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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  September 26, 2019 6:00am-8:31am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: parliament is back, and angrier than ever, as furious mps confront the prime minister. to talk about morals and morality is a disgrace! boris johnson ignored calls to resign and mocked labour forfailing to back a general election. they have until the house arises today to table a motion of no confidence in the government. come on, come on. after yesterday's
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ruling prime minister should have done the honourable thing and resigned. and i'm in stoke—on—trent, which was the city in the uk to support leave by the highest margin, to talk to voters and businesses here about how the political turmoil is affecting their preparation for a potential no—deal brexit. england head coach, eddiejones, calls for a fast start against the usa, as england play their second match of the rugby world cup in kobe later. good morning, a band of rain pushing east, that will clear and behind it sunshine and showers but some of the showers will be heavy. more in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 26th of september. our top story. borisjohnson is facing calls to moderate his language — after being accused of stoking dangerous divisions over brexit during furious exchanges in the commons last night. a number of senior conservative mps — including a cabinet minister — have urged him to pick his words carefully, after he accused his
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opponents of "surrender", "betrayal", and "cowardice". there was particular anger at the prime minister's reply to a question about the murdered labourmpjo cox, and his use of the word "humbug" to dismiss a backbencher concerned about death threats. our political correspondent helen catt reports. as the prime minister prepared to face mps, some were hoping for an apology, others his resignation, others a milder tone. instead... despite the fact that i followed the exact same process as my predecessors in calling a queen's speech, the supreme court was asked to intervene in this process for the first time ever. and it is absolutely no disrespect to the judiciary to say i think the court was wrong to pronounce on what is essentially a political question. boris johnson issued a challenge to the opposition — you vote to sack me. they have until the house rises today to table a motion of no confidence in the government. the snp seemed like they might be tempted to take up the offer. the opposition must unite to trigger
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a vote of no confidence to bring this chaotic government down. but in the end no party tabled a no—confidence vote. they won't throw boris johnson out, they say, until they are sure a no—deal brexit can't happen, but that doesn't mean they think he is the man for the job. this, mr speaker, was ten minutes of bluster from a dangerous prime minister who thinks he is above the law. but in truth, mr speaker — in truth, mr speaker, is not fit for the office which he holds. after the debate, mp after mp expressed concern over the language being used. words like "capitulation", "surrender", or "betrayal". many of us in this place subject to death threats and abuse every single day and, let me tell the prime minister, that they often quote his words, "surrenderer", "betrayal", "traitor", and i,
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for one, am sick of it! cheering and applause. i think, mr speaker, i have to tell you, mr speaker, i...i have to say, mr speaker, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. today i have reported to the police a threat against my child, that has been dismissed as humbug. tension are only likely to rise further over the next few weeks, with little sign of how parliament divisions might be resolved. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. let's get more on this now from our political correspondent, jessica parker. and jessica, was the prime minister ready for this backlash? ido i do not know whether he expected it. perhaps borisjohnson really trying to goad the opposition parties into calling a vote of no—confidence triggering the
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election boris johnson no—confidence triggering the election borisjohnson says he wa nts. election borisjohnson says he wants. it was an interesting set of heated exchanges after borisjohnson had flown back from america following the supreme court ruling that found the suspension of parliament unlawful and a lot of opposition mps wanted to see signs of contrition, wanted to see the prime minister say sorry but all the signs were over the course of the day, he would deliver a defined message and that proved to be the case. the significance of this? opposition may dislike him even more now. it will be interesting how it plays out with his benches. caution from senior members, including nicky morgan, the culture minister who said we need to remind ourselves of the effect everything says on those watching us and borisjohnson actually has a meeting later this morning with his conservative backbench mps and a lot seemed fully
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behind him last night it will be interesting to see if people will raise concerns about his language. lots of questions yesterday as before pmq lots of questions yesterday as before pmo ‘s about is going to be a motion of no—confidence, are we going to see a election, what will happen with brexit. what is next? going to see a election, what will happen with brexit. what is next7m was a slightly difficult question to answer. “— was a slightly difficult question to answer. —— always. we will see an effort by the conservative government in parliament to have a brief recess running until the end of today till thursday next week to allow for the conservative party conference to take place. opposition party members i have spoken to do not seem particularly happy with that. but it is taking place in manchester. a vote of no confidence has not been tabled but it does not mean it will not be. leaders of
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opposition parties might be meeting later today what that that to decide what to do next. sales of alcohol in scotland's shops fell by almost 8%, after it introduced minimum unit pricing, that's according to a new study. since may 2018, the price of alcohol has had to be at least 50p per unit. the study for the british medical journal found the impact was around twice that predicted ahead of the move. here's our health correspondent, nick triggle. scotland was the first country in the world to introduce minimum price, based on the strength of drinks. mounting concerns had built about problem drinking. a study in a british medicaljournal suggested may have started to have had an impact. researchers looked at the of alcohol bought in shops before and after the introduction of the laws. since may, 2018, the minimum prize of alcohol has been 50p per unit. in the first eight months
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following the new law, the amount of alcohol purchased her week, per person fell by 1.2 units on average. that's the equivalent to half a pint of beer or a measure of spirits. it has pleased campaigners. these are in line with the models we have. in fact, a greater effect than anticipated. 20% on the heaviest drinkers, the most likely to run into illnesses or early alcohol—related death. calls have emerged to have the rest of the uk follow suit. a 50p prize in 2020, but neither england nor ireland have plans to introduce their own limit. the scottish government said the findings were very encouraging. nick triggle, bbc news. donald trump has condemened the impeachment proceedings against him as "a big hoax". mr trump has been accused of putting pressure on his ukrainian counterpart to set up a corruption investigation into the democratic
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presidential hopeful, joe biden. mr trump says details of a phone conversation between them prove he's done nothing wrong. but democrats are calling for the original whistleblower complaint to be made public. men with fertility problems are more likely to develop prostate cancer in later life, according to a new study. research published in the british medicaljournal, looked at more than one million pregnancies. prostate cancer uk said researchers must look at a much broader age range, before concluding that men who had fertility treatment, had a higher chance of developing the disease. the duke and duchess of cambridge willjoin sir david attenborough for the naming ceremony later of the polar research ship the public wanted to call boaty mcboatface. they'll attend a ceremony at the cammell laird shipyard, in birkenhead, and will bejoined by the famous broadcaster himself. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports. heading for the most remote parts of oui’ heading for the most remote parts of our planet, this 130 metre long
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polar sheep is almost complete. the said david attenborough ready for its ceremony today. the chips we have at the moment, they are 25, 30 yea rs have at the moment, they are 25, 30 years old. it is an extremely advanced ship. one of the most advanced ship. one of the most advanced ships in the world if not the most advanced ship. it has taken just three years to build this vessel. a million pieces of steel slotted into place. on board, the tea m slotted into place. on board, the team is putting together the finishing touches. for a ship this size, everything is on a huge scale. my size, everything is on a huge scale. my primary role on bodies to get the ship painted. it has taken 60,000 litres of paint to paint this ship which isjust litres of paint to paint this ship which is just mind—boggling the amount we have actually use. and what of boaty mcboatface, the name
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the public chose? boaty mcboatface is part of a submarine deployed in the deep sea. and this is what it would look like when the exploration begins, breaking through ice up to a metre thick, the hope is it will transform the understanding of the rapidly melting pot. after the naming ceremony, the next step will be sea trials before it leaves for antarctica next year. the duke and duchess of sussex have introduced their baby son archie to the anti—apartheid campaigner archbishop desmond tutu. it's the first time the four—month—old has been seen in public on the couple's 10—day tour of africa. archie was seen smiling in his mother's arms and was held up on her lap. prince harry and meghanjoked about their son's time in front of the cameras as they greeted the archbishop and his daughter. today, prince harry will travel to botswana, while meghan will remain in cape town.
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it isa it is a time to have a look at the spot. a lot of positive energy around the england camp. perhaps straight talking after was a slightly disappointing opener against tonga. good scoreline, though. people predicted they would put more points on tonga and if they did not and they got the bonus point which is what they needed but they will be looking to see more from england against the us. never a bad thing to ask more from your team. and never a bad thing to have two easy opening games which they got. england know a win will set up them up for tougher tests to come in the group. argentina and france around the
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corner. eddiejones says he wants a fast start against the usa. ten changes have been made to the side that beat tonga in their opening pool game. italy play canada first at quarter to nine. more cup upsets last night, three premier league sides were beaten by league one opposition in the third round of the efl cup. west ham were thrashed 4—0 by oxford united. what an upset that was. sheffield united lost 1—0 at home to sunderland and burton albion saw off bournemouth 2—0. a hat—trick from janine beckie helped manchester city to a 4—0 second—leg win over lugano to seal their place in the women's champions league last 16. hibs went out, beaten 5—1 by slavia prague in the czech republic. manchester city already exceeding their results and performances in that competition must year. these are games, two games for england, i think that... the danger is that you
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are not faced with really, on the face of it, high—calibre teams so you're not really tested early on. south africa, new zealand, for example, they come head—to—head, they know the markers. if i were edgarjones or any they know the markers. if i were edgar jones or any member of they know the markers. if i were edgarjones or any member of the team listening to you say that, i would be serious. what makes you think they are not trying their best or not fight very hard. think they are not trying their best or not fight very hardlj think they are not trying their best or not fight very hard. i am not saying that. they do not know if their best is good enough. it is ha rd to their best is good enough. it is hard to calibrate how hard the test is, that is what i am saying. do you know what i'm saying?” is, that is what i am saying. do you know what i'm saying? i do. carol, do you know what i'm saying?|j know what i'm saying? i do. carol, do you know what i'm saying? i do. we all set that looking slightly perplexed. you are backing my case, thank you, charlie. that is the
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welcome you get when you are in sa lfo rd. welcome you get when you are in salford. i have to say it is lovely to see you in the flesh. if only you knew what was being said earlier!m you are stepping outside to take an umbrella. it is moving from the west to the east. we are looking at sunshine and showers. some of the showers will merge to give longer spells of rain at times. on the radar picture, you can see that there is light a bit of rain around. that rain has been moving steadily from the west towards the east and will continue to do so as we go through the next couple of hours. shower was already coming in behind. not a cold start to the day, though. for many of us it is pretty mild. you can see the difference responsible for all that rain. and later on enhanced with another little front. quite a blustery day,
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as you can tell by the squeeze on the high suppose. the rain is putting into the north sea, taking its time to clean scotland where it will be for much of the day. in the northern isles we are looking at strong to gale force winds. wherever you are today it will be quite blustery, particularly across southern areas. showers following on behind. we won't all see them, but some will be heavy and sundry. rates bills in between. damages ranging from 12 in the north to 21 in the far south—east. temperatures. we have a plethora of showers. another weather front coming in from the west. once again it will enhance the showery outbreaks of rain. not a cold night. most of us are staying in double figures. in north—east scotla nd in double figures. in north—east scotland and under clear skies temperatures could drop to six degrees. winds easing across the northern isles. tomorrow is another day for having your umbrella to hand. although it will start off on a dry note in many eastern areas, with weather front from the west
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there will be showers around a no—show was merging with a greater chance of hearing the odd rumble of thunder. another windy day across england and wales. showers will rattle through quite quickly. for northern ireland and scotland they will be slow—moving, not much went to move them along. look at the temperatures. slipping just a touch. 12-18. temperatures. slipping just a touch. 12—18. saturday, we start off once again ona 12—18. saturday, we start off once again on a dry note in the east. more fronts coming our way, bringing rain. but this one is potentially a troublemaker. coming up from the south—west it will bring heavy rain and also some strong winds, particularly so across the southern end of the country. overnight on saturday we think this will go across a lot of england and wales with notably gusty winds even inland gusts of up to a0 mph. the timing and extent is open to question. what happens on sunday will have a
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bearing on that. we think at the moment the area of low pressure will continue to push towards the north sea and a northerly wind coming across scotland, for example, 12— 15 degrees. there is also a new moon. there may be some issues with coastal flooding as well. i think i will just coastal flooding as well. i think i willjust come and join you. you are not welcome! i am so glad they came. have a seat. are you serving tea and coffee ? have a seat. are you serving tea and coffee? we get coffee. it is tough at the bottom. we are going to have at the bottom. we are going to have a look at the papers. have you had a chance to have a look? hold your fire for a second. we will do the front pages first. the first is what the times describes as "extraordinary" and "bitter" scenes in the commons yesterday as boris johnson faced mps after the supreme court ruling. the second is baby archie making his public debut, pictured here with his mother, the duchess of sussex.
