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tv   The Papers  BBC News  September 25, 2019 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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19- 20 degrees. it was temperatures 19— 20 degrees. it was a short live settled spell, the next area of low pressure moves in thursday to bring us more unsettled conditions. a band of and windy weather bring across the country wednesday night, thursday morning, will eventually clear off into the north sea. could be a hang back for the north—east of scotland and the northern isles stop then it is so china shows, the showers is across the northern and the west. the best of the sunshine across the south—east where we could see 20 degrees. it will be a blustery day for all, articulately england and wales, which will be quite windy. no pressure with us again to end the week, just to the north—west of the uk, slightly cooler air mixed in with the slow. it will be another blustery day for most, windy again for england and wales. we could see some fronts which could merge the showers together to produce longer spells of rain at times. a little bit of sunshine around. temperatures 13-14 in bit of sunshine around. temperatures 13—14 in the north, 17—18 in the south. into the weekend, we have low pressure dominating the scene, so it
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will remain unsettled. all down to the jet stream, which all this week will be fairly strong running across the north atlantic in a west to east direction, during these weather systems towards our shores. for the weekend, one area of low pressure will bring sunshine agger was certainly on saturday, this feature could bring us a spell of wet and windy weather on sunday. saturday's picture similar to thursday and friday, sunshine agger was, longer spells of rain across more northern areas. it will be cold with north—westerly winds around the mid celsius. further south, some sunshine, 17—18. will have this area of low pressure move in during saturday night and sunday. uncertainty to its northern extent. at this moment it looks like it will bring some very wet weather to parts of england and wales, potentially strong winds. that will bring a very wet morning on sunday across central and southern areas, slowly pushing off to the north sea. a bit dry and
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bright behind it, but northerly winds will bring some cooler air, despite the sunshine, 13— 16 celsius. 0n into monday, a fine start. there will be some sunshine around, quite chilly, we will see another area of low pressure move up from the south—west later on monday. temperature wise, single figure values across the north. 17 degrees, perhaps, across the south—east. that feature moves through during monday night into tuesday. pushes off into the near continent, opens the floodgates into an northerly, arctic area. it will turn quite cold. my prism in to settle down. they draw your attention to this feature out in the atlantic. it will mix in with a low pressure system close to our shores near iceland, it will have an effect on the weather towards the end of next week to bring a sweater and windy weather. temperature wise, we start with high pressure and on a
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cellino —— wet and windy. warm and will move in with that x hurricane. the weather will be more settled thanks to the refrigerant high pressure then it turns unsettled mid week onwards with it pushing off later. do stay tuned to the forecast. hello, this is bbc news with rebecca jones. we'll be taking a look at tomorrow mornings papers in a moment.
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first the headlines: boris johnson returned to the commons today to face the anger of many mps. parliament resumed its business this morning, after the supreme court found that mrjohnson had acted unlawfully when he suspended proceedings. after yesterday's ruling, mr speaker, the prime minister should have done the honourable thing and resigned. this parliament must either stand aside and let this government get brexit done or bring a vote of confidence and finally face the day of reckoning with the voters. in other news: a transcript is published of donald trump's conversation with the ukranian president. 0pponents say it proves the president acted improperly.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are eve pollard, the former fleet street editor, and the political correspondent for the finacial times, laura hughes. many of tomorrow's front pages are in, and borisjohnson‘s return to parliament is the story on all of them. the guardian reports that mps were furious at mrjohnson. who returned to the house of commons, after the supreme court found his suspension of parliament unlawful, after the prime minister claimed to speak on behalf of the country over brexit. he refused to apologise for the suspension, and his remark that the best way to honour the murdered labour mp, jo cox, was to "get brexit done" left mps in tears, reports the mirror. the telegraph focuses on the prime minister's challenge to mps that if they want a change of direction they should hold a vote of no confidence in him,
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and trigger a general election. the metro put his position succinctly with their headline: "come and have a go, then!" meanwhile the mail says that in a survey of those who voted labour in 2017, 64% want a general election. the financial times call it a "people versus parliament" general election, as mrjohnson pit one against the other. 0ne story dominating. the times, it hits boiling point. that is the best headline. because it describes that extraordinary day where i have never heard john boko having to stop politicians. and you whether... you are in the chamber, was it boiling point? when i left this evening there was this moment where a labour
