ken steps to support them. the french authorities have taken steps to ensure the smooth flow of critical produce. they created new border inspection post in order to ensure that fish and shellfish products can be caught in the uk today and be on sale in
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the eu tomorrow. as well as making sure that commerce flows, we must safeguard the rights of individuals. that's what this government has provided the most competitive and generous offer to eu citizens in this country in order to guarantee their rights. it is already the case that under the eu settlement scheme more than1 that under the eu settlement scheme more than 1 million that under the eu settlement scheme more than1 million people been granted status and the home office is helping thousands of new applicants every day, and if any member parliament finds any of their constituents are having difficulties with that process i would welcome them to get in touch with me the home secretary. and in the same way, we have taken home secretary. and in the same way, we have ta ken steps to home secretary. and in the same way, we have taken steps to secure the rights of uk nationals in the eu, including access to health care after exit, and will continue to work with our partners in member states to provide further protection for uk nationals. it is important that uk citizens register with the appropriate authorities and again on the website details member state by member state to enable every citizen to have the rights they deserve. also this month, the new government committed to increasing the uk state
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pension which is paid to 500,000 people living in the uk. previously the commitment was solely for the financial year 2019—20. and as well as making sure uk nationals and eu citizens have their rights protected, we want to make sure uk citizens can continue to travel in the eu without impediment and that's why uk nationals will have visa free travel and we are all talking to eu member states in order to understand how people who provide professional services can continue to do so, a member state by member state. in return briefly to security. we need to ensure that we have the right approach to safeguarding citizens, that's why we have been talking to the eu about making sure we continue to have access to law enforcement and national security. it is also important to recognise that as we leave the eu, it will be the case that there are new tools available to ensure we can better deal with people trafficking, smuggling and
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other criminal activity. in return briefly to the situation in northern ireland. this government is committed to the good friday belfast agreement, determined to ensure there will be no infrastructure at there will be no infrastructure at the border, and determined to uphold the border, and determined to uphold the functioning of the all ireland economy. that's why we have no checks at the border and no tariffs. we wait to see what ireland and the eu commission will decide that we stand ready to work for them to help safeguard commerce and rights across ireland. leaving the eu without a deal of ides challenges but also economic opportunities. there is the opportunity to secure new trade deals and become a strong voice for free trade at the wto. there will be new technologies that will feed the world and enhance our environment. the opportunity to overhaul government procurement to better support growing british businesses. the opportunity to provide a more humane immigration system. the opportunity to deal with more
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cross—border security issues. leaving the eu is a clear instruction from the british people and this house has a clear choice, to be under that instruction or do we continue to delay and seek to frustrate the british people's verdict? this government is clear, we must another decision and i commend this statement to the house. i think the chancellor for the advanced copy of his statement. let's get to the detail and test what he says. he says these negotiations have seen significant movement over recent weeks. could he confirm for the house that three papers were submitted to the eu last week, and one today, but they are what the eu called non—papers,
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because... because they are for discussion but they don't commit the member state to the particular policy in them. at the moment, they are being kept secret from the eu 27. kept sub —— secret from the eu 27. what is the thrust or gist of these papers because we need to know if we are to assess the likelihood of success in the negotiations. secondly, can i challenge the suggestion in his statement that many businesses are already well prepared for no deal? i sat at three o'clock around a table last wednesday with the leaders of pretty well all the business sectors and the one message they wanted to get across to me was how concerned they we re across to me was how concerned they were that businesses were not prepared for a no—deal brexit. i don't believe those ministers, those businesses are saying one thing to
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me and another thing to the government. can he clarify that? and what this statement significantly and studiously avoids is actually giving any detail of the scenario that we are told that government's civil contingency secretariat has drawn up. mr speaker, on the 9th of september, just before we were shut down, and order was made that the government should produce all the documents prepared within her majesties government since the 23rd ofjuly relating majesties government since the 23rd of july relating to majesties government since the 23rd ofjuly relating to operation yellowhammer and submitted to the cabinet or a cabinet committee. —— her majesty's government. they were to be presented to this house two weeks ago. mr speaker, this is important because obviously the government is spending a lot of money telling businesses and the country to get ready and they want to know what they are to get ready
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for. they need to know what could happen so that they can prepare. mr speaker, on the 11th of september, the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster the chancellor of the duchy of la ncaster wrote the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster wrote to the chair of the brexit select committee saying this, i thought it would be helpful to publish the operation yellowhammer document based on assumptions drawn up document based on assumptions drawn up by document based on assumptions drawn up by the last government. and that is this document. that was the only document disclosed. he went on to say, it is my intention to publish revised assumptions in due course. nothing else has been produced. mr speaker, the document disclosed to the chair of the select committee is dated the 2nd of august. and so, can
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the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster explain how it is a document of the last government and not this. as he knows, it was leaked pretty well in full to the sunday times and so he doesn't try to avoid this by simply saying he will not comment on leaked documents, it also went to the welsh government, i understand. in response to that leak, the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster said on the 1st of september, this document predated the creation of this government. and its predictions were the worst possible eventuality. so if the impression he was trying to create is that this document is an old document and it is a worst—case scenario. he went on to say, and i quote, that he is constantly updated. exactly, the point i wanted to come onto. given this document is dated the 2nd of august, was this produced for this government, the
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last government, or both? check the order. if it was the last government, has this government produced any document of its own since the 23rd ofjuly relating to operation yellowhammer? and it is no good saying we are going to produce them. this government has been in place for nine weeks and it is only five weeks and two days until the 3ist five weeks and two days until the 31st of october. if it was the last government, it is an old document, why did somebody change the title after a leak to the sunday times? this used to be branded, the base scenario. somebody got hold of an old document, apparently irrelevant, and changed the title. so it is now called the hmg reasonable worst—case scenario assumption. who did it? and can the chancellor of the duchy of
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lancaster confirm that the rebranded documents has 20 substantive paragraphs, each word for word the same as the document leaked to the sunday times? and if it is co nsta ntly sunday times? and if it is constantly updated, where are the co nsta nt constantly updated, where are the constant updates? laughter. mr speaker, this is the only document we have and, using this document, taking this document, can he confirm that according to this document they will be significant or prolonged disruptions at ports, that's what it says. the worst disruption is to the channel straits, which will be up to three months, and they will be significant queuesin months, and they will be significant queues in kent and delays of up to 2.5 days at the border for hgvs attempting to use the channel route to france. if the answer to that question is no, that is not the case, what is he basing his answer
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on if it is not another document in existence that he hasn't disclosed in accordance with the order to this house? it is either yes or no, based ona house? it is either yes or no, based on a document that hasn't been disclosed. i also want to highlight paragraph 18, which hasn't had the attention it should have done, on the impact of no deal in northern ireland. i know this is a matter of the house takes extremely seriously. it sets out the government's planned model. it indicates that the agri— food sector will be hardest hit. disruption to key sectors, job losses are likely to result, in protest a nd losses are likely to result, in protest and direction action. it talks about severe disruption at the border. the document itself concludes that the pressure will be such, northern ireland happens to be extremely important to many people in this house. we are here to
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scrutinise the government, let us get on with it. this document... mr speaker, this document indicates that that model that the government is proposing set out in its own document is going to come under such pressure, it is unlikely to survive for a few days or weeks, so the government's preferred model for northern ireland, in its own assessment, is unlikely to survive more than a few days or a week. that is not a plan. they must be an update and where is it? and can i also confirm with the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster whether he has received any representations from the energy sector, this is very specific, about the impact of oil and gas supplies to the uk in the event of a no deal? mr speaker, anyone watching today's proceedings and still thinking that somewhere
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lurking there is a clever and cunning plan to get through the chaos of the government's own making needs to think again. the government has lost six out of six votes in parliament, the prime minister has lost his majority, he has lost his case in the supreme court. the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster said on the radio this morning that the prime minister is a born winner. laughter. i'm glad he hasn't lost his sense of humour. but this isn't a game and for the government to be five weeks away from leaving the eu without the plan is unforgivable. cani plan is unforgivable. can i welcome the shadow brexit secretary back from brighton and to the house of commons. when of the things about the house of commons, whether or not we win or lose votes, at least they are recorded accurately.