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the guardian picks up on mrjohnson's dismissal of fears that his use of language such as "surrender" and "betrayal" was dangerous — to the "fury" of opposition mps. the mirror calls him the "man with no shame," and says he hit a "new low" by saying the best way to honour the murdered mpjo cox was to "get brexit done". the daily express describes the prime minister launching a "furious attack" on the "paralysed parliament". it also prints a picture of baby archie on the royal tour of south africa, reporting on the nickname his mum has for him — which it says is "bubba". what have you got for us?|j what have you got for us? i have a fabulous picture of helen mirren. helen the great. there she is arriving very regularly. check out that necklace. if a lift it up you can see it a bit better ——
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regularly. what attracted me to this was how good she looks. you never see a bad picture ever of helen mirren, do you? no. and why should you, she is just fabulous. she gives some advice to people of how to age well. they will get you to look it up on social media. it is very good. i will top your helen mirren with tuna. the fish. a £3 million bluefin tuna. the nice thing about this story is they then let it go. a600 —— 600 bossangoa —— lbs monster. then let it go. a600 —— 600 bossangoa -- lbs monster. it is not bad. how often do you hear i cou rte i lle bad. how often do you hear i courteille fish and it was this
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size. a trickery of cameras -- a court a fish. we talk about amazing women. carol and yourself being among those. he was right about me. two of them. both. dean asher-smith. the first british woman to win a world sprint title —— dena asher—smith. they are getting under way in doha. wouldn't it be some story after what has been a great couple of seasons for her. she one triple gold at the european champions. this is the big one at the worlds. sparrow thought at the marathon runners were going off at one minute to midnight in temperatures of over 30 degrees. that is when it is coolest. it is almost as though we thought it through with a theme around i newspapers. amazing women won'tjust
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invented recently, why they? they have been around since prehistoric times. did you see how he linked that to you? they found out that prehistoric women made, fed their babies from bottles that they made. they stored the milk and fed the babies from bottles. what were the bottles made out of? there is a tiny picture here. it looks like a small animal. but they found these little vessels that used to contain the milk stop they were made to look like animals. and that is an extraordinary... what animal is that supposed to be? a chicken. it looks exactly like a chicken. there we go. we learn something. you have enlightened us all. prehistoric news for you this morning. carol, thank you very much. you are here all
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morning. i think it is fair to say we had a dramatic few days in westminster. yes. anyone who saw heard anything in the commons yesterday, even seasoned viewers of parliamentary business was saying there was an edge, a tone to what was going on at such a crucial time. it made east end does look tame. ben is getting reaction from students in stoke—on—trent this morning. it's the city with the highest number of leave votes in the uk. it is miserable behind you. at i am sure there is chair under the cove rs. sure there is chair under the covers. i noticed that carol is nicely in the warm studio with you this morning and they have sent me out in the rain. but you are right, welcome to stoke—on—trent. we are here, quite rightly, this place voted overwhelmingly to leave the european union. 69.a% of people voted to leave. what looking at this
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morning is the reaction to the last 2a hours, quite a 2a hours it has been with a pretty violent reaction on both sides of the house, it must be said, some big statements we heard yesterday. so what do people outside of the westminster bubble make of this? i have assembled a group of students to talk about some of the issues from both sides of the leave and remain debate and from both the conservative and labour supporters. they will speak to them ina supporters. they will speak to them in a moment about what they made of what we have heard of the past 2a hours, but first let's remind ourselves of what went on when parliament was resumed. out of sheer selfishness and political cowardice, members opposite are unwilling, are unwilling to move aside and give the people a say. after yesterday's ruling, mr speaker, the prime minister should have done the honourable thing and resigned. this
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parliament is a dead parliament. it should no longer sit. it has no moral right to sit on these green benches. this prime minister, to talk about our laws and reality is a disgrace. in this place, subject to death threats and abuse every single day. and let me tell the prime minister that they often quote his words, surrender and betrayal, traitor. and i for one am sick of it! applause . i think, mr applause . ithink, mr speaker, they have applause . i think, mr speaker, they have to tell you, mr speaker, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. so there we have it. the events of the last 2a hours. what do people make of it? with me a group of students. let me introduce you, lily, daniel, valentina, and sam. my
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goodness, we were just watching that clip. so much was discussed yesterday. they wonder what you make of it, there is a danger that this becomes a westminster thing, so far removed from everybody else around the country. i think it is a joke. you have mps on both sides complaining about parliament being prorogued. it opened yesterday and there was no brexit negotiating going on, no scrutiny, just soundbites of political campaigns. it was pointless to me stop valentina, when you hear things like that, and quite clearly strong opinions on both sides, you both remain, do you worry we have got so far away from the actual vote about what people voted for that this is just infighting between the political parties? definitely. think we should be putting party politics behind us this moment. vote both was three years ago and i don't think the people have been consulted at all about this. it has been mps squabbling all the time. daniel, does it frustrate you, it was a
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democratic vote to leave the european union and we seemingly are no nearer to leaving? yes. all the parties except the tories have just completely ignore the will of the people, even then it is a small part of the tory party, not even the tory party as a whole. lily, how would you like to see this change, how do we make any progress, because the prime ministers as let me get on and do this and parliament is saying there are checks and balances we need to put in place?” there are checks and balances we need to put in place? i think people in parliament, individuals in parliament need to look away from the idea that they are in it for self political gain. that is not what politics should be about. it is about representing people and constituents, and that is not what is happening at the moment. and we're not going to get anything done at all people in parliament start trying to do things to better themselves. valentina, how do you see this working from here on out? we are at a position that there seems to be deadlocked, but nothing that the government can propose or
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even mps can agree on will pass. what you want to see happen? do we need to see something pretty drastic, something radical happened? i think definitely, yes, but i think it should be returned to the people, a people's vote about what the deal, ifa a people's vote about what the deal, if a deal, and, ultimately, maybe another referendum. however don't release the board that because of the democratic view in the 2016 referendum —— don't really support. people may have changed their mind or they may have stayed the same. so it is over another vote. yes. we will talk more about this later. there are the views of some students here in stoke—on—trent. a reminder this place voted overwhelmingly to leave. we will talk about some of theissues leave. we will talk about some of the issues and concerns that people like the students have and we will speak to some businesses later and get a sense of what they are doing to prepare to leave the european union and whether, indeed, they are.
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more from me in about half—an—hour. thank you. it is interesting hearing some perspective on what was going on yesterday. a lovely backdrop. very dramatic. just out of the rain. time now to get the news, travel, and weather where you are. hopefully it is not raining where you are. we will see you in a couple of minutes. good morning from bbc london. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has announced new measures to help reduce violence in prisons. the programme, which will start at two london prisons, will involve gang—screening as well as an increased police presence. there will also be more support for mental health. assaults in prisons reached a record high over the past year, increasing by 11% across the country. the mp luciana berger has announced she will fight for the current conservative held constituency of finchley and golders green, at the next general election and leave her current seat in liverpool. it follows her recent move
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to the liberal democrats. the mp had previously quit the labour party over accusations of anti—semitism. a new children's hospice will open today in barnet. the ark is the first to be built in london for many years and will be the only one that serves north and central london. the centre is expected to get a visit from spurs players — the club is a partner charity. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there are minor delays on the circle lines. aa piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. lewisham — one lane closed westbound on a20 lee high road at thejunction with belmont hill due to gas works. in the city: new bridge street is closed southbound from ludgate circus to queen victoria street for gas main repairs. tottenham: temporary traffic lights and electricity works on a1055 watermead way: northbound approaching leeside road.
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in wembley: wembley park road is closed in both directions between wembley hill road and stadium retail park for water mains work. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. air settled we got weather continues and it's another wet start to the day for many of us. that rain is going to clear its way eastwards. sunny spells but also some showers behind it. also going to feel rather blustery, too. now it is a very mild start to the morning, there is a lot of low cloud around, some rather misty, murky conditions. there outbreaks of remote was their way eastwards through the morning. maybe one or two top showers through the afternoon, but lots of dry weather around as well and some decent spells of sunshine, top temperatures
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of 19 or 20 celsius. but it will feel quite breezy throughout. through this evening and overnight, again the chance of one or two showers, lots of clear spells though. and temperatures will drop a little lower than they were this morning, between 11 and 13 celsius. tomorrow is another rather windy day. we'll start off on a dry note, they'll even be some sunshine around, but then we'll get some showers into the afternoon, almost together time to feel like longer spells of rain. on saturday, still windy. sunday, plenty of rain. summer is definitely over. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. it's 6:32. we'll bring you all the latest news and sport in a moment, but also on breakfast this morning, we'll be joined by some of the cast, and the writer, of the bbc‘s epic
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new second world war drama, world on fire. keane will be here to tell us how they're stronger than ever, after bouncing back from divorce and addiction to bring out a brand new album. and the music doesn't stop there. as a special treat to celebrate bbc music day, craig david will be singing us out at the end of the programme. good morning. here's a summary of today's main stories from bbc news. borisjohnson has been accused of stoking dangerous divisions over brexit during furious exchanges in the commons last night. a number of senior conservative mps have urged him to pick his words carefully, after he accused his opponents of "surrender", "betrayal", and "cowardice". there was a particular backlash over his claim that the best way
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to honour the murdered mpjo cox was to deliver brexit. sales of alcohol in scotland's shops fell by almost 8%, after it introduced minimum unit pricing — that's according to a new study. since may 2018, the price of alcohol has had to be at least 50p per unit. the study for the british medical journal found the impact was around twice that predicted ahead of the move. these findings are encouraging. they are in line with the modelling we had before and, in fact, they showed an even greater effect than had been dissipated. a very select one on the 20% of the heavier drinkers who are most likely to have illnesses and early alcohol related death. donald trump has condemened the impeachment proceedings against him as "a big hoax". mr trump has been accused of putting pressure on his ukrainian counterpart to set up a corruption investigation into the democratic presidential hopeful, joe biden. mr trump says details of a phone
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conversation between them prove he's done nothing wrong. but democrats are calling for the original whistleblower complaint to be made public. men with fertility problems are more likely to develop prostate cancer in later life, according to a new study. research published in the british medicaljournal, looked at more than one million pregnancies. prostate cancer uk said researchers must look at a much broader age range, before concluding that men who had fertility treatment, had a higher chance of developing the disease. more than one in four secondary school pupils in england and wales have a private tutor, new research shows. youngsters from wealthier homes are significantly more likely to have extra help according to the sutton trust report. the social mobility charity is calling on the government to introduce means—tested vouchers to help lower—income families access private tuition. a department for education spokesperson said £2a billion had been invested through pupil premium schemes this year. the duke and duchess of cambridge will join sir david attenborough for the naming ceremony later of the polar research ship
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the public wanted to call boaty mcboatface. that name was vetoed and the ship will be officially named the rrs sir david attenborough in a ceremony at the cammell laird shipyard in birkenhead. william and kate will be given a tour of the ship and meet a team of engineers, including young apprentices, who have been involved in the build. the duke and duchess of sussex have introduced their baby son archie to the anti—apartheid campaigner archbishop desmond tutu. it's the first time the four—month—old has been seen in public on the couple's 10—day tour of africa. archie was seen smiling in his mother's arms and was held up on her lap. prince harry and meghanjoked about their son's time in front of the cameras as they greeted the archbishop and his daughter. today, prince harry will travel to botswana, while meghan will remain in cape town. those are the main stories. and
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casting our ride to japan and england in action once again. and their opponents, the united states. edgarjones has likened that to playing 15 donald trump is. what? aggressive, in—your—face, perhaps competitive. maybe he is trying to gearup his team. competitive. maybe he is trying to gear up his team. you need to be very careful with your words.” gear up his team. you need to be very careful with your words. i am only reciting what he said.” very careful with your words. i am only reciting what he said. i never realised it was called the william webb ellis cup. you learn something new every day. i love it. england aware much tougher group games lie ahead in argentina and france. eddiejones has called for a fast start, he's made 10 changes from the side that beat tonga in a perfomrance which has drawn criticsim. and the players know there
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are several areas for improvement. ball control, will be one but judging by running around, it is pretty slippery so it would be a good chance to test that. the other one i felt like, we had tonga in some really good field position but we let them off with for discipline, easy out and when you get a team like that under pressure, you cannot be allowing them easy access and we did that three or four times. there were more league cup upsets last night. three premier league sides were sent packing by league one opposition in the 3rd round. west ham thrashed a—0 by oxford at the kassam stadium. shandon baptiste with oxford's fourth. last season's surprise semi—finalists burton claimed another big scalp as they beat bournemouth 2—0. oliver sarkic and then nathan broadhead with the goals. and max power scored the only goal of the game as league one sunderland won 1—0 at sheffield united.