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mp urged the prime minister to tone down his language because she and other colleagues were receiving death threats, family members of mps we re death threats, family members of mps were receiving death threats and she referenced the matter of jo were receiving death threats and she referenced the matter ofjo cox and borisjohnson replied referenced the matter ofjo cox and boris johnson replied he referenced the matter ofjo cox and borisjohnson replied he never had such humbug and jo cox's replacement also commented and the reaction that the best way to honourjo cox was to get brexit done. shouting at the attorney general whose legal advice of the prime minister has been found to be unlawful in the eyes of the supreme court and i have really never known it like that. we watched it on television and you did get a sense. you had to turn it right up to hear the prime minister's voice
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half the time and they were just angry and it was very interesting because a lot of the abuse was that he should apologise. there is real anger but i also more today about people from other parties saying we have to get together and make this work because i think people in the country are feeling very bitter, people who voted to remain, and people who voted to remain, and people who voted to remain, and people who voted to leave because often they voted that because they felt no—one was listening to them now they feel doubly so because they expected brexit to go through. do you get that sense of people coming together? bitter scenes as parliament returned, pm accused of using violent language. it does not
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feel very conciliatory. there are a lot of mps facing angry constituents. the tory mps kicked out on the conservative party are talking with the democrats about what they could be doing in terms of legislation but they do not seem to have a plan quite yet. labour are sticking to their guns and are not wanting to help the tourist. it does not feel like anyone wants to help boris. he has been forced into a position he does not want to be. exactly. position he does not want to be. exa ctly. h e position he does not want to be. exactly. he did decide to say they we re exactly. he did decide to say they were making progress on the backstop but, of course, they wanted had stuff and he said, if you are in the middle of negotiations, this does not help because the ear is saying come to us with a plan when you think you can get it through the parliament because they had three
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attem pts parliament because they had three attempts with the resume and never got it through. boris johnson wants a general election, something that labour is resisting. an interesting poll in the daily mail, give us an election now. give us more detail about what was in this poll and who they have talk to. this is a poll of...| they have talk to. this is a poll of... ido they have talk to. this is a poll of... i do not have the exact figures but they say millions of labour supporters and it has found that over half of the public that voted for labour in the last election want to see a snap election and they wanted to see it soon. but what it does not get to is that labour is saying they do want an election, theyjust do not want an election, theyjust do not want an election until boris johnson election, theyjust do not want an election until borisjohnson has extended article 50. they think this request for him to trigger a vote of no—confidence is a trap. the pulp
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might say they want an election, it does not quite... i have not read the whole piece... but it does not answer the question labour are grappling with, do you want what now or you want to guarantee this first. labour is saying they are saying no undera certain labour is saying they are saying no under a certain condition. that is another thought that, if you do not get it through the eu by october 31, the eu might say, we have had enough of this so we will not see you for another year and i think that is what people are being driven mad about because of the rail all sorts of companies and people with the plans and no plans are being made, no property is selling, a logjam of life and people are fed up of reading about it. i mean, we're all
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fascinated politics but many people are not and theyjust do not understand why government cannot get their act together because they think, in my life i make things work, why can't this parliament, which actually has never looked more. . . which actually has never looked more... bedraggled, here we are the mother of all parliaments looking like a mess and very aggressive. it is the age of vilification. social media hasn't done about and now it has stretched over into parliament. —— social media has done that. has stretched over into parliament. -- social media has done that. fury because boris johnson -- social media has done that. fury because borisjohnson claims to speakfor because borisjohnson claims to speak for britain on brexit. this again obviously to do with what went on in the house of commons this evening. what is your take on this headline and story? boris is a clear