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laughter. they shadow brexit secretary repeated on a number of occasions that he believed in constant updates. what a pity that he did not updates. what a pity that he did not update his list of questions in light of the points that i made in my statement. what a pity he relied on the list of questions he drafted many, on the list of questions he drafted any on the list of questions he drafted many, many hours before. on the first point about negotiations, they have been detailed negotiations with the eu commission and eu member states and the eu 27 are briefed on those negotiations by the commission and it is as a result of those briefings and those conversations that we have made the progress i mentioned earlier. the withdrawal agreement is now in play and the backstop can be replaced by alternative arrangements. he asked about business and he said he spoke to business representatives and kept them up to three o'clock with simple
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messages. i imagine the simple messages. i imagine the simple message is, please replace your leader. the retail sector have confirmed they are ready, 90% of the companies measured by value that trade with the eu also trade with companies outside the eu, they are ina companies outside the eu, they are in a position to be ready. he asked me about the operation yellowhammer document but he seemed to miss the point, that the national audit office was able to appreciate earlier this year, and seems to have passed him by. operation yellowhammer is a reasonable worst—case scenario. the government have taken worst—case scenario. the government have ta ken steps to worst—case scenario. the government have taken steps to mitigate it and there are more than 300 actions that have been authorised since we started meeting in august in order to mitigate those consequences. we will be updating the house on all the steps we have taken, many of which i listed in my statement, none of which he asked about, all of the
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action things that business need to get ready. he had not a single question on. his intention to speak to business is exposed as a hollow sham. he spoke about cunning plans, i suppose he was talking about the labour party's i suppose he was talking about the labour pa rty‘s position i suppose he was talking about the labour party's position on brexit. in 2017, the right honourable gentleman said, politically, the notion that the referendum was merely a consultation exercise holds no water. we are in labour have to accept the result. but now, in some sort of political equivalent of va, he wants to know that result. now labour ‘s policy is to delay exit further, we negotiate a new deal and put it to the country in a new referendum, with the deputy leader saying vote remain, many backbenchers are saying vote leave, and the leader himself undecided. labour's position on brexit is as
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solid as a blancmange in a hurricane and as coherent as an apology from vicky pollard. mr iain duncan smith. mr iain duncan smith. mr speaker, mr iain duncan smith. mrspeaker, can i... mr iain duncan smith. mr speaker, can i... can i ask my right honourable friend that when he refers to operation yellowhammer as a document that was introduced by the previous administration but which has been read and updated by this, does he not also recognise the purpose of that document was to advise the government of what more they needed to do to be ready, it was not meant to be an assistant to the opposition spokesman, who struggles a very hard to get his lines right, it was a day for a purpose. that purpose is being met. the honourable gentleman hit the nail on the head.
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i thank the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster for advance sight of his statement and it allows me to be gained by pointing out the glaring omission. he ought to have started by thanking lady hale and her fellow judges in the supreme court for the decision they took yesterday because, without that judgment, decision they took yesterday because, without thatjudgment, he would not have had the opportunity to come to the house today and explain the government's preparations, and we would not have an opportunity to see just how woefully inadequately prepared the government actually is. and i don't put this down to a lack of effort on the government's part, i'm sure his committee is in permanent session, almost, and we know from the right honourable member for hastings and rye, that he is fixated almost to the exclusion of everything else in preparation for a no deal, but the fa ct preparation for a no deal, but the fact that we are so far away from concluding those preparations is simplya concluding those preparations is simply a testament to the enormity of the task and the fact it is
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simply not doable in the next five weeks. and as a result of this, rather than be honest with the house, the secretary of state is indulging in euphemisms and wishful thinking and banter and jokes, and the truth is, he is trying to sugar—coat what is a disastrous situation, and that begins with the very title of the document itself. i return to the point raised by the opposition spokesperson. in the very same document that was given to the scottish government, the first minister of scotland has confirmed that it was referred to as a base scenario. and yet several days later, when it is published, it is referred to as a worst—case scenario. an attempt to suggest that there are much better scenarios and there are much better scenarios and there is nothing to see and nothing to worry about. i ask him again, and i don't want a joke in response, who made the decision to change that title and why? there are other things throughout this document which show that it may have been
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sugar coated as well but one of the most bizarre thing is the secretary of state has just said, he said a few moments ago that uk citizens will have a visa free travel throughout the eu. that is nonsense. in the event of a no deal, the very fa ct of in the event of a no deal, the very fact of a no deal means that they will not be that. that is what no deal actually means. either this is an exercise in self—delusion or a wilful attempt to mislead the house. it is certainly not the truth and we ought to be given the truth. mr speaker, surely the point is this, and this is my principal question to the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster, surely the time has come now to assess is it realistically possible to get a deal to leave the european union on the 31st of october? the house has considered this question and come to a judgment that it probably would not be possible. and therefore it is necessary for the government to apply for an extension to the
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process. i want to know from the minister, will he accept that mandate from this parliament, will he do and act as a member of this government to make sure that it is implemented or will he continue to fight the will of the house and proceed on preparations which, frankly, are to prepare for a situation which is now unlawful, according to the law of the land? will he commit to the mandate given to him, will he follow the law of the land and will he confirm to the house whether or not he has had discussions with the prime minister about doing anything other than that? iam very i am very grateful to the honourable memberfor his i am very grateful to the honourable member for his questions and may i also say i am grateful to the supreme court for the clarity of theirjudgment supreme court for the clarity of their judgment and i'm supreme court for the clarity of theirjudgment and i'm grateful to his colleagues in the scottish government for the extensive work they have done along with other devolved administrations to help us prepare for exit. only yesterday i was chairing a committee meeting in
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which the scottish cabinet secretary responsible for agriculture and rural affairs was along with other devolved administration ministers actively taking steps in order to ensure that his constituents were actively ready to prepare for a no—deal brexit, and it is only right we give thanks for that work. i do not shirk from the fact that there are serious challenges and we are all aware of this. we would much prefer all aware of this. we would much p refer to all aware of this. we would much prefer to leave with a deal and the honourable gentleman asked what preparations are being made to security deal. i listed some of the advances made and the other thing i would say is we have had a chance in this house of commons to vote for deals before and it was the choice of his party resolutely not to vote for radio. we could have... the right honourable gentleman should plough on. we could have a withdrawal agreement if only members of the snp were as good as their word and put the interests of scotla nd word and put the interests of scotland ahead of narrow sectarian
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secessionist and separatist arguments. the honourable member also asked about the yellowhammer document. the national audit office confirmed earlier this year that it isa confirmed earlier this year that it is a reasonable worst—case scenario. one we have taken steps in response both to the honourable gentleman on my right honourable friend to mitigate, and those steps, many of which have been taken in coordination with devolved administrations, extends from everything from the provision of infrastructure for fishing to licensing people's health certificates for other areas of agriculture. he finally makes the point, it is vitally important we all uphold the law in this house of commons but it is also important that we recognise that we passed a bill in order to create a referendum in which we said the people's verdict, the people's verdict would be respected, and our democracy
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depends not just be respected, and our democracy depends notjust on respect for the rule of law but for the people's verdict. thank you. can i also thank my right honourable friend for the information he shared with me and other kent mps earlier this week about the accelerating preparations for ensuring that freight traffic approaching the port of dover is able to run smoothly, because i am sure he will agree that avoiding chaos on the roads in kent is one of the key indicators of a smooth running for brexit however it takes place. can he get the house has assessment of how well the haulage industry across europe is actually responding to the british government's information about the paperwork they will need to make sure that the crossing on the channel works as efficiently as possible after brexit. it was a pleasure to meet my honourable
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friend and other kent mps this week. it is the case that more than 80% of the hauliers come from eu countries. that is why we have created offices in those eu countries in order to provide hauliers and traders with information. we have published guidance in more than ten eu languages and that is why we are contacting traders who use them in order to make sure they are ready. it is also the case that steps are being taken to ensure that the traffic management in kent under the aegis of the forum is as effective as possible but further steps do need to be taken and i hope to update my right honourable friend and the house has those steps are taken. how can the british people be safer than ever before if we lose access to eu crime—fighting databases access to eu crime—fighting data bases and a access to eu crime—fighting databases and a no deal scenario? border force will have considerable new powers in order to be able to intercept people smugglers, human traffickers and those dealing in organised crime. sir david roy