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what a goal, as well, there... but it was business as usual for liverpool will now face arsenal and chelsea will host manchester united in the fourth round. james milner got liverpool's first before he set up 17—year—old ki—jana hoever to score his first senior goal for the club. for all the scores visit the bbc sport website. manchester city women are through to the last 16 of the champions league after a a—0 second leg win over lugano. there were already leading 7—1 from the first leg but continued to pile on the goals with a hat—trick from janine beckie. the result means city better their efforts in the competition last season, when they were knocked out in the last 32 by atletico madrid. hibernian were knocked out by slavia prague. the were also four scottish league cup games last night and rangers will play in the semi—finals for a fourth consecutive season after a hard—fought 1—0 win over livingston. glen kamara's deflected fifth—minute strike was enough to send
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steven gerrard's side through. elsewhere, there wins for celtic, hearts, and hibs. britain's alex dowsett missed out on the medals as rohan dennis defended his time trial title at the road world championships in yorkshire. the australian completed the course from northallerton to harrogate with a winning margin of more than a minute. dowsett came fifth but his top 10 finish will earn team gb, a second time trial place in next year's olympics. nicola adams is preparing for the first defence of her world flyweight title at the royal albert hall tomorrow. she became champion injuly — without having to fight — when the previous holder was forced to give up the title. the olympic champion's bout will be the first between women at the albert hall. muhammad ali boxed there, lennox lewis, so many other stars, singers
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have performed there, so it is going to bea have performed there, so it is going to be a surreal moment for me to be able to, like, i was going to say when my world title but it will be like winning a world title for the first time and creating history. it will be interesting to see what she does next, she has turned professional. she can fight one more professional. she can fight one more professionalfight professional. she can fight one more professional fight and still fight in the olympics next year but if she continues to fight professionally you are no longer classed as an amateur. so it will be interesting to see what she chooses to do next. it isa to see what she chooses to do next. it is a difficult thing to resist the olympics. especially when she has won two goals already. good morning and thank you forjoining us. "traitor", "betrayal" and "surrender" — they're just some of the words mps claim are encouraging threats and violence towards them, as they urged
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the prime minister to moderate his language when he talks about brexit. let's speak now to our political correspondentjessica parker. i wonder sometimes, people watching the going on is, they find it frustrating and they think, what does that have to do with our lives. what does the atmosphere tell us about what is happening more generally? i think the debate, as we head towards the october 31 deadline, and obviously a number of yea rs on deadline, and obviously a number of years on from the brexit referendum, people are getting more frustrated and tense and among them mps across the house. i was struck yesterday, every time i put my head in, how unforgiving the atmosphere seemed and when boris johnson unforgiving the atmosphere seemed and when borisjohnson stood up in parliament last night to make his anticipated statement, some of the things was a clearly riled the opposition benches. he kept
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referring to the bill, the act mps passed before the government was prorogued. to ask for an extension to brexit. he kept referring to it as the surrender act and among those to raise the concerns about the language was a labour mp. many of us in the display subject to death threats and abuse every single day and let me tell the prime minister, they often quote his words, surrender, traitor, and i for one, am sick of it. cheering and applause. mr speaker, i have to tell you, mr speaker, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. it was that dismissal of what she said that really seemed to win up a
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number of people again in the opposition benches, causing fury. a lot of people seem to think that was not an appropriate reaction. another labourmp not an appropriate reaction. another labour mp was tracy rayburn, she of course took the seat after the murder ofjo cox and shiraz concerns as well about language. —— she raised. as a woman who has taken over said that was left by our dear friend, jo cox, can i ask him, in all honesty, as a human being, please, please, will he going forward moderate his language so that we will all feel secure when we are going about ourjob. the best way to honour the memory ofjo cox andindeed way to honour the memory ofjo cox and indeed the best way to bring this country together would be, i think, to get brexit done.
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that reaction from the prime minister again caused considerable ire, not least from the husband of jo cox who tweeted last night that he felt a bit sick... that was tweeted by brendan cox last night. what is the significance of all of this? looking at the atmosphere, perhaps if borisjohnson is hoping to bring back a brexit dealfurther is hoping to bring back a brexit deal further down the line after the october eu summit, the atmosphere in parliament, the opposition mps, do seem to like borisjohnson even less than they do before and it could make resolving the issue even harder. thank you very much. going to be talking to james covelli later
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on as well so we will talk to him about boris johnson's comments. on as well so we will talk to him about borisjohnson's comments. at the moment, we absolutely need to know what is going on with the weather. it has turned, all rainy and miserable. look at you smiling! it is such a pretty picture. it is the time of year when we expect the change in the weather. what we have is rain clearing. it has not cleared yet. behind that sunshine and showers. a few of those showers will be happy. as is the way with showers, not all of us will catch one. we have seen a fair bit of rain as we have gone through the course of the night. it has been coming in from the west and progressively moving as was. some of this has been heavy, showers following on behind. it is courtesy of a couple of weather fronts. they will continue to push off into the north sea. if you look at the isobars there will be quite a blustery day, particularly across england and
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wales. later on another weather front comes our way introducing some more showery rain. the first band of rain goes through comically as england, tends to linger across the northern isles. here too we are looking at some to go swing. behind all that rain, brighter skies, some sunny spells and some showers. some will be heavy. by no means will be all see them. temperatures 12—21. as we head through the evening and overnight, a very largely dry start in the east, the next one comes in from the west it will introduce further showers. there will be some clear spells. it will be quite blustery, although the winds will is in the rain will clear from the northern isles. temperatures 10—13 are not particularly cold tonight. across north—east scotland where this goes clear temperatures could fall to six degrees. through the course of tomorrow a lot of dry weather to start. we have a plethora of weather fronts coming our way. what will happen tomorrow is some of
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the showers will merge and give longer spells of rain. tomorrow there is a greater chance of seeing some lightning in and amongst all of this. windy day across england and wales. the showers will move through quite smartly. not so across northern ireland and scotland. if you catch a showers it could be slow—moving and heavy. temperatures coming down, 12—1a in stop 17—18 as we push further south. as we head into saturday, again after a dry start in the east, we have our first run coming in from the west. that will introduce some rain. then we have an area of low pressure coming up have an area of low pressure coming up from the south—west. this one is potentially a troublemaker. the timing of it could change. it could come ina timing of it could change. it could come in a little bit faster or it could slow down. and the positioning of it could change as to this northerly extent. overnight on saturday we expect this to move across england and wales with gusts of wind even inland we could have
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gusts 1a—15 mph around the cursor could be more than that. by the time we get to sunday this is where we think this is going to be. still windy, especially in the east only because of sunday. the timing and positioning could change. keep in touch with the weather forecast if you have outdoor plants. something drier and cooler across the north—west and a little drier as we push down to the south —— plans. that weather does what we think it will do. which isjust bring rain and misery. not everywhere. but some heavy rain. possibly localised flooding. we have spoken a lot about that this year. carol, thank you very much. it is 6:49. ben is in stoke—on—trent this morning — the city with the highest number of "leave" votes in the uk. he's asking businesses and members of the public how events in westminster are affecting their own preparations for brexit. morning, ben.
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he is ina he is in a lovely location. at the top of the stairs. good morning to you. welcome to stoke—on—trent. the city with the highest number of votes for even in—out referendum in 2016. we have come here to get a sense of what is this makes about the last 2a hours. lots of debate as parliament resume. there is a real concern that what happens in the westminster bubble is so far removed from what is actually happening in the real world, and especially as far as business is concerned, they have day—to—day concerns about keeping their businesses afloat, preparing for what happens next, and trying to get some answers to their many questions that they have got about what business will look like when we leave the european union. 692a% of people here voted to leave. but is there a fear that the brexit date is drifting further and further away? perhaps it may not even happen at all. stoke—on—trent made its name
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from ceramics, and from coal mining, but what does business think now? what is the key industry in stoke—on—trent? they have been taking a look at what is really important to people living here. stoke—on—trent, a city of six towns and historically two big industries. pets and pots. the pits at one time employed 20,000 men here. but the last one closed in 199a. the pots and pottery city as it became known, date back to the 17th century, home to world beating brands like wedgewood enrolled in. at one stage there were a000 council. now there arejust a0. there have been small and local firms selling around the world. the city's economy is growing and changing. the big local employer
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metal and has been joined and changing. the big local employer metal and has beenjoined by bet365, as well as logistics firms and thousands of new start—ups. in 2016, stoke—on—trent voted overwhelmingly to leave the eu. so what's next for the area's economy? those are the big industries and the big employers here. what do they make of what they have heard of the last 2a hours? i have a panel of esteemed guests. let me introduce you. laura is the chief executive of the reidis ramos confederation, the chief economist for ey, and keith at titanic brewery. you very much. i looked in that little video there at what the key industries are in this city is one that has changed a lot. he was a sense of what people here are telling you about brexit and voting overwhelmingly to leave. do they feel it is drifting further
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away physio at this point people are probably more worried about what the details are going to be and think through the implications as you say. there are a set of industries, manufacturing where there are issues around customs and tariffs, moving goods around. there are other businesses maybe in consumer and the tax base where it is different. laura, you met with andrea leadsom, michael gove in the last week, it is about getting answers, isn't it? you wa nt to about getting answers, isn't it? you want to know some detail about what your industry come your members will be facing. yes. we need for legislation in place particularly to deal with some of the trade issues on dumping. members are tying up a lot of cash in stocks of raw materials and finished goods, rather than investing it in growing the businesses. and we have been growing asa businesses. and we have been growing as a sector at 9% a year. we are a successful industry. we want to do
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even more. but also we are worried about the export tariffs. our customers will be paying export ta riffs into customers will be paying export tariffs into europe where 57% of the experts go. we will be selling less. and we're not rolling trade agreements to japan and canada, our fourth and eighth largest markets. we need to be able to... we need to avoid no deal. we need a deal. many politicians of all parties to work together to avoid no deal because it is so damaging the manufacturing. keith, you are at the other end of the spectrum. what you do, you source your materials here, you sell them here. are you brexit isn't a concern day today for the business but it is your customers. it is. 9896 of what we sell is sold in the uk. 9a% of what we use is sourced in the uk. the immediate issue is not going to bea uk. the immediate issue is not going to be a major problem to us. the issueis to be a major problem to us. the issue is what happens to consumer confidence, what happens to the
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trade we have with people going out and buying the beer we produce. the other thing is the fact we have com pletely other thing is the fact we have completely ignored the domestic agenda for three years. we are in a position with business rays where we are paying over 3% of our turnover in business rates because we are on the high street, in comparison to somebody like us on paying lower than 1% but we're still using the same people, the local community, we wa nt same people, the local community, we want their schools, education, service, et cetera. but we are having to contribute to much to that. some of those issues have drifted so far off the agenda because they are dealing with one. laura, you talked about dumping. the idea that foreign firms can come here and undercut british manufacture and sell it more cheaply. but for the ceramics industry is a real concern. yes. and moreover in the event of no deal government will impose zero import ta riffs government will impose zero import tariffs on most of the products coming into britain, apart from a
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few in ceramics and other sectors, that really means we will have a flood of imports at the same time as we are paying more to export. so it will be really challenging to operate here. for now, the three of you, thank you very much. we will talk more about this later. it is good to see you. there are the views of three important businesses and industries in stoke—on—trent. it really relates to detail, as we are hearing from laura. theyjust want some answers to the many questions, let them get on with doing business. more from me after seven a.m.. they will see you later. thank you very much. catching up with ben and the other guest this morning talking around the issues to do with brexit. also talking about the language used in the commons, which has got a lot of people's interested a. we will be talking to james cleverly, the conservative party chairman in about 15 minutes. in the meantime, catch up on the news, travel, and whether where you
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are. we will see you at seven o'clock. good morning from bbc london. results of tests for contamination of the soil around grenfell tower won't be shared with residents until next month. they were supposed to be revealed in september. the tests were commissioned following research by a fire toxicology expert who said potentially cancer—causing chemicals and other toxins were found in soil and fire debris close to the fire. the government is committed to publishing the report as soon as possible. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has announced new measures to help reduce violence in prisons. the programme, which will start at two london prisons, will involve gang—screening as well as an increased police presence. there will also be more support for mental health. assaults in prisons reached a record high over the past year, increasing by 11% across the country.