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today and he has been doing this for a while, setting parliament and the elites of london, the establishment, up elites of london, the establishment, up against the people of this country and he is lumping those two groups together. he is making the argument and has made it this evening that, if labour did not trigger an election, if they do not trigger an election, if they do not trigger an election, if they do not trigger a vote of no—confidence, he will take that as saying we have confidence that you can deliver your plan and deliver brexit... confidence that you can deliver your plan and deliver brexit. .. he also says you do not have the confidence to win. that is of the danger for labour. of course. it looks like they are scared. it doesn't look like that and he is well aware of that and also, we all know that different people in labour have different people in labour have different views about the election. they had to go through the drama, the tom watson thing and it is a
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party very much divided by the subject. he can say, on behalf of the normal bloke, want to get this done stop it comes the day after the supreme court gave theirjudgement and he is pitting himself and the people of the country and not apologise that while he respected the ruling he did not agree with that. they have been causing him to resign, to apologise, apologise to the queen but he will not do either of those things that make we do not know what he has done with the queen. in the telegraph, parliament must stand aside or face its day of reckoning and this is picking up on what you were saying about he wants this vote of no—confidence, doesn't he? sure. and yet he will not put a vote of no—confidence on himself. and this is where the opposition
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sees it as a trap. he could set the day of the election to be on the 30th of october. it is not quite as simple. ithink 30th of october. it is not quite as simple. i think it is quite complex. if you're looking at the news tomorrow morning, it is really difficult to understand what on earth is going on in parliament at the moment. if you really tables of no—confidence could he cause an election? downing street have ruled that out and when i asked why they said that is the decision we have taken. said that is the decision we have ta ken. that said that is the decision we have taken. that seems a little bit of concern amongst the opposition who really do see this as a trap. more news this evening that the leader of the house is going to ask for an adjournment to enable the party conference... three days. by no means that the labour party will
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agree to this. you also have to look at parliament and government. these quys at parliament and government. these guys are not sitting all that long a nyway guys are not sitting all that long anyway and suddenly to be told they have five weeks of, a bit of a shock to most mps who do not want to go home forfive to most mps who do not want to go home for five weeks and all the rest of it home for five weeks and all the rest ofit—i home for five weeks and all the rest of it — i will not go any further. also they feel they have been sent by the constituents to be in the house of commons and to vote in the way they have told that constituents they would. they are at a loss. 0ne of the reasons they was so vociferous is that they have been away for two weeks and they have been spectators and they do not like it and been spectators and they do not like itandi been spectators and they do not like it and i understand that. they want to feel they are in the house and wa nt to to feel they are in the house and want to do right by that constituents but a lot of them have a very complicated situation because there are labour members who have their constituents who voted to leave and how they deal with that is
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very complicated. they could be some people who look at this and say, they have had three years to sort out brexit. all this fuss about parliament not sitting for five weeks but what are they going to do? correct. those a few weeks where weeks with conferences and now we have the last one, the tory conference so, let's face it, most of october you just have to go around all these lovely seaside places and listen to and let speeches. they would not have been there anyway but itjust was a mistake that drove them all nuts. there anyway but itjust was a mistake that drove them all nutsm there a prospect that if labour will not agree to the adjournment the house will continue to sit, mps will be shuttling back and forth? aye am still not totally sure. because it
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is historically the tradition that this happens —— i am not. it is not a complete certainty they will vote this down. there may be conditions, they may reduce it by a day, you can see speech is reduced, events cut down... is does on sunday. you could get the prime minister making a speech on sunday or monday ——it sta rts speech on sunday or monday ——it starts on sunday. a lot of times parliament does not meet on a monday. he comes back and ministers will have to go to and fro.|j monday. he comes back and ministers will have to go to and fro. i was struck yesterday of that photo on a lot of the front pages of donald trump and boris johnson, lot of the front pages of donald trump and borisjohnson, together in new york, and, of course, donald trump has his own problems at home. and turning to the financial times, donald trump urged ukraine's president to investigate joe donald trump urged ukraine's president to investigatejoe biden, phone notes reveal. this is the phone notes reveal. this is the phone conversation that did go on, nobody is disputing there was a