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liddington cbe. while completely supporting the need to engage in rigorous contingency planning, as my right honourable friend is doing, could he also confirmed that in northern ireland, the absence of an executive, the civil service lacks the necessary powers to take the mitigating measures that he is rightly putting in place as regards england, and could he say what plans the government has to introduce the necessary steps including legislation to ensure that guidance and direction are available in northern ireland ? and direction are available in northern ireland? i will take a little longer than i would ordinarily want to because i want to congratulate my right honourable friend on his knighthood and also to thank him for his years of government service. he was an outstanding minister in the number of offices and it is a particular
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recognition on my part that is chancellor of the duchy of lancaster he did so much to prepare is for eu exit and to advance negotiations. he makes a very important point about northern ireland. can i first of all say that the northern ireland civil service and police service have done an enormous amount prepare for the contingencies of no deal exit and we should all be thankful to them for the work they do. but in the absence ofa the work they do. but in the absence of a function executive they lack ministerial directive hook direction and it is important we restore that. if no executive is in place then you will have to consider in this house and in their discussions with neighbours and the republic of ireland what steps might be needed to ensure we can give appropriate support to the northern ireland civil service. paragraph 18 of the operation yellowhammer document states that the government's current plans to manage the northern irish border after no deal, which are no new checks are tariffs on goods
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coming in from the republic of ireland, are likely to prove unsustainable. due to significant economic, legal and bio—security risks, and no effective unilateral mitigations to address this will be available. this is not a description ofa available. this is not a description of a worst—case scenario. this is a description of what is likely to happen because as the chancellor of the duchy of lancaster nose, northern ireland businesses will all face ta riffs northern ireland businesses will all face tariffs from the very first day. given that he wrote earlier this year that the united kingdom didn't vote to leave without a deal, as the government really prepared to allow its willingness to pursue a no—deal brexit to jeopardise the peace and security that has been achieved in northern ireland as a result of the good friday agreement? iam result of the good friday agreement? i am grateful to the chairman of the select committee for making that
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point. i do want to stress again that operation yellowhammer is a reasonable worst—case scenario. the scenarios of what would happen if no mitigating steps were taken, but he is right to say that northern ireland businesses would face specific challenges in the event of ano specific challenges in the event of a no deal exit as a result of facing the common external tariff, and it would be the case that businesses across the uk would face those challenges. there are steps we can take, economic interventions and others, to help those businesses and it is important we do so. we should also continue discussions with the european commission and irish government about making sure the position of individuals and businesses in northern ireland is protected. he makes a broader point and a deal is preferable which is why i hope he will vote for one in the future having not been able to do so in the past. i very much agree with the chancellor when he says it is essential that we agree a deal with the eu, but while we are making those preparations for a no—deal
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brexit, can give assurance to the leaders of the nhs in cornwall that when he makes those plans, he will include social care services alongside nhs services, because they are so essential. can i thank my right honourable friend for her question. a very distinguished and effective minister, and she is absolutely right to focus in on some of the challenges that the nhs and indeed social care will face in the future. we have taken steps, the department of health and social care has taken steps to ensure we can have all the medicines that we require, both through ensuring we have unimpeded flow and making sure we can secure additional freight capacity. the broader adult social ca re capacity. the broader adult social care sector requires close attention, and then leaving the eu we have to take account of the impacts on the labour market and also the potential impact of any devaluation in stirling, and we are taking a close look at that particular sector and the vulnerable people who should be your first concern. the secretary of state has
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just claimed the border force will have new powers to do checks, and that will make us safer. can he confirm that under no deal, they will no longer have most of the information they need to do those checks, because they will lose access to the database of over 70 million pieces of criminal information, that the replacement interpol database only information, that the replacement interpol data base only has information, that the replacement interpol database only has several hundred thousand pieces of information, that the home office has also told the select committee that in fact the border crossing arrangements will remain unchanged in the event of no deal, and given that the cabinet secretary, national security adviser, top police officers and counterterrorism jeeps have all said that in the event of no deal, we will be less safe, can he tell us which of those individuals have now told us we will be safer, and if not, will he withdraw that claim to the house?
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the right honourable lady is right about the schengen information system. if we leave without a deal in the eu don't put provisions in place we will lose access to that database, but place we will lose access to that data base, but i place we will lose access to that database, but i have had the opportunity to question people involved both in national security and also individuals who have worked for borderforce. appropriate mitigations are in place and eu powers are available. will he confirm that our current borders with the eu, our currency borders, excise borders and all of the calculations and payments that requires, takes place away from the border, and so won't custom also be handled electronically away from the border, not leading to cues? my right honourable friend makes an important point. it is the case that for most companies, the customs procedures that they will now need to engage in will be conducted away from the border at offices of departure by authorised consignees, and asa departure by authorised consignees, and as a result that should lead to, with the operation of a small border
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that the french put in place, as smooth as possible a flow of trade. the irish government has made it clear it intends to impose full ta riffs clear it intends to impose full tariffs on goods coming from northern ireland into the irish republic, without border checks. if thatis republic, without border checks. if that is the case, why is the minister insisting there will be no taxes on goods from the irish republic into northern ireland. does he not recognise that first of all businesses in northern ireland have an unfair advantage, that will lead toa an unfair advantage, that will lead to a loss of tax revenue, have northern ireland as a back door to gb, and lastly put no pressure at all on the irish government, which is adopted and intransigent position my my honourable friend makes a strong case for that approach but we believe it is in the interests of northern ireland and everyone if we secure a deal so these mitigations
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are not required. i suspect that my constituency who voted 62—38% for brexit arejust constituency who voted 62—38% for brexit are just fed up with this process carrying on, it is like a root canal treatment every other day. they are not fast what do we get, they just want the day. they are not fast what do we get, theyjust want the house to compromise, come together and get a deal. but what they say to me is, if we can't get a deal, we have to leave on the 31st of october. i want a commitment from the secretary of state at the dispatch box that no matter what we are leaving on the 3ist matter what we are leaving on the 31st of october otherwise this government is dead in the water. can i thank my right honourable friend for his point? he speaks very effectively and clearly for the people of his constituency. that is government policy. but the way in which he shaped his question in a balanced, thoughtful and reasonable
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way recommends him as a success of her your own office, mr speaker. can the minister confirm that, according to the government, the food sector, which employs 12,000 people across leicester and leicestershire, will be hardest hit by no deal, and that people on low incomes will be disproportionately affected by any rises in food prices? and can you tell me, if the government has done any planning, hell on earth, we will support the thousands of food banks in this country who tell me they are desperately worried that no deal will threaten the supply of surplus food that we tragically now depend on to feed the poor? three important points that the right honourable lady makes. the first is the case that the food sector in the event of
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an ideal scenario is likely to be the worst affected. our exporters will face the highest tariffs if we leave without a deal. and in this job in my previousjob at leave without a deal. and in this job in my previous job at the dispatch box, i have not shied away from the consequences, there are risks and challenges, and that's why deaf or have taken steps to mitigate those risks and challenges. she also asked on the impact of the vulnerable. some food commodity prices rise, others are likely to fall overall, she makes the point about food banks. it is important we support those who work with food banks, but i have seen no evidence or indication so far, but i'm happy to talk to the honourable lady that the supply food to food banks will be affected any scenario. the supply food to food banks will be affected any scenariolj the supply food to food banks will be affected any scenario. i always enjoy listening to my right honourable friend, but i am always conscious when he moves from answering questions to displacement activity. can we go back to the issue of best case and worst—case?