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the mp luciana berger has announced she will fight for the current conservative held constituency of finchley and golders green, at the next general election and leave her current seat in liverpool. it follows her recent move to the liberal democrats. the mp had previously quit the labour party over accusations of anti—semitism. a new children's hospice will open today in barnet. the ark is the first to be built in london for many years and will be the only one that serves north and central london. the centre is expected to get a visit from spurs players — the club is a partner charity. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there are minor delays on the circle lines. on the roads there is queueing on the a102 blackwall lane towards the blackwall tunnel aa piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. lewisham: one lane closed westbound on a20 lee high road at thejunction with belmont hill due to gas works. now the weather with
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elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. our unsettled week of weather continues and it's another wet start to the day for many of us. that rain is going to clear its way eastwards. sunny spells but also some showers behind it. it's also going to feel rather blustery, too. now it is a very mild start to the morning, but there's a lot of low cloud around, some rather misty, murky conditions. these outbreaks of rain will push their way eastwards through the morning. maybe one or two sharp showers at times through the afternoon, but lots of dry weather around as well and some decent spells of sunshine. top temperatures again of 19 or 20 celsius. but it will feel quite breezy throughout. now, through this evening and overnight, again the chance of one or two showers, lots of clear spells though. and temperatures will drop a little lower than they were earlier on this morning, between 11 and 13 celsius. tomorrow it's another rather windy day.
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we'll start off on a dry note, there'll even be some sunshine around, but then we'll get some showers into the afternoon, they're merge together at times to feel like longer spells of rain. on saturday, still windy. sunday, plenty of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: parliament is back, and angrier than ever, as furious mps confront the prime minister. to talk about morals and morality is a disgrace! boris johnson ignored calls to resign and mocked labour for failing to back a general election. they have until the house rises today to table a motion of no confidence in the government. come on, come on.
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after yesterday's ruling, mr speaker, the prime minister should have done the honourable thing and resigned. and i'm in stoke—on—trent, which was the city in the uk to support leave by the highest margin, to talk to voters and businesses here about how the political turmoil is affecting their preparation for a potential no—deal brexit. england head coach, eddiejones, calls for a fast start against the usa as england play their second match of the rugby world cup in kobe later. we are in birmingham kicking off bbc music day. currently we have a band of rain moving west to east, when that clears, we're looking at sunshine and showers. some of the show was heavy and blustery. i will have more in 15 minutes.
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it's thursday the 26th of september. our top story: borisjohnson has been accused of stoking dangerous divisions over brexit during furious exchanges in the commons last night. a number of senior conservative mps have urged him to pick his words carefully, after he accused his opponents of "surrender", "betrayal", and "cowardice". there was a particular backlash over his claim that the best way to honour the murdered mpjo cox was to deliver brexit. our political correspondent, helen catt, reports. as the prime minister prepared to face mps, some were hoping for an apology, others his resignation, others a milder tone. instead... the supreme court was asked to intervene in this process for the first time ever. and it is absolutely no disrespect to the judiciary to say i think the court was wrong. boris johnson issued a challenge to the opposition — you vote to sack me. they have until the house rises today to table a motion of
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no confidence in the government. the snp seemed like they might be tempted to take up the offer. the opposition must unite to trigger a vote of no confidence to bring this chaotic government down. but in the end no party tabled a no—confidence vote. they won't throw boris johnson out, they say, until they are sure a no—deal brexit can't happen, but that doesn't mean they think he is the man for the job. this, mr speaker, was ten minutes of bluster from a dangerous prime minister who thinks he is above the law. but in truth, mr speaker — in truth, mr speaker, is not fit for the office which he holds. after the debate, mp after mp expressed concern over the language being used. words like "capitulation", "surrender", or "betrayal". many of us in this place subject
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to death threats and abuse every single day and, let me tell the prime minister, that they often quote his words, "surrenderer", "betrayal", "traitor". cheering and applause. i think, mr speaker, i have to tell you, mr speaker, i...i have to say, mr speaker, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. today i have reported to the police a threat against my child, that has been dismissed as humbug. tension are only likely to rise further over the next few weeks, with little sign of how parliament divisions might be resolved. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. let's get more on this now from our political correspondent, jessica parker. just outside the house of commons. people who watch from a distance, they would be familiar with the noise and some of the bluster
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sometimes. you are in the chamber yesterday and this felt different? you are right. often, into the chamber there are robust exchanges and tensions can run high and mps can get visibly upset but the level of tension really skyrocketed last night in the house of commons, particularly as they moved onto the debate about language. as helen was reporting, a lot of opposition mps hoped that after the ruling, that found the prorogation of parliament had been unlawful, they thought they may get an apology or some contrition but that did not happen. borisjohnson saw contrition but that did not happen. boris johnson saw the best form of defence is attack. opposition mps we re defence is attack. opposition mps were already not particularly fond of borisjohnson were already not particularly fond of boris johnson and were already not particularly fond of borisjohnson and they will be even less so now and it might make
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getting a brexit deal even harder. it will be interesting to see how it lays out with his backbenchers. a lot of them seemed supportive last night. he will meet them later today. but one said we need to remind ourselves of everything we say and the effect on those watching. and in terms of the process ? watching. and in terms of the process? boris johnson watching. and in terms of the process? borisjohnson wants to strike a brexit deal and be out by the end of october. but this makes it even harder than before. another thing to point out, what was boris johnson doing last night? on one point he was trying to goad the opposition into a vote of no confidence to trigger a general election. no sign yet that opposition parties are poised to do that yet but they will meet later this afternoon to discuss what next.
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we will have carole later to tell us about the weather because it will be raining fora about the weather because it will be raining for a lot of us later. sales of alcohol in scotland's shops fell by almost 8% after it introduced minimum unit pricing, that's according to a new study. since may 2018, the price of alcohol has had to be at least 50 pence per unit which means a 500ml can of super strength beer must cost at least £2.25. the study for the british medical journal found the impact was around twice that predicted ahead of the move. over 70 flights are scheduled today to bring back 16,000 holidaymakers, following the collapse of thomas cook. the civil aviation authority said a6,000 passengers had already been flown home in the first three days of the repatriation operation. the authority also announced they've extended the atol compensation claim period until the 25th of october. donald trump has condemened the impeachment proceedings
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against him as "a big hoax". the president has been accused of putting pressure on his ukrainian counterpart to set up a corruption investigation into the democratic presidential hopeful, joe biden. david willis reports. it was a visibly weary donald trump who took to the stage at the united nations. his administration's efforts there are eclipsed by a row back home over a highly unusual telephone conversation. the call between mr trump and the president of the ukraine, volodymyr zelensky, in july this year, is thought to form the basis of a complaint from an intelligence service whistleblower. and it could now lead to president trump's impeachment. i fully support transparency on this so—called whistleblower information, even though it was supposedly secondhand information, the white house released a partial transcript of the conversation between the two leaders. in it, president trump takes
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the highly unusual step of asking mr zelensky for help in dishing the dirt on his democratic rival, joe biden. democrats point to the fact that, at the time of the conversation took place, the white house was refusing to release nearly $a00 million in aid to ukraine. president trump has called the row a witch hunt and a hoax. but last night's release of the whistleblower‘s complaint to members of congress might leave more questions for him to answer. joe biden, on twitter, urged the house of representatives to do itsjob and hold donald trump to account for his abuse of power. all this made a meeting between president trump all this made a meeting between presidents trump and zelensky, on the sidelines of the united nations, a decidedly bizarre event, but donald trump has a fight on his hands and this may be just the start of a bitter battle between the executive and legislative branches of the us government. david willis, bbc news, washington. more than one in four secondary school pupils in england
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and wales have a private tutor, new research shows. youngsters from wealthier homes are significantly more likely to have extra help according to the sutton trust report. the social mobility charity is calling on the government to introduce means—tested vouchers to help lower—income families access private tuition. a department for education spokesperson said 2.a billion pounds had been invested through pupil premium schemes this year. the duke and duchess of cambridge will join sir david attenborough for the naming ceremony later of the polar research ship the public wanted to call boaty mcboatface. i still like the name. it works every time, it is still funny. they'll attend a ceremony at the cammell laird shipyard in birkenhead — and will bejoined by the famous broadcaster himself. our science correspondent rebecca morelle reports.
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heading for the most remote parts of our planet, this 130—metre long polar ship is almost complete. the rrs sir david attenborough ready for its royal ceremony today. the ships that we have at the moment are 25, 30 years old. it is an extremely advanced ship. probably the — certainly, one of the most advanced ships in the world if not the most advanced ship. it has taken just three years to build this vessel. a million pieces of steel slotted into place. on board, the team is putting together the finishing touches. for a ship this size, everything is on a huge scale. my primary role on board has been to get the ship painted. so internally and externally. ship total —it has taken 60,000 litres of paint to paint this ship which is just mind—boggling the amount we have actually used. and what of boaty mcboatface, the name the public chose
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for this ship? well, boaty lives on in the form of a robotic yellow submarine. it will be deployed from the ship to the icy deep. and this is how the sir david attenborough will look when the exploration begins. breaking through ice, up to a metre thick, the hope is it will transform our understanding of the rapidly changing poles. after the vessel's naming ceremony today, the next step will be sea trials before it leaves for antarctica next year. rebecca morelle, bbc news. the duke and duchess of sussex have introduced their baby son archie to the anti—apartheid campaigner archbishop desmond tutu. the arch meets archery! the four—month—old has been seen in public on the couple's 10—day tour of africa. archie was seen smiling in his mother's arms and was held up
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on her lap. prince harry and meghanjoked about their son's time in front of the cameras as they greeted the archbishop and his daughter. today, prince harry will travel to botswana, while meghan will remain in cape town. —— archie. thank you forjoining us this morning. we are blessed, boaty mcboatface making an appearance. anyone might think we actually like each other. —— carole. it always works out like this. i have ran in the forecast. we have rain moving from the west towards the east. that'll tend to clear. then what we are looking at, sunshine and showers. but some of the showers will be happy. a few of them could have thunder. looking at them could have thunder. looking at the rate of picture you can see what has happened overnight. there is the
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first band of rain. the second one hot on its heels. there are showers coming in across northern ireland. the weather fronts will clear in. the weather fronts will clear in. the isobars are quite close together. meaning it will be quite blustery, quite windy across west facing coastlines. through the course of the day we say goodbye to the rain, clearing england and eastern scotland first. it hangs on across the north—east of scotland for much of the day. any northern isles it will be windy, strong to gale force winds. behind that there will be showers around. some will be happy. one or two will be thundering. then we are looking at professor green standing in the way... professor green, canno push you out of the way for a second? honestly, you can't get this stuff. temperatures ranging in the north 20- 21 temperatures ranging in the north 20— 21 degrees. they will tell you why professor green is in a minute or two as we had on through the evening and overnight, starts off in a largely dry note and needs. then we have more showers in from the
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west. some of those will be happy. the wind is picking up, particularly along the coastlines of wales and south—west england. most of it staying in double figures overnight. across north—east scotland legacy temperatures dipped to about six degrees. through the course of tomorrow, after the dry start in the east, we have a plethora of showers piling in from the west. they are going to merge at times to give longer spells of rain. you will notice there will be thunder and lightning embedded in them. it will bea lightning embedded in them. it will be a windy day across england and wales. the showers will move through quite quickly. for northern ireland and scotland there will not be so much wind. you could get a torrential downpour at times. temperatures coming down. on saturday, the first weather front moves in across the west, bringing in some rainfall it is the second area of low pressure coming from the south was that proved to be troublesome. it could lead to some localised flooding. without it will have strong winds. now the timing of
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this and the positioning of it could change, but this is what we think at the moment, coming in through the course of the early afternoon and it will be overnights, pushing north—eastward. overnight we see a lot of rain from and gusts of wind as much as 50 mph, even inland. more than that on the coast. if we go on the timings we think at the moment it will push steadily towards the north sea. it will still be winding around this as well. and it will coincide with the new moon and the spring tide. it could lead to some localised flooding. a chilly day in the north, temperatures 1a—15, 17—18 in the south stop why did professor green a pop into my charts? because here is very naughty and so is naga. honestly, naughty, naughty, naughty. there were no instructions. a mist mchugh. -- i missed my queue. i am
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doing the weather this morning. i feel half asleep and entirely incompetent and incapable. have you done the research carol dawson the morning? she is on the phone at about five o'clock. i have looked at instagram for a bit. it is where i'd get my information. i will have to ta ke get my information. i will have to take un had a sort out, think. -- ta ke take un had a sort out, think. -- take you in hand and sort you out. there is a promise... we are heading into a period of uncertainty this weekend... to good already. do you know where salford is already? salford is... it is going to go well. a work in progress. when will we see well. a work in progress. when will we see the finished product? at a
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quarter to nine. it is going to be great. it will be really good. gordon bennett! it is now 7:17. this would coming up later. looking ahead to england's next match in the rugby world cup in japan. as tensions in the house of commons reached fever pitch last night, mps warned against the use of ‘dangerous' language that could encourage threats and violence — something dismissed by the prime minister as ‘humbug'. referring to the murdered mpjo cox, who was killed in her constituency by a far—right activist in 2016, mrjohnson said getting brexit done was the best way to honour her memory. mrs cox's husband, brendan, said he ‘felt sick‘ at hearing her name being used in that way. joining us from westminster to reflect on yesterday's debate is the conservative party chairman, james cleverly. james cleverly, thank you very much