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conversation between donald trump and the president of ukraine, there is no direct evidence, is there, that donald trump said he would withhold money, though? there is absolutely no direct evidence that we have seen it yet. it is very interesting that... it is sailing quite close to the wind. everyone is surprised they were so nice to him. you forget the atmosphere in america. the guy is doing a deal, he is giving money to the ukraine, what are they doing for us, the idea that he is going after biden's son, he has lost one son to illness, to cancer, itjust has lost one son to illness, to cancer, it just seems has lost one son to illness, to cancer, itjust seems to be over the top, but he says, biden said he was going round to stop the prosecution because biden's son had a business in the ukraine and they had some trouble though. i don't know. a genuinely don't know how true any of
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this is. —— genuinely don't know. it seems like overkill. joe biden is the frontrunner of the democratic candidates. whatever else, doesn't smell good, does it? no. look at the transcript thought it looked quite clear. i understand by the democrats, nancy pelosi, has chosen to lodge an impeachment enquiry. they have held back on the roster allegations but suddenly decided to go forward with this —— russia. if you read carefully what he says, he is suggesting and asking another country to look into his main challenger in the presidential race next year. it really doesn't look good and trump was manically tweeting after this came out. he is claiming because he didn't directly say in exchange for this we will give you this that he hasn't done anything wrong. but a thing if you read the words, he is asking, you know, there is this detail where he says he wants ukrainian officials
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and the president to get in touch with william barr, trump's attorney general, there are actual calls to action in this, next step, so i don't think... on the other hand, don't think... on the other hand, don't think... on the other hand, don't think it looks good for donald trump, whether this is an impeachment so very much doubt in the end. we have both been in america recently, and there is this... it is growing, this feeling of, my gosh, we could have four more yea rs of of, my gosh, we could have four more years of trump. nancy pelosi is a strategist. she is very clever. for her to strategist. she is very clever. for herto do strategist. she is very clever. for her to do this is quite a big deal... crosstalk. robert malyn didn't produce anything. —— robert mueller. robert malyn didn't produce anything. -- robert mueller. she has chosen to do this now. that is a tell—tale sign that they think they have a chance. let us turn to the sun. this has made me smile in these
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turbulent times. it tiny picture borisjohnson in a very big picture of meghan markle, duchess of sussex, and her son, archie. a lovely big picture of archie. if you were still editing is that what you would have done? you probably couldn't do it on the telegraph. they do include a picture. it is of first time you've really seen this beautiful baby, who looks just like his father did. really seen this beautiful baby, who looksjust like his father did. and if you want to sell papers a royal baby will often do that for you. and this is the first time we have seen him. we have a pretty person here. and also desmond tutu, who was such an iconic bishop when apartheid was going on, and they think meghan markle has done well in this —— broody. it is interesting that it is on this tour that they have chosen to give the public their first proper look of their baby. we have
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been fascinated. there has been a toe or a finger or something. we are all smiling. it is as good a note is anything to and on what has been, let's be honest, a dramatic day in parliament. that's it for the papers tonight. thank you, eve and laura. don't forget you can see the front pages of the papers online on the bbc news website. it's all there for you, 7 days a week. and if you miss the programme any evening you can watch it later on bbc iplayer. goodbye. good evening. here's your latest sports news. it's been another dramatic night of football in the third round of the league cup. last night it was tottenham. tonight, bournemouth, west ham,
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and sheffield united have all been knocked out of the competition. all of them by teams from league one — and manchester united nearlyjoined them. they could only manage a 1—1 draw against league one side rochdale at old trafford. the match went to penalties, both teams scored their first butjimmy keohane missed for rochdale. no—one else failed to score which left danieljames to win it 5—3 for united. no such problems for liverpool though who were 2—0 winners at league one side mk dons. james milner opened the scoring before 17—year—old debutant ki—jana hoever sealed the win in the second half. so confirmation of all of tonight's scores — bournemouth beaten by burton albion, oxford united beating west ham and sheffield beaten by sunderland. and a huge win for chelsea — they thrashed grimsby 7—1.