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quite specifically, when were the words base case change to worst—case? precise date, please, and who authorised it. when was it done? i think the house needs to understand why that decision was made. the second issue concerns the database. fascinating made. the second issue concerns the data base. fascinating to made. the second issue concerns the database. fascinating to hear about these measures of mitigation. i am familiar with my data base. these measures of mitigation. i am familiar with my database. this is undoubtedly a key piece of data that the security of the united kingdom. what exactly are the mitigations that he is talking about, which will be an adequate substitute for the loss of access to this database on a no—deal brexit? loss of access to this database on a no-deal brexit? it is always a pleasure to hear from no-deal brexit? it is always a pleasure to hearfrom my no-deal brexit? it is always a pleasure to hear from my right honourable friend. the two points i would make is i do a distinction between the base scenario that we can all agree of the consequence of
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the no deal exit, but the operation yellowhammer uses those base facts in order to draw up a reasonable worst—case scenario. that is the distinction between them. with respect to the information system, in fairness to the right honourable gentleman, that is not the only law enforcement or national security tool which we will lose access to in a no—deal brexit, there are others as well, but i've had an opportunity to talk to people involved in the security, and i recognise there are appropriate steps we can take. mr speaker, i will remind the minister that he has not answered yet again that he has not answered yet again that question about when the name on the yellowhammer document was changed and by whom, and i would like to ask on this as well. so please answer those questions which he did not answer from the right
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honourable lerner gentleman and indeed the right honourable and a gentleman who represents the opposition and is the shadow brexit secretary. could he also confirmed the existence of operation kingfisher, operation snow bunting, there is a theme, bird theme, i do not know whether to include opposite rate —— operation toto, or indeed operation ostrich, the communal sticking of heads in the sand as the realities of brexit dawn, all operation bluetit, on which i make no comment. but my final question is this, does operation yellowhammer still exist, or has it also had its name changed? if he could answer these specific questions, we would all be very grateful. i'm very grateful for that ornithological
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outing from my right honourable friend. the first thing to say is that operation yellowhammer does exist, it is the reasonable worst—case scenario, the presumption is that they have outlined those which we seek to mitigate and have taken which we seek to mitigate and have ta ke n ste ps which we seek to mitigate and have ta ken steps to which we seek to mitigate and have taken steps to mitigate. she also referred to operation kingfisher, the programme led by the treasury to ensure we can intervene as appropriate in particular sectors in the event of no deal. i'm afraid there is no operation dodo so i can understand by the independent group the change would be interested in such an exercise. justine greening. taxpayers are funding £100 million get ready for brexit, but the reality is they do not actually know what brexit will mean, and it is very difficult for them when that
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two scenarios we are faced with are no deal as we have just heard with separation yellowhammer, no real details that the government is prepared to divulge, and in relation toa prepared to divulge, and in relation to a negotiated deal, papers have actually been given to the european union by our government to negotiate a settlement that the british people will have to live with, yet the british people themselves are not being allowed to see what is being negotiated on their behalf. my question is, what is the problem? is that there is need for secrecy? in which case explain it. i do not think the british people want to have a secret government, they want openness. or is that the fact that there simply isn't a plan for no deal, and no real plan for getting a deal, and no real plan for getting a deal in which case we ought to know about that too. i am grateful to my right and will friend for the point
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she makes. with respect to preparations for no deal, i listed some of them in my statement and i would welcome any member of this house who would like to visit the cabinet office and who would be like to be taken through the extensive preparations. delighted. as i mentioned earlier, it is the case that everything from the procedures to the allegations to traffic management steps in kent and the information that exists on the website, there is plenty of information which enables businesses to prepare for no deal, and as i mentioned in my statement that will not be wasted in the case of a deal because we are seeking to secure a free trade agreement with the eu. with respect to negotiations, we have been clear that we are seeking to replace the backstop for alternative arrangements on ireland, and it is the case that we want to in any withdrawal agreement guarantee the rights of eu citizens
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and move towards a future partnership based on a best in class free—trade agreement. partnership based on a best in class free-trade agreement. the minister in his statement rightly praised the work of the psni. he will know that the new chief constable of northern ireland warned just a week ago that any deployment by the psni monitoring either checkpoints or cameras at or near the border risked his officers being killed by dissident republicans. can the minister offer a guarantee to the people of northern ireland that that will never happen, that those offices will not be asked to patrol a hard border, and that he will not be putting their lives at risk?|j be putting their lives at risk?” thank the honourable gentleman. it gives me an opportunity to extend my thanks to the police in northern ireland, a brave group of men and women who do so much to keep not just people northern ireland but the
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whole of the uk say. it is the case that we have no intention of erecting infrastructure at or near the border which would require the psni to place their offices at risk. more over, i want to underline the threat from dissident republicans remains, whatever future we have threat from dissident republicans remains, whateverfuture we have in our relationship with the eu, and it is important we all remain vigilant and support the psni in their valuable work against those who seek to disrupt the peace process.” welcome my right on both an's statement today. could he update the house on the advice and funding available to ensure businesses particularly small and medium—sized ready for brexit on the 31st of october? it is the case that my right honourable friend has a —— significantly increase the money available. he has tripled the money to ensure that customs agents are trained and money has been supplied to organisations in order to ensure
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the information necessary to be ready is widely available, in particular to smes who are the backbone of our economy. may i return to these concerns about lack of access to the information system and the 70 million pieces of data that are contained compared with other databases that contain very much less data ? other databases that contain very much less data? can i particularly asked the chancellor to guarantee that no vulnerable person, and in particular no vulnerable child, will be missing or abducting or at risk of criminal exploitation, will be put in danger by the loss of access to that system? she makes a very good point. one of the things we wa nt to good point. one of the things we want to do and we have talked to the eu because it is in our collective interests, to make sure that law enforcement and national security instruments which work to both our benefits are shared, that's what we seek to do. michael gove updating on
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operation yellowhammer. if you want to keep watching that, bbc parliament is the place to go but i wa nt to parliament is the place to go but i want to pick up on what is a feeble atmosphere in westminster. —— fee broil. joining me now isjoe twyman, director of polling group deltapoll, and columnist at the guardian dawn foster. we are all in the wake of that decision yesterday, what a snack polling suggesting the public think of all of this? most recent snap polls think other people believe the supreme court's decision was correct and between one and five and a quarter believe the decision was wrong, but that result corresponds closely to whether you are a remainer or leaver, whether you voted conservative at one of the other parties. what is happening is that people are not paying that much attention to detail, they are just responding in general terms. attention to detail, they are just responding in generalterms. around half, more than 50% or less? 49%. against 20%? how does that work in terms of the split?