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for joining james cleverly, thank you very much forjoining us this morning. tell me, how do you feel? are you proud being part of this government at the moment, considering the weight is behaving in parliament? -- the way. what i'm passionate about, what they are very much focused on anai think this is very much what the premise is focused on, is getting brexit delivered. we can see how divisive this has been. it was divisive through the referendum campaign, it has proved divisive over the last couple of years. the exchanges in the house have shown that it still generates a huge amount of temper on both sides of the commons. and they think the best thing we can do to calm things down is to get it delivered, get it resolved so we can focus on the priorities that british people keep telling me, when they travel around the country, they want us to focus on, things like police, the nhs, public services will stop and we're not going to be able to fully focus on these things as a parliament until this issue is
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resolved stop the sooner we can get this resolved the better. which is why i, the prime minister, and the government are passionate about getting brexit done by the 31st of october so we can focus on those other priorities. ok, so you didn't a nswer other priorities. ok, so you didn't answer my question. so abel played you the voices of students we have been talking to this morning it comes to how they think brexit and about parliament ‘s performance. comes to how they think brexit and about parliament 's performance. mps on both sides complaining about parliament being pro jenot on both sides complaining about parliament being projenot having the debate in time. there was no brexit negotiating going on yesterday, no scrutiny, just soundbites and a political campaign. i think we should feel party politics behind us at the moment. the vote was three years ago and i don't think the people have been consulted at all about this. it has been mps squabbling all the time. certain individuals in parliament need to look away from the idea that they are in it for self gain, because that is not what politics should be about. we will not get anything done until people in parliament stop doing things to
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better themselves. i will ask you again, just picking up on some of those phrases, no scrutiny, party politics is dominating, they are squabbling, talking about mps, in it for themselves. are you proud to be pa rt for themselves. are you proud to be part of this government considering the way it is behaving in parliament? and i refer particularly to yesterday. i think those student voices encapsulate exactly the point it was making. they are clearly frustrated and that first voice that we heard said that we have come back after this period away for party conferences and the conversation is progressing. we are seeing the same arguments going round and round in circles. what people and those student voices reflect this, what people tell me is they want us delivering on their priorities. they wa nt delivering on their priorities. they want this resolved. they don't want us just rowing, they want the government to deliver. that is what we wa nt government to deliver. that is what we want to do. that is why we have announced the extra police officers, the extra funding for the nhs
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hospital upgrades, the increased starting salary for teachers. that is what we want to be talking about... but you're not! you are not talking about that the prime minister is using language like surrender, betrayal, he is using the death ofjo surrender, betrayal, he is using the death of jo cox surrender, betrayal, he is using the death ofjo cox for his strategy. you are not doing what you were elected to do. this is exactly the point we were making. the frustration that is reflected right across the house and right across the country is that while the government, while at the prime minister is passionate about the nhs, about schools, about policing, about transport infrastructure, there are a lot of people who are preventing us from getting onto thoseissues preventing us from getting onto those issues because what they want to do is continue the same row, inconclusive row, about brexit. that is the real dividing line. we have got the government and the prime minister who want to deliver for the british people and we have all the other political parties who want to just really rehash the same
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arguments about brexit. and that is frustrating everybody, including the stu d e nts frustrating everybody, including the students that you interviewed earlier. would you use that language, surrender, humbug, capitulation? your leader is using that language. he is the leader of your party. the bill that the prime minister was referring to, everyone is using shorthand. the labour party call it the ben bill. it is the eu withdrawal number to act. the prime minister described it as a surrender bill, because it surrenders a huge amount of power to the eu. it surrenders the timetabling, it surrenders the timetabling, it surrenders the timetabling, it surrenders the power to negotiate, it massively undermines the government's negotiating position. the prime minister is trying to get a deal, a deal they can get through the house, delivers on the referendum result, and allows us to move referendum result, and allows us to m ove o nto referendum result, and allows us to move onto those other issues. the a cts move onto those other issues. the acts of some members of parliament have made it harderfor the uk to get a deal. and that is frustrating for all of us. there is frustrating
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for all of us. there is frustrating for me, it is frustrating for all of the people who want to talk about their priorities. are you frustrated with your leader? no, the prime minister is moving heaven and to to get a deal, to get brexit result in a way that can get through the house of commons. are you going to answer my question? i'm sorry for interrupting. i'm asking if you're frustrated with your leader, have askedif frustrated with your leader, have asked if you are proud to be part of this government, i have asked if you would use the language he has used. you have not answered any of those directly put a player proud of my prime minister. we have seen com plete prime minister. we have seen complete indecision from the labour party. we have seen the lib dems say they will overturn the largest electoral event in which is history. so, yes, i am electoral event in which is history. so, yes, iam proud to electoral event in which is history. so, yes, i am proud to support a prime minister who is trying to deliver what we all promised the british people, which is to honour that referendum result. i am proud ofa that referendum result. i am proud of a government which is investing in police, in the nhs, investing in teachers and the education system,
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and the transport infrastructure and digital infrastructure of the country. and they i'm absolutely frustrated that after three years and hours a parliamentary debate, there are still some people who would rather go round in that circular argument about brexit, rather than help deliver and move on —— andi rather than help deliver and move on —— and i am absolutely. rather than help deliver and move on -- and i am absolutely. brendan cox has been talking on the bbc‘s programme today, he has spoken about the tone of the language used by the prime minister. by including him. "i was shocked by it. it takes a fair amount shock me now. it was genuinely shocked by their willingness to descend to vitriol and the language that was used. it does long lasting harm." your reaction? as i say, a lot of us are frustrated with the language used. i have had people, you know, accuse me of all kinds of things. there were accusations made about the prime minister, you know, was attributed to him that he has never used. tempers are running incredibly high. a completely understand that. and
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what we do need to do is we do need to move on from the nature of this debate. the best way of doing that is to resolve this very divisive issue. we need to do that by getting brexit delivered. and until we do thatis brexit delivered. and until we do that is going to be very hard, even impossible, to move on to the kind of issues which do unify us things like the nhs and education and policing. that's what we are desperate to do. and i think they frustration is there have been many people in the house of commons who seem to be moving heaven and earth to prevent that from happening.“ borisjohnson had to prevent that from happening.“ boris johnson had spoken to prevent that from happening.“ borisjohnson had spoken to you before pmqs yesterday before the session in the evening in the house yesterday and said to you are am going to use these words, what would you have said to him? which words do you have said to him? which words do you mean. humbug, surrender, capitulation, betrayal, the various words... he has not use the word
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betrayal. it is not usually wear betrayals of this is the point. crosstalk. then used tojo cox's memory... there were words attributed to him that he has not used. that is of course frustrating. the point is... humbug, just missing female pm ‘s as humbug, their fears as humbug, just missing female pm ‘s as humbug, theirfears as humbug. humbug, just missing female pm ‘s as humbug, their fears as humbug. what he was saying is there was attributed to him were inaccurate. he did use the word humbug and dismissed those fears as what he was saying is the word attributed to him by paula sherriff were inaccurate, they were wrong. and the point is, asi they were wrong. and the point is, as i say, tempers are running high right across the house. and what we do need to do is we do need to come things down. and the best way of doing that is to get brexit off the front pages of every paper —— calm things down. by getting rides are delivered. then we can focus on the
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priorities will tell us they want us to focus on, police, hospitals, gp surgeries, transport, that is what we are desperately trying to do. james cleverly, appreciate your time this morning, standing in the rain rose as well on the balcony. chairman of the conservative party, james cleverly. it is 7:28. we are reflecting on all that is going on in politics. sometimes music has the ability to calm things down a little bit. also to add to the emotions as well. we are celebrating that today. we have so many big names. craig david, professor green, he will be doing the weather. random but fun. find out what is happening where you are this morning. see you soon. good morning from bbc london. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has announced new measures to help reduce violence in prisons. the programme, which
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will start at two london prisons, will involve gang—screening as well as an increased police presence. there will also be more support for mental health. assaults in prisons reached a record high over the past year, increasing by 11% across the country. results of tests for contamination of the soil around grenfell tower won't be shared with residents until next month. they were supposed to be revealed in september. the tests were commissioned following research by a fire toxicology expert who said potentially cancer—causing chemicals and other toxins were found in soil and debris close to the fire. the government told us the preliminary data was made available to the community injuly and it's committed to publishing the report as soon as possible. the mp luciana berger has announced she will fight for the current conservative held constituency of finchley and golders green, at the next general election and leave her current seat in liverpool. it follows her recent move to the liberal democrats. the mp had previously quit the labour party over accusations of anti—semitism.
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a new children's hospice will open today in barnet. the ark is the first to be built in london for many years and will be the only one that serves north and central london. the centre is expected to get a visit from spurs players — the club is a partner charity. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube there are minor delays on the circle lines. on the roads lewisham: one lane closed westbound on a20 lee high road at thejunction with belmont hill due to gas works. aa piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. in the city: new bridge street is closed southbound from ludgate circus to queen victoria street for gas main repairs. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. our unsettled week of weather continues and it's another wet start
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to the day for many of us. that rain is going to clear its way eastwards. sunny spells but also some showers behind it. it's also going to feel rather blustery, too. now it is a very mild start to the morning, but there's a lot of low cloud around, some rather misty, murky conditions. these outbreaks of rain will push their way eastwards through the morning. maybe one or two sharp showers at times through the afternoon, but lots of dry weather around as well and some decent spells of sunshine. top temperatures again of 19 or 20 celsius. but it will feel quite breezy throughout. now, through this evening and overnight, again the chance of one or two showers, lots of clear spells though. and temperatures will drop a little lower than they were earlier on this morning, between 11 and 13 celsius. tomorrow it's another rather windy day. we'll start off on a dry note, there'll even be some sunshine around, but then we'll get some showers into the afternoon, they're merge together at times to feel like longer spells of rain. on saturday, still windy. sunday, plenty of rain. i'm back with the latest
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from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. anyone might think we actually like each other. —— carole. hello this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. here's a summary of this morning's main stories from bbc news. borisjohnson has been accused of stoking dangerous divisions over brexit during furious exchanges in the commons last night. a number of senior conservative mps have urged him to pick his words carefully, after he accused his opponents of "surrender", "betrayal", and "cowardice". there was a particular backlash over his claim that the best way to honour the murdered mpjo cox was to deliver brexit. earlier the conservative party chairman james cleverly admitted brexit had been divisive. it has proved divisive over the last
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couple of year. exchanges in the house show it generates a huge amount of temper on both sides and i think the best thing we can do to calm things down is to get it delivered, get it resolved so we can focus on the priorities the british people keep telling me they want us to focus on which a thing like the police, the nhs, public services. sales of alcohol in scotland's shops fell by almost eight per cent after it introduced minimum unit pricing — that's according to a new study. since may 2018, the price of alcohol has had to be at least 50 pence per unit which means a half litre can of super strength beer must cost at least £2.25. the study for the british medical journal found the impact was around twice that predicted ahead of the move. donald trump has condemned the impeachment proceedings against him as "a big hoax". mr trump has been accused of putting pressure on his ukrainian counterpart to set up a corruption investigation into the democratic
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presidential hopeful, joe biden. mr trump says details of a phone conversation between them prove he's done nothing wrong. but democrats are calling for the original whistleblower complaint to be made public. men with fertility problems are more likely to develop prostate cancer in later life — according to a new study. passengers are being flown home with authorities announcing they have extended the compensation. until the 25th of october for thomas cook passengers. men with fertility problems are more likely to develop prostate cancer in later life — according to a new study. research published in the british medicaljournal, looked at more than one million pregnancies in sweden over 20 years. it's hoped the findings will lead to men with fertility problems being screened earlier for the disease. the duke and duchess of cambridge will join sir david attenborough for the naming ceremony later
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of the polar research ship the public wanted to call boaty mcboatface. such a good name. that name was vetoed and the ship will be officially named the rrs sir david attenborough in a ceremony at the cammell laird shipyard in birkenhead. william and kate will be given a tour of the ship and meet a team of engineers, including young apprentices, who have been involved in the build. those are the main stories. take us to the world cup injapan. those are the main stories. take us to the world cup in japan. england are playing two matches in five days now. the second pool game. it is a quick turnaround so a lot being made in rugby, very physical, very attritional, tough games and bearing in mind that the former wales player said he would have to climb the stairs on his hands and knees after
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a game. probably little training between the two matches. nothing is easy but having said that, potentially less difficult matches and they were pretty convincing. but interesting, the strategy against tonga, they were criticised about kicking the ball but if you keep the ball you're more likely to get thumped so that maybe a tactic that serves them well by avoiding injury. england secured a bonus—point win over tonga on sunday, and will feel confident of another against the usa, a team ranked 13th in the world rankings. let's talk to our sports correspondent andy swiss, who's in the city of kobe, where the match will take place. how are the england team? a lot has been made about the quick turnaround. only five of the team started from that match on sunday.