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manchester city's women are through to the last 16 of the champions league. they beat lugano 4—0 tonight, which means they thrashed them 11—1 on aggregate in the end. city continued where they left off from the first leg with keira walsh brilliantly setting upjanine beckie in the fifth minute. she went on to get a hat—trick. before pauline bremer scored the fourth. so city have gone one better than last season after they were knocked out in the last 32. there also four games in the scottish league cup tonight. rangers will play in the semi—finals for a fourth consecutive season after a hard—fought 1—0 win over livingston. glen kamara's deflected fifth—minute strike was enough to send steven gerrard's side through. things were much easier for celtic. they thrashed patrick thistle 5—0. hibernain and hearts both went through after winning on penalties. the funeral of former rangers player fernando ricksen took place
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in glasgow this afternoon. current and former players attended and thousands of supporters lined the streets outside ibrox to pay tribute to the dutch international, who died last week of motor neurone disease, at the age of a3. in a six year spell at the club, he won seven major honours, including two league titles. uruguay pulled off the biggest upset of the rugby world cup so far, with a 30 points to 27 win over fiji injapan. the match took place in kamaishi — a town devastated by the 2011 tsunami. uruguay trailed early on and only scored three tries, compared to fiji's five, but it was the boot of fly—half filipe berchesi that made the difference. so the quarter—finals now look unlikely for fiji. wales and australia are in control of pool d — they play each other on sunday.
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nicola adams is preparing for the first defence of her world flyweight title on friday at the royal albert hall. she became world champion injuly — without having to fight — when the previous holder was forced to give up the title. adams will be the first female boxer to fight at the venue. this is definitely the biggest fight of my career as a pro so far. and they haven't taken my eye off the ball, i've stayed focused, i've stayed dedicated, this is one more step in the right direction for me to be able to unify the whole flyway to be able to unify the whole flyway to division. that's all the sport for now. hello again. we continue to be in the midst of an unsettled run of weather. that means rain and strong winds around in the next few days interspersed with some brighter spells. it's a relatively multi to the day, temperatures 11— 15 degrees, on account of the brisk and
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gusty south—westerly winds. some around as well, thick lee across scotla nd around as well, thick lee across scotland in southern and eastern parts of england. the rain will clear away practically through the morning to be followed by a mixture of and showers. the showers are likely to those together to give longer spells of rain across northern ireland and scotland. it's good turn quite wet through the afternoon. across the south—east, although there will be some showers, there should be bigger gaps between any downpours to allow more in the waves i'm going to come through. heading into friday, another showery day. this time again the showers we re day. this time again the showers were most together to give longer spells of rain. that looks most likely across england and wales, although there will be winter showers further north as well. turning cooler, 111—15 in the north.
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welcome to newsday on the bbc. i'm mariko 0i in singapore. the headlines: will an account of the conversation between these two men be enough to kickstart the impeachment inquiry against donald trump? the president says its a hoax and a witch hunt but his opponents think they have damning evidence against him. like any mafia boss, the president didn't need to say "that's a nice country you have, it would be a shame if something happened to it," because that was clear from the conversation. i'm ben bland, in london. also in the programme: after tuesday's momentous supreme court ruling, britain's parliament is back and angrier than ever.

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