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when you look at leavers, they overwhelmingly believe it is the wrong decision, but over 80% of lib dems and labour and other party supporters believe it is the right decision. it is clear that people have made their mind up but will this actually impact on their voting longer term? will this be a talking point for us in westminster, will be a turning point for the people out there in the real world? a turning point for the people out there in the realworld? you a turning point for the people out there in the real world? you talk about her cooking and turning points. another talking points, questions about borisjohnson's role as mayor of london, giving money to certain companies and the friendship he had with one of their directors. what impact could that have in polling terms? that could have a larger impact in terms of long—term effects for pa rty‘s fortu nes. terms of long—term effects for party's fortunes. that is an easy issue for people to understand, people can relate to it, whereas the supreme court decision and suspension parliament is more
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confusing and detail oriented. but is it? it was unlawful. it does not get much clearer than that. that is true but the other scandal may be juicier in the detail. dawn, we are talking aboutjennifer arcuri and a statement earlier in the house, but borisjohnson has other things to worry about, particularly what he is going to say in the next hour or two. he will have to address the fa ct two. he will have to address the fact that the supreme court said thatjohnson was wrong fact that the supreme court said that johnson was wrong and have completely overturned the parochial. he has had to fly back from new york, he will have bad jet lag, then he has to deal with an angry house. labour and the opposition parties always opposed it but the conservatives will feel angry about this. a lot of tory mps will be worried this comesjust before this. a lot of tory mps will be worried this comes just before the party conference when they are supposed to show unity. they will be
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worried that if the brexit party stand in their seats they could lose their jobs. stand in their seats they could lose theirjobs. i want to show the scene at downing street. nothing happening there. when that daughters open and borisjohnson comes there. when that daughters open and boris johnson comes here there. when that daughters open and borisjohnson comes here to the house of commons to make that statement, we will keep an eye on that doorfor you. statement, we will keep an eye on that door for you. dawn, statement, we will keep an eye on that doorforyou. dawn, he statement, we will keep an eye on that doorfor you. dawn, he came home early, he was supposed to be talking earlier than now. will we see a talking earlier than now. will we seea similar talking earlier than now. will we see a similar performance from boris johnson? i think so. yesterday the conservatives were not expecting this result. everything was cobbled together last minute, there were questions over the conservative party conference will even go ahead. we saw earlier several times when geoffrey cox was asked questions, he was stuttering and unsure. there was a lot of anger around. it was people asking questions as well as the conservatives. johnson will struggle
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with how he tries to put it across. he will have to admit that he has messed this up. politically it is bad for the conservatives. what he will say without much doubt is, i wa nt will say without much doubt is, i want a general election. let's have that general election and turn on the other when they say no and say you are cowards. he has tried that before. the only thing that has changed as he is on an even worse position. he wants a general election, but he does not have a working majority in the house any more. the opposition parties will continue to press on, saying they wa nt continue to press on, saying they want to deal with the european union to block note your brexit before they even consider a general election, because if we go into a general election, we would not be voting until early november, and the deadline for the eu is october the sist. deadline for the eu is october the 31st. people do not want to crash out. we heard edward leigh in the
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house saying his constituency 60% for brexit and his constituents want it done, and if there is no deal, so be it. is there a sense that people become more entrenched in what their views are? yes, when you look at the data around this, consistently the most popular answers are to revoke article 50 and stay in the eu or leave without a deal, but neither one of those options, because more than a third of the country are supporting it. people want and they want, but lots of people want lots of different things, and we cannot agree whether it is in parliament or the general public about the best way to pursue it. and we have more and more parties now with a real chance of taking votes, we have the lib dems who are on a roll, it's difficult to see where this goes. general election represents an enormous risk for the two main parties. neither of them can guarantee that they would end up with a majority by any means. the
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only difference is that for the conservatives not having a general election represents more of a risk. but it is a very difficult situation. any solution will be messy. what happens next? johnson will speak to the house, will push forward and sent several people up to the conservative party conference. johnson will have a nightmare when he gives his speech at the party conference next week. and until no deal is taken of the table, parliament will not move ahead. but parliament will sit tomorrow. there is still stuff to do. will we face a moment when they say, what we do? there is a domestic abuse bill which was shelved and i will be brought back. there are a couple of bills in the table that can get through, but we will see a lot of emergency motions to try to get no deal stopped. that may be the
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only way forward. if the opposition parties can agree to stop no deal from happening, everybody else including the conservatives and labour will then be happy for a general election to break the deadlock. an interesting few more hours. the model the government is proposing will come under such pressure it is unlikely to survive. this document indicates that that model that the government is proposing set out in its own document will come under such pressure it is unlikely to survive for a few days or weeks. so the government's preferred model for
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northern ireland on its own assessment is unlikely to survive more than a few days or weeks. that is not a plan, plan for more than a few days or weeks. that is nota plan, planfora more than a few days or weeks. that is not a plan, plan for a model that will not last for more than a week, there must be an update, where is it? let's cross over to the houses of parliament and our chief political correspondent, vicky young, is there for us. we are all waiting for the arrival of one borisjohnson. we are all waiting for the arrival of one boris johnson. an awful lot of one boris johnson. an awful lot of mps want to intervene in this debate to talk about there is no deal preparations. then we have a statement on iran, then we get to the prime minister, so that could be an hourand a the prime minister, so that could be an hour and a half away possibly. how will he approach all this? he has had to come back early from the un. iam has had to come back early from the un. i am not sure there will be any kind of apology or regret about what happened. let's talk about all of this. i am joined happened. let's talk about all of this. iamjoined byjohn happened. let's talk about all of this. i am joined byjohn redwood. let's start without debate, the no deal preparations. a lot of anxiety, not just from labour mps deal preparations. a lot of anxiety, notjust from labour mps but also from some of your colleagues in
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kent, worried that on the 31st of october we will simply not be ready for no deal. the government has dealt comprehensively with that, a great deal of planning has gone on. and at the moment, we have a lot of trucks and containers coming through our borders where they have to be vat adjustments, currency adjustments, none of those things at the border, they are done electronically, if we need tariffs as well because there is not a trade agreement in place, they too will be done away from the border and the government has confirmed that. every action taken by the british authorities ensures the smooth transit of imports, and why would we wa nt transit of imports, and why would we want to hold up things coming into dover? and we have no need to because we will rant over. other people point out it is not about that, it is the other side as well, so if the french do want to do checks, then a knock—on effect. if people held up going the other way, they will be held up going back this
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way. we export less to them than they send to us, and a lot of our trucks go back empty. but we heard again from the government today that the calais and french authorities are cooperative, they do not want to wreck trade, and they know it is a two—way trade where they sell more than we sell. let's turn to that supreme court judgment. there than we sell. let's turn to that supreme courtjudgment. there have been a lot of attacks on the judges themselves. do you think there's a problem with that? geoffrey cox saying you can question the judgment that you should not question the motives of thejudges. that you should not question the motives of the judges. the attorney general did very well today. he is right to say we believe in the rule of law and we accept the judgment of the courts, but he was also right to say that he and the government thought they were behaving entirely legally, and the high court of england and senior judges legally, and the high court of england and seniorjudges thought they were behaving legally, and what they were behaving legally, and what the supreme court did is it involved will change the law, it invented a new verdict on how you should
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undertake prorogation, giving the courts are they never had before. he did not object to them doing that but he wanted to point out it was not that the government set out to break the law. the situation we are in now, we are back here, parliament is back where it left off. lots of people around here, ministers and opposition, do not know what the out is. it doesn't seem like there will bea is. it doesn't seem like there will be a general election. how will this end in the next few weeks? what the public wants, particularly the leave voting majority, as we leave on the sist voting majority, as we leave on the 31st of october. and they are hoping that the opposition mps do not get in the way of us living on the 31st of october, and we still have the same choice, we either leave with the deal, if he manages to negotiate a better one that parliament would accept, albeit without a withdrawal agreement. we will not leave without deals at all, it will be a misnomer that there will be a haulage and aviation customs agreement, there
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will be all the necessary agreements, but not a comprehensive agreement. a lot of people think thatis agreement. a lot of people think that is a perfectly good answer. what about the idea of a general election? a lot of people saying that does not solve anything because people vote for lots of different reasons, and lots of people here and some of yourformer tory reasons, and lots of people here and some of your former tory colleagues who have left the party now thinking they're actually a second referendum might be the only way forward. i did not want an early general election noted boris johnson, not want an early general election noted borisjohnson, but i think now that the government cannot govern and is being taken hostage by the opposition forces who wish to remain in the eu, we do need a general election to clear the air, and i think the british people would be sensible and would want to have a government that can govern, and only they can decide who that should be. the other option is a deal in which we have a closer arrangement than the withdrawal agreement, so we stained the single market and the customs union, that would get to the house of commons. i'm not sure it's either negotiable with the eu or in any way fulfils the leave remit, and