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yes, only four days since the opening match against tonga which in by opening match against tonga which in rugby terms is not a lot and, with that in mind, they are resting a lot of the players who played in that match, bringing in fresh legs. ten changes to the side who played in the opening match. captain owen farrell, the fly half george ford singing the side because owen farrell is given a breather. a winger and sent up making their world cup debut. england have a lot of depth so it should not be a problem but it is a very, very different starting line—up to the one we saw on the weekend. england tried to avoid the eggheads in tonga and that performance criticised somewhat but eddie jones and that performance criticised somewhat but eddiejones said he wa nts a somewhat but eddiejones said he wants a really fast start against the usa team? england were a little
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bit scratchy in the opening game on the weekend. they got the win and bonus point but it was not entirely convincing and energises looking improvement, particularly with the handling. we saw a lot of handling errors. the conditions could be challenging, it is very hot and humid. by the time the match kicks off it will be cooler and there is a roof but even so the humidity might bea roof but even so the humidity might be a problem. it was interesting to hear the england players during training saying it was very slippery and difficult to group the bolts are playing the sort of running rugby they like to might be a problem.” suppose if their opponents, a lot of their players play they rugby in england. what can we expect from the united states, what sort of challenge will they pose? england will be the overwhelming favourite because i have played the usa five
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times and have won all five matches but the usa are an improving team and eddie jones, but the usa are an improving team and eddiejones, the england head coach, known for his colourful term of breath, saying it will be like playing 15 donald trump is, a comment which slightly mystified the usa coach who said i do not know what that means. they will present a challenge but england should be favourite. charlie in the studio, how is japan favourite. charlie in the studio, how isjapan and bracing the rugby world cup so far? -- and bracing. i think they have an brasted fully. —— enjoying it. fans are turning up just to watch wales training which is pretty much unheard of. the welcome they have given all the teams and fans from overseas has
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been quite extraordinary. a lot of japanese fans will be here to watch this game. although it is a big spot injapan, fora this game. although it is a big spot injapan, for a lot of people it will be the first taste of rugby so perhaps crowd a bit more reserved than we're used to in the uk but it has been a brilliant welcome and you get the sense they are loving this world cup. japan playing ireland on saturday. thanks very much indeed. there were more league cup upsets last night. three premier league sides were sent packing by league one opponents in the 3rd round. west ham thrashed a—0 by oxford at the kassam stadium. shandon baptiste with oxford's fourth. last season's surprise semi—finalists burton claimed another big scalp as they beat bournemouth 2—0. oliver sarkic and then nathan broadhead with the goals. and max power scored the only goal of the game as league one sunderland won 1—0 at sheffield united. if you only score one,
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might as well be a goody! it was business as usual for liverpool who will now face arsenal and chelsea will host manchester united in the fourth round after the draw was made. james milner getting liverpool's first before setting up 17—year—old ki—jana hoever to score his first senior goalfor the club. for all the scores and the draw head over to the bbc sport website. there were also four scottish league cup games last night. rangers will play in the semi—finals for a fourth consecutive season after a 1—0 win over livingston. glen kamara's early effort enough to send steven gerrard's side through. elsewhere, there wins for celtic, hearts, and hibs. manchester city women are into the last 16 of the champions league after a a—0 second leg win over lugano. there were already leading 7—1 from the first leg but continued to pile on the goals with a hat—trick from janine beckie. city improvoing on last season when they were knocked out in the last 32. hibernian were knocked
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out by slavia prague. interesting to get the take from andy about the quick turnaround from england and you think, whether or not you would be wrapping up your best players in cotton wool. three players who played a full 80 minutes and one will be starting this one. you have been training your whole life, or since you have been a young child, to be playing this so surely none of the place would be saying, re st none of the place would be saying, rest me. you would want to be in the action. you would but with the risk of injury so high... they might be a slightly different game plan for the next one. no disrespect to the usa but they are not the biggest challenge. it is very unusual for a player to play every single match in
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a world cup. in 2003, england one the world cup. the number eight, he played every single game which is very unusual and they are suggesting that billy vunipola needs to do that. i guess everyone is different. it isa that. i guess everyone is different. it is a big risk. if it works great but if goes off the edges... you would just be hungry for it. it is like carol, she would never miss out ona like carol, she would never miss out on a good weather day! thanks for pointing that out. actually, when i was on holiday, the weather was really hot and sunny. you made a bad choice there, you should listen to what you preach. did you have a lovely holiday? yes, i did. it is nice to be back and nice to see you all in person and everyone else
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behind the camera. good morning everyone. the rain is moving from the west to east but it will clear into the north sea and then we will be looking at sunshine and showers but some showers will be heavier. the rain continuing itsjourney east. some showers following on in northern ireland. these are the two front responsible for the rain. they will clear away. other weather fronts coming in. if you look at the isobars, quite a blustery day. when the western approaches so west facing coasts. it will dry up and brighten up and we will see some showers. some merging with heavy outbursts. showers in northern ireland. the rain takes a while before clearing the northern isles. in the northern isles, it is meant
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to be pretty windy. mastery across other parts of the uk. overnight, we lose the rain from the northern isles. with the exclusions from the west, frequent showers coming in, some heavy and thundery. temperature wise, 9— 13 degrees but under clear skies we could have a low as six in scotland. but it doesn't mean a dry weather in the east to start the day but then all the showers plugging in against some of them merging. a greater chance of thunder and lightning embedded in them tomorrow. windy across england and wales, the showers rattling through quite quickly. not so in northern ireland and scotland with showers slow and potential for some torrential downpours. temperatures in the north, 12 — 13, in the south 15 — 18
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degrees. on the weekend, front coming in from the west moving east but it is an area of pressure which could prove to be troubles and bringing in some heavy rain and strong winds in areas we do not need it. it is going to be pushing steadily north through the course of the night, bringing heavy rain and noticeably gusty winds, a0—50 miles an hour across england and wales. if that happens, this is what we expected to see on sunday, wednesday for parts of scotland, northern ireland, england and wales but an area of low pressure dragging off into the north sea and it will have gusty winds wrapped around it as well. temperatures 12 — 18 degrees. 18! is that above average? it is not but it will not be feeling great in the wind.
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there is one downside to carol being in the studio. she can see when we are not listening. which is all the time! there is low pressure. the temperatures are around average. i think, actually, that your time is done and there is someone who can do it better. let us find out at a quarter to nine. you are not wrong! it isa quarter to nine. you are not wrong! it is a 7:a7. we have been talking about the tension in the commons. the business it is about what will happen in the nearfuture. ben is in stoke—on—trent this morning — the city with the highest number of "leave" votes in the uk. he's asking businesses and members of the public how events in westminster are affecting their own preparations for brexit. morning, ben. good morning. welcome to stoke—on—trent. you are looking at one of the original ceramic films. at one time there were a000 of these across stoke—on—trent, today there are a7. this one dates back to the 18aos. are a7. this one dates back to the 18a0s. last used in the 1980s. it
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gives you a sense of how economy and business has changed over recent yea rs. business has changed over recent years. it is not so much about this sort of stuff anymore but high—tech firms, start—ups, logistics, that sort of thing. we are here because over the last 2a hours it has been a lot of political infighting on both sides of the commons and it is interesting what business makes of it. is it just interesting what business makes of it. is itjust a westminster bubble thatis it. is itjust a westminster bubble that is so far removed from what people in places like this want to hear? i will talk to some guests in a moment. first of all, i have been looking at how industry and business in stoke—on—trent has changed. stoke—on—trent, a city of six towns and historically two big industries. pits and pots. the pits at one point employed thousands of men. the last one closed in 199a. the pots and pottery city, as it became known, they back to the 17th century, home to world beating brands like
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wedgwood and royal dalton. there are now just a7 wedgwood and royal dalton. there are nowjust a7 kelcie. there has been a resurgence in recent years, thanks to household names like emma bridgewater, one of the smaller local firms selling around the world. in the city's economy is growing and changing. big local employer micheline has been joined by the betting giant bet365 as well as logistics firms and thousands of new start—ups. in 2016, stoke—on—trent voted overwhelmingly to leave the eu. so what next for the area's economy? let us pick up on that thought with three guestsjoining me let us pick up on that thought with three guests joining me this morning, free local business people, julie, daniel, and mo. it is a bit damp down here. julie, you run a
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rufous. talk to me about some of the challenges you face —— roofing company was up you are worried about stockpiling and getting the stuff you need to carry on business. we have done some research on what would happen. we tend to buy local anyway, but we do import timber for the battens for the roofing. we have spoken to the suppliers and they think there might be a shortage, we don't know. it is about planning longer term. you have been through ups and downs, we all know businesspeople are pretty adaptable to economic circumstances. you just wa nt to to economic circumstances. you just want to be able to plan a bit. yes. we don't know if we are leaving, when we are leaving, it is hard to plan. everybody says this may happen, this could happen, but natalie is definite. and, mo, that is similarto you. natalie is definite. and, mo, that is similar to you. —— nobody is definite. you run a lot of different businesses in different industries. you need contingencies. my main
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business is the leisure industry. in local areas i own a large leisure business called waterworld. from my point of view it is a difficult thing. i would like to look at the economics of it. this brexit scenario has to happen one way or the other but we need a deal because if we don't have a deal economically, even the most conservative estimates, 10% of our gdp will be lost, which effectively means 10% of our income. gdp will be lost, which effectively means 1096 of our income. you wanted to remain but you have made your piece that we are leaving but we need a plan. with the big caveat that we must have a deal. without a deal it will be disastrous for everybody concerned. with entrepreneurs, business people, we are adaptable. we will take on new challenges and move forward. unfortunately, the people who will suffer the most are those not so adaptable. to me we must get a deal. we must be adaptable. if not we will
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have some issues. daniel, you work in visual effects. a relatively new industry for stoke—on—trent. we talked about it being about ceramics and mining in days gone by, now it isa and mining in days gone by, now it is a high—tech start—ups. you do that. what impact does it have a new, because getting talent is a big challenge if we leave the european union and there is no clarity things like immigration? i think talent is crucial when you come to the high—tech industries. i think skills are crucial. if you look at the lists ofjobs of the future, education, teachers are at the top, andl education, teachers are at the top, and i think when we are looking at brexit and how that has affected us, one of the positives is that companies are taking responsibility within our industry that we need to start to grow our home force. and we are working with different universities, colleges, nexgen coueges universities, colleges, nexgen colleges are working very hard to deliver internships and training schemes. access via fax puts
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industry mentors with young teenagers to learn visual effects, trying to make it more accessible. so many challenges, but a lot of opportunities as well. now, thanks to you all. nice to see you all. that is the issue. business has been through worse. it has been through ups and downs. it is pretty adaptable. what they‘ re ups and downs. it is pretty adaptable. what they're asking for is clarity on some of the detail, what the politicians seemingly are fighting it out at westminster. just give us some answers and we will get on with it. we will talk more at eight o'clock. i'll see you soon. iam very i am very intrigued by that kiln behind you. will be getting tour of it? yes. when you earlier we were inside. it is a little museum, a little shop. they will show you around later. built in the 18a0s. last used in 1980. a long lifespan. about a7 are still left. last used in 1980. a long lifespan. about 47 are still left. stunning. thank you very much. we go to
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birmingham new street station. a different look and a different sound to it. bbc music days being celebrated. good morning! music plays. this is pretty spectacular. this is the birmingham city council choir. and they sound amazing. you can see on they sound amazing. you can see on the teachers why we are here. bbc music day. the theme is about well—being —— t—shirts. who doesn't feel good listening to this? they are great! i love this. did you know is singing users... oh brilliant. bravo, everybody! wasn't that fantastic? singing users every single part of your brain in a way that no other activity does. good morning to you all. you are sounding
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glorious this morning. what does singing do for you? everything. when using all sorts of chemicals, and often is in oxytocin is released, singing genuinely makes you happy.” know this because they have met some of the choir. come and meet them. peter, tell me what you call yourselves. we are the troublesome tenors, because we misbehave. yourselves. we are the troublesome tenors, because we misbehavem does do you well. tell me about your experience with this choir. singing makes you feel brilliant. i have had personal tragedies, my makes you feel brilliant. i have had personaltragedies, my wife makes you feel brilliant. i have had personal tragedies, my wife died a few years back, without singing, it helps get me through the terrible times. it really does. it is good for the soul. a very stressfuljob in the city council, what does it if you when you come down and sing like this? every tuesday it is the highlight of my week. i have had a stressful day at work, running a big team, i'd come to the choir and a start to seeing and my troubles melt away for about two hours. they melt
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away. fantastic. listen, we have a treat for your commuters out there. listen to this. we will send you on your way to work or the school run where you're waking up this morning. after this song, which is a belter, we will have the news, travel, and whether wherever you are waking up this morning. take it away, choir. singing. good morning from bbc london. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has announced new measures to help reduce violence in prisons. the programme, which will start at two london prisons, will involve gang—screening as well as an increased police presence. there will also be more support for mental health. assaults in prisons reached a record high over the past year, increasing by 11%
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across the country. results of tests for contamination of the soil around grenfell tower won't be shared with residents until next month. they were supposed to be revealed in september. the tests were commissioned following research by a fire toxicology expert who said potentially cancer—causing chemicals and other toxins were found in soil and debris close to the fire. the government told us the preliminary data was made available to the community injuly and it's committed to publishing the report as soon as possible. the mp luciana berger has announced she will fight for the current conservative held constituency of finchley and golders green, at the next general election and leave her current seat in liverpool. it follows her recent move to the liberal democrats. the mp had previously quit the labour party over accusations of anti—semitism. a new children's hospice will open today in barnet.
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the ark is the first to be built in london for many years and will be the only one that serves north and central london. the centre is expected to get a visit from spurs players — the club is a partner charity. let's take a look at the travel situation now. on the tube all lines are running a good service. trains: disruption betweeen watford junction and euston due to a safety inspection of the track. affecting london north western railway and virgin trains services. on the roads hendon: one lane closed in both directions at the junction with finchley lane/hendon lane due to faulty traffic lights. aa piccadilly underpass remains closed out of town towards knightsbridge due to gas mains repairs. now the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. our unsettled week of weather continues and it's another wet start to the day for many of us. that rain is going to clear its way eastwards. sunny spells but also some showers behind it. it's also going to feel rather blustery, too. now it is a very mild
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start to the morning, but there's a lot of low cloud around, some rather misty, murky conditions. these outbreaks of rain will push their way eastwards through the morning. maybe one or two sharp showers at times through the afternoon, but lots of dry weather around as well and some decent spells of sunshine. top temperatures again of 19 or 20 celsius. but it will feel quite breezy throughout. now, through this evening and overnight, again the chance of one or two showers, lots of clear spells though. and temperatures will drop a little lower than they were earlier on this morning, between 11 and 13 celsius. tomorrow it's another rather windy day. we'll start off on a dry note, there'll even be some sunshine around, but then we'll get some showers into the afternoon, they're merge together at times to feel like longer spells of rain. on saturday, still windy. sunday, plenty of rain. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half—an—hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: parliament is back, and angrier than ever, as furious mps confront the prime minister. to talk about morals and morality is a disgrace! boris johnson ignored calls to resign and mocked labour for failing to back a general election. they have until the house rises today to table a motion of no confidence in the government. come on, come on. after yesterday's ruling, mr speaker, the prime minister should have done the honourable thing and resigned. and i'm in stoke—on—trent, which was the city in the uk to support leave by the highest margin, to talk to voters
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england head coach eddiejones calls for a fast start against the usa as england play their second match of the rugby world cup in kobe later. keane we'll be here in the studio to tell us why they're stronger than ever. we have a band of rain moving west to east, behind that sunshine and showers, some of them heavy and it will be a blustery day. more in 15 minutes. it's thursday the 26th of september. our top story. borisjohnson has been accused of stoking dangerous divisions over brexit during furious exchanges in the commons last night. a number of senior conservative mps have urged him to pick his words carefully, after he accused his opponents of "surrender", "betrayal", and "cowardice". there was a particular backlash over his claim that the best way to honour the murdered mpjo cox
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was to deliver brexit. our political correspondent helen catt reports. as the prime minister prepared to face mps, some were hoping for an apology, others his resignation, others a milder tone. instead... the supreme court was asked to intervene in this process for the first time ever. and it is absolutely no disrespect to the judiciary to say i think the court was wrong. boris johnson issued a challenge to the opposition — you vote to sack me. they have until the house rises today to table a motion of no confidence in the government. the snp seemed like they might be tempted to take up the offer. the opposition must unite to trigger a vote of no confidence to bring this chaotic government down. but in the end no party tabled a no confidence vote.
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they won't throw boris johnson out, they say, until they are sure a no—deal brexit can't happen, but that doesn't mean they think he is the man for the job. this, mr speaker, was ten minutes of bluster from a dangerous prime minister who thinks he is above the law. but in truth, mr speaker — in truth, mr speaker, is not fit for the office which he holds. after the debate, mp after mp expressed concern over the language being used. words like "capitulation", "surrender", or "betrayal". many of us in this place subject to death threats and abuse every single day and, let me tell the prime minister, that they often quote his words, "surrenderer", "betrayal", "traitor". cheering and applause i think, mr speaker,
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i have to tell you, mr speaker, i have to say, mr speaker, i have never heard such humbug in all my life. today, i have reported to the police a threat against my child, that has been dismissed as humbug. tensions are only likely to rise further over the next few weeks, with little sign of how parliament divisions might be resolved. helen catt, bbc news, westminster. let's get more on this now from our political correspondent jessica parker. i know you have followed this really closely. what is and just surprising is the ferocity of language on the house of commons, but also who boris johnson is actually talking to, i suppose. yes, boris johnson has said that he wants to head off to brussels, get a brexit deal and bring it back to the house of commons. looking at the house of commons. looking at the house of commons last night where we saw the tensions in the chamber before, but this was on a new scale, and it was
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ha rd to this was on a new scale, and it was hard to see how he will get some sort of consensus on brexit going forward. i think perhaps, to some extent he might have given up trying to win over the house of commons for and was certainly striking a defiant note later. but some speculate what he's trying to do is talk to the voters who is potentially hoping to woo in the event of a snap election, a snap election he has not managed to bring about. but in terms of the language he used, a lot of people saying it was not appropriate, particular people on the opposition benches. speaking this morning, the chair of the conservative party james cleverly gave his reaction. we can see how divisive this has been. it was divisive through the referendum campaign, and was divisive in the last couple of years and the exchanges in the house have shown it is still generating a huge amount of temporal —— temp on both sides of the commons and the best
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thing we can do to calm things down his get it delivered, get it resolved so we can focus on the priorities that the british people keep telling me when i travel around the country that they want us to focus on, things like the police, the nhs and public services. will things calm down as james cleverly says he hopes for? hard to say at the moment. what is happening today? borisjohnson is the moment. what is happening today? boris johnson is due the moment. what is happening today? borisjohnson is due to meet izzo conservative backbenchers at a special meeting of the 1922 committee and it will be interesting to see if his own party are co mforta ble to see if his own party are comfortable with the language he used and some of them won't be and it's clear some are supportive of the broad thrust of what he said. the culture secretary nicky morgan tweeted last night said at a time of strong feelings we need to remind ourselves of the effect of everything we say on those watching us. some will see that as a rebuke directed at the prime minister. the other thing to take note of is that opposition leaders are due to meet later this afternoon to decide on their next steps. jessica,
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interesting times. thank you very much. sales of alcohol in scotland's shops fell by almost eight per cent after it introduced minimum unit pricing — that's according to a new study. since may 2018, the price of alcohol has had to be at least 50 pence per unit which means a half litre can of super strength beer must cost at least £2.25. the study for the british medical journal found the impact was around twice that predicted ahead of the move. more than 70 flights are scheduled today to bring back 16,000 holidaymakers, following the collapse of thomas cook. the civil aviation authority said a6,000 passengers had already been flown home in the first three days of the repatriation operation. the authority also announced they've extended the atol compensation claim period until the 25th of october. donald trump has condemened the impeachment proceedings against him as "a big hoax". mr trump has been accused of putting pressure on his ukrainian counterpart to set up a corruption investigation into the democratic presidential hopeful, joe biden.
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mr trump says details of a phone conversation between them prove he's done nothing wrong. but democrats are calling for the original whistleblower complaint to be made public. men with fertility problems are more likely to develop prostate cancer in later life — according to a new study. research published in the british medicaljournal, looked at more than one million pregnancies in sweden over 20 years. it's hoped the findings will lead to men with fertility problems being screened earlier for the disease. the duke and duchess of cambridge will join sir david attenborough for the naming ceremony later of the polar research ship the public wanted to call boaty mcboatface. they'll attend a ceremony at the cammell laird shipyard in birkenhead — and will bejoined by the famous broadcaster himself. our science correspondent rebecca morelle is there for us this morning rebecca, it looks so impressive, the vessel behind you. good morning.
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good morning. it really is a key moment for this vast ship behind me and what is half known as boaty mcboatface but thousands are queueing up to see it named its real name, sir david attenborough. i am joined by one of the captains who will be in charge of this ship. what makes this vessel really stand out? good morning. what makes the vessel really stand out is the wide range of capabilities it has. it has so much function in one ship. in the middle of the ship there is scientific equipment to employ down the middle of the ship and it will make this a really, really capable tool for uk polar science. the place it is heading, the arctic and antarctic are incredibly hostile environments. what is it like to operate there? you will be there for vast amounts of time. we tend to
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work for three months at a time when we are work for three months at a time when we are in the polar regions and it isa we are in the polar regions and it is a fascinating place to work and a challenging environment with lots of changing conditions and changing geography. it is a really enjoyable and satisfying place to work but it's a fantasticjob. and satisfying place to work but it's a fantastic job. captain, thank you very much and we have that duke and duchess of sussex coming later this morning and of course sir david attenborough. the next step will be see and ice trials before the ship finally set sailfor see and ice trials before the ship finally set sail for antarctica on its first proper expedition. exciting. rebecca, thanks very much. as we've been reporting this morning, borisjohnson has been accused of stoking dangerous divisions over brexit during furious exchanges in the commons last night.