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parliament promised to implement the wishes of the british people, both remain and leave told us leaving meant leaving the single market customs union. if you wish to take back control of your laws and money on borders, you cannot stay in all of these eu arrangements. those state m e nts of these eu arrangements. those statements going on for that lease the next couple of hours and all eyes on boris johnson the next couple of hours and all eyes on borisjohnson as to what he will decide to do with hints today from cabinet ministers that there may be another attempt to get the general election that borisjohnson wa nts. general election that borisjohnson wants. thank you very much. let's talk about more about michael gove. michael gove, the minister in charge of coordinating no—deal preparations, insisted the brexit negotiations with the european union have seen significant movement in recent weeks. the government is determined to secure a good deal with our eu partners and negotiations have been led by the prime minister come the brexit secretary and foreign
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secretary, and those negotiations have seen significant movement over recent weeks. until recently, the eu has maintained the withdrawal agreement was sacrosanct, but now they have acknowledged that it can be changed, and up until this point, the european union have also said that the backstop was inviolable, but again european leaders have said they are not emotionally attached to they are not emotionally attached to the backstop and there are other ways of ensuring we can safeguard the gains of the good friday belfast agreement and also ensure the smooth trade agreement and also ensure the smooth tra d e flows agreement and also ensure the smooth trade flows across the island of ireland. chris morris is here with me now. michael gove essentially saying the withdrawal agreement can be changed, that's what they are trying to do? i think there is some truth in that. cast your mind back a few weeks or months, and from every eu leaders, we had, this is closed, it is finished. yet slowly slowly, they are at least exploring what
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potentially could change parts of it. we are not sure he is right, they are saying the backstop can go, they are saying the backstop can go, they have always said if there is a solution... he said there was no emotional attachment but there's an attachment. the point that it has to bea attachment. the point that it has to be a legally sound solution which replicates all of the elements of the backstop, that is still the key point, that has been for some time. the big task for uk negotiators, and we are a long way from this at the moment, judging by what we have been told, is to find something that replaces everything the backstop does. on the uk side, steve barclay said, if you are an absolutely pure solution, it will never happen. if thatis solution, it will never happen. if that is the case, we could be heading for no deal. part of the uk position is, come on, we are trying to compromise, you do the same. you andi to compromise, you do the same. you and i were on this very spot a couple of weeks ago, nothing has
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changed since then except it has got a lot more angry and afebrile and there is more shouting of the house of commons. i listen to this debate with michael gove and the questions on operation yellowhammer. so much depends on if they were to be no deal. that document was then officially released. the government has said it will update some of the numbers in there but has not done that yet, so we are still looking at those numbers in a reasonable worst—case scenario, 40—60% of the current flow of lorries to dover, so much depends on that flow across the channel, could be what is in place after a no—deal brexit. what is said lessons that could be the worst case scenario, but in a best case scenario, but in a best case scenario it may be no more than 80%, so you would still have a couple of thousand lorries every day, but normally they would currently get across is not going across. we are
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having this debate about no deal. ironically, a day after it would appear that the supreme court has made the idea of note deal less likely. thank you very much. we are keeping and i out for the second from borisjohnson. but that could be pushed back to 5pm or 6pm, maybe later. the white house has released details of a phone call injuly which prompted the launch of impeachment investigations against donald trump. the transcript of the call shows president trump pushed the ukrainian leader, volodymyr zelensky, to investigate corruption claims against mr trump's presidential rival, joe biden, and his son. it is the single greatest witchhunt in american history. it is a disgraceful thing, the letter was a great letter, meaning that the
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letter revealing the call, that was done at the insistence of myself and other people that read it. it was a friendly letter, there was no pressure, the way you had built up that call was going to be the call from hell, it turned out to be a nothing call other than a lot of people turned i and said, i never knew you could be so nice. you have the fake news, a lot of corrupt reporting, some very fine reporters and some very corruptjournalists. our washington correspondent gary o'donoghue has more. this was the 30 minute phone call that took place between the president and the president of ukraine back in july. president and the president of ukraine back injuly. it does seem to confirm that the president did ask his ukrainian counterpart to look into corruption allegations surrounding joe biden and his son, hunter. it does say that the president would like to get some
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help with that, and the president does say things the whole thing is horrible. what's more, the president of the ukraine seems to agree to that request for assistance in that investigation. the president response of that by saying we will get to the bottom of it. he says he will ask his personal lawyer and the attorney general to get in touch with the president of ukraine, although the attorney general says he was never asked by the president and never did that. but we do know from reports in the us media that rudy giuliani was trying to run some kind of shadow ukraine policy that may have involved getting some information about joe may have involved getting some information aboutjoe biden. why is that significant? joe biden is a leading contenderfor that significant? joe biden is a leading contender for the that significant? joe biden is a leading contenderfor the democratic presidential nomination for topping some of the head—to—head polls, whether they mean much, he is leading president trump if it comes to those two in a fight next november. you can see the argument
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the democrats will make. the other thing is that we have learned that the complaint made by the whistle—blower related to campaign finance electoral law, in other words it seems to be the suggestion that the president was seeking a contribution in kind from the ukrainians to helping with his re—election will stop not money but help, but that might come in the form of dirt onjoe biden. we are showing it on the screen. it is that sentence, there is a lot of talk about biden's son, whatever you can do will be great. that is what eve ryo ne can do will be great. that is what everyone will be focusing on. just after that, it goes on to suggest that the president of ukraine agreed that he would do that, he would look into it. the president here said he would get rudy giuliani, bearing in mind that this is personal lawyer, to get in
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touch with the ukrainian president. further on down the call, you also see the president saying, we will get to the bottom of this. there is a clear amount of determination on the part of president trump to raise this issue and push it home, if you like. i think it gives rise to some serious questions for the ukrainian president, who set at the un assembly that the only person who can pressure him is a six—year—old son. but it sounds like he does take things on board when asked to by the president of the united states was critics have been taking to social media. so that is a tweet from hillary
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clinton, which has been liked 90,000 times so far since that was written an hour ago. let's have a look at the weather. more widespread wet weather ran through tonight. we are seeing this area of crowd creeping in from the west. there is still some damp weather, and some showers around to finish the afternoon and head into the evening. the more persistent rain heads in through this evening. heavy bursts mixed in with that, a strengthening breeze as well. but with winds coming from a south—westerly direction, temperature is holed up again, it will not be a cold night. notjust in double figures but sitting in the mid—teens as we going to tomorrow morning's rush—hour. wet weather across scotland and northern and eastern england, down to the far south—east. that will be around during the first few hours of the rush—hour, but it will linger
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throughout much of the day. one or two places could see an inch of rain in the next 24 hours. many other parts will see a lot more sunshine around, one or two showers, and ca ptu res around, one or two showers, and captures still into the mid or high teens if not low 20s. this is bbc news. our latest headlines: parliament is back for the first time since the supreme court said it was unlawfully suspended. the prime minister will make a statement to mps this afternoon. the attorney general tells the commons ministers admit defeat. the government insists the pm did nothing wrong after questions are asked overfunding given to an american businesswoman by borisjohnson while he was london mayor. michael gove says brexit negotiations have seen significant movement in recent weeks. until recently, the withdrawal agreement was sacrosanct. now they have acknowledged that it can be
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changed and up until this point, the european union have also said that the backstop was inviolable but again european leaders have said they are not emotionally attached to they are not emotionally attached to the backstop. the white house releases details of a phone call which triggered an impeachment inquiry. it shows president trump asking his ukrainian counterpart to investigate the democratjoe biden. the transport secretary says the government will be running a shadow airline to repatriate the 150,000 passengers left stranded after the collapse of thomas cook. sport now on afternoon live. good afternoon. australian winger reece hodge will miss sunday's match against wales at the rugby world cup. he's been banned for the next three matches. he was cited for a dangerously high tackle on the fijiian peceli yato in their opening match, injapan. it left the flanker with concussion. it should have been a red card
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at the time but went unpunished. world rugby has criticised the standard of officiating so far in the tournament. hodge will now miss the remaining pool games, starting the wales match, then uruguay and georgia. well, after their defeat to australia, fiji have lost again, but this time in the biggest shock of the world cup so far. they lost to uruguay, in thriller which finished 30—27. it was a fantastic match in kamaishi — a town almost wiped off the map by an earthquake and tsunami in 2011. uruguay came from behind to lead at the break. fiji lost despite scoring five tries to the south americans three. the quarters look unlikely for fiji, with wales and australia firmly in the ascendancy of pool d. rangers players past and present were among thousands of mourners who gathered in glasgow for the funeral of fernando ricksen today. supporters lined the streets outside the stadium, to the dutch international died last week aged 43, following a six—year battle with motor neurone disease.
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nicola adams is preparing for the first defence of her flyweight title on friday at the royal albert hall. she became world champion injuly without having to fight when the previous holder was forced to give up the title. but the olympic champion is looking forward to becoming the first female to fight at the iconic venue. absolutely amazing, unbelievable. i feel like every time i step in the ring, iam feel like every time i step in the ring, i am creating history. a muhammad ali box there, lennox lewis, so many other stars, singers have performed there. it will be surreal for have performed there. it will be surrealfor me, being able to... i was going to say when my world title, but i already have it. it will be like winning my world title for the first time then, and creating history. rohan dennis has defended his time trial world title at the world championships in yorkshire. britan's alex dowsett took a strong fifth place for great britain. the australian completed the course from northallerton to harrogate in a time of one hour
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five minutes and five seconds to win by over a minute. his top ten finish will earn team gb a second time trial place next year at the epic games was —— at the olympic games. that's all the sport for now. no sign of borisjohnson yet, which we re no sign of borisjohnson yet, which were just we no sign of borisjohnson yet, which werejust we are no sign of borisjohnson yet, which were just we are some way off the statement from boris johnson. michael gove is still on his feet inside the chamber, answering questions about operation yellowhammer. it has been a day of considerable emotion, a lot of anger
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in the chamber today on its return after that supreme court ruling yesterday. let's show you one of the moments when there was raw anger inside the chamber as the attorney general was questioned. no shame today, no shame at all, the fact that this government are cynically manipulated their prorogation to shutdown this house it could not work as a democratic assembly. he knows that that is the truth and to come here with his barristers' bluster, to obfuscate the truth and for a bluster, to obfuscate the truth and fora man like bluster, to obfuscate the truth and for a man like him, bluster, to obfuscate the truth and fora man like him, a party like this and a leader like this, this prime minister to talk about morals and morality is a disgrace! i'm not sure i could discern in that
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marshmallow of rhetoric any actual question. but insofar there was a question, there's an answer. if the honourable gentleman thinks that the government should know lockerbie governing, tell his leader to bring a motion of no confidence this afternoon, tell his leader to agree toa simple afternoon, tell his leader to agree to a simple one line statute that fixes the election by a simple majority, and we will be delighted to meet him wherever he chooses in front of the electorate. who will judge whether the marca nations which she supports and the devices he supports are right or wrong? the prime minister is under increasing pressure over his relationship with an american businesswoman who's company was given a grant of public money following claims of a conflict of interest. two ofjennifer arcuri's business
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were given thousands of pounds and the model—turned—tech entrepreneur attended three overseas trade missions led by him when he was london mayor. liberal democrat layla moran raised the subject in parliament earlier today. iam i am concerned that the department appears to have given a £100,000 grant injanuary appears to have given a £100,000 grant in january 2019 appears to have given a £100,000 grant injanuary 2019 as part of the service kills immediate impact fund, grant that was opened to initiatives based in and that operate from britain, and that furthermore these gra nts britain, and that furthermore these grants should not exceed 50% of the company's grants should not exceed 50% of the compa ny‘s revenue. grants should not exceed 50% of the company's revenue. we now know that hacker house is not based in the uk from the sunday times reports that its owner moved back to the usa in june 2018. these grants were not open for application until november. the registered address of the company is in fact a house in cheshire, where she used to rent, and the current occupant apparently
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sends any post addressed to her back to centre. mr speaker, where is the due diligence? what steps did the department take to ensure that it was indeed based in and operating in the uk? why did officials waive the rule that the grant could not exceed 50% of the company's income, and how many of the other 11 companies that have had these grants have had this preferential treatment? did the prime minister, then the backbencher, the men for oxbridge, did he make any representations, official or otherwise, to the department recommending this company question of the government said it will investigate the award of this grant, but when will this review conclude, and will it be made fully public? thank you, mr speaker. i
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wa nt public? thank you, mr speaker. i want to start by saying that the prime minister and his staff have had absolutely no role in the award of this grant, and i suspect i will be saying that a number of times, but it will remain the case was not in answerto the but it will remain the case was not in answer to the other questions that she has raised, the review will be reporting by the end of next month, and i have said that i will update the house where necessary. of course, update the house where necessary. of course , we update the house where necessary. of course, we will fully cooperate with any other enquiry. she raises the matter of the match funding, or the 50%. the officials involved in awarding these grants scored this particular application ore highly in all other aspects. on that aspect, as they routinely do, in a number of other situations, they decided that the other aspects more than outweighed that particular individual criteria. on the question over where the company is based, the
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officials have done the usual due diligence on this company. she mentioned the address where it is basic. it will be a part of the review that we are doing. it is a company that is based in britain, as faras company that is based in britain, as far as companies house is concerned, it isa far as companies house is concerned, it is a company with a british phone number. we will review that, but we have no reason to think... we have no reason to think that there is anything untoward in this particular matter. the prime minister will be addressing the chamber in the next hour or so. there is still parliamentary business under way. i am just looking at the screen now, there are questions over the no—deal brexit. michael gove is taking questions there. that is what you are looking at now, michael gove, in
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charge of no deal preparations. that is what is happening in the chamber now, everybody awaiting the arrival of the prime minister to give a statement. that is what is happening here in westminster. over now to bend planned for the business needs. here's your business headlines on afternoon live. over—budget and a greater risk of delays — the french power company edf said the new nuclear plant it is building at hinkley point c will cost up to £2.9 billion more than thought. it raised its estimate for the project, in somerset, to between £215 billion and £225 billion, and blamed "challenging ground conditions". it also said the risk of the project being 15 months late had risen. sainsbury‘s will close 60 to 70 argos stores as it adds more of the catalogue shop's outlets to its own stores. the company will open about 80 argos
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concessions in its supermarkets. the move comes as the uk's second largest supermarket chain warned investors that profit for the six months to the 21st september will dip. it blamed bad weather and higher marketing costs for the predicted £50 million drop on the period last year. wrightbus — the last uk—owned bus manufacturer — has entered administration and about 1,200 jobs have been made redudant. the company is suffering from cash flow problems and had been seeking investment or a new owner. the firm based in northern ireland employs 1,400 people. it is best known for building the new routemaster bus. talks with two potential buyers failed to reach a conclusion last week. we got a sense today of the scale of the fallout from the collapse of thomas cook, didn't we, and the logistics involved in bringing people home? the government says the repatriation of thomas cook customers stranded abroad will cost
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around £100 million. this is after the holiday firm, founded in 1841, went bankrupt this week after failing to secure emergency funding of £200 million from the uk government. transport secretary grant shapps rejected the idea that the government should have rescued thomas cook. he told mps that it would have risked "throwing good money after bad." mr shapps told mps arrangements are in place to bring back 150,000 people, from 50 different countries using 1,000 flights arranged by the civil aviation authority. so far, 30,000 have already been brought home. mr shapps also said the government will try to recoup some of the cost of getting those people home and will examine if airlines could be wound down in a more orderly process after such a collapse. we have never had the collapse of an airline or holiday company on this scale before. we have responded