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we are going to speak to brendan cox, and if you bear with us a minute, we will play the sequence in the commons yesterday evening which made reference tojo cox. watch this at home. we haven't seen it before, and we will get your thoughts on a second. we are still people. as the woman who has taken over a seat that was left by our dear friend jo cox, cani was left by our dear friend jo cox, can i ask him, in all honesty, as a human being, please, please will he go infor human being, please, please will he go in for moderate is language so that we will all. secure when we that we will all feel secure when we are going about ourjob. the best way to honour the memory ofjo cox andindeed way to honour the memory ofjo cox and indeed the best way to bring this country together would be, i think, to get brexit done. jo cox of course was murdered in 2016. brendan, give us your reaction to what was said yesterday.” brendan, give us your reaction to what was said yesterday. i wasn't
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following it, i was with friends and i turned on my phone and saw it and i have to say i was quite shocked by it. it's one of those moments where you just, ijust it. it's one of those moments where you just, i just wouldn't it. it's one of those moments where you just, ijust wouldn't have thought that would have happened. i was surprised by it and i felt slightly sick, that feeling that you get when you see something that sticks in your throat. as i say, i think in politics generally we should be increasingly used to the unusual, but i didn't expect that. tell us a little more about that. a lot of people, there is a debate this morning about language more generally, but for you and your family this is much more than that when jo's name gets family this is much more than that whenjo's name gets used in this kind of context. explain that a bit more for us, the feelings that it brings up for you. well, i think,
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for me this is obviously very personal and i think there are two things that properly concern me the most. the first is that there is a real, and if what happened tojo didn't show people, there is a real threat to members of parliament and that threat continues. i speak to lots of her friends on both sides of the house and there are credible death threats and there's been a particular case where another attempted assassination of a female mp was thwarted only by the police intervention. this is real and it's really important that everybody on all sides of politics tries to make politics a safe place for people to argue and debate, but to do that in argue and debate, but to do that in a safe way. in the second thing which i think is even more important, although hard to
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distinguish, is there is something more profound about the tone and nature of our politics and what happened last night was a reflection ofa happened last night was a reflection of a much wider willingness to demean each other, to impugn each other‘s motives, to assume that the reason people want to leave is because they are racist or want to remain because they are traitors to the country. this sense of politics now whereby we are not just disagreeing with each other, but we are calling each other the worst names that we can, where we are saying what happened in the last few weeks that it was a coup under dictatorship and boris johnson weeks that it was a coup under dictatorship and borisjohnson is a fascist and that people who want to remain in the european union are in league with other nations. stuff is only wrong, because on both sides of the debate people are just trying to do what they think is right for the country but it's also dangerous and creates an environment where the
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sort of things that happens tojo becomes more likely. and if and when that happens, the nation... let's see if we can hold on for a second, not sure if we can carry on talking to brendan. the images are clearly frozen. can we still speak to him? i am not sure. let's hold on for a second because we were talking about some of the comments in the commons and literally the individual words used. lots of criticism levied against the prime minister, boris johnson, who was coming back to a rather explosive session in the house of commons as many have described. a lot of the language used by borisjohnson land language used by borisjohnson land language used by borisjohnson land language used by opposition as well, much fury in the commons and a lot reflected in the comments aboutjo cox as the prime minister used her name in terms ofjustifying getting brexit done. i think we can go back
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to brendan. we just lost brexit done. i think we can go back to brendan. wejust lost you brexit done. i think we can go back to brendan. we just lost you for a moment. i appreciate you are making wider points about the language used. from a personal point of view, at this stage, do you feel boris johnson owes you some sort of explanation, and i was going to say apology but that almost seems like playing into the notion of the hostility around this. but do you require him to say anything about why he said what he did?” require him to say anything about why he said what he did? i think in thinking about how to respond to this this morning, i thought a lot about how jo would this this morning, i thought a lot about howjo would have tried to respond, as i often try to do. and i think she would have responded with a generosity of spirit and an assumption that it was not malice, that it was in the heat of the moment and it was in a very intense atmosphere, raised voices, raised emotions, so i think the prime minister has a particular responsibility and we should not forget that. he is the prime minister and he sets the tone. but i
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think we all have a responsibility, i don't think it stops with him. i'm trying, i guess, assume that what was said yesterday in the cold light of day and on reflection would be something that the prime minister, either the dismissal of the mp concerns over safety or the way he talked about jo's concerns over safety or the way he talked aboutjo's legacy, i think in the cold light of day he would probably reflect on those things differently. but as i say, the bigger picture is that we all have a responsibility to moderate our own language. we are very quick to see the other side as being disingenuous, or to take their worst exa m ples disingenuous, or to take their worst examples as representative of all of them, to see the flaws in their arguments but also to see the excesses of their rhetoric. and i think we all have to take our own personal responsibility to do what
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jo talked about, which is to passionately disagree with each other, care about things, continue to advance your argument but to do it role respecting your common humanity —— but while respecting. we do have more things in common than divide us, and whatever the end of this god awful processes, we have to come back together as a country and start thinking about that. we can't just try and pick up the pieces at the end of the process. brendan, thank you for your time and apologies for the technical problems along the way. thank you very much. you know what my mother says to me, if you disagree, disagree agreeably. wise, isn't it? wise words. you should listen to your mum. and you should listen to your mum. and you should listen to carol as well if the news is good. 50 slash 50 chance of listening to you. i'm not surprised by that at all. good morning to you. this morning we have a band of rain moving steadily from the west towards the east and that will clear most and then we
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look at a mixture of sunshine and showers but some of the showers will be heavy in places. this is what has been happening in the early hours a band moving towards the east, second band moving towards the east, second band behind it and then showers in northern ireland. it's courtesy of these two weather fronts which will clear, but look at the squeeze on the isobars. a windy day ahead for you and then there are occlusions, these weather fronts which will enhance the showers later on. we lose the rain from the east coast and it hangs across the northern isles and heroes well we are looking at strong to gale force winds. —— here as well. behind the rain showers will develop but if you catch one it will be heavy. temperature —wise, 12 up to 20 degrees, may be 21 in the south, a blustery day but windy in the west on the coast. as we head to the evening we lose the rain in the northern isles and as the two
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weather fronts come in they will enhance the showers and some of them will be heavy and potentially thundery as well. not a particularly cold night with temperatures falling between ten and 13 degrees. but temperatures in the north—east of scotla nd temperatures in the north—east of scotland could nip down to 6 degrees. tomorrow we start on a largely dry note in the east with some sunshine but we still have weather fronts moving in some sunshine but we still have weatherfronts moving in from some sunshine but we still have weather fronts moving in from the west of the east producing some showery outbreaks of rain and at times they will merge to give longer spells of rain and heavy rain, but because it will be windy across england and also wales the showers will rattle through quickly, whereas for northern ireland and scotland not as windy for you, so if you catch one it will be slow moving and quite torrential as well. call tomorrow, 12 up to 1a in the north, 15 to 18 in the south. on saturday we have a weather front coming in from the west, moving eastwards, but then we have this potential troublesome area of low pressure and the timing and positioning of this
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could change so if you have outdoor plans on saturday or sunday, keep in touch with the forecast. at the moment we think it will bring in rain through parts of england and wales, accompanied by strong winds at a0 to 50 mph and more than that with exposure, which will continue through the night and then as we head into sunday we think it's this. the position could be changing, it could be further north or south but we also looking heavy rain and with the new moon and spring tides there is the risk of coastal flooding around the bristol channel or the north sea coastline, so something to keep a close eye on. something else to keep a close eye on is professor green, because he's going to have a bash at presenting the weather at 8a5. feeling confident? bash at presenting the weather at 845. feeling confident? no. it's not hard. yes, it is! you can help me. the blue bits are rain, the
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green bits are land, the other blue bits of the sea and the grey bits are cloud. the pictures do it for you. that is absolute rubbish. i am quietly confident. if carol can do it, come on. this is a science there isa it, come on. this is a science there is a lot more to it than that, isn't there, charlie? what did i say that was wrong? if i get it wrong are proper got as much chance of getting it right. have you had a go with it twice? i pressed the wrong button twice. it's only forward and back. ifi twice. it's only forward and back. if i pressed the wrong button it goes back to the beginning and i will have to do carol's bits. the weather might take a bit longer. you are saying to click one button is hard. it is well dangerous. you are not wrong. carol, my admiration for you is through the roof. in about 20 minutes' time? yes, quarter two. are you sweating? i am well excited. the good thing is that carol is going to
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be one of your gigs coming up. i've got a tour in november, so carol should come along and do some versions. that can be the trade. that's a wrap hands. that's what i did deliberately. perfect. i'll be there. that is such a moment. it's one of those strange days today. a lot of music in the programme, which is lovely. we have sent ben to stoke—on—trent, the city with the highest number of leave votes in the uk and very interesting at the moment. good morning to you. you've been talking to interesting people this morning, haven't you? yes, and hearing all sides of the debate, and what a 2a hours it has been with a fierce debate on all sides of the commons and up and down
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the country but there is a danger that the events in westminster are just that, in the westminster bubble and have little bearing on what is happening in the real world, so lots of questions about what could happen next. with me as chris morris from the reality check team and he is a man with some answers, but we also have some people with questions who have some people with questions who have been with us and chris, what a 2a hours it has been. you've been trying to make sense of what happened with the supreme court, so give us a sense of where we are now. one of the interesting things is we have been talking about no deal this morning and one thing the court decision does is make no deal less likely because it increases the constitutional power of parliament and we know parliament is against no deal, but it's what we've seen for three years, that parliament is stuck and divided like the rest of the country. at this point i want to bring in some of the students we have spoken to. lily and sam. you we re have spoken to. lily and sam. you were both talking about the frustration of what happens in westminster and you have a question for chris about preparations for no
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deal? has there been enough done for a no—deal brexit, and if not, why? in terms of the amount of money? it's not something you canjust throw money at. if you think about what it means, you take the million moving parts of the british economy and you transfer it from one place to another overnight, and some of those parts won't end in the right place but no one is entirely sure which bits will be in trouble, so the government has spent more than £8 billion to prepare for brexit, some of it for no deal, but it's also what businesses do. big businesses have the money to spend on preparing for no deal, but one of the problems is that smaller businesses, they don't have the profit margins and that's one of the areas of concern, how the small businesses that don't have huge amounts of money have the time and ability to spend but something that they don't know will happen or not. talking about the reaction of business, you run a brewery, and you we re business, you run a brewery, and you were saying earlier that you source
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things locally and you sell to customers locally and she would be that effective, but consumer confidence is an issue absolutely. that is a key issue for us and we are domestically based and most of what we produce is sold in the uk but the problem for us will be what happens to the economy after brexit and how it works out. if every business you talk to, the one thing you hear is that the uncertainty is doing my head in. give us some certainty. consumer confidence is an interesting one. you might remember there was a lot of forecast saying that the referendum result would lead to a fall in consumer confidence. it didn't, because the people who made the forecasts didn't think of lots of people voted leave, they properly think it's a good idea. but no—deal brexit would be a much bigger event than the holding of the referendum and all the major economic forecast suggests that over time the country would be poorer thanif time the country would be poorer than if we had stayed in the eu. if
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people have less money at a time of uncertainty, they may be less willing to spend but it is such a difficult thing to predict and i don't think anybody can tell you definitively how it will work out but it is about the question of certainty. time is tight, but sam i wa nt to certainty. time is tight, but sam i want to get your question is —— in, but there is also the worry of the domestic things not being looked at the girl all the attention is elsewhere and your question is about climate change. climate change has been put on the back benches are not really been discussed. when we leave the eu, do you think it will be easier for us to enact legislation to combat climate change? this is the sovereignty question and we can do what we like in a sense, but climate change is one of the classic issues where you need to work with other countries, it's bigger than one country and it crosses borders. and the likelihood is that whatever type of brexit happens, if it happens, we will have to work with other countries, so who will we work with? probably our nearest
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neighbours in the eu, so yes, in theory, but in practice it will be similar, i suspect. good to hear the question are nice to hear the a nswe rs question are nice to hear the answers from chris. so lots more from here and we will talk about the implications of those events over the last 2a hours with a fierce debate on both sides and we will talk about that a bit later, but let's get the news and travel where you are. it's been a wet start for many with a band of rain moving west to east across the uk. it will clear and leave us with a mixture of sunny spells in blustery showers. in the northern isles in far north—east of scotla nd northern isles in far north—east of scotland the rain could persist into
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the afternoon. elsewhere, it clears out to the north sea. showers moving m, out to the north sea. showers moving in, which could be heavy, but sunny spells in between. gusty winds and temperatures between 16—20. tonight, shower is clear but we will see another of rain spreading through ireland, north—west england and wales. overnight temperatures still double figures for many. on friday, more showers. merging into longer spells of rain. limited sunny spells. 1a—18dc.
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this is business live from bbc news. with victoria fritz and ben bland. the rapid rise of alexa. amazon gives its digital assistant a massive push — with a range of new gadgets to bring her even more into your home. live from london, that's our top story on thursday the 26th of september. hello and welcome to business live. amazon's artificial intelligence is getting a make—over. new voices like samuel ljackson to respond back to voice commands. but what does all this mean for our privacy? also in the programme... the us and japan sign a limited

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