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swiftly a nd scale before. we have responded swiftly and decisively. right now, our efforts are focused on getting those passengers home and looking after those employees who have lost theirjobs. but we also need to understand whether any individuals have failed in their duties of stewardship within the company. then our efforts will turn to working through the reforms necessary to ensure that passengers do not find themselves in this ridiculous situation again. we need to look at the and whether it is possible for airlines to be wound down any more audit manner. they need to make sure that their planes can keep flying in order that we don't end up having to set upa order that we don't end up having to set up a shadow airline for no matter what period of time. this is where we will hike as our efforts in the next couple of weeks. in order to do this, we will require primary
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legislation and, there i say it, a new session of this parliament. one of the other big stories today, a big infrastructure rejects possibly going over budget, over time, i'm beginning to think we have heard this before. it does sound like deja vu. we have seen this with crossrail and hs2, and now it is the new nuclear power plant that is being built in somerset at hinkley point c. we understand it will need more cash and possibly more time to get it finished. we should make clear at this point that because of the way the project is being funded, taxpayers and customers will not foot the bill for those increased costs. the french energy firm edf and its partner on the project will
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pat’- and its partner on the project will pay. but the companies benefit from a cushion in the price that was agreed, so when the plant is up and running, the price fixed for a unit of electricity, known as a megawatt our, it was fixed. there is a mock—up, designed to absorb those kind of costs. this is a massive, massive project. this was pointed out earlier. building big infrastructure is never easy, and hinkley point is the first uk nuclear power station in 30 yea rs. we have uk nuclear power station in 30 years. we have made very good progress and we have kept a schedule so far, but we now know that it will cost more than we had initially
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hoped. you know, some of the causes of those cost increases are making sure that we have a design that is fit for build here in the uk, you know, to meet uk requirements. we have also seen more challenging ground work conditions than we had originally expected. the important point for me to make is that those costs are point for me to make is that those costs a re not point for me to make is that those costs are not those that will hit the consumer, they come to us as shareholders in the project. we have a firm price for power at this point? will this be the last increase? we have given the best view we can, given what we know. we have made a lot of progress with the design at the moment. i can't say today what will happen over the course of the rest of the construction. there have been repeated cost increases, and in 2007 the boss of edf said that by 2017, two christmases ago, we would be
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cooking our christmas turkeys on power from this station. now we are saying 2025, maybe later. the hope of 2017 was set at a time when we thought we would start construction much earlier. for what we have said today, we remain aiming for construction to complete and full power to be produced in 2025. pull spence from edf speaking earlier. let's get the thoughts on the various business stories around today, i would like to speak to fiona, a market analyst. let's kick off with this point about the new power station. i cost overruns that could be as much as an extra £2.9 billion will stop it is interesting the way it is structured, that customers and taxpayers will not foot the extra bill. that's right, thatis foot the extra bill. that's right, that is something they have been
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driving home, that the customers are not going to be footing that bill. investors and shareholders are not impressed by edf‘s. .. investors and shareholders are not impressed by edf's... by what has happened here. the share price has dropped over 6% today as investors reacted to the news today that it will overrun. this is several years and also several billion pounds more than what was expected. enough is enough as far as the investors are concerned, and shareholders are selling out now. there is the impeachment enquiry in the us and the uncertainty around brexit in the uk can we have seen the oil price full, can we put that down to fears of global recession and a trade impact really gripping investors once more? that's definitely something we need to think about. the demand for oil, there are concerns about future demand for oil and that it will be lower. what we
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have seen today, we have seen the inventory data coming out, which showed there is a 2.5 million barrel increase when they are expecting a 6.5 million barrel decline. in addition to concerns about demand going forward, we have also got to see that there is a built of inventory that we were not expecting. the price is down at $625 expecting. the price is down at $62.5 per barrel. that is where it was before we had the attack on the saudi oil infrastructure last week. something we will need to be looking out for as well as the gdp results tomorrow from the us. they are respecting a growth. if that comes in weaker, we could see oil sell off again. ok, thank you. that is where we will leave the business for the afternoon.
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thank you. that is where we will leave this hour as well, in the capable hands of the weather. wednesday was not too bad for many of us, so many of us saw some bright weather with some sunshine at times. that is yesterday's weather system, this is more settled spell we have seen through wednesday afternoon, and this low pressure with this frontal system will bring another round of wet and windy weather as we had through tonight, initially reaching northern ireland this evening. then it moves into much of england, wales and scotland. heavy bursts of rain across western hills, but it will be moving eastwards quickly. also windy with it. behind it, some dry weather pushing into the west was you will notice that your purchase, 11 to 15 celsius, another fairly your purchase, 11 to 15 celsius, anotherfairly mild your purchase, 11 to 15 celsius, another fairly mild one. your purchase, 11 to 15 celsius, anotherfairly mild one. low pressure firmly in control through thursday. the frontal system pushes into the north sea, then a run of strong south—westerly winds bringing lots of showers only to western
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areas. the early morning wind and rain clays away from eastern areas quickly, although there will be a hang back for north—east scotland. showers heavy and frequent through many places, the best of the sunshine in the south—east, will be could see 20 celsius else macro, elsewhere, into the mid to high teens. we will see bands of showers or longer spells of rain moving in from the west on friday, interspersed with some sunshine and further showers moving into north—western parts. cool across—the—board on north—western parts. cool across—the—boa rd on friday, temperatures 13 or 14 in the north, 17 or 18 temperatures 13 or 14 in the north, 17 or18 in temperatures 13 or 14 in the north, 17 or 18 in the south—east. through friday night, it stays pretty blustery, further showers or longer spots of rain mainly across the north and west of the country. temperature wise, double figures for most, but a few places where we see prolonged clay spells could just drop into sickle figures. for the
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weekend, unsettled. some logger spells of rain across northern areas, and notice this, it could be areas, and notice this, it could be a vigorous area of low pressure to bring some very wet and windy weather on sunday full stops some uncertainty as to the intensity of it and how far north it can get. sunshine and showers on saturday, some sensual very sunshine and showers on saturday, some sensual very wet weather on sunday. —— some very potentially wet weather.
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today at 5pm, we're live at westminster, where mps are back at work — getting ready to question boris johnson following his defeat in the supreme court yesterday. the prime minister returned from new york this morning. he says he disagrees strongly with the ruling that he acted unlawfully in suspending parliament for five weeks. there's a sense of mounting expectation outside parliament ahead of the prime minister's statement. the attorney general has already been making his views known. this parliament is a dead parliament. it should no longer sit. it has no moral right to sit on these green benches. fora man like him, a party like this and a leader like this,

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